Hello and thank you for being a DL contributor. We are changing the login scheme for contributors for simpler login and to better support using multiple devices. Please click here to update your account with a username and password.

Hello. Some features on this site require registration. Please click here to register for free.

Hello and thank you for registering. Please complete the process by verifying your email address. If you can't find the email you can resend it here.

Hello. Some features on this site require a subscription. Please click here to get full access and no ads for $1.99 or less per month.

Has anyone here done the ancestry DNA or 23 and me tests?

Any genetic surprises? And is the health information they give you helpful? I'm a little wary about the privacy aspects but I think it might be fun.

by Anonymousreply 194August 1, 2021 7:58 PM

Don't do it. I got long-lost ancestors from all over Sweden asking me about getting them VISA's. Oy!

by Anonymousreply 1July 20, 2021 6:04 PM

Apparently I'm 10% neanderthal and 16% donkey.

by Anonymousreply 2July 20, 2021 6:06 PM

Yes, very interesting and did not get any requests like OP's

by Anonymousreply 3July 20, 2021 6:07 PM

r3 Including yours.

by Anonymousreply 4July 20, 2021 6:13 PM

Eventually these companies will get bought out by some other company who will get all the data and who knows what they'll do with it. I'd love to find out more about my ancestors but not at the expense of some health insurance company potentially buying my DNA results and flagging me for predispositions.

by Anonymousreply 5July 20, 2021 6:13 PM

First I did a lot of research on Ancestry.com and built a family tree that went back many generations, each line going back before emigrating to the US. That way, I knew that if my research had been good, the DNA results would be predictable. The results exactly correlated. There may be errors in the family tree research, but on the whole, it is in good order.

by Anonymousreply 6July 20, 2021 6:20 PM

Found out I was half Mexican. I had no idea.

by Anonymousreply 7July 20, 2021 6:28 PM

Then the gubermint has your DNA, of course the OP probably has a criminal history, so they already have his DNA.

by Anonymousreply 8July 20, 2021 6:28 PM

I’ve done it and found some interesting info. Nothing surprising. .

I gave it to a friend, as a Christmas gift… he found out he had a half sister that his now deceased father never disclosed. Awkward.

by Anonymousreply 9July 20, 2021 6:33 PM

Please. Do none of you get your blood drawn during your annual physicals? Do you ask for that blood back? Even if you did, samples were taken to perform tests ordered by your doctor... AND WHAT ELSE???

Honestly, if Blue Cross wanted to cancel your health insurance, all it would have to do is have someone follow your fat ass around to grab samples of your DNA at every restaurant, bar and coffee shop at which you eat or drink.

by Anonymousreply 10July 20, 2021 6:38 PM

My first cousin on my mom’s side and my brother both did it and there was enough discrepancy to conclude that my mother and her sister didn’t have to same father. My aunt is dead (as are my grandparents) and we agreed never to say anything about it to my mother.

by Anonymousreply 11July 20, 2021 6:42 PM

At least you're not paying $100+ to put your own info on the market, r10.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 12July 20, 2021 7:19 PM

An ex-friend used it for her 1 year-old daughter due to uncertainty of baby daddy. she was a RN who faked depression and anxiety (told me herself), somehow got on permanent SSDI. She had subsidized housing and was paid as caretaker by state of California via a private agency for another SSDI person to live in her home. She wanted another kid because her 4 teenage kids were leaving for college or would be soon.

She fucked random guys without protection to get pregnant. One was a mentally unstable Latino guy in his 20s who had family money. The other was a wealthy Indian guy, a divorced tech company executive in his 50 also with older kids. Anyway, she was still unsure of paternity after a year, it was hard to tell because she’s Filipina and her daughter looked like she could be anything from southeast Asian to Mexican. She had been getting support money from the Latino guy’s rich family.

A year later she sent the test for her daughter and it came back that her daughter has half Indian ancestry. Her Indian, former fuck buddy called her out of the blue and asked her what was going on. He didn’t know she was pregnant, they only fucked 2-3 times before he broke it off. He found out when his niece told him about a matched but unknown relative nearby and it was a baby. Long story short, she ended up getting support money from him too while still getting money from the Latino guy’s family. It went on for about 3 years before the Latino guy’s family found out.

Moral of the story is you never know what kind of family strife you’re potentially getting into, when you get these tests. But then again these tests are godsends to women in my scammy former friend’s situation.

by Anonymousreply 13July 20, 2021 7:55 PM

I heard one of these guys had his DNA tested and he found a gay in his family. Never lived it down. Moral = don't risk it.

by Anonymousreply 14July 20, 2021 8:00 PM

Don't do ancestry....run by Mormons and some say they will baptize you as one of their own to pad their numbers as the "fastest growing religion in the world".

by Anonymousreply 15July 20, 2021 8:17 PM

Found out I had 55% Eastern European Jewish ancestry. I was a bit surprised, but never shared that information with my priest or with the members of my NAACP chapter.

by Anonymousreply 16July 20, 2021 8:57 PM

My family research is old, it was done by the family geneologist in the 90s. He was a college professor that used to make regular trips to Europe to scour old cemeteries & church basements for the data.

The test just confirmed it all that research as being true. I also got an email that said in so many words, “uh we hope you know this already but this guy is your dad”. It immediately linked me to my dads profile. So I don’t think the results are junk science

by Anonymousreply 17July 20, 2021 9:19 PM

If you do the Ancestry test, make sure you click on the option to not give them the right to distribute your genetic info.

I had a woman contact me 2 months later who turned out to be a surprise cousin. My 85 yo aunt had a baby out of wedlock a year before she was married and gave her up for adoption. The cousin really really really wants to meet her mother (of course), and my family have made it really really clear she absolutely cannot meet her. Big messy drama all around. (she could probably locate my aunt on her own, but the meeting would very likely be quite unpleasant.)

So yeah, watch out for unknown relatives that pop up.

by Anonymousreply 18July 20, 2021 9:24 PM

Wow, R18.

by Anonymousreply 19July 20, 2021 9:32 PM

Can't you just buy the test in a drugstore and use a fake name?

I want to use Bootsy Gumdrops

by Anonymousreply 20July 20, 2021 9:34 PM

I did it for my rescue dog-- he's 60% chihuahua, 13% terrier, 13% miniature pinscher and the rest is Swedish. Ever since random Swedes have been hitting me up for cash and treats.

by Anonymousreply 21July 20, 2021 9:34 PM

I did but nothing really earthshattering. I did it under a different name then my own though and when my half brother i no longer talk to saw we matched as close relatives he reached out to me. I used it as an opportunity to mess around with him and made up some crap about his dad with hilarious results.

by Anonymousreply 22July 20, 2021 9:39 PM

Yes, and they found the gay gene in my ancestry. I guess that means I have to transition to kill those evil urges. Should've saved my money.

by Anonymousreply 23July 20, 2021 9:41 PM

[quote]...my family have made it really really clear she absolutely cannot meet her.

What gives anyone in your family the right to intrude on this woman's wish to meet her own fucking mother? The mother can decline, but only her. And declining would be a sick and twisted thing to do to a person you already abandoned once.

by Anonymousreply 24July 20, 2021 10:42 PM

The Cherokee line actually turned out to be black. My guess is this is more common than some may think.

by Anonymousreply 25July 20, 2021 10:44 PM

Oh yeah, I sent mine in and discovered I have a second cousin I didn't know I have. and that one of my cousins has a kid they don't know/care(? ) they have.

Now what does one do with that little stick of informational dynamite?

by Anonymousreply 26July 20, 2021 11:06 PM

Family genealogy was a pandemic project that surprised even me since I always thought it was the most boring thing ever. I found out it’s like a giant puzzle and with so many resources online, you can find out a lot about your ancestors from the comfort of your own sofa. Once I was pretty far along, I did the DNA test and it matched my research so that was satisfying. I met a couple of distant cousins through DNA and, like me, they were passing the time during the pandemic so it was fun and low pressure to communicate over email with them. We exchanged old family photos and one even had a voice recording from the 1960s of my dear grandpa. Especially with everything being shut down, it brought me some comfort during the worst of COVID getting to know my ancestors. A little less lonely in a weird way. Oh, and I have no complaints about the Mormon church’s work on genealogy. The Family Search site represents decades of work on the church’s part and they believe no one should have to pay to learn about your ancestors. That site is totally free of charge. I thought that was pretty cool.

by Anonymousreply 27July 20, 2021 11:27 PM

My father split when I was 4 years old, taking with him every bit of family information that might have otherwise been available to me. His parents were deceased 10 to 15 years before I was born, so I never would have known them or gotten any information from them. It's a weird void to grow up with, underscored by his personal absence.

About 5 years ago, I started researching on Ancestry. I now know far, far, far, more about my ancestry and my father's ancestry then he ever could have known. I would rather not deal with the LDS church, but I've gotten a tremendous amount in return out of this deal with the devil.

by Anonymousreply 28July 20, 2021 11:43 PM

I can’t understand why anyone would do this…all they’re doing is collecting information on gullible people, like the Mormons

by Anonymousreply 29July 20, 2021 11:57 PM

[quote] "Found out I was half Mexican. I had no idea."

