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Lets Chat about DC

Inspired by another thread.

Good god why would anyone move there? Painfully boring and dull. Yes- they have museums.. so what? No one smiles. Ugly nerds everywhere. The gay scene? Haha.. Lame. Who dresses in Brooks Brothers to a bar? I had to listen to a guy ramble on and on about his prestigious government contracting job. Jesus kill me now.

by Anonymousreply 21119 hours ago

Honeychile, I'm with you on this.

by Anonymousreply 107/16/2021

DC seems to be filled with 3 types of people: young Mr. Smith style idealists who think they’re going to change the world for the better, the dead inside cynical remnants of people who used to be in the first group who’ve learned through bitter experience that they aren’t actually going to change the world in DC, and the sociopaths who go there to get power and money by making the world a worse place. It’s a soul crushing city. I lived there for a few months. Never again

by Anonymousreply 207/16/2021

And they no doubt find you a frivolous tiresome queen.

Takes all kinds OP

by Anonymousreply 307/16/2021

I grew up in DC and found the city wonderful, It's a manageable size and the gay scene is lively.

As a political town, there is significant turnover whenever administrations change but much of the city residents stay stable,

There is alot of silly oneupmanship with govt guys who talk about all the important work they are apparently doing.

by Anonymousreply 407/16/2021

O, DC, I love thy monuments and museums. And thy lively gay scene.

by Anonymousreply 507/16/2021

Plus with all the spies and military there’s always something sinister in the air.

by Anonymousreply 607/16/2021

True, R6, but lots of Marine ass, too.

by Anonymousreply 707/16/2021

Aside from the humidity, the weather isn't that bad. No hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, droughts, forest fires, heat domes, polar vortex blizzards, earthquakes, mudslides, etc.

Just the occasional severe thunderstorm and a few inches of snow during certain winters. I'd much rather live there than in any area that experiences those aforementioned natural disasters. Plus the property taxes in DC is quite low; almost as low as Delaware's.

by Anonymousreply 807/16/2021

Cunts. Cunts. Cunts.

So many people who were the first in their families to leave for university and internships and jobs in DC. Too many such people because they mistake the first non-profit or law firm or accounting firm or consulting agency or government contractor that would have them as the best place to be, the Metro the cleanest, the bars, the people, the best, tippity-top, the cream of the crop, top drawer, special.

It's the international epicenter of self-satisfaction, of patting oneself on the back, of small dreams fulfilled,of having risen to the middle of something, anything, adjacent to someone who knows someone who knows the chief of staff of some Senator. It's being so very fucking impossibly busy doing nothing anyone can put a finger on and no one would much miss if they had to do without.

It's a beautiful city in some ways, but not that beautiful, and certainly not that interesting. It is, in fact, boring as all fuck and twice as smug.

It's the only place I've known where whole conversations start --and end-- not with a "Hi..." but straight on in to a "What do you do?" and the hand extended so quickly will retract twice as fast and, without so much as a word, you will see the back of your assailant fast shrinking into the distance, hoping for better luck with the next victim, someone who knows someone who knows someone who is in a position to offer them so new job, a quarter ring higher than the last job.

No art schools. No goth kids. No art students. No dirty hippies. No credit card hippies fresh back from 3 years in Ibiza and India. No one who's been anywhere beyond a school trip or a semester in Lincoln, England. No one who has any interests outside talking about politics and watching pundits. No one who can talk about anything but the big annual conference that's coming up and the details are leaving them without time enough to shit. No one with any taste. No one who can tell a story not about the band camp of their job.

by Anonymousreply 907/16/2021

Museums are free, which is amazing!

by Anonymousreply 1007/16/2021

Previous posters oblivious to the hundreds of thousands of Black folk there--of all classes, from elite to homeless--for cultural diversity. And many of them are Ethiopian-Americans.

by Anonymousreply 1107/16/2021

Had a friend who lived there in the nineties. Nice place to visit. But if I stayed longer than three days, really would get on my nerves. The people are so unfriendly and overly status conscious.

by Anonymousreply 1207/16/2021

This is all very interesting R9

Perhaps we can start with you telling me about your mother and her relationship to Washington, DC.

What do you think she would have made of the city?

by Anonymousreply 1307/16/2021

I get all of the criticisms. Just remember that there are some normal people who grew up here and still live here.

by Anonymousreply 1407/16/2021

R8 you must have missed the earthquake a few years ago that cracked the Washington Monument and the towers of the National Cathedral

by Anonymousreply 1507/16/2021

They do, however, have an abundance of Ethiopian and Belgian restaurants.

by Anonymousreply 1607/16/2021

I walked out into the road and knocked a bitch off her bike. Totally my fault because I was being a typical tourist but I laughed. She didn't think it was too funny, though.

by Anonymousreply 1707/16/2021

R9 I’ve never read anything so dead on about DC in my life. It’s amazing to go out to a bar… And watch all the nerds dorks and geeks try to pick each other up. It’s like a room full of fat 3s and 4s staring at each other. Perhaps they ‘ll take each other to the nerd political prom. Yes you’re totally right there’s absolutely no creative class or goth kids.

by Anonymousreply 1807/16/2021

The inner suburbs are just as bad. Bethesda is an insufferable bore. Talk about cunts. Arlington is douche bro govt/consultant nonsense.

by Anonymousreply 1907/16/2021

The problem with dc is it attracts people who have the status hunger and aggression of an east coaster ( without the liberal live and let live ,do your own thing attitude) but all the conformity and small mindedness of a middle American ( without any of the warmth, community mindedness or down to earth mentality). It's like D.C. is a grotesque Mr Potato Head of a populace , with all the worst features of this country combined. Everyone there is so fucking uptight its depressing. They all act like they will explode into a fiery ball if they interact for a moment with anyone who can do nothing for them or to them.

by Anonymousreply 2007/16/2021

R20 Unbelievable how much we think alike: Watching a 20 year old girl walk down the street in pearls and pantyhose is disturbing sight. Talk about uptight!

by Anonymousreply 2107/16/2021

Yes, DC is full of Tracy Flicks (and their male equivalents), but the permanent residents make the city interesting and vibrant.

by Anonymousreply 2207/16/2021

The permanent residents who work for the government or lobbyists, law firms and defense contractors?

by Anonymousreply 2307/16/2021

I went there once, probably about 15 years ago, and I thought it was just really shabby. Maybe it was just an off period, but I was surprised how bad the lawns around the Monument, Smithsonian, etc. were.

The best thing I did was visit the Holocaust Museum. It's certainly nothing I would ever want to do again, but it something I will always remember and I'm glad I did it.

by Anonymousreply 2407/16/2021

R23 Yes because they’re certainly aren’t artists, film makers etc. If you’re creative you get chased out of town.

by Anonymousreply 2507/16/2021

grew up there. not a huge fan. if you aren't interested in the government or politics, it's a tough place to live. also not the safest city.

that being said, they have a really strong local theatre scene (or they DID before covid) and the kennedy center. there's a lot going on.

summers are hell. it's a swamp.

by Anonymousreply 2607/16/2021

It sucks. But at least we have Doug Kammerer!

by Anonymousreply 2707/16/2021

Both my husband and I were there nearly 30 years (late Carter to early Obama), and neither of us ever worked for the federal government. I loved my time there, but we grew tired of city life and now live in a rural animal with our dogs.

I found the city very livable, walkable/bike-able, and surprisingly cosmopolitan with many people with international experiences from living, family or work. I also relished the number of different cuisines, and miss the Adams Morgan Festival to eat my way around the world.

Yes, you could throw a rock in any direction, and you were bound to hit a lawyer. Sometimes, that is a good thing.

Yes, the Tracy Flicks (and their male counterparts) of the city were pretentious and annoying but easily identifiable. I'd snicker as I saw the Preening of the Suits, trying to out-rank each other at Happy Hour at JRs. Fortunately the tides of politics rolled out the flotsam every 4-8 years. Perhaps you just did not notice those of us who kept our heads down and continued to live and thrive in the city.

by Anonymousreply 2807/16/2021

There’s absolutely no reason to live there unless you’re into politics.

by Anonymousreply 2907/16/2021

DC is full of snobbish, obnoxious, cold, cliquish queens. They're positively insufferable.

by Anonymousreply 3007/16/2021

Fascinating how many DLers lived in DC long enough to have such negative experiences with the people there.

by Anonymousreply 3107/16/2021

R31 - why? DC has a number of gays and a lot of job opportunities. It’s not like DLers lived in Wichita long enough to have experiences with people. DC is a big city on the east coast.

by Anonymousreply 3207/16/2021

In my youth I always found it very easy to get laid in DC (as a frequent visitor).

by Anonymousreply 3307/16/2021

[quote] I'd snicker as I saw the Preening of the Suits, trying to out-rank each other at Happy Hour at JRs.

