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Did any of you bitches read Nancy Drew books?

A question for gay men only.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 15911/23/2020

I read a few of them when I was a kid. But I liked the Hardy Boys more. The Three Investigators were the best though, because they had a secret hideout.

I don't know where the heck my parents bought me books, because I read stuff that even people my age have rarely heard of, like The Famous Five (I'm American) and The Mad Scientists Club.

Mabel Maney wrote a funny series of teen detective parodies starring lesbian Nancy Clue.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 109/17/2020

I never did, but I had a friend who referred to the two series as "Hardy Drew and the Nancy Boys."

I've never thought of them by any other name since.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 209/17/2020

I loved them! Nancy cruising around town in her roadster with her obviously lesbian gay pal George.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 309/17/2020

Remember her boyfriend Ned Nickerson? He sounded hot. I’m guessing 7” and a good girth. Nancy wouldn’t settle for any less.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 409/17/2020

Devoted Hardy Boys reader here. My favorite line was, “Joe, his impetuous younger brother”.

When I had read through all of the Hardy Boys books I could get my hands on I started to read my sister’s Nancy Drew books. I always wanted to see a picture of Nancy’s father, Carson Drew. He sounded pretty hot from the description of him in the book.

Our older neighbors learned we were into the mysteries and started to give us the copies they read as children. Some of those copies were so old that words like today and tomorrow were printed as to-day and to-morrow.

There were 5 of us in the neighborhood who read the books and traded them back and forth. We were shocked to learn there is no such person as author Carolyn Keene. I thought it was a violation of male trust when I learned that a person who wrote under the name Franklin W. Dixon could also be writing as Carolyn Keene!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 509/17/2020

After she call that clock “old” I was done with her, girl couldn’t identify an antique if her life depended on it!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 609/17/2020

I remember a nelly but Catholic and married closet queen reviewing the books on YouTube a few years ago.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 709/17/2020

I read one Nancy Drew book. It was filled with so many coincidences, that even I realized how stupid it was.

I read all the Three Investigators books, however! So much better

by Pencil-Diallerreply 809/17/2020

[quote] We were shocked to learn there is no such person as author Carolyn Keene.

Yes, apparently, many different people wrote those books

by Pencil-Diallerreply 909/17/2020

The Three Investigators... all I remember is the lead of the trio having a weight problem.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 1009/17/2020

Probably one of the reasons I liked them!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 1109/17/2020

Wait, isn’t Enola Holmes coming out this week?

by Pencil-Diallerreply 1209/17/2020

As a gayling, I devoured them (and passed them on to my sister) and imagined that "Carolyn Keene" lived in an elegant Greenwich Village apartment with a skylight over her writing desk.

And then I found out that "Carolyn Keene" was actually a syndicate of underpaid, anonymous hacks (male and female).

by Pencil-Diallerreply 1309/17/2020

If you can get a hold of the early, unexpurgated editions they are a TOTAL HOOT!! Full of ethnic and racial stereotypes, 1930s slang, and guns galore!

One of my favorite lines was when she and her father, in separate cars, were in hot pursuit of a dangerous criminal. Before starting the chase, Carson Drew advises Nancy and her “chums” to “Let me lead and try to avoid any stray bullets!”

Only in America!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 1409/17/2020

My favorite was "The case of the Missing Fucks"

by Pencil-Diallerreply 1509/17/2020

I would love to see a move - fictionalized or documentary - called I Was Carolyn Keene.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 1609/17/2020

I think I read them all and all the Hardy Boys too. Then I graduated to Agatha.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 1709/17/2020

I grew up in Mumbai , India and read Hardy Boys. 3 investigators but lived the British ones - Famous Five, Secret Seven and others by Enid Blyton. I personally hated Nancy Drew as they weren't well written nor great plots!!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 1809/17/2020

I read them because my mother had them in the house, but I preferred the Hardly Boys.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 1909/17/2020

[quote] If you can get a hold of the early, unexpurgated editions they are a TOTAL HOOT!! Full of ethnic and racial stereotypes, 1930s slang, and guns galore!