I had no idea you were adopted, either Linda Ronstadt @ R7.

by Anonymousreply 30July 21, 2021 12:02 AM

The government has enough information on all of us. I wouldn’t give these companies any of my DNA

by Anonymousreply 31July 21, 2021 12:04 AM

did it years ago and had a lil surprising makeup. most dna connections were 3rd cousins I never heard of. did it with another service years later to see if it had same results. got email results were ready. clicked relatives and closest was half-brother. I don't have a brother. Yes, I do...my dad hooked up at a party when he and my mom had broken up early in their relationship...the young woman told another guy he was father. He wasn't interested because in a relationship. She gave child up for adoption after a few weeks. My dad was never told until I found it online and freaked as to all of the possibilities it could have been before finding out the truth. we eventually met and it's ok, my parents are still together and my dad had told my mom about the hook up when they got back together so she wasn't mad.

someone else I know found out her mom fucked her best friend's husband and so he was her father instead of the man who raised her.

by Anonymousreply 32July 21, 2021 1:18 AM

Took 23andMe test at the urging of my sister who was building the family tree. Found out we have Nigerian blood in our Swedish/Northern European blood line.

My cousin had hinted at that back in the 1970s. My cousin was working in Salt Lake City in a non religious field. She did our family tree using LDS material. The cousin said she found some weird stuff in the family tree back in the early 1800s in Georgia. Like somebody was having sex with slaves, but she couldn't prove it.

I guess 23andMe proved our cousin was right. Can"t wait to tell my NAACP buddies at the next meeting.

by Anonymousreply 33July 21, 2021 1:42 AM

Did both Ancestry DNA and 23 & Me. The 23 & Me was for the CCR5∆32 variant. I wondered how I managed to stay HIV- and thought this might be it. Alas, no. I have two copies.

But I did find some interesting information.

1. Like the old TV ad, I grew up believing that my father's side was German. We have a German surname and went to a German church. Into my teens, the last Sunday of the month services were in German. But I have than 2% German DNA. After some digging, I learned that my paternal great grandfather married my then-pregnant great grandmother, but their first child, my grandfather, was not his. Through matching others, I know who my "real" great grandfather was. He was of mostly English heritage

2. On my mother's side, I discovered a half-aunt. She was a girl in my K-12 school, two years behind me. She desperately wanted to meet my mother – her half-sister – and it happened after trying to set it up for a couple years.

3. Also on mother's side: the "full-blooded Indian" mythology was finally debunked. The story varied from my mother's great grandmother to her 3x great grandmother, but it was all legend. It turns out that the surname Crow somehow became twisted into an Indian/Cherokee name along the way. My grandmother and great grandmother both assured me that I had a "full-blooded" Cherokee grandmother. They even revealed that it was their grandma Crow. Crow was an Anglicized "Groh," which was a Dutch ancestor's name before immigrating to the US.

4. Finally, the length of time my "family" has been in North America astounds me. With the exception of two 4x great grandparents, all of the rest came to the colonies during the 17th and early 18th centuries. Massachusetts, Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania were most common. The exception was the Swedes who migrated to Delaware. Generation by generation, they moved further west until the 19th century, when they stopped in Ohio. Of my 16 5x great grandparents, all but two were born in Ohio (or the Northwest Territory, prior to 1803).

by Anonymousreply 34July 21, 2021 1:48 AM

*Of my 16 4x grandparents...

by Anonymousreply 35July 21, 2021 1:51 AM

Ancestry.com has drastically revised my DNA results several times, showing how hokey it is. I think they are trying to align the results each time to reflect my family tree.

by Anonymousreply 36July 21, 2021 2:03 AM

R34, regarding the length of time your ancestors have been in the US, I found something similar. Every one of my direct ancestors who emigrated to North America, did so before the American Revolution. My earliest ancestor to come here arrived in Jamestown in 1610. Given the huge number of pairs of grandparents that build up with each generation, it never occurred to me that such a thing could happen.

by Anonymousreply 37July 21, 2021 2:19 AM

My ethnicity results are evolving as more people use the ancestry kit. At one point, I was as British as I expected, but now the results are turning toward Swedish and Norwegian. It makes sense, as Vikings entered Britain many generations ago. More people with similar genetic strands are making things more clear.

Same with my German ancestry. The early Germans came from Eastern Europe and I'm getting more confirmation my roots originated with the Czechs.

I am fascinated.

by Anonymousreply 38July 21, 2021 2:27 AM

R38 understands how a growing field of science works.

R36 does not.

by Anonymousreply 39July 21, 2021 2:39 AM

I did DNA Consultants and found our that I have Mulungeon ancestry which is a mixed race people. This happened in the 1600s in Virginia between indentured servants. This was before there was officially slavery laws. I'm white and my grandfather was from Italy but the mixed race came even before the Italian.

by Anonymousreply 40July 21, 2021 2:41 AM

Yes I did. And I found my entire biological family. I’m still sorting through all of that 1.5 years later.

by Anonymousreply 41July 21, 2021 2:45 AM

R36, the reason Ancestry.com keeps revising your results is because their database / reference pool keeps growing as more people around the world take part. In the beginning they had a much smaller pool of potential matches and couldn't be as specific as they are today..

by Anonymousreply 42July 21, 2021 2:49 AM

My mostly German Jewish dad was 10% southeast Asian

by Anonymousreply 43July 21, 2021 2:51 AM

I did the Ancestry DNA and found out what I already knew. Most of my father's side were of Spanish descent who conquered many of my mother's ancestors in northern Mexico. It explains much of my family's bronze skin and blue eyes. It was interesting to seeing the small percentages of Nordic, and Jewish and ancestry. Yay me!

by Anonymousreply 44July 21, 2021 2:52 AM

I bought the ancestry.com kit but haven't used it yet. I really don't want to hear from distant relatives and they won't hear from me. I'm just curious about where we come from.

by Anonymousreply 45July 21, 2021 2:54 AM

I’m white as they come and I found out I’m part Nez Perce.

by Anonymousreply 46July 21, 2021 2:56 AM

I did the Ancestry DNA and also had done my family tree prior to that—the family tree stuff was really interesting. I found out I have a long patrilineal history in England, and traced our surname back to the era of William the Conquerer. My 12th-great-grandfather was a graduate of Cambridge, and one of my later grandfathers (the 7th, I think?) was a sugar merchant who ended up in Maryland in the late-1700s, where he died within a year.

The DNA kit confirmed a lot of what I already know—I am genetically 25% Irish (mother's side—her paternal great-grandparents were from County Cork), around 25% Russian (also from my mother—her maternal lineage is majority Russian-Jewish/Ukrainian), around 15% Swedish (from my father's side, which I also knew—his great-grandmother was from Sweden), and a little bit of German, French, and Latvian.

I would suggest doing it, OP, if you are truly interested in where your ancestors came from. The DNA test gives a lot of info, but I frankly think putting together/tracing your family tree is much more fun. I spent around two weeks working on it heavily during every spare moment I had, and managed to figure out a lot of stuff using their archives.

by Anonymousreply 47July 21, 2021 3:04 AM

^ I forgot to mention that English obviously also shows up on my DNA results, but it's smaller than I'd expect given that my surname is English. I think it's around 13% if I remember right.

by Anonymousreply 48July 21, 2021 3:05 AM

If you have any unsolved murder murderers in your family tree you can help investigators identify them.

by Anonymousreply 49July 21, 2021 3:08 AM

While taking care of my aging aunt and uncle, who had no children and are now deceased, my aunt began to talk about family members from when she and my mother (already deceased at the time) were young. There were many relatives I had never heard of. I took written notes each time my aunt talked about the family, but soon it got so complicated that I took out a subscription to ancestry.com to get the information organized. That led to more discoveries, most of which my aunt confirmed once I asked if she remembered someone I found on ancestry. My aunt was in her late 80s at that point, had never used a computer, and didn't know what the Internet was. She was both amazed by the power of the net and outraged by the lack of privacy.

Nearly every time I discovered a relative that was alive, my aunt would say, "Don't contact them or they'll ask for money," and she gave me some examples of family members of her generation who had asked for money from relatives. Her warnings deterred me for quite some time until I found a second cousin who is related to two of the few relatives in my extended family I ever knew personally (as a child). We had a nice, long phone call catching up about the family members we had in common, and she certainly didn't ask for money. However, she had been resistant to having the call, and I didn't get the sense she wanted to stay in touch afterwards. The first thing I thought was that maybe some family members told her to stay away from long-lost relatives because they will ask for money! Perhaps that's why I never knew about or met the large extended family I actually have.

by Anonymousreply 50July 21, 2021 3:43 AM

98 percent Ashkanazi Jew: boring. I was hoping for a twist.

by Anonymousreply 51July 21, 2021 3:44 AM

R50 Great story…I can hear your aunt’s voice. On a related note, my work on family history has actually given me something to talk to my father about. It brings up old, half forgotten memories for him and helps me fill in some gaps.

by Anonymousreply 52July 21, 2021 5:19 AM

I want to do this but I’m concerned about what they do with your DNA 🧬.

by Anonymousreply 53July 21, 2021 6:34 AM

[quote] 99.9% British and Irish

[quote] 0.1% Korean

assuming its not some weird error I can only assume one of my grandmothers got frisky with a sailor around the time of the Napoleonic wars.

by Anonymousreply 54July 21, 2021 6:55 AM

[quote] In the beginning they had a much smaller pool of potential matches and couldn't be as specific as they are today..