Last time I was there (2013) it looked like a bunch of losers. Not a suit in the bunch.

by Anonymousreply 3407/16/2021

Lots of dickheads, but you find plenty of people who aren’t and make fun of them. People who grew up here lack a sense of humor about the place and often think they’re smarter and better educated than they really are. I lived here in the 90s and came back 15 years ago—it bothers me less than before and I had found I had missed it. One of the p,aces I’d lived I. Between was Atlanta. The greater areas are similar in size but ATL is such a nothing by comparison. Dc is great for theater and has a wide variety of music venues. It doesn’t have a twink culture like ATL.

by Anonymousreply 3507/16/2021

R19: Why you’d expect any well off residential suburb like Bethesda, anywhere, not to to be a bore is beyond me.

by Anonymousreply 3607/16/2021

I hate DC and the surrounding suburbs too. Just the nastiest people I have encountered in America

by Anonymousreply 3707/16/2021

I live in DC and grew up in NoVA. I am a nerd, which is true to type, but I'm interested in arts, not wonky government stuff. I work for an education organization. I don't socialize with a lot of people because a lot of what is written above is true. However, there are a lot of people here who work for nonprofits, in healthcare, etc., and are not miserable people.

I'm sort of an anti-status person, turned off by elitism and people who live to a quite assets or to feel powerful. It's a curse that I've been here all my life but I never left because I'm close to my family.

I do agree that people in this city are generally unkind or potentially even cruel. People from NYC seem *so* gratuitously friendly to me. People in Paris seemed extremely friendly. The only place I've been where people are nastier than in DC was London.

by Anonymousreply 3807/16/2021

R9, wtf are you talking about? Put down the bottle and go to bed. I'm sure you're semester internship in DC couldn't have been that bad.

by Anonymousreply 3907/16/2021

[quote] The best thing I did was visit the Holocaust Museum.

For a group often unfairly maligned as money grubbers, why they chose to build their museum next door to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing is hard for me to understand.

by Anonymousreply 4007/16/2021

R37 " nastiest people I have encountered in America". The DMV area really is beyond cold and mean. I've heard people explain it by saying that all densely populated areas are like that but the DC area residents are their own unique breed of awful that I have not seen in places of similar size.

by Anonymousreply 4107/16/2021

I love the architecture and certain neighborhoods like Kalorama. And it’s better than Atlanta. But there really is a striver mentality that infests everything. And uprightness. I’ll take NY, LA or SF over DC - especially since it’s become almost as expensive. There are worse places - but I think the vibe would kill my soul after a while.

by Anonymousreply 4207/16/2021

I live in Kalorama. It's beautiful. It's still waaaaay too goddamned hot here in the summer, though.

by Anonymousreply 4307/16/2021

Their movies are darker but inconsistent, unlike Marvel

by Anonymousreply 4407/16/2021

I lived there while working for Discovery Channel then National Geographic Channel. No politics. Loved it.

by Anonymousreply 4507/16/2021

R44 Who's their main superhero? Perhaps its Lobbyistman, who incapacitates his enemies by boring them into a stupor with his long monologues about the time he had lunch with Newt Gingrich.

by Anonymousreply 4607/16/2021

R46 lmfao .. brilliant! Tell everybody you forgot to vote.. just to see their reaction🤣

by Anonymousreply 4707/16/2021

It's 5:00 am, 81 degrees now with a high of 93 by noon today, a heat index of 107 and presently 78 percent humidity.

I really hate summers in this city. It's like living in the steam coming off a volcano.

by Anonymousreply 4807/17/2021

Yes the summers are the worst— muggy and mosquito ridden!

by Anonymousreply 4907/17/2021

R49 sounds awful

by Anonymousreply 5007/17/2021

Mosquitoes don't swarm around me but the summers in this swamp are grotesque. I've been told by so many people from Florida, Georgia, Louisiana even how shocked they are that July and August feel much worse to them here even though it gets hotter there.

by Anonymousreply 5107/17/2021

R51 Why do live there?

by Anonymousreply 5207/17/2021

* you

by Anonymousreply 5307/17/2021

R53 As I said above, because I am close to my family. My mother grew up here, my father moved here from NC after he got out of the Navy and my sister lives here.

My sister works in child protective services and I've always worked for nonprofits.

Neither of us fits in culturally. That happened because we are locals. The stereotypical DC person is an import from elsewhere whose career ambitions or educational ambitions brought them here.

I stayed because I am close with my family and my mother was ill for a long time and I wanted to be near. Now she is gone and my father is declining physically.

People choose where to live for different reasons.

At this point, I am middle aged and have always worked in a nonprofit sector that is largely a local industry. My job isn't as transferrable as various other skilled jobs are. So this is it, for better or worse.

I live in Kalorama and I like my neighborhood, and I like the people I like and the rest I avoid. I actually like Washington, D.C. as a city of neighborhoods apart from the ambitious assholes who move here for work. My only big gripes about living here are the climate and the lack of any interest in the arts and sciences. The culture (if you want to call it that) is interest in policy, history, law, technology, money making, building networks to exploit for personal gain, and acquiring things to show off. I do hate that. But it's been the environment around me all my life.

by Anonymousreply 5407/17/2021

I actually really enjoyed DC. I work for the federal government but usually live overseas. The few months at a time I am in DC, I love it, bur perhaps I am spoiled because it is only ever a few months at a time.

I enjoy all the free events. At least once a week I would go to a free lecture at a museum or a free show at the Kennedy Center. And in a bar, I would sure as hell rather talk about politics and current events than sports. There may not be “creative” types, but if that is the trade I have to make to be free from annoying blue haired SJW types who think they are Artist then sign me up.

Plus lots of good Deaf dick.

by Anonymousreply 5507/17/2021

R54 I respect your decision to stay there. I understand you want to be close to your family so why not live in Philly or New York? I’m sure there are non-profits there. The cities back east are so close to each other. You can live anywhere and jump on a train. We don’t have the luxury out west at least here in the Northwest.

by Anonymousreply 5607/17/2021

Why would anyone want to move there? It’s one of the best job markets in the country. Simple.

by Anonymousreply 5707/17/2021

R56 I wanted to live in NYC 20 years ago when I was young and full of energy. I'm grateful I didn't because I ended up extremely ill in my 30s and would have had to have come back here. Today, I can't think of almost anywhere I would less want to live in than NYC. One reason I don't fit in is that I am not competitive at all. I am very ambitious personally, but my ambitions are all personal—writing, painting, doing things to explore being alive. New York would kill me just from the stress of paying rent, but honestly, while I find almost everyone I've known from New York state and city to be friendly, they are also loud and see everything in life as angling to get ahead and that just is not even a little part of who I am. Yes, NYC is one of the US's arts centers, but that too is competitive and it's about self-branding to become a commodity, and that's not why I am interested in art.

I don't really know anything about Philadelphia. I've only been there twice. I've never even thought about it.

by Anonymousreply 5807/17/2021

in DC, at the corner of MLK Drive & Malcolm X, there is a Popeyes Chicken stand. Last night, a gang shooting occurred there. You can’t make this shit up.

by Anonymousreply 5907/17/2021

R58 Very well said. Again I respect your decision. Tons of people are moving out of Seattle now for the same reasons. The traffic and the stress are through the roof. Lots of folks are relocating to Tacoma and Olympia… and out of state.

by Anonymousreply 6007/17/2021

R60 Agh, Seattle! I was there for work a few years ago and it waa so gorgeous...and I could not believe the real estate prices when I started looking them up. I had no idea Seattle real estate is practically as expensive as in NYC.

And the traffic. Good God. We were staying in a hotel on the water in downtown, and we boarded a coach to go to a dinner that our host told us was "20 minutes away." And then. We sat on the same street for over an hour, and this was in July and the coach's air conditioning was broken. It was sweltering. Three people got off in the middle of the street (traffic didn't move) and the rest of us who were too polite to flip out were in that bus for two hours. It was really insane.