I have the complete set of the Hardy Boys reprints of the original text. I refuse to read any PC versions of classic American books.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 2009/17/2020

The Case of the Hissing Eldergay was a good one.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 2109/17/2020

Three Investigators? They are new to me.....I read ALL the Hardy Boys, one or two Nancy Drews....I preferred boys.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 2209/17/2020

Here's the R7 I mentioned

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 2309/17/2020

My mom bought a bunch of hardback ND and Hardy Boys mysteries at a church sale! I wanted to be one of the Hardy Boys!

As mentioned above, Nancy had a cool lez pal, George! George was smart and brave, as opposed to her more girly CIS cousin, Bess.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 2409/17/2020

I read "The Secret of the Ivory Charm" as a young gayling and loved it. Loved Nancy's "titian" flip hairdo. The Hardy Boys never interested me, however.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 2509/17/2020

R21 Clue in the Caftan was one of my favorites. A vintage floral garment in the window of a charity shop is found to have a real treasure map hidden amongst the intricate embroidered flowers and vines!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 2609/17/2020

I would like an R rated version of the threesome on the wet sand in What Happened at Midnight.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 2709/17/2020

I'm sure I still have my old copy of The Secret of the Fetid Cunt somewhere in the basement.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 2809/17/2020

Gay men only? I'd like to hear from our lesbian sisters on the subject.

For me, I had a twin sister and another sister and we decamped into separate Nancy and Hardy Boys areas.

I always aimed myself from early childhood on at male-male boy teams and situations (like "Fury" and "My Friend Flicka") where a boy was staying with relatives or unrelated adults with youngish men working with them. I yearned before I knew what I yearned for. A little later I started skipping the boy and just enjoying Westerns such as "Laredo," "Laramie" and other shows with a variety of, let's say, "role models."

by Pencil-Diallerreply 2909/17/2020

R10 Yes! That was Jupiter Jones! I wanted to be him, too.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 3009/17/2020

[quote] Gay men only? I'd like to hear from our lesbian sisters on the subject.

Uh. Shut up.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 3109/17/2020

[quote] Gay men only? I'd like to hear from our lesbian sisters on the subject.

Weren’t they outside playing basketball or softball or beating someone up while we were inside reading or playing with our Easy Bake?

by Pencil-Diallerreply 3209/17/2020

Of course, I read all of her books. I also read all of the Hardy Boys. (I was a strange kid)

I was in love with Frank, Joe and Nancy's boyfriend Ned Nickerson.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 3309/17/2020

Of course I did. I knew I would finish the Hardy Boys books too soon, so I added Nancy Drew.

Here's a listing of the Hardy Boys books, with outline and manuscript writers. I read the Grosset & Dunlap series, ending with The Mystery of the Chinese Junk. I don't remember exactly what year I started, but the blue side and back covers had just been introduced. Some of my first books had actual book jackets, and the cardboard covers were beige with brown printing. I had all the books through the Chinese Junk one.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 3409/17/2020

Here's a similar list of Nancy Drew books. I read the Grosset & Dunlap editions. The first ones had the paper jackets on blue cardboard covered books, the newer ones had the yellow back and side printed covers, no jacket. I read all of them through The Moonstone Castle Mystery.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 3509/17/2020

Frank and Joe took turns with Chet and wrecked his hole!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 3609/17/2020

[quote]Gay men only? I'd like to hear from our lesbian sisters on the subject.

Fine. On their experiences reading the Hardy Boys.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 3709/17/2020

Ah, I loved all those books, inherited the Nancy Drews from a family friend, so I had no shame of asking for a “girls” book. The Hardy Boys were socially acceptable, but I didn’t know anyone else who read them.

I must have been a strange child, as I don’t remember reading much stuff that didn’t involve a mysterious house or a long-forgotten treasure to be found in a neglected ruined castle.

I read all the Three Investigators too, sadly growing up to be more like Jupiter Jones than his hawt friends.