Ancestry didn’t refine my results. They shifted my ancestors to a different unrelated ethnic group. If they could be that far off, they shouldn’t have provided their guesses in the first place, or maybe should have refunded my money.

by Anonymousreply 55July 21, 2021 7:04 AM

My mom was adopted and wanted to know more about her background. She found her long-lost father on Ancestry. Turns out her bio mom had an affair with him while he was married. She has a half brother that was born 2 weeks after her! Her mom was single and like 10 years older than her dad. She had since passed away, but my Mom was able to meet family on both sides recently. Her dad is pretty old and frail so I’m glad she had a chance to meet him.

by Anonymousreply 56July 21, 2021 7:07 AM

How do you guys research a family tree without DNA tests?

by Anonymousreply 57July 21, 2021 8:25 AM

r57 Census data and other government records usually. Church parish records can also be pretty useful

by Anonymousreply 58July 21, 2021 8:33 AM

Are these available online?

by Anonymousreply 59July 21, 2021 8:38 AM

r59 Depends what country you're in. The National Archives has most of the old censuses from I think up to pre-1921 up online for the UK. I think they uploaded most of the ww1 records for the centenary in 2018. Local church records and more small scale stuffwould be more difficult to get hold of you'd need more local data and probably have to email the relevant authority and ask them to look for you..

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 60July 21, 2021 8:53 AM

So many pearl clutches on the start of this thread. As someone pointed out, your DNA is already out there if you have ever been to a doctor and they drew blood. Oh and your face is already in a 3D database if you have a drivers license in the last 10 years. And no your banking is not off the internet just because you still write paper checks and walk into a branch to make a deposit.

Anyhow, I did 23 and Me, Don't do ancestry....run by Mormons. It's your choice to share or keep all your info private, random people cant just contact you unless you check that box. The thing is most people doing it want to know if they have a relative they never knew about. that's kind of the point. In my case I found out I had a half brother or cousin. DNA cant prove which one it is. You know why? Because my father and my uncle are identical twins and DNA is identical. So one of those old bastards cheated on their wives but they both took it too the grave.

It would be nice to meet the guy, he took the test and posted it in the first place right? But he seemed pissed realizing his biological mother back in the day was a little lying whore. We sort of talked through a friend of his that contacted me but he never mustered up the courage to make the call or send me an e-mail. Apparently he was told he was adopted. LOL

by Anonymousreply 61July 21, 2021 9:01 AM

[quote]My first cousin on my mom’s side and my brother both did it and there was enough discrepancy to conclude that my mother and her sister didn’t have to same father.

Did you come to this conclusion on your own or did someone who knows genetics conclude this because there can be huge differences between cousins without anything weird having gone on.

Is there any reason for the finger length prediction except to show propensity to be gay? There is some study showing a correlation between index and ring finger lengths or something like that and I can't think of any other reason they'd report that particular genetic marker.

by Anonymousreply 62July 21, 2021 9:09 AM

Just so you know, these companies OWN your genetic data once you give it to them. Yes, you may be able to specify you don't want it shared with OTHERS, but the information becomes their proprietary data.

Keep in mind, the founder for 23andMe was the wife to one of the Google founders for a long time.

by Anonymousreply 63July 21, 2021 9:09 AM

It said me and some older Scottish guy were 3rd cousins. No one was in the war nor traveled to Europe. My guess is since my grandmothers were distantly related (like 1500s) via Irish and Scottish cousins, he somehow has the same situation and we are genetically 3rd cousins.

Knew a lot of my genealogy, except for one side. Found a relative on Ancestry who had done the tree. True life Highlander without magic rocks. Low level Scottish laird who fought the Brits and came to NC before the revolution to fight them some more.

Gedcom will extrapolate your kit and you can use tools on there for more in depth analyses. My 1st namesake was in VA 1640s? right after Jamestown. Story is he married a NA woman. And you know there were not that many white women brought over. Her first name was that of a famous temptress and then Elizabeth after the marriage. Gedcom does give me a NA touch that mathematically seems correct. And it did go up as more people submitted DNA.

by Anonymousreply 64July 21, 2021 9:12 AM

The Native American thing is interesting. I have always been told I was part Native American which apparently a lot of US citizens like to believe. Most people are not. DNA has burst a lot of American bubbles. I dont know if it's a guilt thing or more likely a way of saying their ancestors were not murderous ass holes and they are somehow true Americans. But in my case, bingo! 30% Native American almost exactly what we thought. Keep in mind, Native Americans didn't have a written language so oral history is all I ever had to go on. Liz Warren jokes aside, you would never know, I look white because those just happen to be the dominant genes that made me look the way I am.

by Anonymousreply 65July 21, 2021 9:14 AM

[quote]Just so you know, these companies OWN your genetic data once you give it to them.

What if you give a fake name and your just want to know about your ethnic makeup and don’t care about trying to find family members?

by Anonymousreply 66July 21, 2021 9:19 AM

GEDMATCH not gedcom. opps.

by Anonymousreply 67July 21, 2021 9:34 AM

NA has gone up again to almost 1 percent. It started at like .01 and was stable at .46. Now it is .98.

by Anonymousreply 68July 21, 2021 9:38 AM

[quote]Please. Do none of you get your blood drawn during your annual physicals? Do you ask for that blood back? Even if you did, samples were taken to perform tests ordered by your doctor... AND WHAT ELSE???

[quote]Honestly, if Blue Cross wanted to cancel your health insurance, all it would have to do is have someone follow your fat ass around to grab samples of your DNA at every restaurant, bar and coffee shop at which you eat or drink.

I get that there's always going to be a contingent of Dataloungers who make up fantasies and pass them off as deep thoughts, but this is embarrassing.

Do you really think insurance companies are spending their own money to get labs to run unauthorized DNA tests on patients in secret? Do you think they'll start hiring Pinkertons to follow individuals around and steal their soda cans?

Buying data that you have already signed away your rights to would be much easier, cheaper and perfectly legal. That's a far more likely possibility than the crazy stuff you just made up, simply to be a crank and a contrarian.

by Anonymousreply 69July 21, 2021 9:51 AM

[quote]your DNA is already out there if you have ever been to a doctor and they drew blood

Link?

I don't even know what that means. You're saying everyone who had a blood test had a secret DNA test done of them and the information is "out there" for insurance companies to grab at any time they want?

It's not a surprise to me that a board full of people who cannot WAIT to tell everyone their mother's maiden name, first pet's name and date of birth say that people who care about security are "pearl clutches" [sic] but some of you are just dumb as the proverbial post.

by Anonymousreply 70July 21, 2021 9:55 AM

It doesn't matter if you get these tests. If your family members do, then it's enough for certain things to be traced back to you.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 71July 21, 2021 9:56 AM

[quote] I found out I have a long patrilineal history in England, and traced our surname back to the era of William the Conquerer. My 12th-great-grandfather was a graduate of Cambridge, and one of my later grandfathers (the 7th, I think?) was a sugar merchant who ended up in Maryland in the late-1700s, where he died within a year.

I hate to break it to you, but every young genealogist finds some “lead” enabling them to trace their roots back to medieval nobility. Unless you have solid documentation for each generation, it’s often erroneous… and even documentation that appears to come form a legitimate source is often either forged or was written to be intentionally misleading (for birthright motives, etc.). I spent the first two years of genealogical research adding European nobility links only to find out that my actual ancestral link was wrong-my real ancestor used a false name when he immigrated. Erroneously believing one is descended from William the Conquerer (and even more often, Charlemagne) is pretty common (and often chided in the genealogy community).

by Anonymousreply 72July 21, 2021 10:08 AM

Ancestry and I'm fascinated by the results even though mine are boring.

My sister and I assumed we are basically half Irish and half German with a little French (from Alsace at the German border).

Years ago when we were first tested, we both came up as a minor percentage (23% for me, I think) Irish and otherwise mostly British with a little Iberian (that was a total surprise). I was really hoping for some kind of non-European surprise, but there was none—except I was surprised British is an ethnicity. I just never thought of it that way and I never really thought about my ancestry being British.