DC traffic famously is among the worst in the country, but I blinked and did not notice that Seattle has become the new New York City.

by Anonymousreply 6107/17/2021

I've live in DC for 27 years and I've never had a conversation with someone who opened with, "so what do you do for a living?"

Perhaps you just attract assholes.

by Anonymousreply 6207/17/2021

MUCH more Interesting than at first sight. Even many of the suburbs are fun little towns (some are boring alphavilles). The more I experience of the city the more I like it. First rare subway system that is getting better

by Anonymousreply 6307/17/2021

I think it depends what you do and who you associate with. I work for a national association that educates members and lobbies and it has a very who-knows-who culture—on one end of it, anyway. The people involved with government and those I've met in federal and state governmental agencies always immediately ask if you know X, Y or Z person to size up your value. If you don't have anything to offer connectionswise, they get out of there immediately. I worked with the enterainment industry for a decade and it was exactly the same scenario.

However, it doesn't apply universally at my organization or citywide. People who have jobs other than lobbying and comms do not think or operate this way. Member services people are into pop culture, may have mundane or nerdy interests like anyone anywhere. And they don't fraternize much with the lobbyists and find them boring and off putting.

People who work jobs that have nothing to do with government or money or power don't live in that culture. Healthcare workers, retail, personal services, hospitality—they generally do not care at all and would be a million times more impressed to see a minor TV celebrity than Nancy Pelosi or Jill Biden.

And it's not DC specific. As I said, I work for a national association that lobbies. We represent members throughout the country who lobby. Those people are not in DC, but they are the same type of personality types who live in such a way as to try to get what they want by getting as close as possible to people in power. I'd guess every state capital has its own mini-DC culture, but it's probably small and insular and so not visibile to people outside of it. And foreign national capitals attract the same types of people.

by Anonymousreply 6407/17/2021

There’s a MlK drive in almost all cities of America it seems

by Anonymousreply 6507/17/2021

Is there also a Malcolm X Avenue in every city? Not in mine.

by Anonymousreply 6607/17/2021

Jean Harlow summed it up perfectly in "Dinner at Eight." When Wallace Beery says he wants to move to Washington, her response is: "I'm not movin' to that graveyard! I've seen them girlies....Pourin' tea for the DARs!" This was in 1933. Nothing has changed.

by Anonymousreply 6707/17/2021

R54 I’m curious if there’s any change in a neighborhood when a former president moves in. Any noticeable changes since the Obamas moved there?

by Anonymousreply 6807/17/2021

R68 LOL. No, not for me, because I live "on the other side of the track," by which I mean on the other side of Connecticut Avenue. Kalorama is a small district but it inlcudes, west of Connecticut Avenue, the Obamas' house, the forrmer Kushners' house, lots of ambassadors' residences, other fabulously wealthy people. On my side where I am, between Dupont, Adams Morgan and Woodley Park, are condo buildings that range from very expensive (several millions for a two or three bedroom) to relatively affordable (~$450 for a one bedroom). I rent one of the latter. I could afford to buy where I am and am considering it. But I sure as hell can't afford to live with the ambassadors and former president.

The French ambassador's residence just unveiled a to-scale miniature Lady Liberty that was just imported from France. It'll be in place here for 10 years.

While I am across the street from the ritzier part, the Obamas live only 0.4 miles from me.

I think it DID change the neighborhood when the Kushners moved in. They put up a big wall behind their house, and before the election this fall, almost every single house on their street had pro-Biden and anti-Trump signs in their yards. The neighbors were reportedly very bothered by the Kushners' presence. (They lived literally around the corner from the Obamas; since Jared and Ivanka refused to allow their secret service people to urinate in their bathrooms (really), they used a bathroom in the Obamas' house for a while before renting one from a neighbor.)

by Anonymousreply 6907/17/2021

I want to know about all of the closeted Republicans. Not just politicians. Lobbyists, lawyers, etc. Why do they bother with families and being closeted when they know each other and that they're really gay?

by Anonymousreply 7007/17/2021

DC is a great city to live in. I have been here for a very long time and before I lived in numerous other places.

It's small enough to be manageable. I have never encountered the nonsense some of these posters have. I have worked for the government, for non-profits, for private industry and for myself. In work situations there is inevitably discussion about your work and connections - that's what work gathering of any kind, including social events, are all about. Why is that made such a big deal of? If you can't handle that then avoid those situations. That happens everywhere, all over the world. Those who are most bothered by being asked about their lives or work are people who are young or somehow embarrassed by what they do. You learn how to deflect questions you don't want to answer.

I have found people in DC to be mostly friendly and helpful but it all depends on you and most people don't realize that. In the old days when everything was done in person and not online, I had to deal with the DMV every year for my car registration and less often for driver's license renewals. Except for one woman who was more interested in her private phone call I have not encountered this so called rudeness that has become some urban legend. People are polite and helpful if you are respectful to them. Try that.

I was at the jail once visiting a client and I was with a colleague visiting his client. He had all this trouble with the guards and getting his client but he was also short tempered and demanding and just had an obvious attitude. I don't come at people like that so I can avoid these issues and get my shit done. That goes for everything. You can be a drama queen looking for trouble or you can be cooperative and get what you need and want. I prefer to get what I want and get on with my business.

DC is also a clean city for the most part and pretty. Granted I live in a really nice neighborhood but I have been all over the city in every neighborhood, sometimes I think in every alley, and even the poorer ones have lovely aspects to them. There is a lot of green everywhere and that makes living a lot nicer.

It may not have the greatest arts community in the country but it is lively and thriving. Of course it's not NYC. But we have free fabulous museums and art galleries and that can spoil you when you go to other cities and they charge you for everything. Plus there are tons of free cultural events going on all year all over the place.

We have sports if you're into that, decent and navigable traffic in the city, good job and career opportunities, fairly progressive laws and very progressive courts. I like that we are the center of political life in the country even if it's not causes I agree with - except for that damn motorcycle veteran shit Memorial Days which I hated lol.

So to me DC is like a small city with lots of the amenities of a big city. I mean there are only so many restaurants you can visit and so many things you can do. I have friends and associates that run the gamut as far as professions go. There are assholes in every profession and there are great people as well. I don't surround myself with people based on anything other than whether I want to be around them or not. Decent, friendly, sometimes interesting, sometimes funny, there for you when you need them. That's the same all over the world.

Maybe my favorite times are when I am at Dupont Circle on a late Sunday afternoon in winter and there is almost no one there. It's amazing when you realize you can have this peace in the midst of a city where on another day or at another time the space would be jam packed.

I suspect someone here has personal issues and they think it's the fault of the city. That's a shame and probably short sighted.

I love DC.

by Anonymousreply 7107/17/2021

Jake Tapper lives there. Yum 😋

by Anonymousreply 7207/17/2021

[quote] $450 for a one bedroom

Yea, that's utter bullshit. Not even in poorer neighborhoods but sure as hell not where you described it. Maybe a room in a shared house.

Um, when the Kushners moved in nothing changed. Seriously wtf are you talking about? You're just trying to make drama and spin tales. I remember driving by their house a number of times and, well, nothing.

by Anonymousreply 7307/17/2021

Nah it’s true. Even the uber driver here asks me what I do for a living.

by Anonymousreply 7407/17/2021

R Mee too!

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 7507/17/2021

R74, so? Taxi drivers are inquisitive and full of gossip. I love them. It's how I first heard that William Casey was in the hospital and shit was coming down. I think this was around the time of Iran-Contra shit and testimony. I don't remember now. But the driver's brother was a doctor at Georgetown and clearly leaking confidential shit about his condition. LOL!

by Anonymousreply 7607/17/2021

I heard people call it Ugly Hollywood:

by Anonymousreply 7707/17/2021

[quote] Good god why would anyone move there? Painfully boring and dull.

