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British questions

There are so many things in British television and books that are baffling to us who do not live there.

Let's ask the questions.

I will start:

What do the hyphenate surnames mean? Do people with them come from money?

Nearly every British television program prominently features interracial couples. Does this reflect the reality of Britain or is it merely hopeful?

by Anonymousreply 600Last Saturday at 4:17 AM

In aristocrats, double barrelled surnames often meant two fortunes or dynasties or big wigs of some descriptions merged.

Spencer-Churchills: (from Wikipedia, let's assume it's close to right): In 1817, George Spencer, 5th Duke of Marlborough, obtained permission to assume and bear the additional surname of Churchill in addition to his own surname of Spencer, in order to perpetuate the name of his illustrious great-great-grandfather. At the same time he received Royal Licence to quarter his paternal arms of Spencer with the coat of arms of Churchill.[9] The modern Dukes of Marlborough thus originally bore the surname "Spencer". The double-barrelled surname of "Spencer-Churchill" as used since 1817 has remained in the family to this day, though some members have preferred to style themselves merely "Churchill". The 7th Duke of Marlborough was the paternal grandfather of Sir Winston Churchill (1874–1965), the British prime minister. The latter's widow, Clementine (1885–1977), was created a life peeress in her own right as Baroness Spencer-Churchill in 1965.

The Bowes-Lyons: The Bowes-Lyon family descends from George Bowes of Gibside and Streatlam Castle (1701–1760), a County Durham landowner and politician, through John Bowes, 9th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, chief of the Clan Lyon. Following the marriage in 1767 of the 9th Earl (John Lyon) to rich heiress Mary Eleanor Bowes, the family name was changed to Bowes by Act of Parliament. The 10th Earl changed the name to Lyon-Bowes and the 13th Earl, Claude, changed the order to Bowes-Lyon.[1]

Nowadays hyphenated surnames just represent marriage, so the woman's family name isn't discarded.

The interracial casting is mostly a reflection of the moment, not history.

by Anonymousreply 102/20/2021

Hyphenated surnames can also indicate a child born out of wedlock, where, usually, a mother wishes to ensure that the father cannot evade child support payments.

by Anonymousreply 202/20/2021

Given the history, I am surprised that at this moment there are so many interracial relationships in Britain than the US.

I would have thought it was just wishful thinking on the part of TV producers. But if it reflects the reality of British life as R1 suggests, it is very good to hear.

by Anonymousreply 302/20/2021

[quote]What do the hyphenate surnames mean? Do people with them come from money?

Some double barrelled names are historical but others are just a case of women not wanting to lose their family name. I worked with a woman who had 3 sisters and her father was upset that his name Dickson would be discontinued when his daughters married. So all the sisters became double barrelled when they got married, so there was Annie Dickson-Smith, Brenda Dickson-Jones, Cathy Dickson-Green and Debbie Dickson-Dennis. She was such a twat I used to deliberately misspell her name as Dixon just to fuck her off but that's another story. And is there name more patriarchal than Dixon?

But most double barrelled names now come from unmarried couples, where little Beyonce Jones-Davies is the child of Debbie Jones and Gareth Davies.

by Anonymousreply 402/20/2021

There are a fair amount of interracial couples in the big cities like London and Birmingham, but the vast majority are white with white marriages.

by Anonymousreply 502/20/2021

Don't believe everything you see on TV, OP.

by Anonymousreply 602/20/2021

[Quote] But if it reflects the reality of British life as [R1] suggests, it is very good to hear.

Why is it "very good"? Think critically. R3. What's "very good" about interracial couples? Are they better than intraracial couples?

Jesus, the airhead robots on DL.

by Anonymousreply 702/20/2021

[quote]What do the hyphenate surnames mean? Do people with them come from money?

They did originally.

by Anonymousreply 802/20/2021

R4, that is so weird. It is not as if Dickson is such an uncommon or distinctive name. Why would anyone care about a name surviving?

I wonder if he also is concerned about what brand of oatmeal will be available to his great-grandchildren or where the Spanish automotive industry will be in the year 2086.

I mean if he enjoys pointless worrying....?

by Anonymousreply 902/20/2021

[Quote] Are they better than intraracial couples?

Yes. In a multiracial society interracial marriages are better.

by Anonymousreply 1002/20/2021

R7, it is good because it means people can pair up with whoever they want with less bigotry against them.

My grandparents faced all kinds of shit because they were an interracial couple. And in the US, there is still of a lot of bigotry against interracial pairing.

Maybe R10 and R7 disagree, but I think it should be a non-issue.

by Anonymousreply 1102/20/2021

There's reverse snobbery too, where monied people with hyphenated surnames also cut the hyphen out and just use one surname to make them look like one of us and not so posh.

Don't forget to gay boys getting married too. If Mr Smith and Mr Jones get married, they sometimes both become Mr Smith-Jones or Mr Jones-Smith on marriage.

by Anonymousreply 1202/20/2021

I wouldn't thing twice if I saw a white girl and a black man walking down the high street, hand in hand, on a Saturday afternoon.

I don't think anyone, except extreme right wingers, would think negatively of it nowadays.

by Anonymousreply 1302/20/2021

Mixed race relationships are commonplace in big cities, not so much in smaller towns where the population tends to be majority white. It’s entertaining to hear small minded Daily Mail types who spout their fantasies of a return to a pre- mass immigration society in the 50s. They can’t handle change, and are infuriated that we have a multiethnic society. Good. I have met elderly couples who faced appalling discrimination and violence for daring to be together. They made happy homes and families in spite of this.

As for double-barrelled names, every pair of queens who get married opts for this. It’s lost any sense of superiority. It just looks pretentious.

by Anonymousreply 1402/20/2021

Why does every contemporary drama show a proportion of African/Caribbean-British people that far exceeds their representation in the UK?

They're distracting and almost always smack of tokenism.

Meanwhile, the representation of other minorities is grossly suppressed.

by Anonymousreply 1502/20/2021

The woman's maiden name should not be dropped. I propose both family names for every child. All girls to keep their mothers' name and boys their fathers'. So there are two genealogies.

by Anonymousreply 1602/20/2021

I watch a lot of British TV and there are far too many interracial couples and muslims thrown into each program, far in excess than daily reality. It doesn't bother me at all, but I do find it to be egregious pandering and very forced. Every little remote village seems to be overrun with mixed couples and muslims. It's very hard to believe.

by Anonymousreply 1702/20/2021

R10 is a moron.

by Anonymousreply 1802/20/2021

[quote]They're distracting and almost always smack of tokenism. Meanwhile, the representation of other minorities is grossly suppressed.

If the presence of dark skinned people in a tv show lessens your enjoyment of it then maybe you should think about not being such a racist?

by Anonymousreply 1902/20/2021

Watching Escape to the Country I’ve learned: British bedrooms don’t have closets, much less his and her walk-ins; that it is a rare British woman who can resist hanging wooden hearts as a decorative element; they like to put rugs on top of wall-to-wall carpet.

by Anonymousreply 2002/20/2021

The interracial couple thing and overrepresentation of minorities is also a think in the US. Even Bumfucke towns in the American Midwest have a lot of minorities in US tv shows and movies now.

by Anonymousreply 2102/20/2021

Closets, omg. Even completely renovated places do not have closets. Also bedrooms are tiny: a “single” = big enough for a twin bed pushed up against the wall. Again, this is a house that has been modernized and they didn’t knock down walls to create larger bedrooms. Sure, they’d “lose” a bedroom but is a prison cell really a bedroom? They certainly devote a lot of time and effort to redesigning the kitchen. The kitchen/diners are usually gorgeous. And the garden. It’s just the bedrooms I have an issue with.

by Anonymousreply 2202/20/2021

So what happens if Agatha Maplethorpe-Jones marries Cecil Parker-Downes?

Does she become Agatha Maplethorpe-Jones-Parker-Downes?

by Anonymousreply 2302/20/2021

By closets R22 do you mean an ensuite bathroom?

Those are only common in new builds. My house was built in 1920 and it has large bedrooms but no ensuite.

by Anonymousreply 2402/20/2021

I come from a rural community, OP and have 16 first cousins in this country. Another two in Canada. Of those four of my cousins married people of other races so even in rural communities these days interracial relationships are not uncommon.

by Anonymousreply 2502/20/2021

I'm in the UK and my white nephew is married to a black woman from Tanzania. The have 3 beautiful children.

by Anonymousreply 2602/20/2021

And why do so many houses have their laundry appliances in the kitchen? I've seen it in some US houses, but it's not common. Most people have them in the garage, the basement, or a laundry room.

by Anonymousreply 2702/20/2021

No, R24. Clothes closets. On Escape to the Country, prosperous fiftysomethings with a £750k budget wouldn’t even blink if they were presented with a master bedroom that can only accommodate a queen size bed and has a bulky wardrobe jutting out of a wall as the only real storage (that they have to share!) provided the room has a nice view. The equivalent North American couple would accept that in a hotel room, but not as a permanent living arrangement.

by Anonymousreply 2802/20/2021

Clothes closets, not water closets. I accept that adding extra bathrooms is difficult so I don’t blame them for not having en suites for every bedroom.

Utility rooms! Another brilliant idea and it’s where the washer/dryer are located. Also like the glass conservatory as an extension.

by Anonymousreply 2902/20/2021

Ahhh I see R28 thank you.

No it's true, some properties done have inbuilt wardrobes. My wardrobes are big and I have a chest of drawers too, but then I have a big bedroom it's about 20' x 20'.

by Anonymousreply 3002/20/2021

Do British homes have basements?

by Anonymousreply 3102/20/2021

What the fuck is a "high street" and why do they use it in figures of speech so often?

Did "bloody" really used to be considered strong language?

Why do urban British gays sound SO fucking queeny?

by Anonymousreply 3202/20/2021

[quote] So what happens if Agatha Maplethorpe-Jones marries Cecil Parker-Downes?

They double fist retarded kids.

by Anonymousreply 3302/20/2021

From British crime shows I assume High Streets are where the are bars and where people smoke weed. It's a street where people go to get high.

by Anonymousreply 3402/20/2021

R31 Yes in some cities. Brighton for example has a lot of homes with basements.

by Anonymousreply 3502/20/2021

R32

[quote] What the fuck is a "high street" and why do they use it in figures of speech so often?

Our High street is the equivalent of you Main Street or Mall or other generic shopping area.

[quote] Did "bloody" really used to be considered strong language?

Yes it did back in the day. You'll often see an old black and white movie where someone apologises for using it. We only really started to use fuck and cunt after the Lady Chatterley's Lover obscenity trial in 1960

[quote] Why do urban British gays sound SO fucking queeny?

As a sweeping generalisation my experience is that urban and rural gays sound pretty much the same.

by Anonymousreply 3602/20/2021

R34

[quote] From British crime shows I assume High Streets are where the are bars and where people smoke weed. It's a street where people go to get high.

Smoking dope in public is an offence. The police officer may have a word with you, issue a fine, or report you to the courts, depending on how serious they think it is.

by Anonymousreply 3702/20/2021

The High Street is the British equivalent of Main Street. The British mostly still live in towns and city neighborhoods where day-to-day shopping and services are on one main commercial drag. I get the sense that High Street is also used as a term to describe things (particularly fashion) that are mass market and geared at the lower middle class: Zara and the Gap would be High Street fashion. Boutiques and Harvey Nichols, obviously not. I don’t know if very cheap fast-fashion stuff like Primark and ASOS are considered “High Street”, I get the feeling they aren’t.

by Anonymousreply 3802/20/2021

Sure r35, I’ve seen all the basement flats in London. But houses elsewhere? In cold climates in the US, basements are necessary to regulate temperature (aside from being where the furnace/water heater/oil tank/washer/dryer are located. )

by Anonymousreply 3902/20/2021

I know people who are from the South who couldn't believe how large basements in houses in the North are when they saw them.

by Anonymousreply 4002/20/2021

Georgian and Victorian houses often have basements. Modern houses less so. Usually found in London, Brighton, Bristol, places like that.

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by Anonymousreply 4102/20/2021

Don't know why that pic didn't link.

Basements often have their own entrance from when servants were based there in the 1800s

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by Anonymousreply 4202/20/2021

Since we're competing I live in Scotland and I have a second cousin who is married to an Algerian woman whose parents were Chinese and Peruvian and they have three children of moderate intelligence. She's one ugly woman but he just loves her to bits!

by Anonymousreply 4302/20/2021

[quote]'m in the UK and my white nephew is married to a black woman from Tanzania. The have 3 beautiful children.

Do they throw spears at each other?

by Anonymousreply 4402/20/2021

R44 You're a rascal, sir.

by Anonymousreply 4502/20/2021

Great thread! Continuing the TV questions, growing up in the 70s and 80s we were told you only had one TV channel, BBC, and it wasn’t commercial , but government sponsored like our PBS. This seemed to make sense to us as Brideshead Revisited and Upstairs Downstairs seemed like what our PBS shows were like too. But then you also had Monty Python and then Fawlty Towers, which don't seem like government sponsored type shows that were on it as well?

Then it seems BBC sprouted more channels of itself, when and how did that happen? And now it seems like there are more and a variety of channels too beyond BBC and they are commercial? We also heard talk of something called Sky TV a lot and now people throw around Britbox, but I have no idea what they are referencing?

Your soap operas seemed to also remain sustainable while ours have really died out. Are they all shown at night? And I know Hollyoaks episodes are on nightly, but there’s also some channel that you can see the episodes a day early? How does that work? And as mentioned above it seems really quite diverse for a village in the middle of nowhere, how realistic is that and how do they justify that? Also, the sexualities are extremely fluid there, previously straight characters can basically go gay overnight and switch back and fourth at will. And 50 plus actresses seem to have accidental pregnancies?

Lastly, what we call a season you call a series. So season 14 of Grey’s Anatomy to us is series 14 of Grey’s Anatomy to you. So what do you call a series if that word is already taken?

by Anonymousreply 4602/20/2021

Do they chuck spears? [italic]Christ,[/italic] man, get it straight!

by Anonymousreply 4702/20/2021

[quote]'m in the UK and my white nephew is married to a black woman from Tanzania. The have 3 beautiful children.

So I take it that your nephew has managed not to get eaten by them yet?

by Anonymousreply 4802/20/2021

For anyone interested in how normalised interracial marriage is, Britain's beloved Prime Minister Boris Johnson was married to Marina Wheeler for 25 years and had 4 kids with her, and several kids with other women. Marina is half Indian.

Britain's Home Secretary is Priti Patel, a woman of Indian heritage is married to a white British man. Jeremy Hunt, former Foreign Secretary who Boris Johnson beat to become Prime Minister, has a Chinese wife. Sajid Javid, the former Chancellor, is a British Pakistani married to a British white woman. Dominic Raab, the current Foreign Secretary is the son of a Czech Holocaust survivor and is married to a Brazilian woman. Alok Sharma, who was Business Secretary under Boris now has the same climate change role as John Kerry, was born in India and moved to the UK as a child and is married to a Swedish woman. James Cleverly, foreign office minister, a child of parents from England and Sierra Leone is married to a white British woman. The government's equalities minister Kemi Badenoch is the British born daughter of Nigerian parents and is married to a white English man. Kwasi Kwarteng is the current Business secretary, born to Ghanian parents in London and is married to a white British woman, having previously dated white Tory MPs Liz Truss and Amber Rudd.

Labour's David Lammy and Vaughan Gethin are both black and married to white women.

As for the Scottish Nationalists, they only have one non white elected representative. British Pakistani Humza Yousef was previously married to a white woman and is now married to British Palestinian Nadia El-Nakla. Nadia El-Nakla was previously married to a British Asian but their marriage broke up when she had an affair with a hideously ugly white man.

And for the Liberal Democrats pansexual Palestinian Layla Moran used to be in a relationship with an ugly white man and now she's in a relationship with an ugly white woman.

Britain is really a lot more tolerant than a lot of Americans would like to believe.

by Anonymousreply 4902/20/2021

[quote] Continuing the TV questions, growing up in the 70s and 80s we were told you only had one TV channel, BBC, and it wasn’t commercial , but government sponsored like our PBS.

In the 70s we had 3 channels. BBC1 and BBC2, both non commercial and we had ITV, which was commercial.

Channel 4 didn't arrive until 1982. It too is a publicly run channel, but it shows commercials.

by Anonymousreply 5002/20/2021

R48 You rapscallion, sir!

by Anonymousreply 5102/20/2021

No one is asking the right question.

Do you fucking bastards really drink that much tea?! WTF?!

Dead body in the living room.

'Oh dear. Would you like a cuppa?'

'Yes, please. One lump, ta.'

Steps over corpse.

COME ON!!!!!

by Anonymousreply 5202/20/2021

What really happened to Agatha Christie during those days she went “missing?”

by Anonymousreply 5302/20/2021

Brits, please answer the question at R23.

by Anonymousreply 5402/20/2021

Bukkake party, r53. She wanted to keep it real quiet.

by Anonymousreply 5502/20/2021

R50 Thanks, so what happened to BBC3, did they skip over that or did it launch and fail? And did they see these different BBCs as the same Network, but different channels, or did they all have separate facilities and not really share things like administrators and sound stages and such? Were they in competition with each other or seen as all in the same family?

by Anonymousreply 5602/20/2021

[quote] Your soap operas seemed to also remain sustainable while ours have really died out. Are they all shown at night? And I know Hollyoaks episodes are on nightly, but there’s also some channel that you can see the episodes a day early? How does that work? And as mentioned above it seems really quite diverse for a village in the middle of nowhere, how realistic is that and how do they justify that? Also, the sexualities are extremely fluid there, previously straight characters can basically go gay overnight and switch back and fourth at will. And 50 plus actresses seem to have accidental pregnancies?

Gosh a lot of questions here.

Yes EastEnders, Emmerdale and Coronation Street are shown weekday evenings. Hollyoaks is shown at tea time around 6.30pm. We do have the occasional soap in the afternoon like Doctors and of course we still have the longest continuously running drama on any format that is on at 2pm every afternoon, The Archers on Radio 4. It started in 1950 and is still going today.

Hollyoaks is based on a fictional town near Liverpool. I would say that it is fairly accurate depiction of Britain today, with a little licence. We're living in a more sexually fluid time. I know a few straight guys that have come out. Plus celebrities like Philip Schofield have done it too in real life.

by Anonymousreply 5702/20/2021

[quote] Do you fucking bastards really drink that much tea?! WTF?!

Absolutely yes. I'm on my 6th cup of tea today. Love a cuppa!

by Anonymousreply 5802/20/2021

R23/R54 You're going to need Debretts to answer that question.

There is probably a protocol to take the main name from either party.

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by Anonymousreply 5902/20/2021

R57 Thanks, very interesting we don’t have any serials that air every night, though they are reviving Mary Heartman, Mary Heartman, but I don’t think they’ve announced how it’s going to run yet. I hope nightly like the original.

What of this secret channel that you can see shows air a day early? The YouTube channels are always giving away spoilers saying this is going to happen on Hollyoaks tomorrow?

by Anonymousreply 6002/20/2021

[quote] so what happened to BBC3, did they skip over that or did it launch and fail?

[quote] In March 2014, as a result of a planned £100 million budget cut across the BBC, it was proposed that BBC Three be discontinued as an 'open' television service, and be converted to an over-the-top Internet television service with a smaller programming budget and a focus on short-form productions.[4][5] Despite significant public opposition, the proposal was provisionally approved by the BBC Trust in June 2015,[6] with a new consultation open until 30 September of that year. The TV channel ceased operations on 16 February 2016, replaced by an online-only version.[7] A one hour block on linear BBC One has operated since 2019. On 20 May 2020, it was announced within the BBC's annual plan that the corporation is "considering the case" for returning BBC Three to linear television, five years after it was taken off air.[8]

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by Anonymousreply 6102/20/2021

[quote] Thanks, so what happened to BBC3, did they skip over that or did it launch and fail?