Then Ancestry sent out an update and instead of British, the classification was Northwestern European, emcompassing part of Germany, and that made more sense with respect to our known family history. And the Iberian disappeared and the Irish went up a little bit. (Many people on the west coast of Ireland are closely related to Basque people and that may have been why Iberian showed up.)

Then another update: My Irish went up to about 45% and Ancestry correctly identified Mayo County in western Ireland as my family's origin there. It pinpoints four specific areas where we know our family came from, which I find remarkable. It also now has gone back to "Great Britain," but broke down Britain to include Scotland, and that's where most of the ancestry is shown to be, with much less in England, which makes sense. It also circles a region of Switzerland where my dad knew we have family from, as well as Lichtenstein, which is a totally new thing for us. I now show a small percentage from Sweden and my sister and father show small percentages from Norway. The NW European region that is identified includes a lot of ancestral indicators in Switzerland ns Lichtenstein and nearby Germany as well as specifically Alsace, where we know family came from.

So over the years, the results have been shaken up quite a bit but from the beginning, they were broadly correct, showing only NW European ancestry and over time they have pinpointed very specific, tiny areas (County Mayo, Ireland, Alsace-Lorraine, France) where we know our family came from. Also an area of Scotland that shares our family name, which appears to most people in the US be a misspelled version of a common Irish name, so that's interesting.

Our family has a lot of health problems with autoimmune and allergic diseases and I was also grateful to see the genetic conditions test results that show I don't have to worry about any known ones. The phenotype predictor correctly guessed my eye and hair color and other physical characteristics based on DNA alone. And it says I metabolize caffeine at a quicker rate than most and so I probably drink more coffee and tea than most people, and I appreciate that as an excuse to do so!

by Anonymousreply 73July 21, 2021 10:11 AM

r72: "I hate to break it to you, but"

Do you really hate to break it to someone? Don't you actually love doing that? And what do you know anyway?

by Anonymousreply 74July 21, 2021 10:13 AM

I have used 23andme, and I found the information very interesting. As for requests from family members, I don’t use my real name and I never reply back. Not looking to add to my family pool, just interested to see how many are out there.

It was interesting to see my Eastern European ancestry and find out that I’m part Hungarian, Slovenian (hello Melania), Ukrainian, and Polish. Of course, we’re all bastards in terms of ancestry, but still surprising to see it broken down.

by Anonymousreply 75July 21, 2021 10:18 AM

My partner and had both done. No surprises for me - English/Dutch/Flemish/Norwegian.

My partner, on the other hand, had a couple of surprises. He found Scottish, English, and French, as expected, but the surprises were Basque, a trace of Mongolian, and also a trace of native American..

by Anonymousreply 76July 21, 2021 10:22 AM

[quote] You're saying everyone who had a blood test had a secret DNA test done of them and the information is "out there" for insurance companies to grab at any time they want?

What I am saying is all the pearl clutching queens who thing that a DNA test is going to be sold off to some mythical insurance company who will come after you some time in the near future is just about as ridiculous as a blood test being sold to a third party when you go to a doctors office. Most blood drawn at an office is sent out to an outside lab. They are bound by law not to share that with outside sources. If you trust that then you should trust that the same laws work with DNA testing companies. Anything is possible sure, but you bitches afraid to get a DNA test because you think The Man wants your tained DNA for some nefarious reason are really on the edge of paranoia and conspiracy theory. No one wants to clone you Dear.

by Anonymousreply 77July 21, 2021 10:37 AM

Interpol has spent too many years trying to get my DNA to just give it them now at my own expense.

by Anonymousreply 78July 21, 2021 10:41 AM

The fact that my father and his siblings don’t know his father’s (my grandfather’s) real birth surname name or who his real parents are, and neither does anyone else local to our area, precludes me from doing cohesive ancestry projects. Which is kind of a relief, honestly, as I’m the type to obsess and fixate and freak out when confronted with surprising information. Plus my father’s living family are hillbilly nutcases, with some sort of undiagnosed personality disorder in common. It would only lead to pain knowing too much.

As for the DNA testing...hmm. I wouldn’t go there either, due to data-mining concerns (which as R77 points out may be paranoia, but better safe than sorry. And Mormons are creepy...).

Nonetheless, I am ragingly curious to know what my ethnotype really is. As far as I know from asking my living relatives, I am English (both parents & grandparents English, Saxon/Teutonic type to look at), with suspected Welsh blood (patrilineal—my grandfather was an orphan of mysterious origin as I’ve said, but he had curly reddish hair and a Pembrokeshire accent), and suspected Gypsy blood as well (matrilineal—my last living grandmother says that one of her great aunts was an Irish Traveler). My mother’s family are all pale blonds & gingers for the most part, so I imagine that points to Nordic/Viking blood in there somewhere. They came from Londoner (East/West End) stock, though, which suggests a mongrel gene that could admix anything from Jewish blood to Jamaican (highly doubtful in my lilywhite case, but you never know and I’d be open-minded).

Given choice, I’d prefer to come from the rare elegant dark pale Celtic phenotype, just because it sounds so beautiful and cool, but I think my fairness & redness of colouration rules that one out.

by Anonymousreply 79July 21, 2021 10:43 AM

.,.!

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 80July 21, 2021 10:44 AM

r72 He only said he'd traced his surname back to William. That's honestly not that difficult to do. Most etymology websites will be able to tell you if your name origin is Norman French.

by Anonymousreply 81July 21, 2021 10:47 AM

The fun part was I didn't know Neanderthal was a real thing in our DNA. Apparently when modern man first stepped foot out of Africa, they actually did encounter an earlier branch of humans the Neanderthals. Turns out they made love not war. Got to stay warm somehow. The Neanderthals died out but the DNA is in the chain of all descendants and races to fallow. There is one exception though. Pure blooded Africans lack the Neanderthal genes because their original ancestors never left the continent and therefore never encountered the other species of man.

The average person has 1% to 3% of Neanderthal DNA.

by Anonymousreply 82July 21, 2021 10:51 AM

R73 can I ask why you found it surprising that “British” is an ethnicity?

by Anonymousreply 83July 21, 2021 11:24 AM

R83 It just never occurred to me. I never thought about it. And when I saw it, my immediate feeling was "how can British be anymore of an ethnic group than American?" Because Britain has had so many invaders over thousands of years: there were early pre-Celts who are unknown at this time, and then the Celts moved in, and then Jutes, Danes, Angles and Saxons, and then the Romans and then the Normans. Even today, Great Britain is in flux. And the different nations of Great Britain are distinctly different ethnically, from Wales and Cornwal to Scotland and Northern Ireland. So it stands to reason that genetic mutations would occur within the country, but it seems to have so much continual flow through it.

For example, this finding is really curious: Today, the average British citizen is 36.94% British and 21.59% Irish.

Meanwhile, the British part of my family has been here since around 1700, according to the Ancestry DNA timeline, and I am 59% British (combing Scotland and England).

So my family has been here for 300 years and I'm mixed with other US immigrant groups and I am still more British than the average UK resident!

It's just a real surprise to me.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 84July 21, 2021 11:42 AM

[quote] Found out I was half Mexican. I had no idea.

You never wondered why you loved tacos and burritos?

by Anonymousreply 85July 21, 2021 11:42 AM

All you girls have to do is read the instructions published at Ancestry DNA to know that the DNA testing is done anonymously. You spit in a numbered test tube. That's the only identity that Ancestry DNA has for you. You get the DNA information you want from Ancestry DNA, but no one there ever gets your name.

If you are interested in doing the family tree research on Ancestry.com, you can then choose to attach to your account at Ancestry.com the DNA information needed for it to identify other Ancestry.com members with whom you share DNA. If you have hit a research wall using the conventional documentary research, these DNA matches can open doors not available any other way. You can choose to participate in matching with other members. Or not. You can choose to allow other members to contact you. Or not.

We've just gone through a year and a half of people tied in knots over misinformation about Covid-19. Passionately believing things that are wholly untrue, when all they had to do was read a bit and get the facts. This whole thread is a re-enactment of what we've just gone through with Covid. I can't tell you that there will never be a data breach at Ancestry DNA or at Ancestry.com. But if a hacker breaches Ancestry DNA, all they're going to get are anonymously numbered samples.

by Anonymousreply 86July 21, 2021 12:01 PM

Gedmatch will tell you the Roman bit maybe. It has a Med. percentage which I don't think I would have otherwise. Use the free tools and there are 5 or six. You can look up the specific tests but they are pretty explanatory. I'm like 3 percent ancient pygmy. Who knew. Just upload your raw data.

by Anonymousreply 87July 21, 2021 12:04 PM

[quote] Even today, Great Britain is in flux. And the different nations of Great Britain are distinctly different ethnically, from Wales and Cornwal to Scotland and Northern Ireland. So it stands to reason that genetic mutations would occur within the country, but it seems to have so much continual flow through it.

r86 Not really. There've been invasions and migrations but the only one that made much of a genetic difference is the Saxon conquest in the South. The Romans, Vikings and Celts don't seem to have left any footprint at all. Most of them just resulted in a cultural shift which is the main difference between the nations. The majority of the ethnic makeup can still be traced back to the people that walked across the channel before the Ice melted.

by Anonymousreply 88July 21, 2021 12:06 PM

Canadian here, I took the 23andMe DNA analysis and unsurprisingly it came back as 99.9% European, and 73% British Isles. The rest a combination of French/German and Scandinavian. I think the latter may be linked to the Scottish side of my family.