You've never been there, OP. It sounds like you watched a show on the Smithsonian channel and decided to start a 0/10 thread. Go back and jerk off to Rob Lowe.

by Anonymousreply 7807/17/2021

R69: You live in Adams Morgan. You might be near Kalorama Triangle Park or Kalorama Road but that doesn’t make it the Kalorama neighborhood. I used to live there. It’s Adams Morgan although some people have, in recent years, tried to call it Kalorama. I’m guessing it has something to do with the nearby Washington Heights Historic District which elevated parts of that end of Adams Morgan, between 18th and Columbia.

by Anonymousreply 7907/17/2021

R73 oh girl he meant 450,000 for a one bedroom condo or co-op.

by Anonymousreply 8007/17/2021

I would love to live in DC but I’m a political animal so…..

by Anonymousreply 8107/17/2021

R79 OK...My building classifies it as Kalorama, the neighborhood signs classify it as Kalorama, I live off Kalorama Road, and real estate sites all classify it as Kalorama. But I don't really care what you want to call it. It's a beautiful area of the city. I live on the edge of Rock Creek Park right at the base of the Taft bridge with a view of the park below and I really wouldn't ask for a more satisfying neighborhood to live in, even if you want to call it Poopyville.

This map calls my neighborhood Kalorama Triangle, whereas the mega-mansion side is called Sheridan-Kalorama.

[quote] It may not have the greatest arts community in the country but it is lively and thriving. Of course it's not NYC. But we have free fabulous museums and art galleries and that can spoil you when you go to other cities and they charge you for everything.

Yes, there's a lot of accessible art and culture, but most of it is dead and pinned up on display in museums. What I mean by no arts is no arts culture—most people seem entirely uninterested in visual arts especially. There are some colorful neighborhood murals but there's no much in the way of a creative community. There is some theatre here and that has improved over the years.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 8207/17/2021

R79 Here's a brochure, dear.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 8307/17/2021

Thanks for that great historical brochure. But that's ancient history and the reality is that nobody calls that side of Connecticut Avenue Kalorama. It just isn't known as Kalorama. The only exception would be that expensive condo right before the bridge that faces Connecticut. I had many friends over the years in that area and I never cared for it. It's too close to troublesome street crime.

by Anonymousreply 8407/17/2021

^^^ Meant to add except for realtors who also think Burleith or Glover Park is "North Georgetown". LOL!

by Anonymousreply 8507/17/2021

R85 Thanks for demonstrating the weird snobbery of DC people that everyone is complaining about in this thread!

The neighborhood is literally called Kalorama. It just is, regardless of your associations with it. That's the name of it. There's a sign right outside my building on the street that says Kalorama Triangle. Every home listing calls it Kalorama.

And I have lived here for six years now and have never heard of any crimes around here.

But do carry on. This is fascinating.

by Anonymousreply 8607/17/2021

R84 I lived in DuPont for four years in the 90s and we definitely called that section of Kalorama…Kalorama. Not down by the circle but up there around 25th street (I’m going by memory so don’t judge), yes. It eased into Adams Morgan but both sides of Connecticut were called Kalorama back then.

by Anonymousreply 8707/17/2021

Has anyone seen the 2007 remake of Invasion of the body Snatchers with Nicole Kidman and Daniel Craig? It's set in Washington DC and I remember chuckling while watching it because the so called clues that the populace have been infected are blank cold expressions and bizarrely non human reactions. I remember thinking that with Washingtonians there would be no way to tell the difference!

by Anonymousreply 8807/17/2021

I wasn't going to say anything, but then r87 joined in...

I lived in the 20009 zip code for 19 years. I thought of that neighborhood as the Kalorama Triangle section of Adams-Morgan. It's literally a triangle formed by Columbia Road / Connecticut Ave / Calvert Street (and a little of Rock Creek Park), as you see on the map.

Most people thought of it as Adams-Morgan, though. I had friends who lived on that part of Columbia Road, and they always told people they lived in Adams-Morgan. Friends who lived on Mintwood said they lived in A-M. I think of Kalorama as the section west of Connecticut Avenue, and Kalorama Triangle as something separate from that.

by Anonymousreply 8907/17/2021

Kalorama Triangle and Sheridan-Kalorama make up the Kalorama Heights neighborhood.

Kalorama Triangle is also part of Adams Morgan.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 9007/17/2021

[quote]Yes, you could throw a rock in any direction, and you were bound to hit a lawyer. Sometimes, that is a good thing.

Too bad it wasn't a boulder.

by Anonymousreply 9107/17/2021

R40, you are impossibly ignorant. Kindly STFU.

r8, DC had a tornado just last week.

by Anonymousreply 9207/17/2021

The cunts come out to defend their city...argumentive, nit-pickers, holier-than-thou about whether 2029 Connecticut Ave is properly in Kalorama or in Shantytown (you might think) Adams-Morgan.

Washington's museums are (mostly) free which is wonderful, and there are great public collections in DC, but there is very little sense of contemporary art from now -- not a group of contemporary artists from the 1960s. There's no liveliness to the private gallery scene, less edginess, nothing that's going to make anyone who has been to a few gallery openings scratch his head about. No group student shows because there are no art schools. Crafts is the only thing DC does well related to living visual artists. Some have mentioned theatre and I agree, there are excellent things on offer. It is a strength of DC.

There just isn't much good taste in DC. I have mentioned it on DL before but I've been in many homes that cost$2M, $4M, $6M in DC and the furniture and art are absolute shit. People care enough to have an address that impresses, but inside it's open edition posters of Matisse cut-outs with plastic frames and (inexplicably) matte UV filtering glass. The stairs are on half notch above Ikea. Individually it's slightly disappointing, collectively it's a massive WTF, DC? Bad taste would be a welcome relief from this safe mediocre stuff

There are of course nice people in DC, even nice (and some not so) nice people with contemporary art collections; and there are interesting houses filled with the lifetime accumulation of diplomatic assignments or other work around the world. There are interesting and sophisticated people there who are not doorknob wonkaholics, just too damned few if them, and likely to live part of the time elsewhere.

DC should be an interesting place, and indeed it is somewhat more so than when it was just government people, contractors, and lawyers, but it just isn't. The fault isn't the geography, it's the people who manage to be both too pleased with themselves and not a little bit prickly and defensive.

I lived in DC for much of my adult life, made the best of it, had good and interesting friends, knew people who cared about art (not just gift shop posters to fill a spot above a piece of furniture), went to lectures and knew the city like the back of my hand from Good Hope Road and Suitland Parkway to ambassadors residences and Foxhall Road. But Jesus what a fucking lot of work it was to try not to hate it too much. It's a most difficult to love city.

by Anonymousreply 9307/17/2021

The blurry neighborhood borders thing is weird.

Are NYC neighborhoods this difficult to define? The East Village from the West Village, uptown from downtown, etc.?

by Anonymousreply 9407/17/2021

[quote] And I have lived here for six years now and have never heard of any crimes around here.

Now I know you're full of shit.

by Anonymousreply 9507/17/2021

R86: if you live in the Valley Vista, it’s definitely not Kalorama and it has the smallest apartments in the area.

by Anonymousreply 9607/17/2021

There’s actually less address inflation than in the past. Glover Park doesn’t get tagged as Georgetown. The odd little neighborhoods N of Van Ness are no longer called Chevy Chase.

There is plenty of address inflation in the ‘burbs. Parts of Gaithersburg and Rockville along with nearby unincorporated areas are tagged North Potomac. North Bethesda is an actual subdivision on Old Georgetown Road between 270 and 495 but is now applied to the White Flint area into Rockville.

by Anonymousreply 9707/17/2021

Is Rock Creek Park still the go to cruising area?

by Anonymousreply 9807/17/2021

R96 I don't, but in a building near it.

You do seem to be really set on ranking everything according to various hierarchies, again demonstrating the point everyone's making about how hung up DC people are on status.

by Anonymousreply 9907/17/2021

You guys are boring. Tell us about the hook-up scene in DC.

by Anonymousreply 10007/17/2021

DC has the Corcoran art school which is now part of GW. Still, I don’t think DC ever had much of a distinctive art scene, even before WWII when regional art centers were more common. The area never had much in the way of artists colonies or the kind of businesses that let people are a living by doing commercial work like advertising, publication illustration, or industrial design. Galleries were pushed out of Georgetown and Dupont ages ago and many of them simply disappeared although a few do hold on in Georgetown and Dupont. I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything remarkable in the way of crafts in DC. Despite having some glass studios nearby and, at one time, two first rate glass galleries, DC never really developed as a glass center. Music and theater do well here, though.

by Anonymousreply 10107/17/2021

R100 Easy.. It’s a bunch of guys wearing a polo shirts and loafers standing looking at each other.

by Anonymousreply 10207/17/2021

I'm a DC native, though I left there about 15 years ago. Here was the problem I found there--there were a whole bunch of transplants who imagined that living there required having a big attitude. Given that this particular population would shift with the change of administrations, meant that we were frequently inundated with a bunch of people who didn't know how to behave. We natives, all 200 or so of us, were just living our lives in our rather bland town, but we were surrounded by people that imagined being there was some sort of accomplishment.