I graduated on to all of these from the more baffling Famous Five, who were living in the same country as me, but obviously lived a completely different life. As a kid, I wondered where my secret island was, and why I couldn’t head off on a boat with my friends for the summer without the police taking us home. I was outraged at learning that the Famous Five books had been written decades before I was born!

I’ve actually got a box of all my old childhood books somewhere.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 3809/17/2020

I'm a LESBIAN and I was a big fan of ONE Nancy Drew novel, that I read countless times. Read a few more, but didn't like them as much.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 3909/17/2020

Not that anybody cares, but in the French editions the '"author" is credited as Caroline Quine. I always wondered how to pronounce the last name, while to my mother it was obvious it was a play on "Queen".

by Pencil-Diallerreply 4009/17/2020

I was a big fan of the Famous Five, too.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 4109/17/2020

I loved Nancy, that's how I knew I was a baby gayling! I do think she and George had a Peppermint Patty/Marcie thing going on and Ned was only her beard. Bess was usually completely useless.

But I was also a voracious little reader of all of those mystery series-Hardy Boys, Dana Girls, Encyclopedia Brown, even the Bobbsey Twins. It later progressed to Agatha Christie, then Stephen King and more thriller/horror stuff in my teens.

I used to save up all of my grass cutting and chore money so I could cut out the page in the back and send my $2.50 to get the next in the series shipped to me. Good times!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 4209/17/2020

I read one of the 1930s Nancy Drew’s (red cover) and it was racist as hell. Even the original blue spine ones had tropes like “untrustworthy Orientals”. Ugh. I read the memoir of one of the authors of the original Hardy Boys books, I don’t remember them being as racist? anyway the writer really tried to add interesting details, to give the stories a real sense of place. They were writing to an outline that was provided so there was a limit to how much he could do. The books were revised every ten years or so and he said all that was stripped out of the next edition.

When I was in college, I wanted to write a term paper on either Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys books so I went to the city library to check them out to reread them. I asked the librarian where I could find them and she said “we don’t carry them because we don’t consider them literature “.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 4309/17/2020

R43 I think someone years ago did a dissertation on all of the racism in the Little Orphan Annie comics. It would be interesting to go back and look at all of these old series in terms of today's racial and gender norms.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 4409/17/2020

Nice to see people who remember the Three Investigators. I have never met anyone in real life who remembers them. Not that it comes up very often in conversation.

Now I'm kinda curious to reread one of them. About ten years ago I reread two of my childhood faves and it was interesting to see them from an adult perspective. (A Wrinkle in Time and The House With a Clock in Its Walls, if you were wondering.)

by Pencil-Diallerreply 4509/17/2020

I read my mom’s 1940s editions of Nancy Drew with their delightful spelling of to-morrow [always hyphenated] and thinly veiled racism.

I was probably 9-11 years old and got through about 30 of them.

Single parent, housekeeper, and a roadster. It was intriguingly exotic.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 4609/17/2020

Ha! I remember the clock one!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 4709/17/2020

I loved the Nancy Drew series of books and read at least half of them as a baby lesbian to be. By the way, there are several fairly cheap Nancy Drew adventure/mystery PC games from the early 2000s to more recent that are actually really fun to play (Her Interactive makes them).

by Pencil-Diallerreply 4809/17/2020

Library check out... yep, in grammar school and early junior high school. Nancy Drew, a few Hardy Boys (liked ND more, as I remember). Does anyone remember the Tom Swift series? Like Nancy Drew only Science Fiction. Which led me to Robert Heinlein which fucked everything up....

Do kids go to libraries to check out books anymore? I'm guessing not.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 4909/17/2020

I would have bet anything that this book I remembered was a Nancy Drew. The cover scared me so much I couldn't even look at it. Which explains why I didn't know it wasn't a Nancy Drew book.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 5009/17/2020

“The thermostat is set too high," said Tom heatedly.

I never read them, not being interested in science.