It was launched as a terrestrial channel, then both because the target audience is online now and as a cost cutting measure, it's gone online only now. Breakout shows do now appear on mainstream from it.

by Anonymousreply 6202/20/2021

One of my favorite shows of all time is "Rumpole of the Bailey." I was a British history major in college but I never quite understood the Inns of Court. It is eminently enjoyable as is, and some of the references I just let go over my head because (like many things) it just can't be explained easily. I think I understand the basic differences between solicitor and barrister, though I don't get "instructing solicitor" and the many types of judgeships: recorder, circuit (Rumpole calls them "circus judges"), red, etc.

Like when you're watching a Britcom and the joke will be "And he went all the way to Bristol for scones!" There are just some things I'll never get. Do non-Americans understand a reference to Podunk, Iowa?

by Anonymousreply 6302/20/2021

What is this Royal Ascot thing that Anthony Watson took Dylan Geick to? Is it a Gay thing? Do powerful men usually take their sugar babies regularly to this? And what are the costumes all about? Is it like some upper class Coachella?

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by Anonymousreply 6402/20/2021

[quote] What of this secret channel that you can see shows air a day early?

Hollyoaks is shown on Channel 4 and from memory, they often show the following day's Hollyoaks on More4 on the day before they show it on Channel 4, which is a channel in the same family. They may, I don't know, also show it on the All4 App, which you might be able to watch it on with a VPN over there.

by Anonymousreply 6502/20/2021

Has the discovery of Richard III’s body under the parking lot started a rehabilitation of his image? Is he still looked at as a deformed regicidal pedophile?

by Anonymousreply 6602/20/2021

Another Rumpole fan here, R63. Did you ever watch "Silk"?

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by Anonymousreply 6702/20/2021

Please rank the major cities (excluding London).

by Anonymousreply 6802/20/2021

IMO, American suite-type bedrooms are ridiculous. Yes on the closets, though. Studies show that people don't spend that much time in their bedrooms, yet spend $$$ inordinately to renovate bedrooms.

Washers / dryers in or near kitchens, I've seen in the U.S. as well (apartment). Makes sense in that they all require plumbing. I don't think I'd mind it. Currently, I have to go downstairs into a garage to do laundry and would prefer if the washer / dryer were on my level, even if I lost some living space.

by Anonymousreply 6902/20/2021

R53 - I saw a couple of recent shows about Agatha Christie and supposedly she disappeared to a hotel to get away from her husband who was carrying on with another woman. Sounds like she was in distress over the matter. Someone recognized her at the hotel and the peace and quiet was over. Back to the same problem.

by Anonymousreply 7002/20/2021

I could not have a bedroom without an en suite bathroom and a walk-in closet. Anything else would feel uncivilized.

by Anonymousreply 7102/20/2021

[quote] What is this Royal Ascot thing that Anthony Watson took Dylan Geick to? Is it a Gay thing? Do powerful men usually take their sugar babies regularly to this? And what are the costumes all about? Is it like some upper class Coachella?

One question I can definitely answer as I actually own racehorses. Royal Ascot is a week long racing event that is held in June at Ascot Racecourse. It forms part of the Season, Wimbledon, Trooping The Colour etc. HM The Queen is an avid racehorse owner and so loves attending the races. Often The Queen has a number of racehorses competing in the races. In fact, she owns the racecourse.

Because it is a social occasion and because The Queen is there, there is a strict dress code. A number of areas on the racecourse are delineated The Royal Enclosure, The Queen Anne Enclosure and finally the public enclosure. The details of what you must and must not wear are on the link below. Simply because you may bump into HM The Queen down at the paddock.

Powerful men do I deed take their beau to these events.

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by Anonymousreply 7202/20/2021

Television programs do overstate the prevalence of interracial couples. Also as someone else pointed out, the diversity is always just about including Afro-Caribbean Brits. Other minorities like East Asians and South Asians are underrepresented, even though there are more South Asians in the UK than there are Afro-Caribbeans.

by Anonymousreply 7302/20/2021

[quote] Has the discovery of Richard III’s body under the parking lot started a rehabilitation of his image? Is he still looked at as a deformed regicidal pedophile?

Well I actually come from the city where he was found in the car park. There is a museum that explains about the Battle of Bosworth and his life. The Richard III Society certainly campaign to rehabilitate him.

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by Anonymousreply 7402/20/2021

[quote] I could not have a bedroom without an en suite bathroom and a walk-in closet. Anything else would feel uncivilized.

R71, I can understand the comfort of having an en suite bathroom. What I think is silly is to have a mini-living room in your bedroom (couch, sitting area, etc.). Especially in a small house, just seems like a waste of space.

by Anonymousreply 7502/20/2021

R68 Wikipedia is your friend.

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by Anonymousreply 7602/20/2021

Scallys and Chavs, are they something still going on or were they a period thing like the Punks? Is Triga something that is watched as porn in Great Britain, or is that just some fantasy stuff created for the international market that is otherwise cringey stereotypical stuff? Why is Billy Essex usually the only model prominently named? Is there anywhere that Triga like men are actually getting it on in England, like whole groups of electricians or soccer clubs that have actual orgies? And what are your thoughts on Hung Young Brits?

by Anonymousreply 7702/20/2021

Off for a cuppa tea now, but do keep your questions coming.

by Anonymousreply 7802/20/2021

[quote] And what are your thoughts on Hung Young Brits?

George Mason's flat is near my London home near Oval station. I often see him and the other guys on Grindr looking for a fuck.

by Anonymousreply 7902/20/2021

Does Bridgerton fill you with outrage?

by Anonymousreply 8002/20/2021

Maybe it's like comparing apples and oranges, but IMO coffee is superior to tea.

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by Anonymousreply 8102/20/2021

We’ve heard there’s some musical with Henry VIII wives as racially diverse, was that just an attempt to jump on the Hamilton train?

by Anonymousreply 8202/20/2021

How is it that such great theater, actors and directors come out of that abandoned chocolate factory? That sounds quite magical?

by Anonymousreply 8302/20/2021

I hardly ever drink tea. It’s not compulsory.

by Anonymousreply 8402/20/2021

What was the whole reasoning behind folding the anthological museum, I think it was called The Museum of Mankind into the British Museum? It was such a great space with amazing exhibitions that now must just get lost at the British Museum. It was also one of the best places to get coffee before things like Starbucks opened there.

by Anonymousreply 8502/20/2021

R79 George looks great for his age. There’s a very early amateur porn clip floating around when he must have been working as an escort, it sounds like he built an empire despite starting out as an underage homeless street kid.

by Anonymousreply 8602/20/2021

What is it with the British and skyscrapers? You appear to universally loathe them and yet you keep on building the ugliest ones you can manage. I don't think anyone anywhere is expecting the latest multi-story building to resemble the Flatiron, but Jesus Christ, they don't need to look like the content of a Philadelphia dildo store.

Also, what is it with the British and modern architecture in general? We managed to have the Chicago School, California Modern, Expressionism, Art Deco, Bauhaus and the International Style, as well as weird one-off stuff like Bruce Goff and Eero Saarinen and plenty of regional variations from Malibu to Cape Cod. The British seemed to throw the whole load of eggs in the basket marked "Brutalism", which while not ipso facto without merit, is easily the least user-friendly form of Modernism and the most universally loathed - and it is loathed most of all in Britain.

Why don't you just go back to doing fake Ye Olde Tudore? That sucks too, but at least you seem to genuinely enjoy it.

Are you a race of architectural masochists?

by Anonymousreply 8702/20/2021

J'adore R87.

by Anonymousreply 8802/20/2021

The first season of Line of Duty had a black man married to a white woman who was having an affair with another white woman. I don’t think that would happen on a U.S. tv show.

by Anonymousreply 8902/20/2021

Interracial and bi-racial are so ugly to the ear and sensibilities.

by Anonymousreply 9002/20/2021

My family is miles ahead of that Bucket woman's.

by Anonymousreply 9102/20/2021

I have noticed that British actors have forked tongues. Do all British people have forked tongues, or do you have to get a fork in your tongue in order to be employed in television?

by Anonymousreply 9202/20/2021

R90 = PrinCESS Michael of Kent stroking her Blackamoor brooch

by Anonymousreply 9302/20/2021

[quote] is it merely hopeful?

What do you mean, OP?

by Anonymousreply 9402/20/2021

R66, he wasn’t a hunchback but did appear to have fairly severe scoliosis which would be fixed by surgery today. They did a facial reconstruction of him but then through dna tests changed his colouring from dark hair and eyes to blonde hair and blue eyes.

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by Anonymousreply 9502/20/2021

Silk is great but has a lot of the undecipherable British stuff. Why the hell does anyone care about getting the right to wear silk in a courtroom? Why doesn't someone just wear it without going through whatever they go through?

R82 The musical Six does present the wives of Henry VIII with actresses of all ethnicity. But it also has them in short skirts, so why not?

I thought that early poster was overstating when he said that "in this moment" there are that many interracial couples. I really thought that TV was overstating and now another Brit says R1 was wrong.

With all these small British bedrooms how are you managing in COVID? Most households I know have multiple people working or schooling from home. Without decent sized bedrooms, where would they all work? In the basement? No all of you even have those. And if someone works in the kitchen, what do you do on laundry day?

by Anonymousreply 9602/20/2021

R96, you do the laundry throughout the week and in the utility room.

by Anonymousreply 9702/20/2021

Are British washer and dryers portable?

by Anonymousreply 9802/20/2021

[quote][R96], you do the laundry throughout the week and in the utility room.

Except most people don't have a utility room - in most houses the washing machine is in the kitchen, usually just along from the kitchen sink.

by Anonymousreply 9902/20/2021

R87 Brutalism is cheap.

by Anonymousreply 10002/20/2021

Why do British kitchens and bathrooms have ugly wall-mounted water heaters?

Why is Julie Hesmondhalgh a television star?

Why do charming, affluent rural villages have such high homicide rates?

by Anonymousreply 10102/20/2021

R86 Yes absolutely

by Anonymousreply 10202/20/2021

R102

Why do British kitchens and bathrooms have ugly wall-mounted water heaters?

The old fashioned water heaters are long gone due to safety concerns. The wall mounted heaters are natural gas boilers.

Why is Julie Hesmondhalgh a television star?

She appeared for many years in Coronation Street.

Why do charming, affluent rural villages have such high homicide rates?

If you think that St Mary Meade is bad, then you should checkout Cabot Cove!

by Anonymousreply 10302/20/2021

R98

Are British washer and dryers portable?

They have small wheels on the bottom, but we don't take them for walks or anything.

by Anonymousreply 10402/20/2021

[quote]George Mason's flat is near my London home near Oval station. I often see him and the other guys on Grindr looking for a fuck.

Wow -- and in America, we named a University after him!

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by Anonymousreply 10502/20/2021

If they don't have closets, what do gays Brits come out of?

by Anonymousreply 10602/20/2021

r64 has apparently never seen "My Fair Lady."

by Anonymousreply 10702/20/2021

R96

Silk is great but has a lot of the undecipherable British stuff. Why the hell does anyone care about getting the right to wear silk in a courtroom? Why doesn't someone just wear it without going through whatever they go through?

'Taking Silk' is when a barrister becomes a Queen's Council. Judges of our various courts wear various silks to signify rank and speciality.

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by Anonymousreply 10802/20/2021

R106 The fucking wardrobe Rose! The fucking wardrobe!

by Anonymousreply 10902/20/2021

R109 = Louis Tomlinson

by Anonymousreply 11002/20/2021

OK, 90% of my knowledge comes from Hollyoaks and it’s only a show, but please tell me that the out of control over the top wallpaper is something some crazy set dressing queen on the show came up with and not what Brits actually have in their houses?

by Anonymousreply 11102/20/2021

R95

There is an interesting connection between Richard III and DNA testing. In that Richard was discovered in a car park in Leicester. Leicester also gave the world DNA testing, when Professor Sir Alec Jeffrey's assisted the police in the very first use of DNA testing to solve a local murder.

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by Anonymousreply 11202/20/2021

R111

OK, 90% of my knowledge comes from Hollyoaks and it’s only a show, but please tell me that the out of control over the top wallpaper is something some crazy set dressing queen on the show came up with and not what Brits actually have in their houses?

We have a wide choice of wallpapers in the UK. Some of them are indeed over the top!

by Anonymousreply 11302/20/2021

R112, was it most foul? Richard's body that is.

by Anonymousreply 11402/20/2021

R108, I am not sure I understand that Wikipedia article. A Queens council can be either a prosecutor or for the defense? So they work for the government as either a public defender (to use the American term) or a prosecutor as they are assigned.

If they leave government service, do they get to keep the fancy robe? And since closet space is limited in Britain, where do they keep it?

by Anonymousreply 11502/20/2021

Are British men gentlemen or filthy beasts in the sheets?

by Anonymousreply 11602/20/2021

My great grandparents emigrated from England and insisted the last name not be joined to accommodate the wishes of the immigration clerks on Ellis Island but hyphened. I have noticed when I state my last name when applying for whatever, the tendency is to join.

by Anonymousreply 11702/20/2021

[quote][R108], I am not sure I understand that Wikipedia article. A Queens council can be either a prosecutor or for the defense? So they work for the government as either a public defender (to use the American term) or a prosecutor as they are assigned.

In UK law there are solicitors and barristers. Solicitors do the bulk of the paperwork and barristers put the wigs on and do the dramatic representations and cross examinations. In theory barristers work with a "cab rank" system where they can't turn down work. So a barrister could prosecute a murder case and then defend the accused in the next case.

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by Anonymousreply 11802/20/2021

(112) PBS had a documentary on finding Richard's remains and their was a curvature of the spine.

by Anonymousreply 11902/20/2021

[quote]The woman's maiden name should not be dropped. I propose both family names for every child. All girls to keep their mothers' name and boys their fathers'. So there are two genealogies.

In the Spanish-speaking world, most people have two surnames: The first surname is the father's and the second is the mother's. In Portugal and Brazil, the surnames are reversed.

by Anonymousreply 12002/20/2021

R111, my flat's quite old and though I'm not keen on the wallpaper in my bedroom I'm worried it's the only thing holding up the wall. One day I'll get around to taking it down but expect I'll need a plasterer to fix up whatever problems it's hiding.

by Anonymousreply 12102/20/2021

R121 = Oscar Wilde

by Anonymousreply 12202/20/2021

[quote]In the 70s we had 3 channels. BBC1 and BBC2, both non commercial and we had ITV, which was commercial.

ITV wasn't branded as a single network called ITV until around the mid-'90s. Before then it was ITV "under the hood," but what people actually watched were its regional affiliates: Granada, Yorkshire, Thames, London Weekend Television, Anglia, etc.

YouTuber Bob the Fish has a fascinating series about the history of the ITV regions.

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by Anonymousreply 12302/20/2021

[quote]In the Spanish-speaking world, most people have two surnames: The first surname is the father's and the second is the mother's. In Portugal and Brazil, the surnames are reversed.

What about Spanishy people who only have one name? Like Evita, Shakira, Xavi and Pele?

by Anonymousreply 12402/20/2021

R114

was it most foul? Richard's body that is.

His curvature of the spine was very pronounced.

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by Anonymousreply 12502/20/2021

R115

Yes. A barrister can be the defence on one case and the prosecution on an entirely different case.

by Anonymousreply 12602/20/2021

R116 Are British men gentlemen or filthy beasts in the sheets?

How would you like us to be? 😉

by Anonymousreply 12702/20/2021

(114) I understand Margaret Rutherford was present and uttered those famous words, "Murder Most Foul."

by Anonymousreply 12802/20/2021

The ITV regions used to be distinct enough that not every network carried every major show. For example, [italic]Coronation Street[/italic] didn't air on all of ITV its early years.

by Anonymousreply 12902/20/2021

R123 Is quite right. We were ATV that then became Central TV in 1982.

The land of Crossroads Motel made way for Bullseye and Boon!

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by Anonymousreply 13002/20/2021

^ This is another interesting point: The regional networks had to reapply with the ITA (Independent Television Authority) every few years to maintain their licenses, and they sometimes had to compete with new startup networks for a particular region. Thus, Central TV replaced ATV in 1982 as the ITV regional network for the West Midlands.

by Anonymousreply 13102/20/2021

R88, I recognise R87 as the John Wellborn Root Fan of Chicago.

by Anonymousreply 13202/20/2021

What are the perks of becoming Queens Council? If you still have to take any case handed to you.

Also, it is the government who pays? Can't a barrister turn down someone who they think will stiff them?

by Anonymousreply 13302/20/2021

Why’s Edina always going on about Holland Park and Shepard’s Bush, it seems VERY important to her?

by Anonymousreply 13402/20/2021

R133

What are the perks of becoming Queens Council? If you still have to take any case handed to you.

Appointment as QC has been said to be a matter of status and prestige only, with no formal disadvantages

Also, it is the government who pays? Can't a barrister turn down someone who they think will stiff them?

The government pays if it's a prosecution case. A defendant pays if it's a defence case. Not sure about stuffing them. I'm sure an assessment of means is made. Often in the most serious of cases, if a defendant is poor then the Legal Aid system kicks in and that pays the barrister's costs at a set amount.

by Anonymousreply 13502/20/2021

R134 Why’s Edina always going on about Holland Park and Shepard’s Bush, it seems VERY important to her?

Holland Park is a posh part of London where many celebrities live. Think the Beckhams, Rowan Atkinson, people like that.

by Anonymousreply 13602/20/2021

[quote]Is he still looked at as a deformed regicidal pedophile?

Hoping for a friend!

by Anonymousreply 13702/20/2021

Yes R67, Silk is an equally enjoyable show.

by Anonymousreply 13802/20/2021

[quote]Television programs do overstate the prevalence of interracial couples. Also as someone else pointed out, the diversity is always just about including Afro-Caribbean Brits. Other minorities like East Asians and South Asians are underrepresented, even though there are more South Asians in the UK than there are Afro-Caribbeans.

This is true. Watching British TV and sports, one is likely to assume black people represent the largest minority when, in actual fact, Asians (South Asians in the British sense) are, by far, the largest and most ubiquitous minority group. It is easy to make this mistake because, for example, there are currently none represented in the top flights of popular sports like football (soccer) or rugby.

Also, as can be seen from r49, if Britain were to have an Obama moment and elect a non-white prime minister (and that moment could be as close as the next election), they are most likely to be of South Asian (Indian/Pakistani/Bangladeshi/Sri Lankan) heritage.

by Anonymousreply 13902/20/2021

Watching Silk again and it is hard for non-Brits to get it all.

They have two barristers in the same office (still not sure if it is a government office or a private firm) arguing both sides of the same case. Is that possible in real life? If a barrister can argue either side it seems like an open invitation to corruption and collusion.

What am I missing?

And would an office really be given a name like "Shoe Lane"?

by Anonymousreply 14002/20/2021

R4

Going back ages as a condition for a man marrying an heiress her family insisted on a hyphenated name to keep theirs from dying out.

Until laws were changed (rather recently by historical standards), all a woman had became legal property of her husband (including the woman herself, and any children from the marriage), so it does seem least a man could do.

by Anonymousreply 14102/20/2021

Reading old Fanny Burney novels, I learned that if the wife had more money than the husband in the late 1700, he would be expected to take her name (since he would living on her money).

by Anonymousreply 14202/20/2021

R136

Holland Park is far more upmarket and desirable than Shepherd's Bush.

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by Anonymousreply 14302/20/2021

More...

Though these days many will take what they can get in London, Eds did have bragging rights back in 1990's when she went on about her home being in Holland Park proper, not Shepherd's Bush.

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by Anonymousreply 14402/20/2021

[quote]We’ve heard there’s some musical with Henry VIII wives as racially diverse, was that just an attempt to jump on the Hamilton train?

That is the case, I'm afraid. Hamilton's influence was huge. As it happens with entertainment phenomena from the US, it elicited great admiration, coupled maybe with a bit of envy. Most, if not all, entertainment trends come from the US. So you'll have, for example, a large swathe of British pop/rock music sang in American accents. They've had a strong black music (soul/r&b/hiphop) and a "blue-eyed soul" scene even though it doesn't come as naturally to them as it does to African-Americans raised in the black church tradition.

So, while the original casting of Hamilton was mostly motivated by the genre of music in the show, it's opened the door for the UK to try something similar.

by Anonymousreply 14502/20/2021

R127 Filthy beasts, please, kind sir.

by Anonymousreply 14602/20/2021

Since we are talking about the hot new musical from three years ago, here is a clip.