I'll always love my home town; I knew a lot of great people there, both natives and people who moved there. But I can't appreciate those who think that living there confers some kind of special status.

by Anonymousreply 10307/17/2021

[quote]Here was the problem I found there--there were a whole bunch of transplants who imagined that living there required having a big attitude.

I know this phenomenon well.

by Anonymousreply 10407/17/2021

I heard they have good pupusas there.

by Anonymousreply 10507/17/2021

Great French food too

by Anonymousreply 10607/17/2021

I spent a week in DC R100 and hooked up with a lot of hot guys while I was there. My hotel room was like a revolving door. Not a dud in the bunch. But then again, I was new meat and didn't live there so it might be different for full time residents.

by Anonymousreply 10707/17/2021

There are a decent number of gay men. Always been a place where I can find someone I’d be interested in. Not the friendliest and a little conservative superficially/socially (not politically). More exciting than Baltimore. Though I prefer Phillys absence of pretension, the guys aren’t as good looking.

by Anonymousreply 10807/17/2021

“Alot” is not a word, R4.

by Anonymousreply 10907/17/2021

R107, details! Who were they?

by Anonymousreply 11007/17/2021

R138 true statement. Philly has no gay scene. Woodys is it. Baltimore died years ago. Gays have moved out. Straight guys in Philly are way hotter.

by Anonymousreply 111Last Sunday at 8:45 AM

The only "creatives" I saw were rich bored white ladies working/owning galleries full of ugly pointless art.. often of landscapes and fruit bowls.

by Anonymousreply 112Last Tuesday at 11:37 AM

DC isn’t an art town. There are a lot of great museums and the city design was inspired by Paris. It’s a sports town and a theater town, and it’s (slowly) becoming a restaurant town. It’s not and is never going to be hipster central. It’s a preppy Mecca and a government center. The summer weather is gross. If that’s not your thing visit somewhere else.

by Anonymousreply 113Last Tuesday at 12:09 PM

The people in DC are unfriendly, that is true.

by Anonymousreply 114Last Tuesday at 12:12 PM

Do the local guys know who most of the (not so obvious) closeted Republicans are? I'm fascinated how that species copes.

by Anonymousreply 115Last Tuesday at 12:15 PM

I don't even understand why closeted Republicans are even tolerated.

by Anonymousreply 116Last Tuesday at 12:58 PM

[quote] The people in DC are unfriendly, that is true.

No, it is absolutely NOT true. I’ve lived here for over 30 years, and there are plenty of friendly people who live in and around DC. Are there jerks also? Of course, but they exist all over.

by Anonymousreply 117Last Tuesday at 1:21 PM

It’s a decent place for lunch if you must go, but you’ll want to be on a northbound Acela by late afternoon.

by Anonymousreply 118Last Tuesday at 1:21 PM

r118 You'll be attacked by the Asperger's geek khaki pant politico non profit mafia --- if you don't escape by 2pm LOL.

by Anonymousreply 119Last Tuesday at 1:29 PM

R117, I absolutely agree. I've been here for decades and I find DC to be very friendly and filled with people who are willing to help others. I've worked, gone to school and lived in every community this city has and it is full of all types of people.

I think some people have personality issues and look to blame others rather than doing a self-check.

by Anonymousreply 120Last Tuesday at 1:33 PM

Does one's profession determine if they're nice? I mean is it cliched to assume DC lawyers are assholes?

by Anonymousreply 121Last Tuesday at 1:46 PM

R121 No, but in my experiece Hill staffers are 90 percent mega-assholes.

by Anonymousreply 122Last Tuesday at 2:33 PM

To R33, it still is "easy" to get laid in Wash DC. I am there all the time for work! The new Tech companies in DC(smart men with no social skills) are great to FUCK. Lots of Yummy Grad students, Law school, The Military men(I cannot say enough about them, there is something about a MAN in Uniform). The TRASH is being forced out of DC(block by block).. There are still problems in DC(dtrump leftovers, Rethugicans, the poor-crime). You can have aGood Time in DC.

by Anonymousreply 123Last Tuesday at 3:13 PM

[quote] I mean is it cliched to assume DC lawyers are assholes?

Of course it is, you asshole.

by Anonymousreply 124Last Tuesday at 6:20 PM

^DC lawyer

by Anonymousreply 125Last Tuesday at 6:25 PM

I guess it's up to me to be the heretic in the room and proclaim that I'm perfectly at home with DC AND Marvel comics, TV programs and motion pictures. It doesn't have to be either/or folks.

by Anonymousreply 126Last Wednesday at 3:32 AM

“No goth kids. No art students. No dirty hippies. No credit card hippies fresh back from 3 years in Ibiza and India. No one who's been anywhere beyond a school trip or a semester in Lincoln, England. No one who has any interests outside talking about politics and watching pundits.”

Apologies, I don’t know the DL format for pasting quotes.

Among the kids who grow up in DC and it’s burbs there are a plethora of students who study abroad and/or study art. You’ll have to go out to the suburbs for goths or punks because the city kids are more sophisticated than that, just like in NY or any other big East Coast city. Dirty hippies are really more of a West Coast/Vermont/Colorado phenomenon. How many dirty hippies do you see in NYC or Boston or Philly? Even in Portland (I lived there for 5 years) most of the hippies are over 50. For the young it’s a passing phase. A credit card hippie isn’t really a hippie, you know?

by Anonymousreply 127Last Wednesday at 4:59 AM

And yes, the military men are divine.

by Anonymousreply 128Last Wednesday at 5:01 AM

R122 is correct. Most of those guys are smug assholes.

by Anonymousreply 129Last Wednesday at 5:03 AM

As a fat whore, I approve of the selection of cuisines. It may not be the best of anything (maybe Ethiopian in the US), but it certainly not the worst - except maybe BBQ.

There are a substantial plurality of assholes in town but there are actually a good number of decentish folks, but among the transplants and natives.

The cock is acceptable, but it is not LA or NY. A paper bag may be needed for the face. "Hollywood for the Ugly" is not a joke.

by Anonymousreply 130Last Wednesday at 5:23 AM

[quote]How many dirty hippies do you see in NYC or Boston or Philly?

uh, can I introduce you to Baltimore Ave in West Philadelphia?

by Anonymousreply 131Last Wednesday at 5:31 AM

R127: Rather than argue the typology of hippies or the post-goth sophistication of D.C. city kids studying in European universities (by which I assume you mean graduates from Holton-Arms, etc., and I should hope so for $50K a year), let me make my point more broadly:

Almost everyone everyone in DC belongs in DC. And by extension, there is very little room for those who do not fit the profile. It's like a child's first puzzle, those clunky wooden things with the few distinctly different shapes and colors that can only fit into their unique slots. Not only is there no room for art students, DC isn't very accommodating to anyone the least bit unconventional by local standards. There's no room for the homeless in DC, even; it seems they don't fit in either.

DC is a place that draws people who tick the right boxes, fit into the right slots. It's not a city that brims with the interaction of people of deeply different backgrounds and education and interests, where high and low interact, poor and rich, and ideas fly like sparks from the mix of the theatre crowd with the gallery crowd with the business world and the city hall crowd. No, instead it's a highly compressed middle mix of somewhat above average people a great many of them performing wholly interchangable jobs.

You'll never go to a party in DC and exclaim to yourself "Who is that odd bird?" or "I have to meet this guy!" Neither one of them will ever be at a party there.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 132Last Wednesday at 6:22 AM

dc is the only major city where I've seen people do the weirdo small town staring thing. Have you ever seen a movie set in a cliche little town and someone walks into a diner and everyone turns around? It's not normal eye contact or a casual once over it's a frozen almost predatory stare. I can't quite describe it only to say I haven't seen it in NYC/ S.F. / Houston or even smaller cities like Pittsburgh. DC residents either have this inappropriate stare or avoid any eye contact.

by Anonymousreply 133Last Wednesday at 6:46 AM

R132 Dead on my friend.

by Anonymousreply 134Last Wednesday at 7:04 AM

I've only been to DC a couple of times visiting family who were living there, so I can't assess for sure. However, I feel like despite exposure to people from all over the world (esp., those who work on the hill), they still manage to be provincial.

by Anonymousreply 135Last Wednesday at 9:46 AM

[quote]Good god why would anyone move there? Painfully boring and dull. Yes- they have museums.. so what? No one smiles. Ugly nerds everywhere. The gay scene? Haha.. Lame. Who dresses in Brooks Brothers to a bar?