The Dana Girls books were hard to find. Not at the library and none of my friends read them. I did find one or two and was madly envious that they went to a boarding school. That seemed very cool. In my mind, it was set in the woods.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 5109/17/2020

[quote]The Dana Girls books were hard to find.

They had them in the bottom shelf of the HB / ND / Tom Swift tier at my local bookstore.

Were you a boy? (I was.)

by Pencil-Diallerreply 5209/17/2020

I was a voracious reader but unfortunately my parents could not afford to buy books so I got everything from the library.

Thank you Miss Hall for letting me check out as many as I wanted.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 5309/17/2020

OP is a twat.

I thought he didn't want twats here.

Meaning - you don't get to do threads for your invited audience only, you insufferable lunatic. Your pussy ain't that special and your posts are hardly anything worth discriminating over.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 5409/17/2020

R39, sorry. The OP told me to shut up when I suggested that we'd like to hear from women, too.

But the OP is one of "those" gay men. Meaning a 52-year-old chub who wants to hear Nifty tales of how people were jealous of Joe in Nancy's stories, and dreamed of having his paws on him.

If he's an asshole, blame him.

Love some of the covers here. Thanks.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 5509/17/2020

r54 is more insufferable than OP.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 5609/17/2020

I wanted to hear from gay men their experiences reading these books, which, as a boy, I was not allowed to read.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 5709/17/2020

There. Was that so hard? Very reasonable, R57.

And so maybe then people could say what their experiences were and include who they are.

"Uh. Shut up" conveys something different. I play the games here but the exclusionary one is tired and unhelpful, as it can align people where none of us (I trust) want to be. Yeah, I'm insufferable, but part of communication is communicating.

I never touched Nancy Drew. She was too much like girls I knew. I wanted to read about boys I didn't know.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 5809/17/2020

R58, are you a boy or are you a girl?

by Pencil-Diallerreply 5909/17/2020

I loved Nancy Drew, The Hardy Boys, and The Famous Five, and devoured all of them, plus everything by Judy Blume (do kids still read her books? Is there a 21st century Judy Blume?)

by Pencil-Diallerreply 6009/17/2020

r58 is an alien with that nonsensical language.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 6109/17/2020

R45 I still remember the title "le Perroquet qui bégayait", from the French translation of the Three Investigators. I'm 42, and would never bring this up in conversation. It's true I never think about them.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 6209/17/2020

R39 which one??

by Pencil-Diallerreply 6309/17/2020

R45 I recently reread The Figure in the Shadows by John Bellairs (I think that one came after The House with a Clock...). It was just as good (and scary!) as I remembered!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 6409/17/2020

En Français, r40, Quine would be pronounced...Keene.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 6509/17/2020

I never read a Nancy Drew. I think I might have read a Hardy Boys book or two, but wasn't really into them.

The mysteries I loved were the Happy Hollisters. I couldn't get enough of them. Also the Three Investigators.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 6609/17/2020

Mon truc en plumes... Anyway.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 6709/17/2020

The only game we're playing on this thread is this one, r58.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 6809/17/2020

God, nothing can ruin a fun thread like a dyke.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 6909/17/2020

R63 The Clue of the Black Keys. Apparently written by Wilhelmina Rankin and Harriet Adams. One of the keys was made of obsidian. I was obsessed with it. Never saw the word again in my life, but boy did I know it then! Still do, only use it every thirty years or so.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 7009/17/2020

Thanks R39/R70 I’ll look for that one.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 7109/17/2020

I call it the Barbie/Midge complex, r42. Of course to avoid competition, Barbie *had* to choose a butterface best friend. Nancy didn't have to worry about lesbian George or overweight Bess encroaching into her Ned Nickerson territory.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 7209/17/2020

I was a big fan of Beverly Gray...

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 7309/17/2020

R18 my story exactly! Loved the various Enid Blyton series, Famous Five, Secret Seven etc.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 7409/17/2020

R8 I know right?

It also has a three types of guys today any gayling could like.

Jupe - for the chub chasers/bear lovers

Pete - the jock. Jerked off to him so many times..