During lockdown I signed up for Ancestry.com’s 30 day trial. I now understand why genealogy is typically a pastime of retired persons, because it’s a massive time suck! Tracing your lineage can be like going down dozens of rat holes, and just when you think you’re getting somewhere you realize that further up the chain you linked to the wrong ancestor and need to prune back that part of the tree and re-start.

To get my hands around it (and complete something within 30 days) I focused on mapping out my paternal grandfather’s side of the family, which is one I’m most familiar with. I knew that he (and his wife’s, too) family had come to this country via the U.S. following the American Revolution.

[quote] Every one of my direct ancestors who emigrated to North America, did so before the American Revolution. My earliest ancestor to come here arrived in Jamestown in 1610. Given the huge number of pairs of grandparents that build up with each generation, it never occurred to me that such a thing could happen.

That’s pretty much what I confirmed as well. Traced my grandfather’s lineage all the way back to the early 1600’s in what is now Rhode Island. Their descendants were later forced to flee to New Brunswick for choosing to stay loyal to the crown rather than commit treason (and yes, it was TREASON!).

I’ve never been to Rhode Island, although my parents visited years ago and brought back some amazing photos of the homes in Newport. Me, I’ve learned all I need to know about Rhode Island from watching Family Guy LOL.

by Anonymousreply 89July 21, 2021 12:15 PM

[quote] I’ve learned all I need to know about Rhode Island from watching Family Guy LOL.

Don't LOL at your own post. It's bad form.

by Anonymousreply 90July 21, 2021 12:19 PM

Disagree about the Vikings not affecting Brit. lines. There is no other way my Swedish 10% and Norwegian 14% DNA would be in there.

by Anonymousreply 91July 21, 2021 12:21 PM

It could be later migration +10% sounds unusually high for an ancestor from 1200 years ago. Admittedly if the Vikings altered the genetic makeup is a bigger debate than I thought.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 92July 21, 2021 12:27 PM

[quote]Most blood drawn at an office is sent out to an outside lab. They are bound by law not to share that with outside sources. If you trust that then you should trust that the same laws work with DNA testing companies.

Ridiculous, r77. DNA companies are not bound by the same laws as medical labs.

Lab work is protected by HIPAA. DNA results from these various companies are not. That's why they share DNA results so easily with law enforcement and other agencies.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 93July 21, 2021 12:30 PM

[quote]There is no other way my Swedish 10% and Norwegian 14% DNA would be in there.

And you would know this how? You were there when your ancestors got together and mixed it up a bit? You were not.

What happens to a society on a macro level as it moves through history can be important. But in genealogy, so can a chance meeting. Pinpointing the moment when particular DNA was placed into your own personal bloodline is often impossible to do with certainty.

by Anonymousreply 94July 21, 2021 12:31 PM

Well, they are talking about Danish DNA and not Norwegian. Look at this thread and see how many with British Isle roots are like 10 plus percent Norwegian.

by Anonymousreply 95July 21, 2021 12:34 PM

And I bet they all have blue eyes.

by Anonymousreply 96July 21, 2021 12:35 PM

[quote]All you girls have to do is read the instructions published at Ancestry DNA to know that the DNA testing is done anonymously. You spit in a numbered test tube. That's the only identity that Ancestry DNA has for you. You get the DNA information you want from Ancestry DNA, but no one there ever gets your name.

They also have your payment information and your address, plus a whole lot more once someone chooses to use their website to try to find ancestors and relatives.

The thing is, even anonymous DNA without a name attached gives personal information. The Golden State Killer was found using ANONYMOUS DNA. By "combining an anonymous DNA sample with some basic information such as someone’s rough age, researchers could narrow that person’s identity to fewer than 20 people by starting with a DNA database of 1.3 million individuals."

That means even anonymous samples without names attached can identify a person.

[quote]We've just gone through a year and a half of people tied in knots over misinformation about Covid-19. Passionately believing things that are wholly untrue, when all they had to do was read a bit and get the facts. This whole thread is a re-enactment of what we've just gone through with Covid.

Sorry, no. You're a know-it-all who is just trying to win an argument.

This happens literally every time someone suggests people use caution when giving personal identifying information out. There's always at least one know-it-all like you who insists everything is safe and anyone who doesn't agree with you is so stupid they're practically ruining the entire country. It's pathetic.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 97July 21, 2021 1:06 PM

I found my grandpa the rapist.

by Anonymousreply 98July 21, 2021 1:17 PM

And your father, r98?

by Anonymousreply 99July 21, 2021 1:21 PM

[quote]The thing is, even anonymous DNA without a name attached gives personal information. The Golden State Killer was found using ANONYMOUS DNA.

Right. But it wasn't the Golden State Killer's anonymous DNA that gave him away.

The killer left his DNA on his victim and the police collected it. The police then tested the DNA, uploaded the results and looked for close matches. They found them. Cousins, as I recall. Once they found that, there was only a small number of people who the killer could be. Had to be male. Had to be an adult at the time of the killing. Etc., etc. The cousins cooperated with the police.

Your example does nothing to serve as an example of why one should not test one's own DNA with a commercial service. The killer didn't do it at all.

by Anonymousreply 100July 21, 2021 1:28 PM

[quote]He only said he'd traced his surname back to William.

You'd think Mike Deconqueror would have known that already.

by Anonymousreply 101July 21, 2021 1:48 PM

[quote]I did it for my rescue dog-- he's 60% chihuahua, 13% terrier, 13% miniature pinscher and the rest is Swedish. Ever since random Swedes have been hitting me up for cash and treats.

Much better than say, giving the money you spent on the test to the "rescue shelter."

by Anonymousreply 102July 21, 2021 1:59 PM

[quote]If you do the Ancestry test, make sure you click on the option to not give them the right to distribute your genetic info.

Yes, because that is all it takes to stop them.

by Anonymousreply 103July 21, 2021 2:00 PM

flip phone much?

by Anonymousreply 104July 21, 2021 2:01 PM

I had my DNA analyzed and I found out I'm the son of a thousand maniacs.

by Anonymousreply 105July 21, 2021 2:08 PM

R98 my father lived with me and my mom and sisters until the smoking caught up with him and he died of a massive heart attack. I’ve been thinking about him a lot recently. As for the rapist, my grandma was a light skinned black woman and my “grandpa” was an alleged minister. She was at death’s door in her sick bed and he went into pray for her and left her alive, but with my Mom on the way. So now, I see all of these people who I’m related to and it all seems icky. Being that both sides of my family are mixed my online relatives are majority white, so it’s all very weird.

by Anonymousreply 106July 21, 2021 11:17 PM

No real ancestry surprises, other than my mom's family actually did NOT have Native American lineage, although we were told otherwise for years and she was, too.

But it did reveal that my dad fathered another kid.

by Anonymousreply 107July 21, 2021 11:21 PM

I did the 23andme one, and got 100% 'British and Irish'. Extremely boring but I also feel a bit inbred because I went to the 23andme subreddit and almost everyone posting is a mix.

by Anonymousreply 108July 21, 2021 11:32 PM

I didn't understand that these services would put you in touch with actual named people you're supposed to be related to. I thought that was an entertaining fictional detail they made up for sitcoms and such. That would be a deal-breaker for me. I can't deal with the relatives I already know about.

by Anonymousreply 109July 21, 2021 11:34 PM

R109, you can opt out of it with 23andme. I decided to open mine up briefly out of curiosity and only found 1 second cousin.

by Anonymousreply 110July 21, 2021 11:39 PM

R109 Privacy setting. You can keep everything 100% private.

by Anonymousreply 111July 22, 2021 12:35 AM

I did the Ancestry DNA several years ago when it first came out. My results have changed dramatically in that time. The first report said I was 25% Armenian, which was a total shock and didn’t match any of my research at all. I though perhaps I was the bastard child of Robert Kardashian - but no such luck. The latest update matches my research pretty much exactly.