Gross generalizations are the refuge of the ignorant. Thanks for revealing yourself, though I'm sure you don't realize you did so. NO ONE in D.C. smiles? REALLY? Asshole.

[quote]I've only been to DC a couple of times visiting family who were living there, so I can't assess for sure. However, I feel like despite exposure to people from all over the world (esp., those who work on the hill), they still manage to be provincial.

My comment above applies to you as well. You should have stopped with your first sentence. Pity that you felt it necessarily to go one and make a fool of yourself.

by Anonymousreply 136Last Wednesday at 9:57 AM

R132, you really know very little about DC. If you live here then you live a very limited life and I have to assume that's by choice.

The tents on the sidewalks as depicted in the picture are a very recent phenom. DC has a very robust program and lots of money dedicated to assist the homeless with transitional housing and other housing assistance. There will always be those who refuse housing assistance for whatever reasons. They are the ones who refuse to live by any rules and that often means a disregard for laws and respect for others. They shouldn't be allowed to just do whatever they want as an alternative. I support not allowing these tents to just exist wherever. As more people resume life as usual and are out and about these tents will be gone.

We live in a society and we need to assist those in need but with that comes a give and take.

by Anonymousreply 137Last Wednesday at 10:20 AM

Going into government work of any kind feels so 1954 to me. DC is like a throwback, a remnant, a bygone era.

by Anonymousreply 138Last Wednesday at 10:42 AM

Fucking hell, R137, don't be so obvious. If you try too very hard to prove my point that DC is overflowing with boring, humorless, take everything to its most literal extreme and then try to wonk your way out of it high school debate team summer camp sorts, then people will think that you are me trying to blow my own horn.

I don't live in DC but did for too many years. Thanks for confirming that some things remain that the place may change but the people remain the same.

by Anonymousreply 139Last Wednesday at 10:44 AM

I'm a district manager for Best Buy. I'm of no use to anyone in DC. Conversations stop.. dead.

by Anonymousreply 140Last Wednesday at 10:44 AM

r 139 - agreed this is the type that lives in DC. Haha - high school debate team. God this is so true.

by Anonymousreply 141Last Wednesday at 10:47 AM

Everyone that was picked on in high school moves to DC.

by Anonymousreply 142Last Wednesday at 10:50 AM

I've only been to DC once and liked it. DC seems to be a blend of the North and South Atlantic

by Anonymousreply 143Last Wednesday at 10:51 AM

R137, I have never seen even one tent on a sidewalk in DC, but plenty of cardboard homes when in NYC. I still love NYC, and I understand that every city comes with good and bad things. Haven't been to DC in the past 6 months since I work from home, but my partner goes in to work once a week, and he hasn't mentioned anything to me about that.

I would love to know in which perfect city the majority of the DC haters live?

by Anonymousreply 144Last Wednesday at 10:52 AM

R140 summarizes it perfectly. Not sure what other city is so blatant about job/career elitism. Most other places it’s respectable to do retail - because you can still be an interesting person who cares about life more than status.

by Anonymousreply 145Last Wednesday at 11:11 AM

R136, you sound like a dick.

by Anonymousreply 146Last Wednesday at 11:13 AM

Uh oh, poor R145 got dissed once by some effete shopper at the old Garfinckel's and is still butthurt.

Let it go. Just let it go. That will be better for your mental health.

by Anonymousreply 147Last Wednesday at 11:37 AM

[quote] I have never seen even one tent on a sidewalk in DC,

R144, they sprung up during the pandemic - maybe before. I have personally seen a number around 22d & K St NW (Washington Circle) on the sidewalks and around Dupont Circle. There are certainly more around town. I think during the pandemic they just let them alone - probably not enough personnel available to deal with them properly and people just weren't on the streets much.

by Anonymousreply 148Last Wednesday at 12:00 PM

R140, I had to laugh, because as much as I like DC, you're partially right. It all depends on the company you keep, of course, but what you do for a living is kind of important here. I do wonder if it's so much different from other people in snobby cities and circles? Personally, I have always liked people who are different and not boring, and I do have to admit that people in DC and the surrounding areas are more serious which comes with the territory when you know what most people do for a living here. Nothing wrong with that, as long as you know what to expect when you move to the area.

by Anonymousreply 149Last Wednesday at 12:03 PM

R149 Well - its a city of over - achieving nerds. They moved to DC to be around their own kind. Remember the kids you beat up in HS? Well - they moved to DC - a long with the student government dorks. They look down on anyone attractive, interesting/edgy or creative. You're in nerd territory - and they rule.

by Anonymousreply 150Last Wednesday at 12:59 PM

[quote] It all depends on the company you keep, of course, but what you do for a living is kind of important here.

You had a point in the first half of your sentence. I'm sure that what you do for a living is very important to SOME people in D.C., but not at all important to others. Just as what you do for a living is very important to SOME people in New York or L.A. or Chicago, but not at all important to others.

Some of you people are ridiculous.

by Anonymousreply 151Last Wednesday at 1:02 PM

The best part about DC is the black people. I could sit with them all day and listen to them make fun of white people in DC.

by Anonymousreply 152Last Wednesday at 1:10 PM

I've never lived in DC but it's hard to tell if this thread is just a couple of people who had a really awful experience in DC or a 100+ poster consensus.

Because I could 100% see DLers hating a city where being a flamboyant flames-from-space gay man with a career in retail or the arts is not very common.

Visiting, it always felt like being at a UVA or Georgetown frat party with lots of guys who eventually wanted to go to law school, one of those places like NY, Boston, LA, SF where everyone was from somewhere else.

by Anonymousreply 153Last Wednesday at 1:22 PM

r153 Equals boring and dull.

by Anonymousreply 154Last Wednesday at 1:30 PM

R153 Thing is, the nelliest guys I’ve ever met have been in DC - and I lived in NYC for 10 years.

by Anonymousreply 155Last Wednesday at 2:52 PM

I enjoyed my visits to DC and met some hot military men there.

But beyond a few central areas.....getting from point A to point B was enough to drive me to drink. Never been in any city where the distance between two points, as the bird flies, was so small, yet getting there was a nightmare.

by Anonymousreply 156Last Wednesday at 2:55 PM

Most of the people who are assholes are from other U.S towns - just like in NY. The natives are more laid back and most do not work on Capitol Hill.

Not a native but I grew up in the DMV and returned when my mother’s health declined. The power and status-absorbed clowns are but a slice of the population. The DMV is very diverse with not only Black communities, but significant Ethiopian, Salvadorian and Vietnamese communities as well.

I’ve only once been to a party where someone walked away from me when they found out I worked in an unconventional job. But I don’t hang out with those kind of people.

The best people I’ve met in the DC area are in the military - courteous, well-traveled, most have a good sense of humor and they’ve seen everything.

by Anonymousreply 157Last Wednesday at 3:11 PM

R132, Please tell me of this city in the U.S. where the poor mix with the rich - outside of NY or LA where that interaction is, let’s not kid ourselves, transactional. A city where it’s not just artists, musicians and actors hobnobbing with producers and patrons, each party hoping to gain something from the other.

by Anonymousreply 158Last Wednesday at 3:18 PM

I think it’s an unusually unfriendly city, and I’m a native. You can carve out your little group of friends and enjoy yourself, but you’ll never be out and strike up a great conversation with strangers, Its just a very uptight place. Everyone is on the defensive about themselves and their spot in the world instead of enjoying life.

by Anonymousreply 159Last Wednesday at 3:25 PM

[quote] Everyone is on the defensive about themselves and their spot in the world instead of enjoying life.

Do you think that comes from the fact that few people are natives like you? I was always told DC didn't have natives, that everyone is from elsewhere.

by Anonymousreply 160Last Wednesday at 3:29 PM

I visited once, had a great time.

by Anonymousreply 161Last Wednesday at 3:38 PM

[quote]I think it’s an unusually unfriendly city, and I’m a native. You can carve out your little group of friends and enjoy yourself, but you’ll never be out and strike up a great conversation with strangers, Its just a very uptight place. Everyone is on the defensive about themselves and their spot in the world instead of enjoying life.