Bob - the nerd.

I think they were are hot in their own way.

Fúck Nancy Drew and her stinkfish, her fat best friend and Dyke cousin!

Yeah I think Ned was at least 7 in cut, hairless balls.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 7509/17/2020

My sister collected them. Even as an 8 year old kid, I knew that I shouldn't read them in front of my father but I didn't know why.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 7609/17/2020

Here are the wonderfully evocative covers. I grew up with the later set, on the right, but I love the earlier ones as well.Probably like the late 50s-Kennedy era versions the best, the ones that are action scenes instead of montages. Imagine doing all that running around and climbing in a blouse, skirt, hat, and flats or low heels with a bag and maybe a hat on.

There's a huge difference between original text Nancys (vol 1-34) and their revised versions. Even though the revisions were done to eliminate the stereotyping and racism, the revised books seem to have their share of those elements too.

I picked one up to reread it, or as much of it as I could take, recently. The character of Nancy is absolutely a forward thinking feminist in her way, but she also has all kinds of white privilege. Also the constant cliffhangers and the pre-computer/internet/cellphone detective methods and story twists really do keep the stories well in the past. Nancy is constantly getting chloroformed or bound and gagged, locked in...whatever that means, symbolically. She's also suddenly expert at a wide, wide variety of things. So many of the mysteries could be more or less solved with a Google search.

You can also see Harriet Adams getting to be more and more of an old lady as the original series (1-56) goes on and Nancy isn't like someone from the 1960s or 70s at all. The books become obsessive about the recovery of objects: priceless family heirlooms that really wouldn't be worth that much, bracelets and necklaces, plates and statues or figurines or vases. Or alternately, about uniting long-lost relatives in days when people could more easily disappear. Or breaking a code and finding something.

Love it when the action in the story completely stops to describe in intimate detail Nancy and chums stopping at a roadside eatery, getting either totally perfect or shockingly rude service, and having tea and sandwiches...then they get back in the roadster and get on with the mystery.

The link is a great site for Nancy Drew fans.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 7709/17/2020

Cherry Ames knew where to find the boys!

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 7809/17/2020

This is a side tangent, but I also loved the ABC series. I especially enjoyed when they merged Nancy and the Hardy Boys. Frank totally wanted to bone Nancy but she always kept him at arms length. Then there was the homoerotic tension between Parker Stevenson and Shawn Cassidy....and their badass van with shag carpeting!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 7909/17/2020

[quote] Nancy is constantly getting chloroformed

omg, that is so true. Chloroform and quicksand were popular themes in the early 60s. I’m a little disappointed that I haven’t got to experience either as an adult.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 8009/17/2020

Were there any titles where both happened?

by Pencil-Diallerreply 8109/17/2020

The Curious Case of the Bug Up the Ass

by Pencil-Diallerreply 8209/17/2020

Coffee, tea or Vicki Barr?

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 8309/17/2020

Nancy seemed to be into bondage...

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 8409/17/2020

And...

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 8509/17/2020

Plus...

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 8609/17/2020

Ooooooooooo!

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 8709/17/2020

No Drew, just Hardy. Because I like cock.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 8809/17/2020

I read all of them. As a young gayling, when I finished one Nancy Drew Book, I would race to the library to borrow the next one.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 8909/17/2020

I have a stylish friend who said she didn't read Nancy Drew, but would look at the covers in bookstores to see if she liked what Nancy wore. Strictly fashion literacy.

I too loved the Three Investigators series, and collected them all in cheaply bound paperback editions that eventually fell to pieces.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 9009/17/2020

I was all about the Three Investigators, the Mad Scientists' Club, and Encyclopedia Brown

by Pencil-Diallerreply 9109/17/2020

Loved Encyclopedia Brown. And the Great Brain series.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 9209/17/2020

[quote][R63] The Clue of the Black Keys. Apparently written by Wilhelmina Rankin and Harriet Adams. One of the keys was made of obsidian. I was obsessed with it. Never saw the word again in my life, but boy did I know it then! Still do, only use it every thirty years or so.