Clearly, unlike Hamilton, the casting has nothing to do with the genre of musical. The creators are clearly trying to do a respectful, old-fashioned historic musical while gussying it up with the actresses who are best for the part rather than actresses who are white.

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by Anonymousreply 14702/20/2021

R140 They have two barristers in the same office (still not sure if it is a government office or a private firm) arguing both sides of the same case. Is that possible in real life?

It's probably in chambers, so a private office. Yes it's absolutely essential that a barrister can argue both sides of a case.

If a barrister can argue either side it seems like an open invitation to corruption and collusion.

How so? Given that a defence barrister will be opposing a prosecution barrister from different chambers.

What am I missing?

And would an office really be given a name like "Shoe Lane"?

Yes absolutely. The Inns of Court are based in the City of London which has very old, quaint street names. Pudding Lane, Old Bailey, Fleet Street being examples.

by Anonymousreply 14802/20/2021

Is a Chamber like a law firm?

In the program, two barristers arguing a case are from the same chambers. Even if that is a dramatic license, it would seem that arguing for a client that a colleague from the same chambers may be prosecuting a few years later would mean that nothing could be discussed with office staff or co-workers. Or a prosecutor could just look into old files to gain an unfair advantage.

Also, how high is the credibility of barristers if they did not put the case together?

And if I was starting a chamber, I cannot imagine using a street name even if it is customary, if the street name sounds silly. You need some dignity when you go into court, don't you?

by Anonymousreply 14902/20/2021

Why does every room have a door? Keeping Up Appearances. As Time Goes By.

by Anonymousreply 15002/20/2021

What the hell is a TV license? Is that like paying a Comcast cable bill or is it something totally different? This is truly an explain it to me like I am a moron, because I don't get it at all.

Do you also have to have a radio license?

How much does all of this cost? So many questions.

by Anonymousreply 15102/20/2021

Although....with the whole wig thing, maybe the British system is about taking away the dignity of the professionals who speak in court. The wigs certainly do knock them off their pedestal. Maybe these chamber names are a similar attempt to keep barristers from getting too authoritative.

by Anonymousreply 15202/20/2021

On interracial couples, you'd struggle to find an equivalent of the Obamas, Beyonce & Jay Z or even superstar athletes like Steph Curry or Russell Wilson married to black partners in the UK. First, demographics make it such that marrying interracially is more likely than in the US. Black people are only about 2% of the population (3% in England and Wales)

[quote]Amongst the 56 million residents in England and Wales, 86% were White, 8% were Asian/Asian British and 3% were Black/African/Caribbean/Black British. Of the foreign-born population almost half (46%) identified as White, including over a quarter who identified as Other White (28%).

Also, British cities are not as segregated. To this day, my mind boggles at the fact that black and white Americans from the same cities, towns and areas sound different. There is no Black British accent. However, Asian communities tend to be more close-knit.

by Anonymousreply 15302/20/2021

[quote]Black people are only about 2% of the population (3% in England and Wales)

That is astounding if you regularly watch British tv shows. You'd think blacks were about 40% of the population.

I guess the same thing is true of the US. Blacks are overrepresented in media here as well.

by Anonymousreply 15402/20/2021

It seems like there would be so much more opportunity for Black actors in the UK than, but instead we seem to import them to the US to play prominent Americans like Harriet Tubman and MLK?

by Anonymousreply 15502/20/2021

Black actors have long complained about limited prospects in the UK, r155. But that's a topic for another thread.

by Anonymousreply 15602/20/2021

R65 Slight correction: the channel that the "day in advance" Hollyoaks airs on is E4, as opposed to More4. And R60, this day-ahead episode airs each weeknight at 7pm, right after that day's scheduled episode at 6:30pm on Channel 4. A viewer has to watch this day-ahead episode *live*, but yes, one can watch it with a VPN on the E4 live stream as long as you've registered at All4. And once it airs on E4, that episode isn't available again until the next day when it airs for its regular broadcast on Channel 4. After that, it then gets added to All4 website for on-demand streaming.

by Anonymousreply 15702/20/2021

Most shows in Britain and the US take place in large cities where minorities make up a larger part of the population. In NYC blacks make up 25% of the population and even shows shot in NYC do not come near that number.

by Anonymousreply 15802/20/2021

R157 Thank you. My mistake about More 4. I forgot it was E4.

by Anonymousreply 15902/20/2021

r158 most shows set in NYC are about rich people/people in upscale professions. The demographics there are heavily white.

by Anonymousreply 16002/20/2021

R151

What the hell is a TV license?

Every home with a TV is required, by law, to have a TV Licence at a cost of £157.50 per year, per home.

Is that like paying a Comcast cable bill or is it something totally different?

If we have a cable TV provider like SKY or Virgin Media, then that's extra, on top of the £157.50 licence fee.

This is truly an explain it to me like I am a moron, because I don't get it at all.

Do you also have to have a radio license?

No. There is no radio licence. You can listen to the radio for free.

How much does all of this cost? So many questions.

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by Anonymousreply 16102/20/2021

[quote]Every home with a TV is required, by law, to have a TV Licence at a cost of £157.50 per year, per home.

Americans would be rioting in the streets.

by Anonymousreply 16202/20/2021

[quote]It seems like there would be so much more opportunity for Black actors in the UK than, but instead we seem to import them to the US to play prominent Americans like Harriet Tubman and MLK?

Damn right.

by Anonymousreply 16302/20/2021

R161 Thanks for the explanation. Holy shit, that's not cheap! I agree with r162

I remember an episode of The Young Ones when the were too broke to pay their license fee and hijinks ensued, but somehow I figured that was now outdated. Obviously, quite wrong.

by Anonymousreply 16402/20/2021

R123 That's interesting. .. The funny thing is, it appears that some UK TV guides still use those regional channel names. I'm looking at digiguide.tv and they show something like 15 broadcasts of the same Emmerdale episode each with a different ITV region name. (I see some of the same region names you've mentioned). And I recall one time when I was having an issue streaming the show on a tablet, the ITV rep's first question was, what region was I in?

by Anonymousreply 16502/20/2021

R165 We still have regional news programs at 6pm on ITV where each area breaks away to its component regions. So here we have Central News for the Midlands. Granada will have there's for Manchester and Liverpool.

The BBC break away to regional news at 6:30pm. We have East Midlands Today here.

by Anonymousreply 16602/20/2021

R164 In fact, things have got more conscious recently as the over 75s used to get a free TV licence, but that ended last year.

The TV licensing are pursuing loads of old grannies to pay up and they're refusing.

by Anonymousreply 16702/20/2021

Harking back to the High Street question, because I don't entirely agree with the explanation. My understanding is that "the high street" is as distinct from "the Mall/Megamall".

The high street is where you walk down the street and you can walk straight into each shop in turn. A department store may be in a high street, and a city high street may even have century-old arcades that join it perpendicularly to the next street, but NOT a mall, where typically none of the shops faces a street.

Hence, high street fashion means it comes from an independent boutique or the shop of its designer, not from the brand-you-see-everywhere store you find in a mall. (Though note: in the case of Kate Middleton it is more often used to describe clothes she has bought from anywhere except a couturier.)

I have a high street butcher and greengrocer, which is useful during the pandemic because I don't have to mix with people going to other shops.

Well designed high streets can make suburbs or sections of a city into villages, whereas malls and supercentres mitigate against any community feel.

I'm not American and I too am appalled by the "closet space" issue in Escape to the Country. Worse still, frequently the master bedroom has no room at all for a wardrobe, because one whole corner is occupied by a fireplace. Nor ever do those cute little rooms they put under the eaves, where you can only stand up in the middle of the room and the husband is always going to hit his head on a characterful beam getting out of bed in the night, and then fall down the incredibly steep stairs while trying to find the toilet with concussion, since they never have a toilet up there either. I always assume that the people who buy those places are couples where the woman wants his superannuation payout.

by Anonymousreply 16802/20/2021

R75

It goes back to concept of private versus public spaces.

Nobles took it from royals, then later it trickled down to upper then middle classes, and now anyone who can afford.

In keeping with old ways a lady or gentleman never appeared in public space (even within their own home) undressed. That includes going downstairs or whatever in a dressing gown.

For ladies in particular whose wardrobes or fashion of dress often involved elaborate and uncomfortable under and over garments, being able to remain in their "boudoir" undressed as it were was relaxing.

Also in homes or whatever full of servants at least in one's personal apartments one was alone to do anything from write personal letters to break wind if mood struck.

Another reason for a couch, comfortable chair, etc... was to give a place for taking maybe a quick nap or to relax without messing up the bed. It is generally considered unsanitary to sit on a bed, plus it takes away from the freshness and neat appearance of one that is well made. Of course if one has the money and servants answer is to have bed made twice per day. Jackie Kennedy did this as First Lady because JFK took naps in the afternoon. So at least linen in master bedroom was changed twice per day; once after rising, then again sometime later in afternoon. Think of the laundry bills.

by Anonymousreply 16902/20/2021

BBC and other British television networks or radio stations are funded by government taxation to some extent. Thus while there is advertising (commercials), you don't have things to extent say of American television or radio broadcasts.

Thanks to this stream of government funding (via taxation) UK television programs no not rely as heavily on advertising (commercial breaks) compared to say USA. ITV may have breaks about every 25 or so minutes, OTOH in USA network television has breaks more like every 10 or even less minutes.

Shows like Keeping Up Appearances work well enough on American PBS stations because they run for 30 minutes, and are taped without gaps for commercial breaks. That just wouldn't work if shown on say network television. Maddening thing about watching shows on MeTV is they not only keep original commercial breaks, but edit programs further to insert more. You can often see results of this bad editing when a scene just fades out or is cut where it obviously shouldn't, and goes to commercial.

Generous funding for BBC, ITV/Granada television gave the British and world via export some of the most wonderful programming. Brideshead Revisited, Jewel in the Crown, I Claudius, etc... Sweeping dramas sadly that largely aren't done any longer in modern era of belt tightening. Downton Abbey relied heavily on sponsorship from outside sources (hence all those cruise line adverts), even though it was a very successful series.

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by Anonymousreply 17002/20/2021

Important old distinction between barristers and solicitors is that one was considered in trade, whilst the other not.

Under rules that carried on at least until WWI, those who took money directly for their services were considered "in trade" and thus unacceptable to be presented to monarch or his/her consort. Thus the wife or daughter of a barrister could be presented to at court, but not same of a solicitor.

Historically barristers were usually paid via solicitors who in turn got their money from clients. Being removed (even by only one degree) from actually taking money directly allowed barristers to escape being labelled tradesmen. Now of course with Public Access barristers some are paid directly by clients, but since court pretensions long have ceased that bit of snobbery is gone.

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by Anonymousreply 17102/20/2021

#R143, God knows I'd prefer to Park myself up Holland rather than investigate Sheppard's Bush

by Anonymousreply 17202/20/2021

[quote] What do the hyphenate surnames mean? Do people with them come from money?

That’s not just British, child.

by Anonymousreply 17302/20/2021

Vegemite/Marmite. REALLY, Brits? Ewwww.

Also, I hear tell that British versions of chocolate bars (some of which are sold here in the States, even) such as Dairy Milk, Cadbury, etc. are much less sweet and are of better quality than their American counterparts. Is this true? Is British chocolate better? Is everything in America "too sweet?"

by Anonymousreply 17402/20/2021

R155

Africans were in Great Britain by the 1700's thanks to the vast expansion of empire and of course slave trade.

In this famous painting by Hogarth as part of "Harlot's Progress" you can clearly see a darker skinned woman imprisoned in work house with heroine of tale.

While there may have been darker skinned persons in London and other urban areas, most of the television and film work that has come out of Britain historically is all about Jane Austin, monarchs and their courts, nobility, bodice ripping dramas, etc.... You didn't see any darker persons cast in say "Angels and Insects", nor "Gosford Park", nor any of the litany of dramas about Elizabeth I, Mary, Queen of Scots, Jane Grey, Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII etc..

You didn't or don't see blacks in dramas like Upstairs/Downstairs, Keeping Up Appearances, etc.. Though you do in things like East Enders, Call The Midwife, and other dramas that deal with the less toff parts of UK.

Saffy's dad Justin in Ab Fab had a black partner. There was of course that wonderful black nurse who gave Eds good as she got..

Suppose creators, directors and other suits involved in films and television programming would argue where historically approproiate they do cast darker skin people. But chances of a dark person living in Tilling (set of Mapp and Lucia) during period between the wars was nil, so why would we insert one.

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by Anonymousreply 17502/20/2021

Presenting Full English Breakfast!

I ask you is there anything more nauseous producing than confronted with a plate of beans, sausages, ham, eggs, tomatoes and God only knows what else first thing in morning?

Oh, and you can add kippers to that as well.

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by Anonymousreply 17602/20/2021

R168

Well of course one could use a slop jar (which people did well into 1900's) to avoid having to go outside at night to toilet located in outhouse.

In morning take container downstairs and out back, flush contents down loo, clean and put container back under bed....

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by Anonymousreply 17702/20/2021

But roasted tomatoes are devine!

by Anonymousreply 17802/20/2021

R27

To do laundry you need access to plenty of water (hot and cold), a warm room to dry laundry if things cannot be hung outdoors, and finally something to heat non electric irons for ironing laundry.

Historically in urban areas or smaller homes the one area where all that could be found was kitchen. Between a large solid fuel fired range, a scullery with a copper (for boiling laundry), and area on range for heating irons, everything was right in kitchen. Oh and thanks to that big cast iron range that burned 24/7 all year kitchens were warm so wash could be hung from ceilings on clothes horses, or placed in front of range on racks.

Fully automatic washing machines didn't become common in GB until well after WWII. We're talking well into 1960's or 1970's. By that time British households long had been used to doing wash in kitchen area, so that is where washing machines were and still are usually installed.

Keep in mind again fully automatic washing machines need hot and cold water connections (or at least cold since most front loaders sold in UK heat their own water), and also access to a sink or drain. In many homes indoor plumbing of that sort is largely found in or off kitchens, and maybe bathrooms. Hence these are the two areas you see washing machines not just in UK but many parts of Europe.

by Anonymousreply 17902/20/2021

Isn’t it complicated having the dishwasher and washer and dryer all in the kitchen, that eats up lots of below counter cupboard space?

by Anonymousreply 18002/20/2021

Why don't actors on British TV ever kiss properly? Unlike us, you Brits have nudity on TV, but not tongue kissing. Is there a rule?

by Anonymousreply 18102/20/2021

R181

As with France and many other parts of Europe when it comes to laundry more urban homes (if not in general) own washing machines than dryers.

Washing laundry is viewed as more of a chore than drying, so push comes to shove people will live without a dryer. Things are just hung up in airing cupboards, on racks, etc...

This also has much to do with high utility rates as well.

That being said thanks to ventless (aka) condenser dryers one doesn't necessarily need to have a dryer next to, stacked above or even near washing machine.

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by Anonymousreply 18202/20/2021

When done well with built ins things look rather nice.

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by Anonymousreply 18302/20/2021

r174, yes choc is better over there. they use ingredients that have a longer shelf life in the USA. also they are stricter on preservatives and artificial coloring. so their cookies, sweets, choc are "healthier". GMO is not allowed in the UK either.

by Anonymousreply 18402/20/2021

British chocolate is better than all but the very best American chocolate.

by Anonymousreply 18502/20/2021

[quote]Things are just hung up in airing cupboards, on racks, etc...

How do you dry bedding after washing?

by Anonymousreply 18602/20/2021

The kitchen is the last place I want my washer and/or dryer. Th kitchen is full of things that will dirty or stain or ruin your laundry. Unless you don't actually use your kitchen or I suppose have servants that keep it immacuate continually.

Kitchens with a small closet where you can put a washer and dryer behind doors can work. But clothes on or near a kitchen counter? No way.

by Anonymousreply 18702/20/2021

r187 you don't leave your clothes in the kitchen. You bring them out, put them in the washer/dryer and then bring them back to the bedroom. Kitchen washers and dryers used to be fairly common in American homes. In the South the washer and dryer is commonly on the back porch, in older houses.

by Anonymousreply 18802/20/2021

[quote]Britain is really a lot more tolerant than a lot of Americans would like to believe.

I was reading how in the second world war the Americans in Britain tried to insist their segregation laws be introduced for their troops in pubs and such. The English were just like: "Ok, sure. Only black Americans are allowed in our pubs then!"

I find it bizarre so many people are harping on about race and interracial couples on British TV. How is it that you are so focused on this? I never really notice it. I think it's because the British don't make a big deal about it. It just is what it is. Whereas American TV cannot let an opportunity pass to point out that characters are different races. And you never really see interracial couples on American TV come to think of it. I'm sorry to say it, but it always seems like Americans have a real problem understanding that not everyone does things the way they do. Who cares about percentages of the population and all that rubbish?

R70, I read her autobiography, and while she doesn't mention specifically what happened, not only was her husband having an affair and wanted a divorce to marry this other woman, but her mother had just died (she was the baby, and they were very close) and she was left cleaning out this giant house all by herself while her husband played away from home and her sister for whatever reason wouldn't come down from the North, and her brother was a huge wastrel (in fact, he may have been dead by then). It's kinda heartbreaking in the autobiography where she talks about just wanting Archie or Madge to come and BE with her during the time. It's pretty heavily implied she had a nervous breakdown and just ran away to avoid everything.

by Anonymousreply 18902/20/2021

R189 watches Foyle's War.

by Anonymousreply 19002/20/2021

Never seen it, R190.

by Anonymousreply 19102/20/2021

Are most of the interracial relationships in the UK either black male / white female or white male / East Asian female couples? Those are the combinations we seem to at least see most often in the cities.

by Anonymousreply 19202/20/2021

R174, American chocolate is awful. I mean, I am sure there are great artisanal chocolatiers, but the mainstream brands are shockingly bad. One of the things I really wanted to try on my first trip to the US was a Hershey bar, as I had seen them so often on US TV shows. What a disappointment! They taste of very little, but dissolve into this weird oily mush in the mouth. So disgusting.

In general, food is one of the big differences between the US and the UK. I’ve had great restaurant meals in the US, but readymade supermarket food seems to be much lower quality, and everything is sweet (which is great for manufacturers, as high-fructose corn syrup is cheap and addictive, and stops food from going off). And people want value for money, but value quantity over quality. One of the big preconceptions Americans seem to have is that UK food is uniformly dreadful, but I think this goes back to the experience of US soldiers arriving in Britain during the war, at a time when Brits were subsisting on rations, Bovril and tinned fish from the colonies!

by Anonymousreply 19302/20/2021

[quote]Are most of the interracial relationships in the UK either black male / white female or white male / East Asian female couples? Those are the combinations we seem to at least see most often in the cities.

Certainly amongst celebrities it feels like there are more cases of black or mixed race men dating white women, but there are a lot more black or mixed race men in the public eye than black or mixed race women. Vanessa Feltz, a Jewish journalist and tv/radio presenter has been in a relationship with singer Ben Ofoedu for about 15 years. There have been some comments about the racial dynamic but more people are fascinated by her being 10 years older than him.

The main eyebrow raising about mixed race marriages is, to be blunt, when a white woman marries a Muslim and converts and changes her lifestyle. Wearing very conservative and religious dress and changing their lifestyle is relatively controversial. But then there are parts of Scotland (the whitest part of the UK) where catholics marrying protestants is frowned upon.

by Anonymousreply 19402/20/2021

[quote]Presenting Full English Breakfast! I ask you is there anything more nauseous producing than confronted with a plate of beans, sausages, ham, eggs, tomatoes and God only knows what else first thing in morning?

When lockdown ends and Britain reopens, my first venture out is going to be my local high street cafe/bar for their deluxe full English - two poached eggs on granary toast, baked beans, sausages, bacon, tomatoes, mushrooms, hash browns, pass on the black pudding, with a glass of orange juice and a large latte. And lashings of HP sauce.

by Anonymousreply 19502/20/2021

R195 What a pussy. Wetherspoons Large Breakfast and a pint of Kronenbourg at 9am for me.

by Anonymousreply 19602/20/2021

[quote][R195] What a pussy. Wetherspoons Large Breakfast and a pint of Kronenbourg at 9am for me.