It’s been kind of cool to connect with relatives I never knew I had and compare genealogical notes. The best part about it for me though has been the validation of my 20+ Years worth of research.

by Anonymousreply 112July 22, 2021 12:46 AM

"British" is not an ethnicity.

by Anonymousreply 113July 22, 2021 1:16 AM

We've had a number of threads over the years where DLers share their DNA results and it is overwhelmingly from the UK, Ireland and Northern Europe. Makes me wonder if homosexuality is more prevalent amongst people whose ethnicity comes from those regions.

by Anonymousreply 114July 22, 2021 1:22 AM

R109 The benefit of connecting you to others you may be related to from a pure genealogy perspective is that you can meet others from your family tree who are researching the same common ancestors and, if both parties are agreeable, exchange information. I met a cousin who had a photo of our mutual great-great grandfather in his civil war uniform which was really interesting. On the other hand, I have some antique wedding and baptism photos from my grandparents’ cousins circa 1920s. I’m not much interested in them but if their descendants find me, I’d be happy to give the copies to them. But I’ve been lucky so far, the distant cousins I met are a pretty mellow group and everyone has been helpful and respectful of privacy.

by Anonymousreply 115July 22, 2021 1:45 AM

How many of you ladies bitching about guarding your privacy have photos of your junk on websites that can capture your IP address? Online privacy is an illusion. At a minimum, everything you post online is subject to subpoena in a court case. Or a warrant signed by a judge.

And how many of you have very detailed information about yourself and maybe even a photo of your face at LinkedIn? LinkedIn is the pinnacle of oversharing. I am much more comfortable with Ancestry.com than I am with LinkedIn.

by Anonymousreply 116July 22, 2021 1:47 AM

[quote] We've had a number of threads over the years where DLers share their DNA results and it is overwhelmingly from the UK, Ireland and Northern Europe. Makes me wonder if homosexuality is more prevalent amongst people whose ethnicity comes from those regions.

How odd that an English language web site would draw so many people of British origin!

by Anonymousreply 117July 22, 2021 1:53 AM

[quote] I didn't understand that these services would put you in touch with actual named people you're supposed to be related to.

omfg

by Anonymousreply 118July 22, 2021 2:04 AM

r117 I'm talking about Americans. The Americans on here are overwhelmingly of UK/Irish/Northern European origin.

by Anonymousreply 119July 22, 2021 2:08 AM

R93 = Pearl Clutching her blood like it's liquid gold.

No one ones you blood dear, or your DNA. Let me guess, you put tape over your web cam too because the government can spy on you.

by Anonymousreply 120July 22, 2021 3:17 AM

[quote]I am much more comfortable with Ancestry.com than I am with LinkedIn.

Exactly. Linkedin is the ultimate public posting of all your information. Criminals and the dark web will find that kind of info far more useful and lucrative than some insurance company finding out you are some half breed.

by Anonymousreply 121July 22, 2021 3:22 AM

The largest wave of Germans came to America during the middle of the 19th century, facing civil unrest and high unemployment at home. Today, the majority of German-Americans can be found in the non-coastal states, with the largest number in Maricopa County, Arizona.

Coincidentally, the larges group of racist Trump voters are from the same non coastal areas. Middle America. Mostly whites of German decent.

by Anonymousreply 122July 22, 2021 3:29 AM

I found a half sister

by Anonymousreply 123July 22, 2021 4:58 AM

Thanks to this thread, I now believe that my father isn't my father. I got Ancestry done a few years ago but never looked too much at the matches - only the origins (German, British, scotish, French, Sardinian, Indian/native). Going over the matches, nothing makes sense.

On background - my father has never been a part of my life but I do know who he is, so it wouldn't really make a difference to me.

by Anonymousreply 124July 22, 2021 7:12 AM

I have done genealogy without doing a DNA test. I got a lot of data from a relative who had done research through relatives. I expanded it using primarily familysearch.org. My fathers side started with some data from a relative, then I also ecpanded that greatly. Interestingly I found that one of my distant relatives was one of the founders of 23andme.

by Anonymousreply 125July 22, 2021 8:36 AM

[quote]No one ones you blood dear

What gets me about DL these days is how many people we have like r120, someone who obviously thinks he's smarter than everyone else here, yet can't go more than three words without completely screwing up a sentence.

by Anonymousreply 126July 22, 2021 10:33 AM

R120 I'm not the poster you're talking to but I do actually put tape over my webcam because Mark Zuckerberg does and if anyone should know about privacy-breaching, it's him.

That said, if someone wants my DNA, they can easily get it like how they got a sample from the Golden State Killer, since we discard DNA all the time. I think the benefits outweigh the negatives.

by Anonymousreply 127July 22, 2021 10:42 AM

CONSUMER REPORTS recently featured an article entitled, "Your Genetic Data Isn't Safe."

I am not about to PAY to send in my genetic material and lose ownership of it.

As they say, "fools rush in ... "

by Anonymousreply 128July 22, 2021 10:47 AM

[quote]CONSUMER REPORTS recently featured an article entitled, "Your Genetic Data Isn't Safe." I am not about to PAY to send in my genetic material and lose ownership of it.

But, what are you afraid of, R128?

by Anonymousreply 129July 22, 2021 11:31 AM

Yet R128 probably has a Facebook page where he willingly posted endless amounts of personal data and images for the largest company on the planet to do whatever they want with it.

by Anonymousreply 130July 22, 2021 11:47 AM

[quote] I do actually put tape over my webcam because Mark Zuckerberg does and if anyone should know about privacy-breaching, it's him.

So you are ranking your personal status of important on the same level as a billionaire? Really? Hackers want to hack famous people or people with money, not some old queen clutching her pearls posting about the evils of science on a gay bitch site.

by Anonymousreply 131July 22, 2021 11:51 AM

Health insurance companies , r129.

If you ever tried to buy private health insurance pre-ACA, then you would know insurance companies only want to insure healthy people whose genes do not contain time bombs for expensive conditions that will cost them big money.

Other DLers can corroborate this, I feel sure.

by Anonymousreply 132July 22, 2021 11:56 AM

It sounds so fancy that some of you have 5x grandparents that were still in the USA, and that you were already able to dig up your ancestry via church records and headstones and whatnot. Many of us here in the NY tri-state region are descended from turn of the century European immigrants, and we often don’t have the same easy access to those records without knowing the languages of our ancestors. And our ancestors were often dirt poor peasants who came to the US for a better life, so there isn’t always a lot of information on them except immigration records and census reports. I’d love if I could trace my ancestry to Virginia planters in the 17th century as many of you can, but unfortunately my people came in steerage from Naples in 1900 and were considered n****** by white protestants in the US.

by Anonymousreply 133July 22, 2021 12:03 PM

My mother's husband was not my father, that was a fun one.

by Anonymousreply 134July 22, 2021 12:05 PM

R131, hackers and scammers target average/normal people all the time. Even average people often have tens of thousands-worth in savings or assets that's worth it for hackers and scammers. There are numerous examples.

by Anonymousreply 135July 22, 2021 12:06 PM

My mother had told me (after a few cocktails) that her unmarried sister who died a spinster had a child out of wedlock in 1950. Sense she was a devout Catholic, this would’ve been a scandal so the child was given up for adoption. My mother claimed to know nothing beyond that. Fast forward five years when my nephew is on 23 and me and his contacted by a woman who turned out to be the love child. Somehow she knew my aunts name from getting her birth certificate and we determined that she was the daughter and my first cousin. She was now in her 70s and a grandmother and a very nice person. We met her and the resemblance to our aunt was remarkable. She just wanted to know more about her mother and we were able to share some stories as well as some personal items which my aunt had from her years with Ma Bell. We told my mother that we had met this lady who was her niece, however my mother being quite elderly, did not want to meet her. All she wanted to know was that the lady was a nice person and was raised by kind people and was not a freak looking for money. We respected my mothers wishes and simply told our new cousin that my mother was not well mentally which was not true but we didn’t want to tell her that her own mothers sister did not want to meet her. So ours was a happy story. The lady has not contacted us more than a few times just to say hello as she has her own life and family as we do. She just wanted to know who she really was. Somehow she also found the name of her father who was apparently a one night stand with her mother.

by Anonymousreply 136July 22, 2021 12:09 PM

But you are living in the past R132. I have tried to buy insurance back then. Life is not like that anymore than telephones with cords and and land lines. Besides, even back then the info they got was what you provided them with the authorization of your doctor. They couldn't just snoop in your background or private information without your authorization. You are paranoid. Stop reading click bait articles that just reinforce your echo chamber of pearls.

by Anonymousreply 137July 22, 2021 12:15 PM

My friend will never do it, because she thinks down the line they'll have the potential to clone people and turn them into slave labour.

by Anonymousreply 138July 22, 2021 12:27 PM

Several years ago, a cousin did his DNA test. At a family reunion we were discussing it. We can trace our families back to the early 1500s to an area of Germany called Ostfriesland. Yet the DNA test said zero percent German. It said we were English. Centuries ago, a lot of Frisians settled in England

I’m sure that as more people have taken these tests, the geography/ethnicity has gotten more specific and less generalized.

by Anonymousreply 139July 22, 2021 12:48 PM

You're not American r137, you obviously don't have any pertinent knowledge of American health insurance company practices.

by Anonymousreply 140July 22, 2021 12:54 PM

[quote]your personal status of important

Try again.

[quote]not some old queen clutching her pearls posting about the evils of science on a gay bitch site

Okay, that is enough out of you, r131. No one has said a THING about "the evils of science." That's such a stupid take on the things people have said in this thread that until your dumb ass said it, I didn't even realize that's what people like you were thinking.