That was one of the ones that was rewritten for political correctness. Several African-Americans figured in it, and the original title was [italic]The Clue of the Blackies.[/italic]

by Pencil-Diallerreply 9309/17/2020

Encyclopedia Brown, yes! How could I forget about the boy genius?

by Pencil-Diallerreply 9409/17/2020

An early one...

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 9509/17/2020

This one kept me on the edge of my seat!

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 9609/17/2020

The first Nancy Drew book was read to us at school, near the end of the school year, so all summer we’d go to the library and get a different one or two every week. Then I started on the hardy boys. There was a character in one of the ND books named Mr. Darlington, and I thought it was the most elegant wonderful name I’d ever heard, but I imagined him as bring a fat troll, so I was conflicted.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 9709/17/2020

My public and school libraries wouldn't buy the Hardy Boys books, so I had to buy used copies of the most ancient editions. Lame.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 9809/17/2020

I got hooked when I went to see Emma Roberts movie in theaters as a kid. I find the older books the best (although, yes, they can be very racist for today's standards at times). Also like the 90's paperbacks. I like the PC games, the earlier ones are a bit dated but still very good; I replay them, and they still hold up to me.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 9909/17/2020

Loved Nancy Drew and The Three Investigators, but Hardy Boys, not so much. I also loved the Trixie Belden series.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 10009/17/2020

[quote]—Jupiter-Jones

Oh my god.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 10109/18/2020

I think I read all of the Lewis Barnevelt books, R64, but I only clearly remember the first one. I seem to recall the resolution of Figure in the Shadows left something hanging that creeped me out. Maybe I will reread it. I found a Three Investigators torrent...add it to the pile!

Sorry to keep going off topic from Nancy Drew, but I read all those Hardy Boys and Nancy Drews in rapid succession and they blur together. Mostly what I remember is that they felt a little old-fashioned.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 10209/18/2020

[quote]—Jupiter Jones, hanging out with Constance McCashin

Ha! That even better. Feel free to discuss whatever. Lewis Barnavelt I'd never heard of before.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 10309/18/2020

PS Any of you Famous Five fans remember when The Comic Strip Presents did a parody, Five Go Mad on Mescalin? Featuring DL faves French & Saunders! I think there was a sequel too.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 10409/18/2020

At least *I* made it to Hollywood!

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 10509/18/2020

Good for you, whoever you are.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 10609/18/2020

At least I didn't do lesbo porn, Nance.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 10709/18/2020

I read the Hardy Boys, but in general the Three Investigators held my attention more and they worked for Alfred Hitchcock. I know they had a few books after his death, but they seemed to disappear in the 80's. Some of Alfred Hitchcock's horror anthologies really creeped me out.

I forgot about the Great Brain - I read a few of those and Encyclopedia Brown. There was also a series called The Secret Seven of a group of kids, but the only thing I remember about those is that they had a dog I wanted. I grew up in a small town, and I think our library had a lot of older series.

There was one series involving a kid who had a chemistry or magic set or something in between, but I cannot remember what it was called and my Google searches have come up empty. I think an old lady helped him out from time to time. If I could get into my grade school library as it was in 1978, I remember where they were on the shelf, but no time machine.

I also graduated from the Three Investigators to an Agatha Christie phase (with some Perry Mason thrown in).

I reread Wrinkle of Time when the movie came out, and it had not aged well. I loved the book as a kid and thought I had read it as a young adult and still found it decent, but on the third read decades later I mainly wanted to jettison the kids into space. Lord of the Rings did better on an adult read, great creation of the middle earth and story line, and great characters - but a lot of them just a type of character and not really fleshed out. Where the Red Fern Grows is my other childhood favorite that I still have my copy. I suspect that would still be good on reread (I reread at the end of high school and remember thinking it was well-written, but think I thought the same thing rereading Wrinkle of Time at that point ), but am not sure I want to deal with aftermath of that one right now.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 10809/18/2020

Trixie Beldon is from that long ago time when a gang of kids would get on their bikes and roam around all creation. It was more relatable than Nancy Drew and her roadster because not many teens had their own cars back then.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 10909/18/2020

[quote]At least I didn't do lesbo porn, Nance.