The way Wetherspoons treat their staff and the all round general awfulness of Tim Martin means I'm no longer able to eat there. For all the talk about Andrew Neil's new tv station brainwashing people they need to look at the crap Wetherspoons puts out in its customer newsletters on Brexit and lockdown.

It's a shame because they are a well run business with generally pleasant staff and decent food - the Tennessee burger is my go to choice - but I won't give the company my money.

by Anonymousreply 19702/20/2021

By the blood of Jesus! Certainly a blasphemy since the beginning of Christianity.

"Bloody," dumbass chav.

by Anonymousreply 19802/20/2021

[quote]Certainly amongst celebrities it feels like there are more cases of black or mixed race men dating white women, but there are a lot more black or mixed race men in the public eye than black or mixed race women.

R194. I notice you distinguish "black" and "mixed race", does this mean half-black people are not considered black in the UK? Would Obama or Halle Berry be considered black in the UK? And does this only apply to black and white mixes? How do white and Asian mixes (I'm assuming there more of these) identify?

by Anonymousreply 19902/21/2021

[quote][R194]. I notice you distinguish "black" and "mixed race", does this mean half-black people are not considered black in the UK? Would Obama or Halle Berry be considered black in the UK? And does this only apply to black and white mixes? How do white and Asian mixes (I'm assuming there more of these) identify?

Black and mixed race people all come under the BAME umbrella and are both subject to similar levels of racism.

Marvin and Rochelle Humes, both mixed race, started out in pop groups then married and are both now established TV presenters. Rochelle was recently announced as the presenter for a programme about higher rates of death during childbirth for black women. There was some confusion because a black woman called Candice Braithwaite, who has done a huge amount of research and work into maternity services had been expected to present it. I only know about it because their names were trending on Twitter, and there was nothing but vitriol directed at Rochelle from mostly far left black people angry that someone with a "pale face" was stealing a job from a dark skinned black woman.

There was a documentary on last year after the George Floyd BLM protests called The Talk where famous black and mixed race people discussed their first encounters with racism. Rochelle talked about how she was told she wasn't allowed to attend a friend's birthday party when she was 7 simply because she was black, and that led to her trying to scrub her skin clean.

There is push from the left wing that certain groups of people are less discriminated against than others. It started with Jews, it's progressed to Indians, Black African kids are doing better than Black West Indian kids in schools and it looks like mixed race people will be added to the list for not being black enough.

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by Anonymousreply 20002/21/2021

[quote] The main eyebrow raising about mixed race marriages is, to be blunt, when a white woman marries a Muslim and converts and changes her lifestyle. Wearing very conservative and religious dress and changing their lifestyle is relatively controversial.

Yes.

My sister is engaged to an Egyptian Muslim she met at University, and his family do not accept the relationship wholeheartedly, because they don’t want their eldest son with Western English-speaking Christian-born woman.

The fact that neither their precious son nor their prospective daughter-in-law believe or practise their assigned religions, or that their son wants to assimilate to Western culture and leave the Muslim Arab world behind makes a whit of difference. His father in particular is set against their union; he wouldn’t speak to or look at my sister when they all attended son’s graduation ceremony. It’s considered an insult that my sister even exists.

We have all counselled my sister for her own safety never to move to Egypt or another Arab country just to be with him, and not to convert, either. That doesn’t come from racial intolerance, just the bitter knowing that women are treated worse than dogs by that culture and we don’t want that for her.

by Anonymousreply 20102/21/2021

If they refer to something happening at "half-six" does that mean three, or thirty minutes before or after six, or what?

by Anonymousreply 20202/21/2021

[quote]If they refer to something happening at "half-six" does that mean three, or thirty minutes before or after six, or what?

Half past 6

6:30

by Anonymousreply 20302/21/2021

R200 You're talking about colorism in the black community which exists everywhere. The person you used clearly looks and identifies as black. Are there well-known personalities that are half white and South Asian? How would they identify? Does mixed-race only mean half black and white?

by Anonymousreply 20402/21/2021

R204, they would be mixed race too.

by Anonymousreply 20502/21/2021

[quote][R200] You're talking about colorism in the black community which exists everywhere. The person you used clearly looks and identifies as black. Are there well-known personalities that are half white and South Asian? How would they identify? Does mixed-race only mean half black and white?

Well known mixed race British Asian people are far less prominent. There's Professor Jonathan Van Tam, hockey player Sam Quek, Marina Wheeler, Alexa Chung, Henry Golding, Max Minghella. I remember having a conversation with someone about Ben Kingsley a few years ago and they were outraged that a Jewish actor had "blacked up" to play Ghandi all those years ago. They had no idea Kingsley had an Indian father, had anglicised his name on the advice of his agent because he could pass as white, and is only perceived to be Jewish because he's played lots of famous Jews.

There is a perception that West Indian and African communities integrated more widely than communities from India and Pakistan. Sport, acting and music have played a huge part with making Black Britons more visible than British Indians/Pakistanis.

by Anonymousreply 20602/21/2021

Really interesting questions. I'm not surprised that the issue of race is a reoccurring topic, but I am surprised that it's dominated this thread so far.

I currently live in a city which has a black majority. It's uncommon in the UK that respect. Whilst right-wing groups attempt to sow seeds of racial division, the city, on the whole, gets on with life harmoniously. I live in a suburb, where Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic people move out to larger houses, from the Victorian terraced homes they grew up in. It is a majority white area and I have never heard any racial tensions in my community.

by Anonymousreply 20702/21/2021

[quote]I currently live in a city which has a black majority.

That's impossible. Which city in the UK has a black majority?

by Anonymousreply 20802/21/2021

I've noticed that the type of interracial couples also depends on the class. I know of extremely few working class South or East Asians partnered with someone of a different race. A majority of the working class interracial couples seem to be black/white with most of them being a black guy with a white woman.

In middle and upper middle class circles, white/Asian couples seem more common, especially among the academic types.

by Anonymousreply 20902/21/2021

[quote] There is a perception that West Indian and African communities integrated more widely than communities from India and Pakistan. Sport, acting and music have played a huge part with making Black Britons more visible than British Indians/Pakistanis.

But the professional sectors and academia are the exact opposite with Asians (East and South) far outnumbering black people. Of course the Grauniad immediately blames Asians and claims that they face less discrimination than Caribbean Brits. Most hospitals have a large number of Asian doctors, but if you watch any Brit TV show you'd think half the medical staff is Afro-Caribbean.

by Anonymousreply 21002/21/2021

Half-six, seven, five, etc... mean half past hour in UK.

Americans would say 6:30, 5:30, etc....

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by Anonymousreply 21102/21/2021

^^^ Any American would understand half past six to mean 6:30, but half six is ambiguous unless one is familiar with that convention. Now that I know I’ll stop being confused about it. Half six might have meant half past six, but it also might have meant half way to six (from five).

by Anonymousreply 21202/21/2021

R308 Leicester

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by Anonymousreply 21302/21/2021

Actor Geoffrey Streatfeild was married to Nikki Amuka-Bird for several years, but it didn't last....

by Anonymousreply 21402/21/2021

Getting back to the law courts, what I understood from watching Silk is that the clerk (Billy) controlled everything. He ran the chambers (practice) although he didn’t own it and a good clerk is very well paid. He was the one out there drumming up business, bringing in cases and he had connections everywhere.

Re barristers being obligated to take a case if it was presented to them, I remember on the show it was kind of a dance. He would dangle a few cases in front of them or promise to “save” them a case or if he was angry at them, he’d give them a dog of a case. (It’s been a long time since I watched it so I don’t remember it very clearly)

The really weird part to me was that you could have two barristers, with offices right next to each other, on the same case. One prosecuting and the other defending. That would never happen in the US. Even if the cases were years apart and the law firm had hundreds of partners and covered five floors of a skyscraper, it would be a conflict of interest.

There was another program with Martin Shaw as a QC judge. He seemed to move around the country and judge in different courtrooms because he sometimes stayed in nice guest houses (?) with the other people involved in the case. As a judge he questioned witnesses directly a lot.

It’s so easy for Americans to think that British life is similar to US life just because we speak the same language but in reality, the educational and judicial systems are wildly different.

The question a

by Anonymousreply 21502/21/2021

Nah, R193, British food was still pretty abominable when I was there in the early 1980s, and you were well past rationing then. But it's seen a revolution since. The US, not so much.

by Anonymousreply 21602/21/2021

[quote] Leicester

R213 Your link says the black population of Leicester is 6.24%. Hardly a majority.

by Anonymousreply 21702/21/2021

[quote][R213] Your link says the black population of Leicester is 6.24%. Hardly a majority.

Maybe "Majority Black" means "Majority non white" in this context?!

50.5% of Leicester where white in the 2011 Census, I'm sure it will be lower in this year's.

Poor Leicester East though, represented in Parliament by the crooked Keith Vaz for four decades and now the crank Claudia Webbe. If she's found guilty at her upcoming criminal trial I'm sure there'll be a recall petition to kick her out.

by Anonymousreply 21802/21/2021

R217 Apologies. I should have been clearer. The British white population is in the minority in the city.

by Anonymousreply 21902/21/2021

HA HA! @ R44 I'm so programmed by media that I immediately saw "racial slur" not " rascal, sir"

by Anonymousreply 22002/21/2021

HA HA! @ [R45] I'm so programmed by media that I immediately saw "racial slur" not " rascal, sir"

by Anonymousreply 22102/21/2021

Lol

by Anonymousreply 22202/21/2021

Really interesting that the questions are around race.

I'd expect more about our national sports, our culture, our countryside, our economy, the NHS and our day to day lives.

by Anonymousreply 22302/21/2021

[quote]But the professional sectors and academia are the exact opposite with Asians (East and South) far outnumbering black people.

Nothing remarkable about that. Of course, Asians outnumber black people in professional sectors. The South Asian population is more than double the black. What's interesting is that just 2%-3% dominate the British cultural landscape (especially sports and music) the way the African-Caribbean community does.

I remember watching a panel discussion on the BBC during the England riots of 2011 and by that point, it had been established that the vast majority of rioters and looters were white. Some crusty old bigot had the balls to blame it all on "black youth culture", saying they are prone to violence and tend to glorify lawlessness, as responsible for negatively influencing the mostly law-abiding point. At which point a very offended black panellist shot back with a question: "what does it say about English culture when such a tiny percentage of the population can be blamed for controlling the entire country?" It was so delicious watching that tory fumble for answer.

by Anonymousreply 22402/21/2021

Are basement kitchens common, a la AbFab?

by Anonymousreply 22502/21/2021

[quote]I remember watching a panel discussion on the BBC during the England riots of 2011 and by that point, it had been established that the vast majority of rioters and looters were white. Some crusty old bigot had the balls to blame it all on "black youth culture", saying they are prone to violence and tend to glorify lawlessness, as responsible for negatively influencing the mostly law-abiding point. At which point a very offended black panellist shot back with a question: "what does it say about English culture when such a tiny percentage of the population can be blamed for controlling the entire country?" It was so delicious watching that tory fumble for answer.

Was it David Starkey? The racism that pours out of his mouth is astonishing.

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by Anonymousreply 22602/21/2021

Why is Catherine referred to as "Kate Middleton" in the press? Isn't she a Windsor now? Or at least a Windsor-Middleton?

by Anonymousreply 22702/21/2021

I'm going to visit London after the pandemic. When I see people have their tea I rarely see the beautiful sandwiches and desserts touched outside of the biscuits (I think you call them scones).

Are people actually meant to eat the wonderful food displayed or would I look like a fat American whore?

Is there an order to what I eat first? I refuse to watch that YouTube vide with that androgynous etiquette queen and her all white room that DL was gassing up a few weeks ago.

Would a nice high tea establishment get upset if I make a reservation for one? I'm not sure if having tea alone is done but I think this may end up as a solo trip.

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by Anonymousreply 22802/21/2021

Adding to r227 why is it not "Cate" instead of "Kate" where the hell did they pick up that random K?

by Anonymousreply 22902/21/2021

Are basement kitchens common, a la AbFab?

Not really as most houses don't have basements.

by Anonymousreply 23002/21/2021

[quote]Why is Catherine referred to as "Kate Middleton" in the press? Isn't she a Windsor now? Or at least a Windsor-Middleton?

Diana was often referred to as Diana Spencer or Lady Di throughout the 80s, and Fergie was often Sarah Ferguson rather than Duchess Of York. If someone said "Countess of Wessex" to me I'd have to think who they meant but with Sophie Rhys Jones I know it's Edward's wife immediately.

by Anonymousreply 23102/21/2021

Why is Catherine referred to as "Kate Middleton" in the press? Isn't she a Windsor now? Or at least a Windsor-Middleton?

Just like Meghan Markle is referred to by her maiden name?

by Anonymousreply 23202/21/2021

R228 British people don't have 'Afternoon Tea' anymore. It's purely for tourists who want to pretend they're in Downton Abbey.

by Anonymousreply 23302/21/2021

Damn r233 so I will look like an idiot being taken for a ride. Well, we do have high tea joints in the States but truth be told I'm more interested in the food over the actual tea. My favorite tea flavor is mint, lol. I'm sure that's probably look down on or something. I'll chop up my overpriced London tea to just an experience like visiting a fancy restaurant or seeing an uninhabited country estate. A when in Rome attitude....

Back to the matter at hand. Is there an order to what is eaten at high tea or just go at the food as I see fit? Where are my fancy Brits sick of talk about Barrister and race?

by Anonymousreply 23402/21/2021

When naming where you are from, why do Brits always include the county (shire)?

by Anonymousreply 23502/21/2021

Why do you Brits pronounce the SCH in school and schedule differently?

by Anonymousreply 23602/21/2021

I am with the person who worries about getting stains on clean clothes if you wash them in the kitchen.

Plus if you do not have a dryer, you have to take them somewhere else to dry them. Even if you air dry, you would not want wet clothes hanging around the kitchen--they could get stained with all that would go on around them in one of the most used and most high-traffic areas of any home.

by Anonymousreply 23702/21/2021

[quote]We have all counselled my sister for her own safety never to move to Egypt or another Arab country just to be with him, and not to convert, either. That doesn’t come from racial intolerance, just the bitter knowing that women are treated worse than dogs by that culture and we don’t want that for her.

Women can so easily get dickmatized and ruin their whole lives because of it. No dick is worth it.

by Anonymousreply 23802/21/2021

When you say Asian are you referring to Indian/Pakistanis or "Oriental" people?

by Anonymousreply 23902/21/2021

R237 Hundreds of millions of people in Europe with washing machines in their kitchens manage to wash and dry their clothes without getting stains on them. It's not difficult.

by Anonymousreply 24002/21/2021

I am sure they do, R240. But I when I cook stuff spatters. I could not do it. And drying anything in the kitchen would end badly.

by Anonymousreply 24102/21/2021

R234 To be completely honest I couldn't tell you. I've only had afternoon tea once and that was for a foreign colleague's retirement "party". I can't think of any British person I know who goes for Afternoon Tea unless they're entertaining a tourist who wants to try it. I've seen it offered at hotels and restaurants and it just makes me wince. It's the biggest rip-off on the planet and it makes me feel a bit embarrassed to see tourists getting so excited about it.

by Anonymousreply 24202/21/2021

[quote] When naming where you are from, why do Brits always include the county (shire)?

R235 There is often more than one place with the same name. ie. Newport, Gwent and Newport, Isle of Wight. St Neots, Cambridgeshire and St Neot, Cornwall.

Just in the same way you'd differentiate Springfield or Washington or Jefferson.

by Anonymousreply 24302/21/2021

[quote] When you say Asian are you referring to Indian/Pakistanis or "Oriental" people?

South Asian from Pakistan and India, South East Asian from Malaysia, Singapore and China.

by Anonymousreply 24402/21/2021

Why do you Brits pronounce the SCH in school and schedule differently?

We prefer the hard C.

Why do you pronounce route as rowt, when we pronounce it root?

by Anonymousreply 24502/21/2021

R228 Make or buy some sandwiches and some cakes from a nice cake shop and go and have a picnic up at Primrose Hill or Hampstead Heath. It will half the cost and twice as nice.

by Anonymousreply 24602/21/2021

Thank you r246. I hope to visit in early September so hopefully the weather will hold up. If not I may go ahead and do my solo trip for the Afternoon Tea. Just as wasteful as my decision to venture into one of Gordon Ramsey's restaurants for dinner. Though a nice spot to sit, read, and enjoy some deserts and sandwiches sounds lovely!! Can't wait to visit.

by Anonymousreply 24702/21/2021

[quote]Why do you pronounce route as rowt, when we pronounce it root?

Both pronunciations are common in the US.

by Anonymousreply 24802/21/2021

What’s wrong with soggy bottoms?

Some of my best friends are soggy bottoms.

by Anonymousreply 24902/21/2021

What (and why) are "elevenses?"

by Anonymousreply 25002/21/2021

Can you provide us with a list of the important absurd pronunciations that the U keep to themselves to trip up the posers?

by Anonymousreply 25102/21/2021

[quote] When naming where you are from, why do Brits always include the county (shire)?

For the same reasons Americans include the state, I imagine.

by Anonymousreply 25202/21/2021

R 247 Go to Fortnums and treat yourself to some nibbles in the delicatessen or one of the deli's in Soho. Then sit in the sun in Regents or Hyde Park.

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by Anonymousreply 25302/21/2021

[quote] What (and why) are "elevenses?"

That's for hobbits.

by Anonymousreply 25402/21/2021

R234, I have to disagree with r233. Afternoon tea is not something people would have every day, but it is a treat that people - admittedly mainly women - enjoy very much as a social gathering with friends or on a date.

No-one really minds the order in which you eat, but I think the correct one is tea selection - sandwiches - pastries - cakes. And a glass of champagne at the end is a nice palate cleanser.

If you decide to indulge while in London, Claridges is probably your best bet. There are cheaper places, but Claridges is the one which seems most like a treat. Book ahead, and dress appropriately: there is no need to wear a suit, but no jeans or trainers! It’s a civilised and surprisingly friendly place.

by Anonymousreply 25502/21/2021

[quote] That's for hobbits.

Hobnobs, surely!

by Anonymousreply 25602/21/2021

Where to buy those cool paisley shirts on the telly presenters?

by Anonymousreply 25702/21/2021

Speaking of tea -- why is dinner called "tea"?

by Anonymousreply 25802/21/2021

[quote] The British seemed to throw the whole load of eggs in the basket marked "Brutalism", which while not ipso facto without merit, is easily the least user-friendly form of Modernism and the most universally loathed - and it is loathed most of all in Britain.

Because of the bombings of WW2, the UK needed a lot of ruined buildings replaced right after the war. Moreover, the change to a socialist government under Clement Atlee in 1946 also meant that there were new buildings built that were experiments in "council housing." So the mid-century was a huge time for building in the UK, and Brutalism was the style then.

Most people who live or work in Brutalist housing loathe it, but architects love its experimentation, and so even though it's fallen out of fashion, they often work to get major Brutalist buildings listed so they cannot be taken down.

by Anonymousreply 25902/21/2021

And why is every dessert called “pudding?”

by Anonymousreply 26002/21/2021

[quote] Why do you pronounce route as rowt, when we pronounce it root?

People in the US Midwest also refer to them as "rowts."

There are multiple pronunciations for many words in the English language depending on location--regional pronunciations vary. Linguists would tell you none is more correct than any other.

by Anonymousreply 26102/21/2021

I worked at a hotel that served afternoon tea.

[quote] I'm going to visit London after the pandemic. When I see people have their tea I rarely see the beautiful sandwiches and desserts touched outside of the biscuits (I think you call them scones). Are people actually meant to eat the wonderful food displayed or would I look like a fat American whore?

Yes, you are meant to eat everything. You paid for it, you should eat it.

[quote] Is there an order to what I eat first?

I would probably eat the scones & sandwiches first (any order between these 2 items). At the end, I'd eat the desserts (cakes).

[quote] Would a nice high tea establishment get upset if I make a reservation for one? I'm not sure if having tea alone is done but I think this may end up as a solo trip.