Another asshole making ridiculous generalizations. As if everyone, or even the vast majority, of people in an entire city would have a particular personality or would tend to behave in a certain way. Did it ever occur to you that perhaps you clearly project that you have an extremely off-putting personality, and that's why you are unable to strike up a conversation with strangers, and why they avoid doing so with you?

by Anonymousreply 162Last Wednesday at 6:38 PM

[R162] Not really! I’m pretty gregarious and make friends easily, it’s something many others observe as well, so not just me. There is an aloofness and it may be because most people here are transients and just passing through. No one on my block talks to each other and I’ve tried having neighbors over and hardly any will come. People avoid each other, they don’t even sit outside. I think New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia are very different. More neighborhoods with local bars, diners, coffee shops.

by Anonymousreply 163Last Wednesday at 6:55 PM

R163 I agree with you 100%. All the cities you mentioned are 100% different than DC. They are towns that have hundreds if not thousands of different types of jobs and industries. Great neighborhoods full of all sorts of people blue-collar white collar etc. People flock to New York yes but it’s still has a better feel than DC. Baltimore and Philadelphia are very family oriented a lot of people stay and raise families: DC is a one company town… Most industries feed into the government somehow. People are just passing through so they ignore pretty much everybody in their path which makes their neighborhoods incredibly boring, dull and quiet. People move there for to satisfy sone twisted politico agenda. Black people are pretty much ignored except for when some nerd political asshole wants to show them that they care about the blacks to advance their political agenda.

by Anonymousreply 164Last Wednesday at 7:23 PM

I dare anyone to walk into a bar on Capitol Hill…& say I don’t vote, I don’t give a shit about politics, I didn’t graduate from college, I drive a taxi etc. Sure some nonprofit geek will come up to me and act like they care. They’ll probably take a picture of me for the brochure so their donors will give them more money. Then they’ll toss me in the river with the rest of the creative people

by Anonymousreply 165Last Wednesday at 7:28 PM

The straw that broke the camels back for me was seeing two fat fuck nerds with bowties on talking about Rutherford B Hayes… Our former president.. Debating on who they would replacing in his cabinet Fucking someone hang me outside in the tree .. motherfucking nerds

by Anonymousreply 166Last Wednesday at 7:32 PM

R166 😂😂😂

by Anonymousreply 167Last Wednesday at 8:34 PM

Love DC great place to go to college

by Anonymousreply 168Last Wednesday at 8:47 PM

[quote] but you’ll never be out and strike up a great conversation with strangers, Its just a very uptight place

R159, sorry but more of your generalizations just reflect on you and your ability to socialize. I strike up conversations with people all the time. In many different situations and locations around town. Maybe I'm just a friendlier and more open person. I sure as hell don't go around assuming sweeping generalizations about whole city wide populations.

You go looking for unfriendly and you'll find unfriendly.

You got issues. Work on them.

by Anonymousreply 169Last Wednesday at 9:01 PM

While R162 and R169 seem to think that they are they are the friendliest motherfuckers in DC, I have doubts.

by Anonymousreply 170Last Wednesday at 9:59 PM

[quote] I dare anyone to walk into a bar in Los Feliz…& say I don’t watch TV or read books, I don’t give a shit about plays or movies, I didn’t graduate from film school, I drive an 18-wheeler etc. Sure some documentary filmmaker geek will come up to me and act like they care. They’ll probably take a picture of me for the brochure so their donors will give them more money. Then they’ll toss me in the river with the rest of the non-creative people

[quote] I dare anyone to walk into a bar down on Wall Stree…& say I don’t invest, I don’t give a shit about finance, I didn’t graduate from college, I drive a taxi etc. Sure some nonprofit geek girlfriend of one of the bankers will come up to me and act like they care. They’ll probably take a picture of me for the brochure so their donors will give them more money. Then they’ll toss me in the river with the rest of the poor people

See how that works?

Most of the posts on this thread are from a guy who says he works as a general manager at Best Buy.

I can understand why DC would suck for him if he keeps trying to hang out in places where political geeks hang out.

I went to Princeton. I could easily see the debate about Rutherford B. Hayes's cabinet happening among a number of my classmates late at night. I would have found it amusing, not a reason to shoot myself and far more interesting than a debate over two Real Housewives from Season 3.

I've never lived in DC and rarely stay overnight if I have to go there for work.

But I know/have met a number of people who live there and most of them seem to love it.

That may be because they are political nerds or like political nerds, but mostly it means they found other people there who share their interest.

With several million people in the metro area, i suspect you can find whatever type of person you are looking for.

by Anonymousreply 171Last Thursday at 12:44 AM

I'm from the DC area and I live in DC, and I am not a political or TV news junkie or motivated by money and power—so I tend to feel alienated.

But I'm more culturally DC than I thought if it's unusual to think someone sauntering into a bar and announcing "I DON'T VOTE!" should be received as normal and unremarkable. I can imagine that happening only in places like Montana, where not voting might be seen as a virtue by some twisted logic, but otherwise, I would think most people would be pretty turned off by such a boast.

by Anonymousreply 172Last Thursday at 1:06 AM

The women dress awfully. Bodycon dresses with blazers, twinsets and pearls.

by Anonymousreply 173Last Thursday at 2:08 AM

R151, can you read? I said that it’s probably not different from other snobby cities or circles, and that’s what I was referring to. If you don’t surround yourself with snobby people, it won’t matter what you do for a living.

I think it’s stupid to have posters from Bumfuck, AL shitting on DC, but it’s equally stupid to pretend that DC is 100% perfect and elitism doesn’t exist. There are good and bag things about any place on earth, and DC is no exception. But I do find it odd that some posters hated it so much after stepping off the Greyhound bus.

by Anonymousreply 174Last Thursday at 2:34 AM

If R166 wants to be taken seriously, he should consider expanding his vocabulary

by Anonymousreply 175Last Thursday at 3:43 AM

It’s the Panera of US cities.

by Anonymousreply 176Last Thursday at 4:24 AM

I agree that DC isn’t the most friendly but what major city is? Chicago. NY. NO.

Not LA not SF not Boston.

by Anonymousreply 177Last Thursday at 5:56 AM

R169 needs to change her bloody tampon.

by Anonymousreply 178Last Thursday at 5:58 AM

[quote]DC is a one company town… Most industries feed into the government somehow.

Incorrect.

[quote]People are just passing through so they ignore pretty much everybody in their path which makes their neighborhoods incredibly boring, dull and quiet. People move there for to satisfy some twisted politico agenda.

Do you actually believe this nonsense you're typing, or are you just trying to stir up shit?

by Anonymousreply 179Last Thursday at 5:58 AM

[quote] I agree that DC isn’t the most friendly but what major city is? Chicago. NY. NO.

Chicago isn't as mean as it is lazy - and somewhat racist.

The gays there just can NOT be bothered with you if you live more than a few el stops away. Like I said, LAZY.

by Anonymousreply 180Last Thursday at 6:00 AM

R176: That would be Atlanta.

by Anonymousreply 181Last Thursday at 6:04 AM

OK, maybe it’s the Applebee’s of US cities then.

by Anonymousreply 182Last Thursday at 6:11 AM

OP just described my impressions of DC to a tee. Please someone tell me he is wrong.

by Anonymousreply 183Last Thursday at 6:14 AM

OP is wrong. I hope that Jesus has killed him by now, as per his prayer, so we don't have to listen to anymore of his nonsense :-)

by Anonymousreply 184Last Thursday at 6:16 AM

[quote]Jesus kill me now.

Address?

by Anonymousreply 185Last Thursday at 6:19 AM

My memory is that close in neighborhoods tend to be fairly friendly and fairly homogeneous (perhaps for that reason).

Capitol Hill neighbors meet at Eastern Market and mingle over for outdoor cocktails (often at Open Houses). DuPont Circle types tend to congregate in restaurants, a few bars (and on Grindr). Georgetown denizens (generally older) meet at “charity” functions and regularly entertain each other catered events in homes.

Each neighborhood is a different “type.” But DC’ers do smile a lot, tend to skew mildly liberal, willingly accept those who vary somewhat from that orientation, but mostly just tolerate the four year rotating political crazies.