"I don't always give my personal information to corporations" is not "science is evil." Good lord. Maybe this "gay bitch site" isn't the place for you.

by Anonymousreply 141July 22, 2021 12:58 PM

I'm American R140, I just chose not to live in the past and in fear. And trust me, I have actual long term health issues, I deal with insurance all the time. I am not saying I like it, but I am not paranoid they are going to secretly going my DNA report to use it against me. I know people who work in the industry, that's not how it works, they would use a far simpler method and reasoning to deny coverage. They don't need to jump through hoops to change policy or deny coverage.

by Anonymousreply 142July 22, 2021 1:01 PM

You might find........that your ancestors fucked over half of Europe with a smattering of other unexpected surprises.

by Anonymousreply 143July 22, 2021 1:26 PM

R136, that’s sweet. Sorry your mom didn’t want to meet her but understandable.

After my aunt died, when my cousin was going through her things, she found out that her mother had given up a baby for adoption. My mother confirmed it was true but insists she knows nothing more and urged my cousin to drop it. My cousin suspects the father is either someone we know, a rapist or other known criminal, a different race, or married with a family. It was the early 70s and any of those scenarios would be difficult for a young unmarried mother.

My cousin is registered on both Ancestry and 23 but has not been contacted by anyone connected to her long lost brother.

by Anonymousreply 144July 22, 2021 1:41 PM

R136 thanks for sharing that.

I was the one who posted at R107 - I am glad I went into it initially just for the ancestry piece. My father and I got along reasonably well once I was an adult and out, but it was nice to have the ancestry search to sort of collaborate on and talk about. He was trying to trace a particular line back from colonial Pennsylvania into Ireland, but we didn't have much luck.

I was the youngest by several years and missed meeting a lot of family beyond some basic aunts/uncles/cousins so I learned a lot about my extended family from the ancestry research.

But I also realized after meeting them that, as nice as they were, and as pleasant as the meetings were - well, mostly - they were not my "family." That's something that happens over time, over years, and we just didn't have that bonding.

So if I ever do meet my newly discovered half brother, I will have much more realistic expectations, which is a good thing. But that is a very complicated situation, so I don't know if we'll ever meet, or if he'll ever know who his father is.

by Anonymousreply 145July 22, 2021 1:50 PM

R139 - it would still show that you had part German ancestry though, despite them migrating to Britain centuries ago. As a northern Brit I have 19% Scandinavian DNA, even though the Viking migration was a millennia ago. Maybe you just don’t have any German in you?

by Anonymousreply 146July 22, 2021 3:37 PM

I'm reading a history of the Vikings and contrary to the Nazi myth that the people of the North were a "pure" ethnicity, they had absolutely no problem mingling and intermarrying with people from other cultures, including the indigenous Sami. They were also polygamous prior to being converted to Christianity, and like every other raiding and slaveholding society, left behind lots of rape babies that were assimilated into whatever society they happened to be born into.

by Anonymousreply 147July 22, 2021 4:02 PM

R61

[quote] Because my father and my uncle are identical twins and DNA is identical.

Surprisingly, this is not true. They have made DNA tests of identical twins and/or triplets. While the results are very similar, the percentages of various lineages differs.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 148July 22, 2021 7:46 PM

My Ancestry DNA test showed that I was 100% European, no black, no Indian, no Jewish. Where can I sign up for the SS?

by Anonymousreply 149July 22, 2021 8:39 PM

I did the FamilyTreeDNA male Y-line DNA test and it showed that my male-line ancestor lived in Southern Denmark or Northern Germany as far back as 3000 BC! I can only trace it on paper back to 1660 in Southern Scotland. So did my ancestor come over with the Romans, the Anglo-Saxons, the Vikings, the Normans, who knows? But they're trying to figure all that out.

by Anonymousreply 150July 22, 2021 8:42 PM

[quote] My Ancestry DNA test showed that I was 100% European, no black, no Indian, no Jewish. Where can I sign up for the SS?

Europeans are not all equal.

by Anonymousreply 151July 22, 2021 9:15 PM

What could nefarious actors do with my DNA? I don’t understand the risk people are freaking out about upthread.

For AncesteyDNA, I spit in a tube. Surely the used the entire sample for the DNA test, and if they didn’t, I highly doubt they saved it to clone me…not that they can clone people yet… and even if they could, why would I care?

Once the test is done, what could they possibly do with the results that would bring harm to me? I don’t get it.

I think DL has too many nervous nellies.

by Anonymousreply 152July 22, 2021 10:39 PM

I took the genetic test to see if I carried the breast cancer gene, bc my mom had breast cancer.

There have been no consequences with regards to insurance premiums since. And if there was ever a reason for an insurance company to raise my premium, that would be it.

So I don’t really think you all should be concerned about DNA testing Data mining with regards to insurance coverage.

Maybe in the distant future but right now ACA prevents insurance companies from refusing coverage for pre-existing conditions.

Right now, The only ones that should be worried about DNA test data mining are the people that got away with rape or murder decades ago. The clock is ticking on them

by Anonymousreply 153July 22, 2021 11:56 PM

[quote] Europeans are not all equal.

Well, it was all Northwestern Europe, so I think I'm OK. I meant to specify that it would be the old, gay, overweight, lying on the couch in my caftan division of the SS.

by Anonymousreply 154July 23, 2021 12:02 AM

re: insurance

they can get info anyway - you all know they can order your prescription history when you apply for life insurance, right?

by Anonymousreply 155July 23, 2021 1:31 AM

Remember when mounted cameras (streets, stores, etc.) were new and people felt like it was horrible. Now, if something happens, everybody wants to see the video to find out the details of "what really happened."

Both of my parents are dead. Both were reasonably good parents and never got divorced. I'm not interested in analyzing my DNA.

However, there are so many people (abandoned children) all over the world who know very little about their ancestry. I can understand wanting to meet at least one blood relative to feel a connection.

by Anonymousreply 156July 23, 2021 2:44 AM

DNA has been very useful for people who were adopted and want to find their birth parents.

by Anonymousreply 157July 23, 2021 3:19 AM

[quote] "Because my father and my uncle are identical twins and DNA is identical." Surprisingly, this is not true. They have made DNA tests of identical twins and/or triplets. While the results are very similar, the percentages of various lineages differs.

Well that still does not solve the problem. While the difference between the two is so small it falls within the margin of error of all DNA tests. Remember DNA tests are on a spectrum of accuracy at the moment. Even companies like 23&Me have a slider somewhere on their page that you can adjust the probability of accurate of people you are related to. If you set that really low, you will have 1000 third cousins with 1% match probably.

In my case since both twins being my father and uncle passed away long before DNA for the public was available, it's your guess is as good as mine as to who fathered the offspring. Your article in interesting but apparently it's the first time its ever been done so I don't think it's going to be incorporated into commercial DNA tests for a long while.

by Anonymousreply 158July 23, 2021 4:57 AM

R149, R154.. you are gay. The Nazis literally sent gay people to the concentration camps (pink triangle). So shut the fuck up because they would have hated you too. Along with disabled people, gypsies and some other groups no doubt, even though they had European genes too. Twat.

by Anonymousreply 159July 23, 2021 3:00 PM

I would like to hear a story about a white supremacist who found out they were part black.

by Anonymousreply 160July 23, 2021 3:11 PM

R160, here you go, this is good.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 161July 23, 2021 3:16 PM

There was also a story (I'll never find it) about an African-American Studies professor who was big into black supremacy, but turned out to be very much of white ancestry.

by Anonymousreply 162July 24, 2021 1:58 AM

23andme says I’m about 90% UK/Irish and around 10% French/German with less than a percent West African. What surprises me most is how little my ancestors mingled with non-white folks. I expected more somewhere. The 1% West African is likely due to some kind of slavery situation and assault…however, the Science vs. podcast mentioned that for the ancestry companies, anything around 1% or less is questionable in terms of accuracy. However, I’m not trying to deny that an ancestor would’ve assaulted someone with less power—that is highly likely given human history.

by Anonymousreply 163July 31, 2021 4:00 PM

I did both Ancestry and 23andMe. Ancestry says I've got Northern Filipino, Southern Filipino, Southern Chinese, and Spanish in my genetic makeup, which was no surprise to me. 23andMe goes even further and throws in tiny percentages of Dai, Korean, Italian, Bengali/Northeast Indian, and Egyptian, which was a surprise but made sense.

by Anonymousreply 164July 31, 2021 6:47 PM

R165 joins the discussion

by Anonymousreply 165July 31, 2021 7:55 PM

Do you get matches as far back as third or fourth cousins? I know all of my second cousins' identities (barring "surprises"), but going a bit further back might hook me up with a brick-wall descendant to share info.

by Anonymousreply 166July 31, 2021 8:30 PM

I have a good number of 4th, 5th and 6th cousins who are DNA matches found on Ancestry that I have been able to trace and add to my family tree.

by Anonymousreply 167July 31, 2021 9:03 PM

I don't think I would want to know any 3rd, 4th, 5th or 6th cousins. I know all of my 1st cousins and a few of my 2nd cousins and that's MORE than enough lol!

by Anonymousreply 168July 31, 2021 9:05 PM

Knowing of distant cousins doesn’t require you to know them.

by Anonymousreply 169July 31, 2021 9:08 PM

The ethnicity results are the DNA equivalent of a parlor game. The science at this point is good at distinguishing between continents, and perhaps larger regions, but that's about it.