Probably would not get upset. But who cares? You're traveling and will never see these people again.

by Anonymousreply 26202/21/2021

[quote] Why is Catherine referred to as "Kate Middleton" in the press? Isn't she a Windsor now? Or at least a Windsor-Middleton?

People get used to knowing the wives of the royals by how their name first appears in the press when they're dating the royal prince. For many people it becomes hard to get used to their new titles, so they go back to the first names they knew them by.

Kate Middleton will likely go from being the Duchess of Cambridge to the Princess of Wales to the Queen in the next 25 years--it will be very confusing for a lot of people. So she's mostly just referred to in the press as "Kate."

Incidentally, no one (except maybe a very few members of her birth family) ever calls her "Kate"--the members of the royal family and her friends all call her "Catherine," and that's been true since she first started dating William. But the tabloids needed to shorten her name to fit headlines (which is also why they invented calling Madonna "Madge" and Michael Jackson "Jacko"--although they also liked the cheekiness of it).

Sarah Ferguson's friends before her marriage (which included Diana) all called her "Fergie," which is why the press called her that (they thought it was cute). Her parents hated it as a nickname for her and were very upset that that was how she was known by the public. her family members (both Fergusons and Windsor-Mountbattens) call her "Sarah," and that's how she refers to herself (since she is pretty informal, especially when she comes to the US), but she'll never get rid of "Fergie."

by Anonymousreply 26302/21/2021

R258, dinner is only called tea in areas where lunch is called dinner.

by Anonymousreply 26402/21/2021

[quote]I would probably eat the scones & sandwiches first (any order between these 2 items). At the end, I'd eat the desserts (cakes).

A scone is a dessert!! It certainly counts as afters.

There are two big British debates around scones. The first is whether they are pronounced scone as in Rome or scone as in John. And tben there's the debate about whether you put the cream or the jam on first.

I'm a southerner so I say Scone as in Rome and put the jam on first.

by Anonymousreply 26502/21/2021

R265, I thought of scones being sweet. However, I think scones are not considered desserts or "afters." Hence, I'd eat them first, along with the sandwiches.

Also, scones with clotted or Devonshire cream are about the best things you will get at an afternoon tea. IME, none of the pastries or sandwiches will be as good as the scones & cream. Hence, I'd eat the scones first, along with the sandwiches, before I get too full / stuffed.

This is based on my experience at serving afternoon tea at the hotel.

by Anonymousreply 26602/21/2021

[quote] And why is every dessert called “pudding?”

Because pudding means dessert, and custard means pudding.

by Anonymousreply 26702/21/2021

R186 I fold my bed sheets and put them over a "Clother airer" in the bathroom. When it's dry I fold my airer and hid it against the wall of my bedroom.

You can look up everything about british appliance by checking argos.co.uk . they sell pretty much everything British need, including kettles, a must have for tea. I got one made with white pastic instead of the fancy stainless metal, this way I don't loose bit of skins each time I touch it when it's hot.

by Anonymousreply 26802/21/2021

[quote] Nothing remarkable about that. Of course, Asians outnumber black people in professional sectors. The South Asian population is more than double the black.

Yes, and the representation of those sectors in films or TV doesn't reflect that. You watch an average show about doctors and the cast is more likely to have black doctors than any Asians. Asians are very underrepresented in the media here even when the stories are set in areas or fields where you would expect to see them more than than you would Afro-Caribbeans. Given the percentage of the population black Britons are over-represented in British media.

by Anonymousreply 26902/21/2021

The bafflement over the logistics of washing machine placement is pretty funny. Surely American kitchens have wipeable surfaces which can be wiped clean of debris so that you can put laundry on it?

However, French and German people I have met have been equally confused about it. In both of those countries, the washing machine is generally located in the bathroom.

by Anonymousreply 27002/21/2021

R270 The bathroom????? Don't you get toothpaste on all your clothes??????

by Anonymousreply 27102/21/2021

Thank you, thank you, thank you, r262! I know High Tea may be as foolish as a trip to Disney World, but like you said I'm on a vacation so why not. I appreciate your response.

by Anonymousreply 27202/21/2021

[quote]Yes, and the representation of those sectors in films or TV doesn't reflect that. You watch an average show about doctors and the cast is more likely to have black doctors than any Asians. Asians are very underrepresented in the media here even when the stories are set in areas or fields where you would expect to see them more than than you would Afro-Caribbeans. Given the percentage of the population black Britons are over-represented in British media.

What TV shows do you regularly watch where this racial disparity aggravates you so much?

by Anonymousreply 27302/21/2021

R270 my building is only 3 years old, and the plumbing for the washing machine is in the kitchen, I asked if I could move it to the bathroom, somebody in the neighbours did it but it was complicated.

by Anonymousreply 27402/21/2021

R261 We get our British pronunciation from the French, as in autoroute, I just wondered how it had become rowt, that was all.

by Anonymousreply 27502/21/2021

A lot of modern build flats have an open plan kitchen/diner/lounge living area, where only the bedrooms and bathroom have doors.

Trying to dry clothes in the same area where your cooking smell lingers is not idea.

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by Anonymousreply 27602/21/2021

R143

Holland Park! Holland Park! It's not on the outskirts, either. It's not the edge of Holland Park. This is the rich heartland of Holland Park here.

by Anonymousreply 27702/21/2021

[quote] Thank you, thank you, thank you, [R262]! I know High Tea may be as foolish as a trip to Disney World, but like you said I'm on a vacation so why not. I appreciate your response.

You're so welcome, R272. Remember, though, you'll be having afternoon tea. High tea is something different.

by Anonymousreply 27802/21/2021

[quote] High tea is something different.

Soon to be legal in New Jersey!

by Anonymousreply 27902/21/2021

why is your cereal so plain and boring?

by Anonymousreply 28002/21/2021

R280 because we don't need to eat a kilo of sugar and additives for breakfast.

by Anonymousreply 28102/21/2021

[quote] [R237] Hundreds of millions of people in Europe with washing machines in their kitchens manage to wash and dry their clothes without getting stains on them. It's not difficult.

These people are either anal about their kitchens or they have big kitchens.

I have bottles of oil and other things on my counters. I don't always wash my dishes right away. I'm not always sure I clean my counters and counter sides and cannisters and stove and fridge and the hardware perfectly clean. I cook and bake all the time and I would hate to risk my laundry in the same room. And who ARE these people who immediately put their laundry away? I live in the real world. I still have clean laundry from this past week I haven't put away yet. But they're not getting any cooking smells or stains in them. LOL!

These Europeans sound poor. Get a laundry or utility room. At least a closet.

by Anonymousreply 28202/21/2021

Banana Bongos!

by Anonymousreply 28302/21/2021

Americans in cities (e.g., San Francisco) would feel grateful to have a washer / dryer in or next to the kitchen area. (Because you usually don't get a W/D in your unit or even in your building; you go to the laundromat.)

However, if you grew up in a situation where you have a dedicated laundry room set apart from your kitchen, then I guess it would seem shocking to do your laundry in close proximity to your kitchen.

by Anonymousreply 28402/21/2021

One thing that would completely flummox me: the Aga. People seem to love them but they sound very complicated. Like one-step up from a wood stove.

by Anonymousreply 28502/21/2021

Where do the British normally place the gift wrapping room?

by Anonymousreply 28602/21/2021

R282, no offence, but you make your home sound rather dirty. I’m sure it isn’t, and that you would be able to find a clean surface to place something if you really wanted to.

It’s not difficult. UK washing machines tend to be front loaders, so they can be installed underneath a work surface in line with other appliances, like a freezer or a dishwasher. When the washing cycle finishes, you place a basket/washbowl on the surface above the washing machine, open the door and empty the contents of the machine into the basket, then carry the basket to a different room to hang up the laundry or place it in the drier.

by Anonymousreply 28702/21/2021

Is it true they don't rinse the soap off their dishes?

by Anonymousreply 28802/21/2021

Where the fuck are the paisley shirt answers????!!!!!

by Anonymousreply 28902/21/2021

Washer and driers in the bathroom make more sense.

If it is in the kitchen you have to avoid doing laundry at times you are preparing food. That just feels like it would get old.

by Anonymousreply 29002/21/2021

No, r288, we rinse our dishes like everyone else. However, UK studio stages don’t usually have plumbed-in sets, so you very rarely see running water. If you do, it’s usually some in the pipe which will only be enough to give the illusion of filling a kettle.

by Anonymousreply 29102/21/2021

R289, the Paisley pattern is a Protected Heritage Product, only available from stores located in the town of Paisley (on the outskirts of Glasgow).

by Anonymousreply 29202/21/2021

[quote]Washer and driers in the bathroom make more sense.7

Yes! Putting large electrical devices in bathrooms is a great idea.

by Anonymousreply 29302/21/2021

I'm 1/4 Scot, MacDonald. Gimme some sources!

by Anonymousreply 29402/21/2021

[quote] [R280] because we don't need to eat a kilo of sugar and additives for breakfast.

Right, you just pour two liters of alcohol through your liver.

Choose your toxin.

by Anonymousreply 29502/21/2021

That TV license bill at R170 shows "Licence type: Colour TV Licence." Do they really still have a separate license for non-color TVs? Do they even MAKE non-color TVs?

by Anonymousreply 29602/21/2021

If having a W/D in your kitchen or bathroom area is too much to handle, you've probably never lived in a foreign country or very far from your hometown. There are a lot more culture clashes that are way harder to deal with than the W/D "issue."

by Anonymousreply 29702/21/2021

I know, R293. If a washing machine should fall into a bathtub. Or if you mop near the washer and spill the bucket. The disaster scenarios just pop into your head.

by Anonymousreply 29802/21/2021

I rented a small furnished apartment in a fairly new apartment building in the DC area a few years ago. It had a stackable washer/dryer set in a closet adjacent to the kitchen.

by Anonymousreply 29902/21/2021

I wonder how many UK residents can remember being the subjects of a King. Probably not too many.

by Anonymousreply 30002/21/2021

[quote] I rented a small furnished apartment in a fairly new apartment building in the DC area a few years ago. It had a stackable washer/dryer set in a closet adjacent to the kitchen.

Yes, I've seen that set-up before. Somehow, people survive.

by Anonymousreply 30102/21/2021

Just to say afternoon tea and high tea are different things and probably where the dinner being called tea thing comes from. High tea would have been eaten at a high table and would have been a fairly substantial meal. I have heard an early evening meal still called high tea in some parts of Ireland.

by Anonymousreply 30202/21/2021

[quote]I know, [R293]. If a washing machine should fall into a bathtub. Or if you mop near the washer and spill the bucket. The disaster scenarios just pop into your head.

There are strict building regulations in the UK around having electrical sockets in bathrooms.

I can't remember the science behind it but apparently there's some kind of chemical reaction that means putting metallic electrical appliances in rooms with a lot of steam is not advisable.

by Anonymousreply 30302/21/2021

To be honest, R303, you wouldn't think that needs much of an explanation.

by Anonymousreply 30402/21/2021

I live in Florida and every apartment building I have lived in has had the washer and dryers outdoors. So this squeamishness about having them around moisture seems a bit excessive.

by Anonymousreply 30502/21/2021

R181 Somewhat related, there appears to be a bunch of Brits protesting the current Cadbury's ad. The two guys are a real-life couple, and their lips barely touch. Petition news from just a couple of days ago.

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by Anonymousreply 30602/21/2021

I have my tea at 6pm. I eat lunch at 1pm, so tea is usually a light meal. Beans on toast, Spaghetti Bolognese, Soup, or Fish and Chips.

Sometimes I will eat out for dinner around 7:30-8.00pm, but I usually have a lighter meal at lunchtime.

by Anonymousreply 30702/21/2021

Are semi-detached houses the most common kind of homes in the suburban UK? Are they mostly owned or rented? Are they considered very working class? Or are some posher than that? What if you don't get along with your semi-detached neighbor?

by Anonymousreply 30802/21/2021

In Victorian and Edwardian novels, what is meant when they say someone has been given an income (not earned) of a particular amount of money every year? It sounds like it's from an inheritance yet it's seems like it's being doled out, like an allowance, every year. Who controls the money? A bank as per a will? In novels, it seems like this could be for very wealthy people down to the middle classes.

by Anonymousreply 30902/21/2021

[quote] Are semi-detached houses the most common kind of homes in the suburban UK? Are they mostly owned or rented? Are they considered very working class? Or are some posher than that? What if you don't get along with your semi-detached neighbor?

Generally they are, although ranges of both detached, and terraced housing are equally common. It's just dependent on how old the houses are in an area and what the local councils permit in order to meet the density of housing on a particular new development.

A large number of properties are owned. With increasing house prices, particularly in the South East of England and popular rural areas becoming unaffordable, renting is more common.

A semi-detached house in the South East of England can cost a significant amount of money. Neighbour disputes do happen and both the council and the courts would intervene if these were issues of noise or land encroachment.

by Anonymousreply 31002/21/2021

[quote] In Victorian and Edwardian novels, what is meant when they say someone has been given an income (not earned) of a particular amount of money every year? It sounds like it's from an inheritance yet it's seems like it's being doled out, like an allowance, every year. Who controls the money? A bank as per a will? In novels, it seems like this could be for very wealthy people down to the middle classes.

I think they mean an income derived from money held in trust. That could be a large sum held at a bank, where the person lives off the interest, or rent from property, or dividends from a shareholding.

by Anonymousreply 31102/21/2021

[quote] I have my tea at 6pm. I eat lunch at 1pm, so tea is usually a light meal. Beans on toast, Spaghetti Bolognese . . .

Spaghetti Bolognese? Light? One of my favorite meals ever but I'd never consider it light.

Smart to eat lighter int he evening. I wish I did.

by Anonymousreply 31202/21/2021

[quote] I have my tea at 6pm. I eat lunch at 1pm, so tea is usually a light meal. Beans on toast, Spaghetti Bolognese, Soup, or Fish and Chips.

R307, do you say "spag Bol"? Actually, aside from soup, not of that sounds "light."

by Anonymousreply 31302/21/2021

[quote] It had a stackable washer/dryer set in a closet adjacent to the kitchen.

That makes sense. But it's not in the kitchen and it's behind a door.

by Anonymousreply 31402/21/2021

[quite] do you say "spag Bol"? Actually, aside from soup, not of that sounds "light."

Yes, I say Spag Bol!

Beans on toast is pretty light. It just depends on the time of year too. Sometimes I'll have cooked meat with salad in the summer. If it's winter time I might have a microwave ready meal. Just depends how hungry I am.

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by Anonymousreply 31502/21/2021

There's a YouTube channel called 'Whats for Tea' that has a number of recipes.

There's a link to a video showing you a typical range of meals that one lady serves her family for tea.

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by Anonymousreply 31602/21/2021

So do you really all go get drunk, then after the bars close, head over to nearest kebab shop, so you know what you'll be sick on in the morning?

by Anonymousreply 31702/21/2021

[quote] So do you really all go get drunk, then after the bars close, head over to nearest kebab shop, so you know what you'll be sick on in the morning?

Not everyone, but many do. I've finished up at the Market Diner in Brighton at 4am and have enjoyed a Gutbuster Breakfast after clubbing.

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by Anonymousreply 31802/21/2021

What's better - the Tennessee burger or the Gutbuster Breakfast?

by Anonymousreply 31902/21/2021

Gutbuster. Lines the stomach after consuming 12 pints. 🤣

by Anonymousreply 32002/21/2021

Do any Brits pronounce scone like "skoon" as in "Stone of Scone"?

by Anonymousreply 32102/21/2021

R321 In Scotland they might.

The humble Scone is the source of much trouble. Pronunciation first of all. The heated debate of whether to pronounce it a Scon or a Scune.

Once that's out of the way, then it's the perennial question of which goes first, jam or cream in it. Cornish Cream Tea or Devon Cream Tea is a hotly debated subject in the south west.

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by Anonymousreply 32202/21/2021

When did coin-operated heating devices go out of fashion? Or are they still being used somewhere in the UK? How was the money collected and how often?

by Anonymousreply 32302/21/2021

Did most of the pubs in England originally have rooms above to rent for the night? Do many of them still have that feature , at least those outside of London?

by Anonymousreply 32402/21/2021

Do you all ever worry about mold from the carpets in the bathrooms?

by Anonymousreply 32502/21/2021

I'm curious about what a British concept of a "Tennessee burger" (something that doesn't exist on our side of the pond) is. Does it have Jack Daniel's on it? Memphis barbecue sauce?

by Anonymousreply 32602/21/2021

What exactly is "semi-detached"? Something has to be either attached or not attached-- right? Does semi-detached mean "hanging by a thread?"

I live in a townhouse in California -- there are five two-story ATTACHED units in my row. I have an end unit, and even though I only have one common wall, it's still attached.

I used to live in a townhouse in Virginia -- same thing (except they were three-story with a basement.)

by Anonymousreply 32702/21/2021

[quote] I'm curious about what a British concept of a "Tennessee burger" (something that doesn't exist on our side of the pond) is. Does it have Jack Daniel's on it? Memphis barbecue sauce?

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by Anonymousreply 32802/21/2021

[quote] What exactly is "semi-detached"?

Sharing a common wall only on one side rather than two. Terraced has common walls on both sides.

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by Anonymousreply 32902/21/2021

Do American accents make any of you horny the way British accents can turn people on in the states?

Also, what's with this love affair I keep hearing from Europeans with Texas. It's so random but a lot of people seem to throw Texas into their tentative plans for trips to America. I don't know how many stop off in Texas but it seems to be more and more popular as a place of passing interests with Europeans. Any thoughts?

by Anonymousreply 33002/21/2021

This: ".

Instead of this: ."

by Anonymousreply 33102/21/2021

[quote]Sharing a common wall only on one side rather than two. Terraced has common walls on both sides.

So a duplex would be semi-detached, as would an end unit in a row of townhouses?

by Anonymousreply 33202/21/2021

[quote] When did coin-operated heating devices go out of fashion? Or are they still being used somewhere in the UK? How was the money collected and how often?

Electricity and gas prepayment meters with a rechargeable key instead of a money slot, have been pretty standard for a number of years here. You take the key to a corner shop or garage, pay however much you want to charge the key up and then insert the key into the meter to charge it up.

I'm not sure if any of the old fashioned ones where you insert a coin are around still in say holiday rental properties. There may be, but I haven't seen one in over 30 years. The utility company would send a guy around periodically to empty the meter.

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by Anonymousreply 33302/21/2021

[quote] Did most of the pubs in England originally have rooms above to rent for the night? Do many of them still have that feature , at least those outside of London?

The origin of the pub goes back to Roman times in the 1st century AD. We get the word tavern from that time. A tavern generally just offers drink and food but not accomodation.

Inns established themselves after the Romans built there roads for travellers to spend the night before moving on. Some are very old. Most offered not only a bed for the night but stabling for horses and coaches. Some developed into hotels, hence the origin of Holiday Inn.

In the 19th century Britain and France were were at war with each other, the government wished to see brandy imports restricted. So gin became more readily available, to such an extent that the government decided to then restrict gin sales, by licensing ale houses. These were small pubs just serving beers. These grew very quickly outnumbering the existing taverns and inns, essentially creating the pubs we know today, that don't have accomodation for travellers.

Nowadays, most modern hotels have a bar, so although there are inns still operating, they tend to be in rural locations.

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by Anonymousreply 33402/21/2021

[quote] Do you all ever worry about mold from the carpets in the bathrooms?

No because the Building Regulations mandate the ventilation required for bathrooms in particular. Floor tiling and laminated flooring is often present in bathrooms instead of carpet.

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by Anonymousreply 33502/21/2021

[quote] What exactly is "semi-detached"?

A house with 1 connecting wall.

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by Anonymousreply 33602/21/2021

[quote] Do American accents make any of you horny the way British accents can turn people on in the states?

It's individual personal preference. Like the UK, you have many, many accents, so it's hard to answer that question. "You like that big cock, doncha?" Can and cannot be a turn on. I guess if we heard a Brummie (someone from from Birmingham, England, ie Dame Julie Walters) say that, we'd probably laugh our socks off as they have a strong accent here.