Beyond neighborhoods, mixing occurs at work and in passing at sports events.

by Anonymousreply 186Last Thursday at 6:19 AM

Seems a lot of these observations are from people who are very into The Gay Scene and based on their interactions with similar Gay Scenesters.

by Anonymousreply 187Last Thursday at 6:41 AM

R182: that would be Indianapolis or Columbus, Ohio.

by Anonymousreply 188Last Thursday at 7:20 AM

K -12 Washingtonian here. When I had foot surgery in September, my neighbors brought me bagels, cookies, reading materials, etc. They asked if I needed groceries or sundries.

When my mother died they wrote me notes and left plants. I didn't tell them she died, they saw her obit in the WP.

To be fair, I currently live in a building across the river from DC, not DC proper. Before I was a fat whore, I could bike to DC in 20 minutes. I am likely the lowest-paid, least-connected person in my building but I still get invited to events and am treated like a human being.

I agree DC is a generally unfriendly city, but there are many friendly people, particularly the natives or long-time residents. Not everyone works in government or politics and the city is quite diverse.

When I haven't lived here I've always looked forward to visiting.

by Anonymousreply 189Last Thursday at 8:19 AM

When I was growing up, DC had more in terms of a counter-culture arts/music scene. That was all but gone by the late nineties when big money moved in and started buying up all of the real estate that housed venues such as the WPA and properties in/near Chinatown.

A family member buys a lot of art. The artists he finds live in places like Minnesota, New Mexico, Western PA. Most working artists are priced out of the US metropoli.

by Anonymousreply 190Last Thursday at 8:35 AM

^ metropolises

by Anonymousreply 191Last Thursday at 8:51 AM

[quote]I agree DC is a generally unfriendly city, but there are many friendly people, particularly the natives or long-time residents.

Sounds like you're saying that the unfriendly people tend to be those just passing through, or at least, not there for the long term. But any big city is going to have a considerable percentage of people like that, don't you think?

by Anonymousreply 192Last Thursday at 9:19 AM

DC is the Ruth’s Chris of American cities.

by Anonymousreply 193Last Thursday at 10:17 AM

Of course the District is pretentious and ultra-conformist and status obsessed—it's the gayest place in the USA!

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 194Last Thursday at 10:59 AM

Generalizations! Generalizations! Generalizations!

by Anonymousreply 195Last Thursday at 11:04 AM

R195 Most of this is based in truth and observation

by Anonymousreply 196Last Thursday at 11:28 AM

R196, I was actually just mocking the poster who keeps responding with that word.

by Anonymousreply 197Last Thursday at 11:44 AM

169 is typical of what passes for charm in DC.

by Anonymousreply 198Last Thursday at 12:02 PM

Also from R196, who is desperately unhappy, and very much invested in getting other people to hate DC as much as he does.

[italic] Lets Chat about DC

Good god why would anyone move there? Painfully boring and dull. Yes- they have museums.. so what? No one smiles. Ugly nerds everywhere. The gay scene? Haha.. Lame. Who dresses in Brooks Brothers to a bar? I had to listen to a guy ramble on and on about his prestigious government contracting job. Jesus kill me now.

R9 I’ve never read anything so dead on about DC in my life. It’s amazing to go out to a bar… And watch all the nerds dorks and geeks try to pick each other up. It’s like a room full of fat 3s and 4s staring at each other. Perhaps they ‘ll take each other to the nerd political prom. Yes you’re totally right there’s absolutely no creative class or goth kids. Lets Chat about DC

The inner suburbs are just as bad. Bethesda is an insufferable bore. Talk about cunts. Arlington is douche bro govt/consultant nonsense.

R20 Unbelievable how much we think alike: Watching a 20 year old girl walk down the street in pearls and pantyhose is disturbing sight. Talk about uptight!

R23 Yes because they’re certainly aren’t artists, film makers etc. If you’re creative you get chased out of town.

There’s absolutely no reason to live there unless you’re into politics.

R58 Very well said. Again I respect your decision. Tons of people are moving out of Seattle now for the same reasons. The traffic and the stress are through the roof. Lots of folks are relocating to Tacoma and Olympia… and out of state.

I heard people call it Ugly Hollywood:

R100 Easy.. It’s a bunch of guys wearing a polo shirts and loafers standing looking at each other.

r118 You'll be attacked by the Asperger's geek khaki pant politico non profit mafia --- if you don't escape by 2pm LOL.

[bold]I'm a district manager for Best Buy. I'm of no use to anyone in DC. Conversations stop.. dead.[/bold]

r 139 - agreed this is the type that lives in DC. Haha - high school debate team. God this is so true.

Everyone that was picked on in high school moves to DC.

R149 Well - its a city of over - achieving nerds. They moved to DC to be around their own kind. Remember the kids you beat up in HS? Well - they moved to DC - a long with the student government dorks. They look down on anyone attractive, interesting/edgy or creative. You're in nerd territory - and they rule.

The best part about DC is the black people. I could sit with them all day and listen to them make fun of white people in DC.

R163 I agree with you 100%. All the cities you mentioned are 100% different than DC. They are towns that have hundreds if not thousands of different types of jobs and industries. Great neighborhoods full of all sorts of people blue-collar white collar etc. People flock to New York yes but it’s still has a better feel than DC. Baltimore and Philadelphia are very family oriented a lot of people stay and raise families: DC is a one company town… Most industries feed into the government somehow. People are just passing through so they ignore pretty much everybody in their path which makes their neighborhoods incredibly boring, dull and quiet. People move there for to satisfy sone twisted politico agenda. Black people are pretty much ignored except for when some nerd political asshole wants to show them that they care about the blacks to advance their political agenda.

I dare anyone to walk into a bar on Capitol Hill…& say I don’t vote, I don’t give a shit about politics, I didn’t graduate from college, I drive a taxi etc. Sure some nonprofit geek will come up to me and act like they care. They’ll probably take a picture of me for the brochure so their donors will give them more money. Then they’ll toss me in the river with the rest of the creative people

The straw that broke the camels back for me was seeing two fat fuck nerds with bowties on talking about Rutherford B Hayes… Our former president.. Debating on who they would replacing in his cabinet Fucking someone hang me outside in the tree .. motherfucking nerds

by Anonymousreply 199Last Thursday at 12:07 PM

OP = MARVEL shill

by Anonymousreply 200Last Thursday at 12:08 PM

[quote]I was actually just mocking the poster who keeps responding with that word.

The idiots who insist on making gross generalizations about the behavior and personality of all the people (or the majority of the people) in a huge city are the ones who deserve to be mocked.

by Anonymousreply 201Last Thursday at 2:18 PM

R201, but you don't have to feel compelled to dissect every single comment. If someone doesn't like DC, that's their view. Everyone has different experiences. You can't force someone to feel the way you do.

by Anonymousreply 202Last Thursday at 2:50 PM

And DCers have ruined Rehoboth Beach for me.

by Anonymousreply 203Last Thursday at 3:46 PM

[quote]You don't have to feel compelled to dissect every single comment. If someone doesn't like DC, that's their view. Everyone has different experiences.

Yes, everyone has different experiences -- which is exactly why gross generalizations are so stupid and so terribly annoying. Is that clear to you now?

by Anonymousreply 204Last Thursday at 5:26 PM

R204 is so terribly, terribly annoyed.

by Anonymousreply 205Last Thursday at 10:25 PM

It's the first city in which I saw human feces on the sidewalk. That aside, there was something fun to do every night I was there visiting.

by Anonymousreply 206Last Thursday at 10:36 PM

Gross generalizations are what DL traffics in. Usually whatever city that’s up for discussion is written off as a dump, so DC gets off easy just being bland.

by Anonymousreply 207Yesterday at 6:30 AM

Ha, R207. And yet someone has still managed to be offended by that description.

by Anonymousreply 208Yesterday at 7:53 AM

[quote]And yet someone has still managed to be offended by that description.

I'm not so much offended by the specific description of D.C.. I hate ALL gross generalizations because, as I said above, they are the province of ignorant people whose brains are so ill-developed that they can only think that way and are unable to see complexities in anything.

by Anonymousreply 209a day ago

I will make a generaliztion, R209, that you have done something few men are fortunate to do. You have found the very best place for you. May your prickly happiness continue there for many years to come.

by Anonymousreply 210a day ago

R210, if you're referring to DataLounge as "the very very place" for me -- well, you are here too, so I don't get your point. If you're referring to D.C., I do not live there, and though I have visited many times, I have not been there in more than two years due to COVID. For whatever that's worth to you, and not that I care in the slightest.

by Anonymousreply 21119 hours ago
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