They were ART PHOTOS!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 11009/18/2020

They were porn, Nance.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 11109/18/2020

Her books are banned from my lending library. Don't even come asking for them.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 11209/18/2020

[quote]Nancy seemed to be into bondage...

The Hardy Boys did not get into bondage peril as frequently, but this cover is listed as an influence of more than one person with a bondage fetish.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 11309/18/2020

I was TERRIFIED of quicksand reading those books in middle grade.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 11409/18/2020

I'm too lazy to Photoshop it but R113 needs to be retitled "Beware Uncle Bottom."

by Pencil-Diallerreply 11509/18/2020

I updated it and changed the title to The Mystery of the Stretched Sphincter, r115.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 11609/18/2020

[quote]There was one series involving a kid who had a chemistry or magic set or something in between, but I cannot remember what it was called and my Google searches have come up empty. I think an old lady helped him out from time to time. If I could get into my grade school library as it was in 1978, I remember where they were on the shelf, but no time machine.

I think it's Scott Corbett's "Trick" series: the first novel was "The Lemonade Trick".

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 11709/18/2020

I love Roz Chast!

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 11809/18/2020

Thanks R 117 - I have tried to remember that series off and on for years and never gotten it to pull up in a search.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 11909/18/2020

Nancy Drew always struck me as a constant masterbator, which seemed progressive at the time.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 12009/18/2020

Thank you for sharing, r120, and...oh dear.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 12109/18/2020

The Happy Hollisters!

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 12209/18/2020

I started with Encyclopedia Brown, then Nancy Drew. ND bored me with her constant meddling in her dull pleated skirts, thick wool sweaters and bobby socks. I went straight to Zane Grey novels after a box full were given to my family.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 12309/18/2020

Missed this Hardy Boys story...

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 12409/18/2020

BRAVO, R116!! I'm still laughing.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 12509/18/2020

There was an obscure Nancy Drew book called “The Scissoring Mystery”. And let’s not forget that little known Hardy Boys title “The Curse of the Jade Anal Beads”.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 12609/18/2020

Bonita Nancy

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 12709/18/2020

Now I want to read the original Nancy Drews from the 30s. Anyone know where to find copies?

by Pencil-Diallerreply 12809/18/2020

Try eBay, r128? The old ones have this great deco graphic on the inside.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 12909/18/2020

R128 Ebay is a great place to get them. Some do have the endpapers that R129's image shows, but the tell-tale sign of an original text book is the 25 chapters (as opposed to 20 in the revised text) and the page count will be right at or over 200 pages.

Only books 1-34 have original text and revised text; books 35-56 were never revised.

If you grew up like me with the picture covers and the blue multi-scene endpapers, the earlier picture cover (not the ones in use now) will usually also mean an original text, 25-chapter book. Books 1-4 and book 6 were never printed with original text in a picture cover though.

Many of the original text books also have a different font for the text than the one in the later books and the revisions. Hope this link helps.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 13009/18/2020

I read a couple of Hardy Boys mysteries and they were just OK. But then I stumbled on A Famous Five book by Enid Blyton and was was hooked on them as well as her Secret Seven series and even the St. Claires and Mallory Towers school series.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 13109/18/2020

R128, if you just want to read them, look up Project Gutenberg or one of its clones. They have out of copyright books—copyright lengths are different in other countries—and you can either read the early ones online or download.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 13209/19/2020

This was my favorite as a young, gay thing.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 13309/19/2020

I've read the controversial "The Mystery of the Mantle Clock!"

So many swears.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 13409/19/2020

The Clue to Larkspur Lane, i iked the cover, as a 9 yr old boy......loved the Hardy boys alot, the paper covers were awesome. i have many.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 13509/19/2020

Enjoyed Nancy Drew but was more of a Hardy Boys fan. It always made me all tingly whenever they got captured and tied up.