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by Anonymousreply 33702/21/2021

[quote] Also, what's with this love affair I keep hearing from Europeans with Texas. It's so random but a lot of people seem to throw Texas into their tentative plans for trips to America. I don't know how many stop off in Texas but it seems to be more and more popular as a place of passing interests with Europeans. Any thoughts?

No idea on this one. 4.5m Brits visit the US each year I would have thought that New York City, Florida, California, New Orleans, New England in the Fall and Las Vegas were hot spots for British tourists rather than Texas, but who knows?

by Anonymousreply 33802/21/2021

I haven't seen a carpeted bathroom in decades.

by Anonymousreply 33902/21/2021

Maybe there’s a fascination with Texas, the size of the state, the western gear, southern accents, even JR Ewing.

by Anonymousreply 34002/21/2021

R318 Britain sounds very violent. Do you club each other often?

by Anonymousreply 34102/21/2021

R340 Or people who work in the oil industry, combining a business trip with a leisure break?

by Anonymousreply 34202/21/2021

Everything about the British is so sophisticated and elegant!

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by Anonymousreply 34302/21/2021

Britain sounds very violent. Do you club each other often?

R341 We didn't have the biggest Empire that the world has ever seen by being nice to people. The Brits love a good fight, be it verbal or physical. A typical High Street on a Saturday night after the pubs have shut is a sight to behold. Young lads, with a few pints in them, scrapping over some girl has a primitive nature to it.

by Anonymousreply 34402/21/2021

R343 We enjoy nothing more than exploring the majesty and grandeur of foreign lands. Soaking up their culture and cuisine.

Sod it! We just go on holiday and get pissed up!

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by Anonymousreply 34502/21/2021

they are shit at fighting, the scene in Bridget Jones's diary is a good example, except maybe for the window smashing , that's a bit over the top. And there is usually more alcool involve.

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by Anonymousreply 34602/21/2021

This is one of the most iconic photos of a city centre when the pubs have closed.

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by Anonymousreply 34702/21/2021

Love the guy on the left R347 still with his pint, unspoiled, to hand!

by Anonymousreply 34802/21/2021

The man with the pint became a bit of a meme

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by Anonymousreply 34902/22/2021

R349 Haha! I've not seen that before.

Brilliant!

by Anonymousreply 35002/22/2021

I live in a University city that hosts major sporting events and is a haven for stag and hen parties due to the pubs, clubs and bars being located in a small area.

The drinking culture here is horrendous, there are regular stories about people going missing, their bodies are often found in the river that runs through the city. New students are encouraged to get drunk as part of "carnage" events during freshers week which becomes a criminal's paradise - incapacitated teenagers in an unfamiliar city being preyed on by rapists and thieves. One year there were several rapes during freshers week including one on a girl who had got lost and passed out. A man went to help her and he was initially arrested on suspicion of rape. Student bodies were blaming taxi drivers for refusing to pick drunk students up and take them a short distance back to the halls, but the taxi drivers complained at how badly they were treated by students and how often people were sick in their cars. Shops and businesses in the same area as the bars are have to get their staff to clean up the sick, piss and shit left in shop doorways.

When the bars and clubs reopen in the early summer as the UK comes out of lockdown there is going to be absolute literal carnage.

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by Anonymousreply 35102/22/2021

R332 the end house in a row of terraced houses would be called 'end-of-terrace'.

I suppose technically it isn't really different from semi-detached, but would never be described as semi-detached.

by Anonymousreply 35202/22/2021

[quote]Was it David Starkey? The racism that pours out of his mouth is astonishing.

Yes, that's exactly him, r226. He showed up on several panel shows spewing that same garbage. The one I watched, he was confronted by a British writer of Jamaican descent.

by Anonymousreply 35302/22/2021

R322 no one calls them 'Scunes' it's either 'SCON' or 'SCOWN' (rhymes with OWN not GOWN)

by Anonymousreply 35402/22/2021

R308 said: [quote] Are semi-detached houses the most common kind of homes in the suburban UK? Are they mostly owned or rented? Are they considered very working class? Or are some posher than that? What if you don't get along with your semi-detached neighbor?

Not sure if semi-detached or terraced is more common to be honest - generally the housing hierarchy goes terrace > end-of-terrace > semi-detached > detached (that is very general because obviously you could have a shitty detached house that is much worse than a fantastic semi).

There's also bungalows (single story) which are usually detached and they usually also have a fairly large plot due to being all one level so tend to be more expensive than a semi.

I think it's about a 2/3 owned to rented split according to something from gov.uk I just Googled. Definitely home ownership is still one of the pinnacles of UK aspiration, so there is always a lot of news about millennials and younger generations not being able to afford to get onto the housing ladder at all because house prices are too high and rent is high too meaning they can't save for a deposit the poor dears (I'm being cunty here really, it is a big problem).

Working class people are probably more likely to live in a terrace or renting than owning a semi, as the average UK house price is about £235k (that's actually way way cheaper than my area) and a working class salary would probably be under 20k a year so without substantial savings for a hefty deposit, working class people are not likely to be able to afford to buy a semi. They are probably more likely to be in council housing.

If you don't get along with your semi-detached neighbour there's not really anything you can do unless they are actively breaking the law/harassing you etc. A lot of people have fence disputes! Often in a semi-detached you will share a fence in your back garden with the house you are attached to and the house next to you that you are not attached to - I think the responsibility for the upkeep of the fence is based on if it's on the right side of your garden, it's your responsibility.

by Anonymousreply 35502/22/2021

R354 doesn't get to Scotland very often.

by Anonymousreply 35602/22/2021

[quote]Given the percentage of the population black Britons are over-represented in British media.

Many of these shows are set in metropolitan areas with large minority populations. As for sport, you have to ask the Premier League why they don't have a single Asian player in their teams.

by Anonymousreply 35702/22/2021

R356 - I've been about 4 times, and had a Scottish grandparent, and never heard it said like that, but if that's how Scottish people say it then perhaps that should have been clarified. It's never said like that in anywhere else in the UK to my knowledge.

by Anonymousreply 35802/22/2021

Well, smull hur!

by Anonymousreply 35902/22/2021

Are "public" schools what we in the US would call private schools (high fees are involved)? What are schools in the UK called that are free to the country's population?

And can anyone give us a brief explanation of A levels and O levels?

by Anonymousreply 36002/22/2021

I don’t think they would call the last unit in a row of townhouses semi-detached. I think it would just be described as the end unit of a terrace.

by Anonymousreply 36102/22/2021

[quote]Are "public" schools what we in the US would call private schools (high fees are involved)? What are schools in the UK called that are free to the country's population? And can anyone give us a brief explanation of A levels and O levels?

State schools/comprehensives/academies are free to attend and attendance is based on where you live, known as the catchment area. Houses in certain catchment areas can be significantly higher in value than other areas, depending how highly the school is rated. A small number of areas have grammar schools, which take academically gifted children with the rest going to an ordinary school.

No one really used the term public school in Britain - private or fee paying schools.

O levels haven't existed for around 30 or so years - children take GCSEs in around 10 subjects when they are 16 and if they choose to continue in school they take A Levels at 18. University admission is often based on A level grades. Some schools are offering an alternative to A Levels, a more modular based approach rather than exam based.

by Anonymousreply 36202/22/2021

R360, taxpayer-funded schools are state schools.

Schools which parents pay to send their kids to are traditionally called public schools. If you used the term “private education”, people would assume you were talking about education at a public school.

by Anonymousreply 36302/22/2021

That's interesting, r363, as public schools mean exactly the opposite in the US. Public schools here are free to the public.

by Anonymousreply 36402/22/2021

Why do British Aristocrats cling so tenaciously to their titles?

Perhaps titles should have phased out after World War One.

by Anonymousreply 36502/22/2021

R365, I suppose the titles are retained because they are an inheritance from your family. If you inherit the title given to your great-great-great-grandfather, it might seem sad to be the one to stop that tradition. However, it is actually possible to renounce your titles. Several politicians (both leftwing and rightwing) and have renounced their inherited peerages in order to continue their political careers in the House of Commons.

Phasing out aristocratic titles after WW1 may well have had unpleasant connotations for the Royal Family, which worked hard to maintain popularity at the time when crowned heads were rolling across Europe!

by Anonymousreply 36602/22/2021

Why do British Aristocrats cling so tenaciously to their titles?

Perhaps titles should have phased out after World War One.

They are hereditary. So whilst it's possible to disclaim a peerage, someone else in the family then is able to claim it.

So imagine R385 that you're my son. I disclaim my peerage as Earl of Ambridge. I am then free to be elected an MP for Borsetshire as Mr Ambridge. Now when I die, you inherit the title and you become the Earl of Ambridge, and so it goes on.

by Anonymousreply 36702/22/2021

R385 You have to remember that some of the titles of peers go back many centuries.

The Duke of Norfolk is one of the oldest,. Stretching back to 1397.

Britain is still a hereditary monarchy. If we had done away with hereditary lords and ladies in 1917, then the arguement could be made, Why stop there? And go the whole hog and abolish the hereditary monarch.

by Anonymousreply 36802/22/2021

Do people look down on those from the north?

by Anonymousreply 36902/22/2021

If I remember correctly there were only something like five private schools in Britain which were classed as public back in the day. I think it has changed now. They were Elton, Harrow, Rugby and a couple of others. I think Dulwich college might have been one of the others. They were called public as pupils could attend from anywhere in the country so long as the parents could pay the fees and had a good enough social standing. I suspect some of the sons of those who acquired wealth through industry might not have been terribly welcome.

by Anonymousreply 37002/22/2021

[quote]That's interesting, [R363], as public schools mean exactly the opposite in the US. Public schools here are free to the public.

It's rare you'll find people using the term "public school" in Britain. When the far left campaign group Momentum was campaigning to abolish non-state education their campaign group was called "Labour Against Private Schools" and they used the hashtag #abolisheton.

It's funny because well known millionaire socialist Charlotte Church set up a private school in her house for very unique talented children who are too unique and talented to be educated in the state system alongside average normal unremarkable children.

This explainer might be helpful

[quote]Independent schools and private schools: These terms tend to be interchangeable for schools which aren't state-funded. All schools that are not funded by the state but by tuition fees, gifts and endowments

[quote]Public schools: Historically the most exclusive – and expensive – of boys’ private (mainly boarding) schools. But the term is used with greater flexibility these days.

[quote]Boarding schools: Schools with facilities for pupils to have a home from home on a termly, weekly or flexible basis, often with superb facilities and a multitude of extracurricular activities. These days, most accept a proportion of day pupils who can benefit from everything on offer but go home to sleep in their own beds.

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by Anonymousreply 37102/22/2021

R370 here. It was nine public schools and Dulwich wasn’t one of them.

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by Anonymousreply 37202/22/2021

R267 Hereditary peers have been permitted to stand for election to the Commons since they were removed from the Lords in 1999.

by Anonymousreply 37302/22/2021

"Public school" may not be a term used much in the UK today, but it's a term littered throughout Victorian, Edwardian and post-WWI British literature . I think it was even commonly used well into the mid-20th century.

by Anonymousreply 37402/22/2021

Thanks for the update R373

by Anonymousreply 37502/22/2021

[quote] Do people look down on those from the north?

I don't. There is a lot of debate about 'levelling up' the country, given that large areas of northern towns were formerly manufacturing and mining areas. There is a perception that infrastructure investment goes to London and the South East where there is growth. An example of that would be trains. The north have trains that are essentially buses in wheels. They are not compliant with access for disabled persons. Whereas in the south new trains and carriages run in the tracks.

East to West connections across the Pennine Hills which go up the centre of England are slow. There is a perception of being left behind. Political pressure on the Conservative government to level up the economy, comes from many of those industrial areas voting Conservative at the last election. Some of these areas have voted Labour for many, many, many years.

So no. I don't look down on the north. The people, countryside, cities and food up there is second to none.

by Anonymousreply 37602/22/2021

Whatever happened to that poster who went by the handle Angry Young Brit?

by Anonymousreply 37702/22/2021

Britain is characterised by a number of semi-serious, mostly good-natured rivalries. Scotland versus England. Soft Southern England versus Blunt Northerners (i.e. north of England), London versus the English provinces. The posh Home Counties against everywhere else. Teuchters (Scottish highlanders) versus the (Scottish) Lowlanders. Glasgow versus Edinburgh (even though they are only 50 miles apart).

These tend to be based on nothing more than slight perceived class/cultural differences, with the exception of the Scotland/England spats which has become more acute over the past decade as Scottish independence becomes a bigger issue. Many feel aggrieved (as many in the North of England do) about the comparative lack of opportunities and economic investment in those areas, especially given the oil boom from oil in the North Sea off the Scottish coast. On the other hand many in England feel aggrieved that government spending in Scotland is higher per capita. The truth of this economic issue would only become apparent if Scotland becomes independent, I think.

by Anonymousreply 37802/22/2021

[quote]Do people look down on those from the north?

The worst kind of people who look down on the north are the left wingers who come from money and privilege who think working class people need to be saved from their humdrum lives. The way that the Labour Party fetishises the mining communities is ridiculous. So much of Labour's focus was on student debt and house prices in London they don't realise that in a lot of "the north" you can get a job in a non academic profession and have a decent quality of life. It's mainly Oxford private school poshos who are obsessed with a class struggle.

All regions of the country have poverty and deprivation, and you'll often find it in the heart of big cities, often in the shadows of the most affluent areas - Grenfell Tower is the best example of this. In Wales there's a feeling that Cardiff and the south gets all the investment and the north and west of Wales is ignored. In Scotland there's resentment that Edinburgh and Glasgow get the investment and the other areas are just left to get on with it.

by Anonymousreply 37902/22/2021

In the United States the term Independent Schools is used for private schools almost exclusively within those environments, but outside them, especially in the press and government, they are referenced as “private schools” and it is still used with an heir of elitism.

by Anonymousreply 38002/22/2021

Do these titles every seem plain silly to you?

Dame Maggie Smith.

Sir Elton John.

To an American, they seem like honorary Ph.D.s given to high school graduates.

by Anonymousreply 38102/22/2021

Do these titles every seem plain silly to you?

Dame Maggie Smith.

Sir Elton John.

Erm...not really silly, because they're given to people who have achieved greatness in their field. I think it's sweet that is done.

by Anonymousreply 38202/22/2021

[quote] Erm...not really silly, because they're given to people who have achieved greatness in their field. I think it's sweet that is done.

What about actually having to call someone "Sir Elton John," etc. Does that seem silly?

by Anonymousreply 38302/22/2021

I’m surprised that the title’s not attached only to their real name, not one made up.

by Anonymousreply 38402/22/2021

In America, R382, it is people who have achieved greatness in their field who get honorary PhDs.

But unless they are Maya Angelou, you usually do not have to call them by any silly title.

by Anonymousreply 38502/22/2021

Why (at least in TV series set in the past) are physician's offices called "surgeries?" And why are surgeons not called "Dr.," but rather "Mr." (or "Ms.")?

And why do you use the metric system for many things (liters, meters, grams), but still use miles, stone, and other archaic measurement systems (like we idiots on the other side of the pond use for everything)?

by Anonymousreply 38602/22/2021

[quote] And why are surgeons not called "Dr.," but rather "Mr." (or "Ms.")?

I'm guessing it's because being a doctor was or is middle-class in England. In the U.S., physicians (M.D.s) are held in much higher regard, so, you call them "Dr. _____."

by Anonymousreply 38702/22/2021

What part of England is roughly equivalent to the American South? The South West/Dorset?

by Anonymousreply 38802/22/2021

[quote]Why (at least in TV series set in the past) are physician's offices called "surgeries?" And why are surgeons not called "Dr.," but rather "Mr." (or "Ms.")?

If you cut into patients, i.e. operate on them, then you progress from being Dr to Mr or Mrs.

As for the name of surgeries, members of Parliament also hold surgeries. You go along, sit down and wait to be seen.

by Anonymousreply 38902/22/2021

The Assurance instead of Insurance confused me.

by Anonymousreply 39002/22/2021

R388 Northern Ireland.

by Anonymousreply 39102/22/2021

[quote]As for the name of surgeries, members of Parliament also hold surgeries. You go along, sit down and wait to be seen.

Btw the way the NHS works is that unless you have an emergency you will make an appointment at your local surgery/health centre to discuss it with your general practitioner (GP). This is called Primary Care and they can prescribe medication or if required refer you on to a hospital for a specialist department which will be Secondary Care.

Most hospitals will provide a range of secondary care services but in some big cities you might have different hospitals covering different specialities, e.g, dermatology in the north of the city, cardiac services in the east, orthopaedics in the south and neurosurgery in the west. A lot of people gripe about having to travel for care but are ultimately grateful. Over the last 10 years there has been a real political problem in North Wales where there are no big cities and no obvious place to run a specialist unit with highly trained staff, so mothers and babies are sent over the border into England to Liverpool hospitals.

Tertiary care, the most highly specialist care is located in the big cities. Great Ormond Street Hospital in London is a highly specialist tertiary service for children.

by Anonymousreply 39202/22/2021

Is consciousness of class and class distinctions really that important in your culture?

by Anonymousreply 39302/22/2021

R393 I don't think it is too much these days. Just like any culture, we have markers that will show where we come from or how well educated we are, but it's nothing like as bad as people seem to think it is. I genuinely think Americans are more obsessed with our aristocracy than any Brit, for example.

by Anonymousreply 39402/22/2021

Don't equate the obsession displayed about the aristocracy on DL compared to the real US; very few people in the United States care anything about it.

by Anonymousreply 39502/22/2021

Are most British people alcoholics by other countries' standard?

by Anonymousreply 39602/22/2021

Why is there no British cuisine that is known / loved worldwide?

by Anonymousreply 39702/22/2021

Fish and Chips.

by Anonymousreply 39802/22/2021

Are most British people alcoholics by other countries' standard?

We're 25th, behind the French and Australians.

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by Anonymousreply 39902/22/2021

Why is there no British cuisine that is known / loved worldwide?

Ask the French what they call is Brits.

by Anonymousreply 40002/22/2021

R397 The sandwich perhaps?

by Anonymousreply 40102/22/2021

The British invented biscuits, pies, crisps and chocolate bars.

WE INVENTED JUNK FOOD!

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by Anonymousreply 40202/22/2021

What part of England is roughly equivalent to the American South? The South West/Dorset?

Norfolk.

by Anonymousreply 40302/22/2021

The information about types of schools is not correct.

The UK has three different categories of school: State, Private, and Public.

State schools are free (what America calls “public schools”).

Private schools are fee-paying schools. They are most commonly known as Independent schools.

Public schools are a specific subset of fee-paying school that are elite and ancient. Technically all public schools are private schools. But the vast majority of private schools are not public schools.

To put it in context, there are 26000 private schools in the UK. There are fewer than 500 public schools and that’s using the most generous description.

I’m not sure where the info about the phrase “public school” not being used any more comes from, because it’s still in very very common usage where I am. (London arts/political world.)

by Anonymousreply 40402/22/2021

[quote] Is consciousness of class and class distinctions really that important in your culture?

In a word, yes.

by Anonymousreply 40502/22/2021

Why is there no British cuisine that is known / loved worldwide?

The sandwich.

Chicken Tikka Masala

Apple Pie

Christmas Pudding

Haggis

by Anonymousreply 40602/22/2021

[quote] Why is there no British cuisine that is known / loved worldwide?

[quote] There are in England sixty different religions and only one sauce.

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by Anonymousreply 40702/22/2021

[quote]I’m not sure where the info about the phrase “public school” not being used any more comes from, because it’s still in very very common usage where I am. (London arts/political world.)

No doubt those in your little elitist bubble differentiate between Eton/Harrow/Westminster/Godolphin and Latymer and know exactly who attended which one and how much they cost per term, just like which college in Oxford University someone studied at, or whether they slummed it at somewhere terrible like Leeds or Bristol.

For most people it's "did their parents pay for them to opt out of the state system" and "did they go to Oxbridge"

by Anonymousreply 40802/22/2021

^^^^^ went to Bristol

by Anonymousreply 40902/22/2021

To elaborate on my last point, no one cares whether the private school Rishi Sunak went to is a private/public school. They just know he didn't go the local comp.