In other words, they can tell with fairly good accuracy what percentage of your DNA comes from the Americas, what percentage comes from Europe, and Africa, and Asia, etc. They can also pretty much distinguish, say southern Europe from Northern Europe, North African from Sub-Saharan African, Eastern Europe from Western Europe, North from South America, etc. etc.

But the Scottish vs. Irish vs. English vs. Welsh thing? All pretty much guesswork. Same with German vs. French, Spanish vs. Portuguese, Swedish vs. Norwegian, and so forth. And the tiny percentages of certain ethnicities, say, that 1% Turkish that shows up that you can't figure out how it got there, or that mysterious 0.5% from Pakistan...in some cases it's true, but in a lot of cases it's just "noise". People who test take it all as gospel, when it's about as accurate as your daily horoscope.

But it seems to be the main selling point for the tests, and the reason why most people participate in the first place, so the companies tend to oversell the accuracy of the ethnicity results.

And the ethnicity estimates are based on carefully selected reference populations, then run through an algorithm...which is why the results vary from company to company. Each company has its own reference pool and algorithm. The reference groups are NOT taken from customer base, so the idea that "the more people test, the more accurate the results" isn't true. The results change because the companies are constantly adding more people to the various reference populations and toying with the algorithms, in an attempt to make things more accurate.

by Anonymousreply 170July 31, 2021 9:20 PM

I would imagine that most African Americans have a higher % of European DNA than white Americans have African DNA. 1% seems really small and what does that mean? A slave ancestor was raped and the baby passed as white and that’s that? I think if a white American had African (from a slave) DNA then it would be a larger %.

Am I wrong? I am certainly no expert…

by Anonymousreply 171July 31, 2021 10:06 PM

[quote]So I don’t really think you all should be concerned about DNA testing Data mining with regards to insurance coverage.

You don't want your health insurance adjuster knowing your family's medical history. We don't know who 23andMe sells their info to. And if they sell it to someone, you don't know if that someone turns around and sells it to someone else

insurance is a multi-trillion dollar a year industry. If they can use something against you, they will. And remember they pay to have laws created to benefit themselves

by Anonymousreply 172July 31, 2021 11:03 PM

Silly geese! This is Murica. Of course there's something nefarious going on! You just paid a significant amount of money to place your DNA in a perpetual database, and that of your descendents!

by Anonymousreply 173August 1, 2021 2:01 AM

I did it. Absolutely, no surprises. 100% Western European in the correct percentages.

No surprise siblings/relatives or scandalous secrets revealed. I was hoping for something akin to a daytime soap.

by Anonymousreply 174August 1, 2021 2:53 AM

Can you do it anonymously?

by Anonymousreply 175August 1, 2021 9:07 AM

Yes. Of course it's anonymous. The testing kits are identified by number. Only.

And, yes, of course, there is an office somewhere with an email address that is connected to that kit number so that your results can be sent to you. Yes. Of course there is. And, yes, you probably paid by credit card. But that information is not at the lab, either. It's at your bank. Looking globablly, that information is at all the various banks used by all the various customers scattered around the world. So good luck cracking all of that.

The server with the email addresses of the customers is not in the lab contracted to do the testing. The people handling the sample do not have access to your name. And the information about your DNA that is retained is done so anonymously, identified only by that kit number. When studies are done using the DNA data collected in this process, those scientists do not have access to your name. They're looking at large numbers of samples, anyway, seeking patterns and trends that can be discerned, not looking to personally destroy your own sniveling life, in particular.

There is a MAMMOTH amount of hacking and other nefarious behavior that would be needed to accomplish what the nervous nellies on this thread fear so greatly. Their concerns are really just more conspiracy theories. Insurance companies wouldn't bother because they cannot screen for pre-existing conditions. If they want to limit their exposure, they already have ample tools in their arsenal of things that fuck us up. Ancestry.com is not likely to be one of them.

by Anonymousreply 176August 1, 2021 11:43 AM

Given what just happened with COVID, people should be very concerned that China is buying these entire databases.

by Anonymousreply 177August 1, 2021 1:54 PM

Thanks for the non-specific, generalized, and unsupported warning, R177.

Would you like to tell us WHY we should be concerned and the facts that support your conclusion?

by Anonymousreply 178August 1, 2021 2:20 PM

R178, it's exhausting to be the personal research assistant of the lazy so I've retired from that portion of Internet life. I'm sure you can search the Internet if you're interested enough to expend the effort and make your own judgments about the information you find and the sources they're from. If you're not interested, that's both understandable and no skin off my nose.

by Anonymousreply 179August 1, 2021 2:30 PM

It was your claim. You support it.

by Anonymousreply 180August 1, 2021 2:36 PM

I don't recall signing a contract obligating me to acquiesce to your demands. Good day.

by Anonymousreply 181August 1, 2021 2:37 PM

R170 the confidence intervals they use with their data are laughably lax in the research world, but there is a fair amount of accuracy the bigger the reference population gets in a particular region. My family had traced my ancestors back to a very specific region/county in UK and 23and me started out with generic “50% Northern Europe” and zeroed in on that exact county over time (as highly likely to have ancestors from there) that my ancestors were traced from legitimately through documents. The 1% random population that some people see in their reports is far more likely to be wrong because the dna segments with gaps are sort of just guessed, so the very small percentages are negligible and should be ignored. Anything closer to the 3 or 4% range or more is probably more sound in terms of the science.

by Anonymousreply 182August 1, 2021 4:08 PM

They that said "more people does not mean more accuracy" contradicted they-selves (had to do it) in the last few sentences.

by Anonymousreply 183August 1, 2021 4:11 PM

It is possible to run only one side of your family, for instance, have them search only through the maternal DNA?

by Anonymousreply 184August 1, 2021 5:00 PM

R184, if you meant to write 'is it possible', speaking for 23andme, it isn't. I doubt it's possible with other companies either.

by Anonymousreply 185August 1, 2021 5:06 PM

You got caught and owned, R181.

Better luck next time.

'Good day?' Good God.

by Anonymousreply 186August 1, 2021 5:32 PM

Who is "owned" on an anon message board?

Get a life!

by Anonymousreply 187August 1, 2021 5:35 PM

R184 Sort of.

Some companies offer mitochondrial DNA tests (maternal) and Y-DNA tests (paternal, and only men can take these). But these are very different tests than the autosomal DNA tests that the vast majority of people take (the ones that give ethnicity breakdowns, and close and distant family matches).

Mitochondrial DNA will give you matches only from your purely maternal line...in other words, your mother, your mother's mother, your mother's mother's mother, and so on down the centuries. So most of the matches you get are going to be very, very distant, and nearly impossible to trace. Same with the Y-DNA, which gives you your paternal line (father's father's father, etc.) The purpose of these tests is different than the autosomal tests, and they are generally for people who are balls deep into the advanced nuts-and-bolts of DNA.

by Anonymousreply 188August 1, 2021 7:13 PM

R188, what companies are those that offer only searching through maternal DNA?

by Anonymousreply 189August 1, 2021 7:15 PM

R189 not trying to be nosy, but may I ask what you're trying to find out with the maternal DNA test? I'd hate to see you waste your money on something that isn't helpful to you

by Anonymousreply 190August 1, 2021 7:31 PM

R190, I'm not the original questioner lol. My question was actually rhetoric because I find it hard to believe that any company offers searching via maternal DNA-only. I have an account with 23andme which was the most expensive option and they don't offer that option. It doesn't seem to be happening.

by Anonymousreply 191August 1, 2021 7:36 PM

R191 OK, got it.

Family Tree DNA does the detailed mitochondrial (mtDNA) testing, with matches. Link below gives more info.

You know how 23 and Me shows you your maternal haplogroup? That is done via mtDNA, so they do it, but just in a very limited way.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 192August 1, 2021 7:43 PM

R192, sure but they don't offer a way to search by that alone.

by Anonymousreply 193August 1, 2021 7:52 PM

R193, which is why I tried to explain that mtDNA and Y-DNA testing is an entirely different animal than autosomal. Apparently you missed that part.

by Anonymousreply 194August 1, 2021 7:58 PM
Loading
Need more help? Click Here.

Yes indeed, we too use "cookies." Take a look at our privacy/terms or if you just want to see the damn site without all this bureaucratic nonsense, click ACCEPT. Otherwise, you'll just have to find some other site for your pointless bitchery needs.

×

Become a contributor - post when you want with no ads!