I also read Trixie Belden which most people seem to have never heard of. She, her two older brothers and their friends formed a club and solved mysteries. I liked all the boys except for her brother Mart. He came across as an obnoxious dick.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 13609/19/2020

I would say I wish I had kept all of my Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, Dana Girls, and Tom Swift books—I had every single volume through 1962—but that would have meant carrying too much stuff with me all my life or, who knows, being a hoarder. I sold them all to the used bookstore in our town, sometime during high school, I believe. Now I see them listed on eBay for $20 or more per book for the condition mine were in.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 13709/19/2020

Did anyone here join the Nancy Drew or Hardy Boys Fan Club? I was too stingy and poor.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 13809/19/2020

R138 Never joined the fan club but that show was must see tv for me back in the day. My wall was plastered with pics of both of them. Thank you, Tiger Beat Magazine.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 13909/20/2020

R139: I have the Shaun/Parker dolls with their original boxes!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 14009/20/2020

This raises the question...what exactly was in Nancy's box?

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 14109/20/2020

Reading was just too boring, but I I loved watching the Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries. Shaun Cassidy was so cute!

by Pencil-Diallerreply 14209/20/2020

[quote]This raises the question...

Are the "begs the question..." queens going to jump down our throats for saying this, too?

by Pencil-Diallerreply 14309/20/2020

This was a fun thread before lesbians ruined it.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 14410/31/2020

For whatever reason, I stopped reading books a couple of years ago. In an attempt to ease myself back into it, I bought this (from r105) on eBay. I found it both trenchant and gripping...

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 14510/31/2020
by Pencil-Diallerreply 14611/20/2020

I read a Mabel Maney lesbian spoof series about. Lesbian Nancy Clue I recall she was, after Nurse Cherry LOL.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 14711/20/2020

I read a Mabel Maney lesbian spoof series about. Lesbian Nancy Clue I recall she was, after Nurse Cherry LOL.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 14811/20/2020

Biggles and Billy bunter anyone?

by Pencil-Diallerreply 14911/20/2020

I read all the Bobbsy Twins, Nancy Drews and the Hardy Boys all in order bases on the numbers on the spine.

I am still upset to this day I dont have a twin, Did not have a roadster, Nor solve a mystery with my hot brother while I was in high school

by Pencil-Diallerreply 15011/20/2020

I read all the Nancy Drew & Hardy Boys books that were in our town’s library. I was fascinated by the descriptions of teenage fashions & the idioms ascribed to teens from those days - not the “cool” idioms, but the “clean” ones.

Eg, “Well, I like that!” meant “I don’t like that.”

by Pencil-Diallerreply 15111/20/2020

I liked Nancy Drew but I absolutely LIVED for the Trixie Belden series. It was probably my precursor to my teenage love of VC Andrews because it was kind of gothic and weird.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 15211/20/2020

Do preteens read today?

by Pencil-Diallerreply 15311/20/2020

R153 good question. Any parents of preteens want to weigh in?

by Pencil-Diallerreply 15411/21/2020

Here's one of R1's Mabel Maney lesbian Nancy Clue mysteries. They are a lot of fun, and she also wrote some about Cherry Aimless, RN, including some in which Nancy and Cherry work together to solve crimes.

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by Pencil-Diallerreply 15511/21/2020

I know this is a ND thread, but still, I'm surprised no one has mentioned the Hardy Boys on Mickey Mouse Club. They were HOT, and their dreamy father, Fenton Hardy....I seem to remember that THEY got bound gagged too. For some mysterious reason, it gave me a kind of tingle.....or was that Circus Boy???

by Pencil-Diallerreply 15611/21/2020

Other question: did any of you see that 2007 film and the new TV series.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 15711/23/2020

or the recent film with DL fave Linda Lavin

by Pencil-Diallerreply 15811/23/2020

The new TV show is a C-budget porno parody.

by Pencil-Diallerreply 15911/23/2020
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