No one cares whether the school Diane Abbott sent her son to is a private or public school they just know she made the decision to send him there, and now supports the abolition of private/public schools.

by Anonymousreply 41002/22/2021

[quote]^^^^^ went to Bristol

Nah, I didn't go to university. I left school at 16 and have worked mostly in the public sector.

by Anonymousreply 41102/22/2021

Speaking of Oxbridge, just how difficult is it to get into Oxford or Cambridge these days? Would a lot depend on what one's major is and is that called "reading" instead of majoring? Does anyone know how large a typical first year (freshman?) class at those 2 universities is now?

As an American having visited both campuses in recent years, I much preferred Oxford. Cambridge's campus is much prettier but it feels very isolated next to that modern shopping mall. I love the way Oxford University's buildings are dispersed throughout the town. How do the smart young Brits feel about both schools?

by Anonymousreply 41202/22/2021

Uh, I left school at 14 and my family are from Yorkshire, so watch who you’re calling elitist.

I have no idea what any of those schools cost or who went to them.

Doesn’t change the fact the term “public school” is still in extremely common usage in the UK - and it’s used just as often as a put down by people who went to state school, as by elitists. So don’t get defensive just because your info is wrong, sweetheart.

by Anonymousreply 41302/22/2021

Agreed with R413. To say:

[quote]It's rare you'll find people using the term "public school" in Britain

is simply wrong.

by Anonymousreply 41402/22/2021

Do they use the phrase "smelling biscuits" for "smelling cookies"?

by Anonymousreply 41502/22/2021

[quote]Doesn’t change the fact the term “public school” is still in extremely common usage in the UK - and it’s used just as often as a put down by people who went to state school, as by elitists. So don’t get defensive just because your info is wrong, sweetheart.

Private school/private education is now the go-to term to describe fee paying schools outside of state control.

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by Anonymousreply 41602/23/2021

The only reference to public school here is to describe the photo - private school is mentioned throughout.

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by Anonymousreply 41702/23/2021

Again, private schools referenced throughout.

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by Anonymousreply 41802/23/2021

R417, I grew up in the West Country and went to the local comp. I would also refer to many private schools as Public schools especially those like Eton and Harrow. It might not be written in articles but like others have mentioned it is still very much in the general vernacular.

by Anonymousreply 41902/23/2021

A rare reference to public school in a headline, found in The Guardian's section of Private School stories.

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by Anonymousreply 42002/23/2021

I am probably missing your point, r420. All I, and others, are saying is that people still often refer to the more elite private schools as public schools.

by Anonymousreply 42102/23/2021

Doesn't the term 'public school' refer specifically to those very old schools that were originally centres of religious learning attached to monasteries/cathedrals and exclusive to those in religious training? They were called 'public' as they become open to people who weren't part of the clergy.

There's a slight difference these days if someone is described as 'private-school educated' and 'public-school educated'. If it's the latter it means they went to Harrow/Eton/Westminster etc. The former could be any private school.

by Anonymousreply 42202/23/2021

What's with the bleeding heart Labour types like Dianne Abbott and Shami Chakraborty constantly speaking out against the privilege of private schools while choosing to send their own kids to private schools? How hypocritical can they get? And why do they defend their personal choices while denying other parents the same choice?

by Anonymousreply 42302/23/2021

[quote]What's with the bleeding heart Labour types like Dianne Abbott and Shami Chakraborty constantly speaking out against the privilege of private schools while choosing to send their own kids to private schools? How hypocritical can they get? And why do they defend their personal choices while denying other parents the same choice?

Diane Abbott's defence was that the local schools weren't good enough and her son would have ended up in a gang if she'd sent him to the local comp. The timing was especially unfortunate because she'd been the most vocal critic of Harriet Harman and Tony Blair sending their children to a selective state schools. With recent events I wondered if Abbott's choice was also related to her son being gay. Being a soft gay black boy in a rough school would not have been an easy experience. When Labour conference voted to abolish private schools and redistribute all their assets back to the state, Abbott's comment was that schools in her area had since improved from when she made her decision.

As for Baroness Chakrabarti of Kennington, she never said it in public but it was widely briefed to journalists that it wasn't her choice to send her son to Dulwich school, but that of her ex husband. No one was really surprised by the hypocrisy, she was already a totally discredited figure after accepting a peerage and shadow cabinet role in exchange for her "independent" investigation into Labour's major problem with anti Jewish racism.

by Anonymousreply 42402/23/2021

As an American, I find it interesting that public schools were first given that nomenclature in England while we here took it up to refer to exactly the opposite kind of education.

by Anonymousreply 42502/23/2021

R417 Public school refers to the most elite kind of private school. That's why they use the term "public" in the photo referring to the Etonians. It's a term still commonly used in the UK.

by Anonymousreply 42602/23/2021

So lunch today was Cullen Skink, which is a Scottish soup made with Smoked Haddock, leeks, cream and potato.

It was delicious.

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by Anonymousreply 42702/23/2021

Explain spotted dick. Were all other possible words taken when you named this dish?

by Anonymousreply 42802/23/2021

[quote] Explain spotted dick. Were all other possible words taken when you named this dish?

Spotted - sultanas and raisins

Dick - dough

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by Anonymousreply 42902/23/2021

Is "sultana" a British term or is it also used in the US?

by Anonymousreply 43002/23/2021

R430 A sultana is a large raisin made from a specific grape. I think in the US you just call them large raisins.

by Anonymousreply 43102/23/2021

If someone had mentioned eating cullen skink for lunch I would have assumed it was something cooked with lizard meat.

by Anonymousreply 43202/23/2021

Do people really eat kedgeree on a regular basis? It’s a dish that looks appealing to me.

by Anonymousreply 43302/23/2021

R433 Why not just make it? It's not difficult. It's not hugely popular here - you might see it on more traditional hotel or restaurant menus but you're unlikely to see it on a pub or café menu really. It's a breakfast dish.

by Anonymousreply 43402/23/2021

Thanks, R434, I saw it on Downton Abbey and it looked really good. Maybe I'll just make it.

by Anonymousreply 43502/23/2021

Kedgeree is the dish Margaret Thatcher cooked for her Cabinet dinner (not breakfast) meeting on The Crown.

by Anonymousreply 43602/23/2021

R436 So?

by Anonymousreply 43702/23/2021

How many people in the UK really care about football?

by Anonymousreply 43802/23/2021

American football or soccer?

by Anonymousreply 43902/23/2021

R438 Pretty much everyone. It's unavoidable. If you don't like football and can't even pretend to have a team you support you're viewed with deep suspicion.

by Anonymousreply 44002/23/2021

R439 You could probably count the number of people in the UK who know anything about American football on one hand. We just have no concept of it.

by Anonymousreply 44102/23/2021

Have you or anyone you know used the word “ticketyboo?”

by Anonymousreply 44202/23/2021

I can see how American football would seem very boring for those outside the U.S.

by Anonymousreply 44302/23/2021

I think they broadcast the Super Bowl on BBC1 simply because of the half-time show...lol.

by Anonymousreply 44402/23/2021

Why are housing projects called estates?

by Anonymousreply 44502/23/2021

About 300,000 people watch NFL games in the UK, so there's some fanbase there, and it's not like there's much else on at 1am in the morning that they're moving stuff in the schedules to accommodate it.

by Anonymousreply 44602/23/2021

How homophobic are people outside of cities like London, Brighton, Manchesterand and Liverpool?

by Anonymousreply 44702/23/2021

Are barley sweets still a thing? They're always referring to them on "Call the Midwife."

by Anonymousreply 44802/23/2021

Not terribly, R447. You might be given a wide berth for your homosexuality in the very rural places, or teased a bit by the friendlier locals, but you aren’t likely to get bashed for it.

by Anonymousreply 44902/23/2021

Why do the British prefer the aga over a regular stove? Is it a class thing?

by Anonymousreply 45002/23/2021

When I lived in London, I told a co-worker that I was of Scottish ancestry and he said, "Oh, so you're a Jock?" And then he began calling me "Jock". I still have no idea what that was about.

by Anonymousreply 45102/23/2021

Who is Gordon Bennett and why are people always using his name like a curse word?

by Anonymousreply 45202/23/2021

R452 Long story short ... and skipping to the to the third paragraph from the end:

[quote] The expletive Gordon Bennett appears to be a minced oath. It is a version of Gor blimey, which is itself a euphemistic version of God blind me. That, combined with Bennett's famously outrageous lifestyle and newsworthy stunts, is sufficient to explain why his name was picked out.

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by Anonymousreply 45302/23/2021

What is barley water?

What is lemon squash?

What is a pint of bitters?

What is the preferred blend of tea and is there a preferred brand of tea in the UK now?

And do digestive biscuits really help digestion?

by Anonymousreply 45402/23/2021

Why do British homes have separate faucets for hot and cold water. What if you desire warm water?

Also, is the chip butty (French fries sandwich with ketchup and butter) really a popular snack? It sounds repulsive, not gonna lie.

by Anonymousreply 45502/23/2021

R455 Cold water used to come directly from the mains and was suitable to drink, whereas hot water came via the boiler, and in old systems hot water would sit in a big tank in the attic, so was not suitable to drink. If the two connected, the different pressures could cause one stream to enter the other and contaminate it. So they had to be separate by law, until more modern systems were introduced.

And yes, a chip butty is glorious. With thick-cut fries though - not sure what the term is for them in America.

by Anonymousreply 45602/23/2021

[quote] How many people in the UK really care about football?

Lots. Given that we've been playing some form of football since time immemorial, we invented the modern rules, we have the oldest competitive trophy and have, arguably, the best league in the world, it's not surprising. You'll probably find a kid kicking a football in a Manchester United or Liverpool shirt almost everywhere around the globe, except for the US. Get on a plane at Bangkok airport and you'll see Leicester City's kit for sale.

From ancient beginnings, play in public schools, the advent of the railways, codification, competitions and the expanse of Empire, association football has gone around the world. Culminating in the World Cup.

It's on every evening, features large in our cultural psyche. It's the source of great pride and rivalry. Asking, "Who do you support?" Can lead to great conversations.

Yes, it huge.

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by Anonymousreply 45702/23/2021

[quote] Have you or anyone you know used the word “ticketyboo?”

Scarily, yes I have. Is everything tickety boo with you?

by Anonymousreply 45802/23/2021

[quote] Why are housing projects called estates?

It's thought that it originates from the first public house being built on land that was owned by landowners who had large land holding often called a country estate. Estate homes would be built to accommodate staff, like in Downtown. When councils began building public housing on a large scale the term stuck.

by Anonymousreply 45902/23/2021

I recently learned that toast sandwiches are also a thing. That sounds like the most unimaginative sandwich ever.

by Anonymousreply 46002/23/2021

[quote] How homophobic are people outside of cities like London, Brighton, Manchesterand and Liverpool?

Not really. I've lived in cities and villages and it's not been a problem to me, but that's just been my experience. Of course homophobic slurs do happen, just as trans and racial ones do, but my personal experience has been good and I've not been called a "poof" or anything worse in over 25 years.

by Anonymousreply 46102/23/2021

[quote] Why do the British prefer the aga over a regular stove? Is it a class thing?

We don't. Most people have a regular electric or gas stove. Only people in the Cotswolds, like David Cameron, and my aunt have an Aga cooker. They're big, expensive and bloody heavy for anything other than a big house with a big kitchen in the country.

by Anonymousreply 46202/23/2021

[quote] When I lived in London, I told a co-worker that I was of Scottish ancestry and he said, "Oh, so you're a Jock?" And then he began calling me "Jock". I still have no idea what that was about.

We have terms for all the nations. Whether they are endearing, pejorative or slurs, I leave to the reader.

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by Anonymousreply 46302/23/2021

[quote] What is barley water? What is lemon squash?

Fruit cordial that you add water to, to dilute the very strong concentrated flavour to make a refreshing drink. Always seen at Wimbledon.

[quote] What is a pint of bitters?

I've not heard of this. Do you mean a pint of Bitter? Bitter is a style of beer, very popular in the UK.

[quote] What is the preferred blend of tea and is there a preferred brand of tea in the UK now?

There are lots of brands of tea. PG Tips, Typhoo, Tetley, Yorkshire, Supermarket own brand. People find a flavour they enjoy and stick with that usually.

And do digestive biscuits really help digestion?

They used to, but not anymore. A chocolate digestive is one of my favourite biscuits.

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by Anonymousreply 46402/23/2021

[quote] I recently learned that toast sandwiches are also a thing. That sounds like the most unimaginative sandwich ever.

Toasties can be quick and easy to make with a variety of fillings to suit personal preferences. I've not owned a toastie maker for years now.

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by Anonymousreply 46502/23/2021

[quote] How homophobic are people outside of cities like London, Brighton, Manchesterand and Liverpool?

R447, the only outright homophobia I've noticed and experienced was actually in London. In the smaller towns and the countryside there might be the odd joke or two but nothing that ever became threatening. In London on the other hand, my friends and I were actually a bit worried when we came face to face with the open bigotry and hatred.

by Anonymousreply 46602/23/2021

R446 There are that many American citizens living in the UK so that's no surprise. If you were to ask even the biggest British sports fan to explain the rules or even the scoring system in American football, or to name any teams other than a couple of the biggest, they'd struggle.

by Anonymousreply 46702/23/2021

I like sport, but I struggle with NFL, even though a number of games have been played over here.

I do know that Tampa Bay Buccaneers won the Super Bowl, but that's about it.

How do you guys get through watching a game with so many ad breaks and sponsorship messages?

by Anonymousreply 46802/23/2021

Is there really only one gay in each village?

by Anonymousreply 46902/23/2021

What possible reason could there be for this thread to be struck out and greyed?

by Anonymousreply 47002/23/2021

Do you really use linen water and not spray starch?

by Anonymousreply 47102/23/2021

[quote] Is there really only one gay in each village

1.5

by Anonymousreply 47202/23/2021

[quote] What possible reason could there be for this thread to be struck out and greyed?

Muriel is French. We've been at war for 1,000 years. It's her way of getting back at us, because there's no "French questions" thread.

by Anonymousreply 47302/23/2021

[quote] Do you really use linen water and not spray starch?

I've not ironed since 1997. I do give my pelmets and headboard the occasional squirt of Fabreze though.

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by Anonymousreply 47402/23/2021

[quote]Toasties can be quick and easy to make with a variety of fillings to suit personal preferences. I've not owned a toastie maker for years now.

A toasted sandwich can be pure heaven.

Salami, cheddar and pineapple.

Pastrami, gherkin, red leicester and mustard.

Bacon, brie and cranberry.

Goats cheese and red cabbage.

The trick is to put butter on the outside of the toastie, rather than the inside.

by Anonymousreply 47502/24/2021

Do you mean a jaffle?

by Anonymousreply 47602/24/2021

From what I've read, a toast sandwich is a toasted slice of bread with butter, salt & pepper betwixt two pieces of bread. I've never heard anything about meats and cheeses being included.

by Anonymousreply 47702/24/2021

R477 Wtf? I think someone was taking the piss out of you. That isn't a thing at all.

Toasted sandwiches using a Breville machine are still kind of popular though I think they were more a 70s/80s thing. A piece of bread between two slices of toast sounds like something a resident in a care home for special needs children might make.

by Anonymousreply 47802/24/2021

R477, I have heard of a fried bread sandwich which sounds slightly more believable but I have never heard of anyone actually making or eating one. I do believe it is very likely, as r478 said, that someone was taking the piss.

by Anonymousreply 47902/24/2021

Okay wtf!? Have people never heard of grilled cheese sandwiches?

No fancy special equipment needed and, yes, butter on outside. SMDH.

BTW I hear you just invented sex.

by Anonymousreply 48002/24/2021

The Wiki page says it's just "a piece of toast sandwiched between two pieces of bread."

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by Anonymousreply 48102/24/2021

I've never heard of a toast sandwich as per the Wiki page, but I do like a nice toastie. I use my George Forman grill to do them.

by Anonymousreply 48202/24/2021

Have these toast sandwiches succeeded pastys (pasties?) as the favorite labourer's lunch?

Are pork pies still popular?

by Anonymousreply 48302/24/2021

[quote] Have these toast sandwiches succeeded pastys (pasties?) as the favorite labourer's lunch?

It's all down to personal preference. Both are acceptable socially. Cheese and Ham toastie is just as acceptable as a Cornish Pastie.

[quote] Are pork pies still popular?

Good afternoon from Melton Mowbray. The pork pie capital of Britain. The only place in Britain where you may make a Melton Mowbray Pork Pie. Simply the best. In fact, I had one delivered today in my Amazon Prime Now delivery. Going to have a slice with some red onion chutney, some Stilton and Red Leicester cheese later.

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by Anonymousreply 48402/24/2021

[quote]And why do so many houses have their laundry appliances in the kitchen? I've seen it in some US houses, but it's not common. Most people have them in the garage, the basement, or a laundry room.

Because the UK is a tiny, densely populated country for the most part. Houses are correspondingly smaller and more expensive than what many Americans would be used to and the kitchen is the obvious place for a washing machine because of access to plumbing. Many houses have no garages or basements or anywhere else where you could put a washing machine. It isn't even feasible to extend the houses to create more useful living space.

I grew up in a mid-Victorian terrace house. Bathrooms and washing machines weren't even a thing when those were built. Newer buildings will most likely have a small utility area not far from the kitchen but not always. The house I live in now was built at the tail end of the 1960s but still had no other area for a washing machine. The previous owner added a conservatory of sorts off the kitchen to house the washing machine.

by Anonymousreply 48502/24/2021

I have my washing machine in the Conservatory too R485, along with my fridge as my kitchen is quite small.

by Anonymousreply 48602/24/2021

What’s with the wrapping of fish and chips in old newspaper, that sounds dirty and unhygienic, our health codes would never allow that?

by Anonymousreply 48702/24/2021

Fresh newspapers were always considered (believe it or not!) highly hygienic because until they were opened they were untouched by human hands.

Weren't there incidents of women giving birth outside of hospitals and nursing care where fresh unopened newspapers were used as a mat for the mother to lie on?

by Anonymousreply 48802/24/2021

In regard to the lack of closets in homes, Americans should be aware that they weren't in American homes until the early 20th century. Clothes were all hung and stored in large pieces of furniture made for that purpose called armoires. Closets were vulgar!

by Anonymousreply 48902/24/2021

[quote]What’s with the wrapping of fish and chips in old newspaper, that sounds dirty and unhygienic, our health codes would never allow that?

That hasn't happened for decades. Some novelty chip shops in tourist areas buy printed paper to use as a second wrapper on chips. Or you might get a specially printed cone for your chips.

I used to love a cone of chips at the beach. Loads of salt and vinegar and when you'd finish the chips you could gulp down the salty malty goodness at the bottom.

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by Anonymousreply 49002/24/2021

R487 Fish and chips haven't been wrapped in newspaper in living memory. The actual food would be wrapped in plain paper (the same kind used to print newspapers on) and this could then, possibly, be wrapped in old newspaper for insulation.

But actually wrapping the actual food in newspaper hasn't happened since Victorian times except maybe for a brief period during the war.

by Anonymousreply 49102/24/2021

[quote]Fish and chips haven't been wrapped in newspaper in living memory.

Thanks.. I was born in the 60s and my local chippie, (Weaver and Hollins, Witton, Birmingham) run by two old women, always wrapped the chips in newspaper. To be fair, there was an underlay of a greaseproof paper bag to house the chips but it was never quite enough for the fish on top and the novelty wore off when I could read yesterdays football results imprinted on the fish batter.

by Anonymousreply 49202/24/2021

I thought I could remember newspaper still being used in the early 70s, but I could be wrong.

Certainly all of the food hygiene regulations will have ruled newspaper use out by the 80s or 90s?

by Anonymousreply 49302/24/2021

[QUOTE]I thought I could remember newspaper still being used in the early 70s, but I could be wrong.

I have a vague memory of a chip shop having newspapers on the counter and people taking sheets to wrap their already wrapped up fish and chips in them, maybe to keep them warm on the way home.

My local Chinese takeaway always had days old tabloids on the counter you could read while you were waiting.

by Anonymousreply 49402/24/2021

Newspaper might have been used as outer wrapping for insulation, but actually placing the fish and chips onto old newspaper would have got them shut down.

by Anonymousreply 49502/24/2021

Do any American chain restaurants do real British Fish and Chips?

by Anonymousreply 49602/24/2021

R496 NYC did, but who knows what exists anymore?

by Anonymousreply 49702/24/2021

So, the whole foggy day in Londontown was just about the burning of coal and not weather related right, kind of like Pittsburgh at the height of the steel industry?

by Anonymousreply 49802/24/2021

What of the pantos that y’all trot out at Christmas, why are they so big there, but never caught on anywhere else?

by Anonymousreply 49902/24/2021

Do you think the British are more tolerant and accepting of the wildly eccentric type then in other places in the world? I know it’s ironic that the best example I can think of is Quentin Crisp, who actual left, but maybe Annie Lennox and Tilda Swinton fit the bill as well?

by Anonymousreply 50002/24/2021

R455 said [quote] Why do British homes have separate faucets for hot and cold water. What if you desire warm water?

Also, is the chip butty (French fries sandwich with ketchup and butter) really a popular snack? It sounds repulsive, not gonna lie.

Mixer taps are very common now too, for example my kitchen sink has a mixer, my bath has separate taps (more of a design choice) and bathroom sink has a mixer.

Chip butties are not repulsive - I'm not sure if I would describe it as a REALLY popular snack, it's probably more common/popular in northern/deprived areas. Oh and it's thick cut chips (I think US folk call them 'home fries') rather than French fries, it would be unusual to have a French fry butty.

by Anonymousreply 50102/24/2021

Even nicer than a chip butty is a crisp butty with a mix of salt and vinegar and cheese and onion

by Anonymousreply 50202/24/2021

A curry pasty is the most wonderful thing in the universe.

by Anonymousreply 50302/24/2021

[quote]Also, is the chip butty (French fries sandwich with ketchup and butter) really a popular snack? It sounds repulsive, not gonna lie.

My (very non-British) aunt taught me how to make potato sandwiches, which sound similar--sliced potatoes, fried, then put between two slices of the worst possible white bread (e.g., Wonder Bread) with lots of butter, salt and pepper. Delicious.

by Anonymousreply 50402/24/2021

[quote]And yes, a chip butty is glorious. With thick-cut fries though - not sure what the term is for them in America.

If they're cut like fries -- i.e., long and narrow -- they're usually called "steak fries."

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by Anonymousreply 50502/24/2021

In recipes, it's often specified you can use graham crackers as a substitute for digestive biscuits, and vice versa. But do graham crackers exist in the UK? I don't think the two products are identical.

by Anonymousreply 50602/24/2021

R485, until reading this thread I would have thought "terrace house" was some kind of spacious home with a large outdoor terrace and yard (or garden).

I remember reading about estate flats and similarly imagining it some kind of luxury housing.

by Anonymousreply 50702/24/2021

Graham crackers were part of a very early American health food craze similar to the invention of corn flakes.

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by Anonymousreply 50802/24/2021

R506 Graham crackers don't exist in the UK but I think digestives would be the nearest thing to them we have. Digestives are used as a base for cheesecakes like graham crackers are, so I suppose they can't be that different.

by Anonymousreply 50902/24/2021

So you can make s'mores with digestives?

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by Anonymousreply 51002/24/2021

R510 S'mores don't exist in the UK either.

by Anonymousreply 51102/24/2021

Would you like a chain of Harry Ramsden's Fish and Chip shops America?

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by Anonymousreply 51202/24/2021

R512 Aw come on now. That's not fair. America has done a lot of bad but they don't deserve that.

by Anonymousreply 51302/24/2021

Hehe

by Anonymousreply 51402/24/2021

All this talk of fish and chips made me peckish, so Ive just had cod, chips and mushy peas for my tea.

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by Anonymousreply 51502/24/2021

Like the lack of closets, separate taps for hot and cold water wasn't particularly a British thing. It was how everything was done in all of the western world's most civilized countries, including the US, until the early 20th century. I lived in a college dorm in Boston in the early 1970s (Myles Standish Hall at BU) that was formerly a hotel that still had two taps on each bathroom sink. The sink had a rubber cork on a chain that you were supposed to use to fill up the sink with a mixture of hot and cold water to wash your face and shave. Hated it, but just got used to it.

by Anonymousreply 51602/24/2021

I don’t like Graham crackers but I love digestive biscuits. They are similar but not exactly.

by Anonymousreply 51702/24/2021

Are Ben's eggs tasty?

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by Anonymousreply 51802/24/2021

I don't know anyone who's ever eaten a pickled egg.

by Anonymousreply 51902/24/2021

I have.

They, like Ben, are very tasty.

by Anonymousreply 52002/24/2021

R519 Aren't they available in every chippy? And used to be available in almost every pub.

by Anonymousreply 52102/24/2021

Absolutely seen them in every chippy I've been in.

by Anonymousreply 52202/24/2021

I make my own pickled eggs. Peeled hard-boiled eggs in a jar of pickle juice (the juice left behind when you finish a jar of pickles—I like kosher dill deli-style) for two-plus weeks in the fridge and Bob’s your uncle. Add beet juice for pretty, pink eggs.

by Anonymousreply 52302/24/2021

R521 Yes, which is why the fact I've never met anyone who's eaten one is all the odder.

R520 Really? I have to admit, not a huge fan of boiled eggs in general, but I just can't imagine the addition of vinegar helps.

by Anonymousreply 52402/24/2021

why are hot dogs in cans?

by Anonymousreply 52502/24/2021

Now, why has the OP post been crossed out on this thread? It doesn't make any sense to me.

by Anonymousreply 52602/24/2021

R523 That sounds nice. I have some Polish gherkins I've nearly finished eating. I'll try and put some boiled eggs in the left over liquor and report back.

by Anonymousreply 52702/24/2021

[quote] why are hot dogs in cans?

They come in cans, bottles and sealed plastic. Most come from The Netherlands, Germany and Denmark, so I guess it's easy to transport and export.

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by Anonymousreply 52802/24/2021

R526 Who crosses threads out?

by Anonymousreply 52902/24/2021

R529 - Muriel? I'm told after it gets FF'd enough. But that's what I don't understand - why would a thread like this get lots of FF votes?

by Anonymousreply 53002/24/2021

No idea. R530.

Oh well let's see how Part 2 goes in a bit.

by Anonymousreply 53102/24/2021

I grew up with pickled eggs. Beats and vinegar. Truly delicious.

Also, Korean markets sometimes have tea eggs--hard boiled eggs left in tea and spice for a few days. yum

by Anonymousreply 53202/24/2021

I don't see OP crossed out. But I am OP.

by Anonymousreply 53302/24/2021

That's sounds interesting R532

Yes the first post is struck through R533

by Anonymousreply 53402/24/2021

I think if enough posters F/F a thread it it goes grey.

by Anonymousreply 53502/24/2021

I can only think that possibly enough posters had previously FFed the OP in the past on other threads. Why would anyone FF this thread?

by Anonymousreply 53602/24/2021

There are quite a few posters here who hate anything British, for whatever reason. So maybe there's enough of them to get the necessary number of FFs?

by Anonymousreply 53702/24/2021

Maybe.

Still, keep those questions coming.

by Anonymousreply 53802/24/2021

R536 If that were the case, then I think the topic would have been grey from the get-go, and/or OP would have been identified with a troll name (in red) given by DL.

by Anonymousreply 53902/24/2021

Can you really drive across the UK in one day?

by Anonymousreply 54002/25/2021

R540 Yes.

by Anonymousreply 54102/25/2021

Yes, r540. The distance from the farthest South West Point and the most northerly point on mainland Britain is 837 miles and would take between 14 and 15 hours to drive. Obviously, you couldn’t get to all the smaller islands.

by Anonymousreply 54202/25/2021

Should have added, R540, I think you meant Britain rather than the UK as you need a ferry to get to N. Ireland. The UK is Great Britain and N. Ireland. (Great) Britain is the island of England, Scotland and Wales.

by Anonymousreply 54302/25/2021

You can do east coast of England to west coast of Ireland including the ferry crossing too.

by Anonymousreply 54402/25/2021

R544, I suppose it depends where you start.

by Anonymousreply 54502/25/2021

R545 We used to do London to Galway via Holyhead every year when I was a kid. I hated it.

by Anonymousreply 54602/25/2021

R546, we used to do the Liverpool ferry to Belfast starting in the South West. That was quite a trek as the ferry was 8 hours. Still is. The road to Galway used to be a nightmare. Much improved in recent years but still a trek. If we need to take the ferry we tend to use the Scottish crossings as they are shorter.

by Anonymousreply 54702/25/2021

R488

Anyone who has watched episodes of "Call The Midwife" will notice the nurses prepare beds for home births by laying down thick layer of newspapers. One can only assume those advising the show gave them that bit.

by Anonymousreply 54802/25/2021

Don't know where some of you American gays on DL live or have lived, but plenty of homes and apartments have bathrooms, kitchens and other plumbing with separate hot and cold water taps. We're talking about things built late as 1960's or so.

by Anonymousreply 54902/25/2021

I’m going to make pickled hard boiled eggs.

by Anonymousreply 55002/25/2021

What about "High Church" vs "Low Church"? Is there still a big distinction in the UK? Can all of the church ministers, vicars, chaplains, bishops, etc. marry? Or all churches tolerant of homosexuality by now?

by Anonymousreply 55102/25/2021

It's fascinating what non-Brits pick up on! My early 1800s cottage wouldn't have been built with a bathroom, just two upstairs bedrooms. (The loo would have been in the garden outhouse, I guess, but that's now a study.) One bedroom was converted into a spacious bathroom (with washing machine and tumble dryer facilities!) years before I bought it. I don't have separate taps, either, they would have gone with the remodel.

by Anonymousreply 55202/25/2021

R552 I bought an old cottage in the 1990s. It had a lounge with an Inglewood fireplace and two bedrooms. The kitchen and bathroom had been added to the gable end in the 1950s as an extension before planning rules were a lot stronger.

by Anonymousreply 55302/25/2021

[quote]why are hot dogs in cans?

We have Vienna sausages in cans.

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by Anonymousreply 55402/25/2021

Re: separate faucets for hot and cold water in the U.S.

I lived in an Edwardian style apartment in San Francisco. The bathroom had a sink with the two separate faucets. You were supposed to (I guess) plug the drain, mix the water in the sink bowl, then wash your face / hands.

I prefer a single faucet.

by Anonymousreply 55502/25/2021

Why do Brits have a love-hate relationship with Americans? They embrace American culture but seem to resent it at the same time. I felt so unwelcomed when I visited the UK several years ago. On the other hand, Brits are often met with open arms when they come here.

by Anonymousreply 55602/25/2021

[quote] Why do Brits have a love-hate relationship with Americans? They embrace American culture but seem to resent it at the same time. I felt so unwelcomed when I visited the UK several years ago. On the other hand, Brits are often met with open arms when they come here.

Firstly, on the whole, we love American TV, film and theatre. You've produced some of the greatest TV, films and theatre known to man.

Secondly, I'm sorry that you felt unwelcome. Care to share, how the reality of your visit didn't match up with your expectations?

As for being welcomed with open arms in the States, yes you're a friendly bunch.

by Anonymousreply 55702/25/2021

Maybe you're just an asshole, R556

by Anonymousreply 55802/25/2021

*arsehole R558

by Anonymousreply 55902/25/2021

How pissed were you that Americans renamed books like The Golden Compass and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone?

by Anonymousreply 56002/25/2021

R560 It is a matter of deep national resentment and something we were very close to declaring war over. There isn't a day that goes by every Brit pulls out clumps of our own hair about it.

by Anonymousreply 56102/25/2021

[quote] How pissed were you that Americans renamed books like The Golden Compass and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone?

We're used to you rebranding our best products R560!

I enjoyed that R561

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by Anonymousreply 56202/25/2021

You must have had a very good chuckle of our renaming The Madness of King George, removing the III because we worried people would think they missed the first two films in a series.

by Anonymousreply 563Last Friday at 1:08 AM

Hahaha!

by Anonymousreply 564Last Friday at 1:09 AM

There are American actors you must despise like Gwyneth Paltrow for her abominations like Emma, Sliding Doors and Shakespeare in Love and Renee for the Brigit Jones shenanigans, but are there any you think highly of who have played British? I personally resent the British actors who have come here and played MLK Jr. and Harriet Tubman.

by Anonymousreply 565Last Friday at 1:19 AM

For lunch today I'm doing liver and onions with mash.

Tonight for tea I'm going to do salmon, new potatoes and peas

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by Anonymousreply 566Last Friday at 1:21 AM

[quote] There are American actors you must despise like Gwyneth Paltrow for her abominations like Emma, Sliding Doors and Shakespeare in Love and Renee for the Brigit Jones shenanigans, but are there any you think highly of who have played British? I personally resent the British actors who have come here and played MLK Jr. and Harriet Tubman.

Actors play a role, I don't despise any of them to be honest. The most obvious examples are two actresses that I think played the same person very well in their own way. That person was Margaret Thatcher and the two actresses, Gillian Anderson and Meryl Street. Both were good IMHO.

by Anonymousreply 567Last Friday at 1:24 AM

Damn spell checker

by Anonymousreply 568Last Friday at 1:27 AM

R565 Renée was very good as Bridget Jones and I've never heard of anyone resenting her. It all comes down to how good their accent is. RZ's was almost flawless (though there's always a slight 'tell' to British ears). Another one who was very impressive with his Estuary English accent recent was Michael C Hall in Safe. That's a tricky accent to nail for non-British people.

Another one who was very impressive was Bridget Fonda in Scandal. If her surname wasn't a massive giveaway, I'd have been convinced she was English. Also had no idea Jennifer Ehle was American for years.

If they're good at it, we like them.

by Anonymousreply 569Last Friday at 1:31 AM

Be honest, you sent us Emily Blunt because you wanted rid of her.

by Anonymousreply 570Last Friday at 1:39 AM

R570 and James Corden.

by Anonymousreply 571Last Friday at 1:41 AM

The thread title is “British Questions.” Do you prefer to be called British or English?

by Anonymousreply 572Last Friday at 2:00 AM

R572 that's a whole new can of worms.

They're not the same thing and it's far too complicated to get into in terms of national identity etc. I often find Americans will use the term 'English' when they mean 'British' and that annoys us. Call anyone from Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland 'English' and you'll probably get a smack in the mouth or at least an earful of expletives. Call someone from England whose parent/s aren't British, 'English' and they'll say they're British, not English.

I, for example, was born in London to two foreign parents and grew up here for the most part. I'm very happy and proud to call myself British, but would never call myself English. It's a bit of a minefield.

by Anonymousreply 573Last Friday at 2:30 AM

Having read through all this thread I'm beginning to wonder if I'm actually British at all.

I couldn't give a fuck about the royal family, football, Agas, tea (never drunk it in my life).

I do however find it fascinating how others see us.

I'd high recommend the book Watching The English by Kate Fox, which explains at lot of things we actually do, things that are not represented on Downton Abbey or Keeping Up Appearances or whatever programme it is people get their curious ideas from.

by Anonymousreply 574Last Friday at 2:38 AM

*highly recommend before someone oh, dears me.

by Anonymousreply 575Last Friday at 2:39 AM

What do you think of the Harries twins, Jack and Finn?

by Anonymousreply 576Last Friday at 2:54 AM

And the Kray twins, Ronnie and Reggie??

by Anonymousreply 577Last Friday at 3:11 AM

R576 until I read your post I'd literally never heard of them.

R577 - over sentimentalised thugs. Not much else to say really.

by Anonymousreply 578Last Friday at 3:54 AM

R578 They are the grandsons of one of your greatest playwrights and authors.

by Anonymousreply 579Last Friday at 4:02 AM

R579 So what? They are complete nobodies.

by Anonymousreply 580Last Friday at 4:07 AM

My Mum has a gas-fired AGA; it really is the heart of the home - everyone wants to lean up against it to chat when they visit. (Or used to, before coronavirus.)

Any American actor who can do a good British accent is OK in my book. That rules Anne Hathaway out - her British accent attempts have all been awful. Renée Zellweger's is so fabulous, I find her real accent disconcerting.

by Anonymousreply 581Last Friday at 10:26 AM

[quote]Renée was very good as Bridget Jones and I've never heard of anyone resenting her.

Toni Collette did because she thought she should play Bridget Jones.

by Anonymousreply 582Last Friday at 10:42 AM

Do Brits eat English Muffins?

The article at wiki seems to indicate they're more of an American and Australian thing.

by Anonymousreply 583Last Friday at 11:17 AM

Are the Egg McMuffins from McDonald’s in Britain made with English muffins like the ones in the USA?

by Anonymousreply 584Last Friday at 11:32 AM

Are "dodgy kebabs" as prevalent as they appear to be on British soap operas?

by Anonymousreply 585Last Friday at 12:23 PM

R583 Yes.

R584 Yes.

R585 Yes.

by Anonymousreply 586Last Friday at 12:25 PM

[quote] Do Brits eat English Muffins?

Yep. We have them buttered with jam or with Eggs Benedict. 65c for 4.

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by Anonymousreply 587Last Friday at 1:25 PM

[quote] Are the Egg McMuffins from McDonald’s in Britain made with English muffins like the ones in the USA?

Yep.

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by Anonymousreply 588Last Friday at 1:27 PM

[quote] Are "dodgy kebabs" as prevalent as they appear to be on British soap operas?

Yes. Absolutely. Staple diet after sinking a few pints. Top cuisine!

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by Anonymousreply 589Last Friday at 1:32 PM

How does one pronounce Marylebone?

I enjoy strolling through that neighborhood when I visit England....is it as chic (or would hip be a better word?) as it appears to be?

by Anonymousreply 590Last Friday at 3:49 PM

Ordinary people like me pronounce it Marylebon.

Would be posh folk pronounce it Marlybone.

That is where Prince Philip is in hospital so I wonder how he would pronounce it, if he has heard of it.

by Anonymousreply 591Last Friday at 3:52 PM

[quote] How does one pronounce Marylebone?

Marry-lee-bone is how I say it.

The only thing I think about in that area of London is Madame Tussaud's, the railway station and Lords Cricket Ground.

by Anonymousreply 592Last Friday at 5:49 PM

Do Brits get on down to Lambeth Way to do the Lambeth Walk?

by Anonymousreply 593Last Friday at 11:53 PM

[quote] Do Brits get on down to Lambeth Way to do the Lambeth Walk?

Any evening, any day. You'll find us all. Doin' the Lambeth walk.

by Anonymousreply 594Last Saturday at 1:36 AM

[quote] Also had no idea Jennifer Ehle was American for years.

Throughout the 1990s every role she had was performed in the same plummy English accent. The Camomile Lawn, Pride & Prejudice, Wilde, Melissa, Paradise Road, Bedrooms & Hallways, This Year's Love. The only time she attempted a different accent was as Cynthia Lennon in Backbeat. All the same accent as she has during this Rosie interview. Her 2000 Tony speech is also in her English accent.

And on another note, why hasn't anyone cast her as Meryl Streep's daughter in something?

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by Anonymousreply 595Last Saturday at 3:13 AM

Jennifer Ehle is the daughter of stage luminary Rosemary Harris. and too old to be Meryl's daughter. Well, she's 51 and Meryl is 71 so I suppose it's possible.

by Anonymousreply 596Last Saturday at 3:28 AM

Marylebone is the home of Conran's, the wonderful Daunt Book Store, a small Paul Smith boutique and the very hip Firehouse Restaurant.

by Anonymousreply 597Last Saturday at 3:33 AM

R597 On no planet is Marylebone "hip".

by Anonymousreply 598Last Saturday at 3:40 AM

Was Marylebone where Gwyneth Cuntrow lived when she was with Chrissy Martin?

by Anonymousreply 599Last Saturday at 3:43 AM

I've never heard anyone call Marylebone mary-le-bone. (I'm not saying it doesn't happen, just that I've not encountered it!) I pronounce it mar-lee-bon. Southwark is also often mispronounced - it's suzth-ark, not south-walk.

by Anonymousreply 600Last Saturday at 4:17 AM
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