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Art History 101

To the lovers of fine arts on DL - what are your favourite painters, books, periods, photographers? Where should an art virgin with scant access to galleries or museums of any times start?

by Anonymousreply 10811 hours ago

Neoclassicism with Jacques-Louis David! So many dramas!

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by Anonymousreply 105/17/2016

After failing five times to win the French Academy's Prix de Rome (protesting his 1772 loss with a hunger strike lasting a two-and-a-half days), Jacques-Louis David finally won it in 1774 and traveled to Rome for a five-year stay beginning in 1775. There, he painted this Study of a Man in 1778 when he was thirty. The painting is also known as Patroclus, who was Achilles' lover......

by Anonymousreply 205/17/2016

Caravaggio:

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by Anonymousreply 305/17/2016

Masters of Photography:

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by Anonymousreply 405/17/2016

I often find "B-list" artists, so to speak, more interesting than the super famous ones. That being said, here are my favourite "A-listers", in roughly chronological order:

Jan van Eyck

Hieronymus Bosch

Pieter Bruegel the Elder

Caravaggio

Jan Vermeer Van Delft

Canaletto

Jacques-Louis David

Caspar David Friedrich

Claude Monet

Edgar Degas

Henri Rousseau

Georges Seurat

Vincent Van Gogh

Henri Matisse

Giorgio De Chirico

Rene Magritte

Max Ernst

Edward Hopper

I love Academic art, and find it very underrated (because it used to be the conservative status quo opposing/opposed by the avantgarde) - it's due for a reappraisal imo.

I haven't read it myself yet, but E.H. Gombrich's "The Story of Art" is generally considered [italic] the[/italic] classic general art history.

by Anonymousreply 505/17/2016

Caspar David Friedrich

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by Anonymousreply 605/17/2016

Thank you all! Honestly, I binged watched the first two seasons of Portrait Artist Of The Year and am fascinated by the process. In each 4-hour heat the artists painted (usually painted - a couple drew and one guy did lino cuts) a celebrity. They didn't know during the first episode that they would be painting celebrities so it was kind of adorable to see their shock at seeing Robert Lindsay and Juliet Stevenson and Alison Steadman turn up to model. The winners prizes received commissions to paint Hilary Mantel and Alan Cumming for major institutions, and both models were thrilled with their likenesses.

As a young teen I was obsessed with the movie ARTEMISIA. Something about scantily clad Italians with fabulous dark hair.

How the fuck does J-L David get that sort of anatomically correct muscle definition? Or, rather, paint it?

The B-Listers I am certainly interested in.

As a tourist in Houston visiting the Rothko chapel, I happened upon a nearby exhibition of ... I can't recall his name, but the guy with the hat and the apple. What "school" is he a part of?

by Anonymousreply 705/17/2016

Margritte -- the Belgian surrealist did the apple/hat guy.

More --

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by Anonymousreply 805/17/2016

Thanks for the Masters of Photography link. I recall studying Lange at school.

Funnily enough, when I was in uni was trying to look grown up for my parents' impending visit and grabbed a coffee table book from the stack of art books my local bookstore had on sale I ended up grabbing one with a nicely lit black and white nude. It turned out to be a David Hamilton who just that weekend was brought up as a similarly bad influence when Sally Mann got bad press for her photographs of her kids! Not the greatest timing!

by Anonymousreply 905/17/2016

Thanks for that r8!

by Anonymousreply 1005/17/2016

Caspar David Friedrich fan here too, R6. His moody, contemplative, German landscapes appealed to me as a sullen teen, and still do to this day. They make me feel so alone but uplifted at once. This is definitely his most popular work.

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by Anonymousreply 1105/17/2016

Margritte invented Cousin It ten years before The Addams Family debuted on TV.

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by Anonymousreply 1205/17/2016

Sadly, many Friedrichs were destroyed in Allied bombings during ww2

by Anonymousreply 1305/17/2016

Ferdinand Hodler (1853-1918)

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by Anonymousreply 1405/18/2016

Ed Ruscha

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by Anonymousreply 1505/18/2016

Is WAYS OF SEEING worth a read? It was referenced multiple times in college and now I have no access to an academic library, I would have to purchase either the book or the TV show.

by Anonymousreply 1605/18/2016

Stuckists AN ANTIDOTE TO THE GHASTLY TURNER PRIZE (2008)

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by Anonymousreply 1705/20/2016

Stuckist Gallery

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by Anonymousreply 1805/20/2016

John Singer Sargent

by Anonymousreply 1905/20/2016

Rubens - Maria Serra Pallavicino

Rubens was impressed by the lifestyle of the wealthy, aristocratic families of Genoa. For some reason, he painted the parrot in a strange way, like a caricature.

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by Anonymousreply 2005/29/2016

Ed Ruscha - Lisp

Gimmicks, like writing with water, impress me.

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by Anonymousreply 2105/29/2016

Bernini.

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by Anonymousreply 2205/29/2016

Master of Calamarca - Angel Letiel Dei

This is how gay men would dress if they didn't have to fit in to straight society.

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by Anonymousreply 2305/29/2016

Dutch Masters

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by Anonymousreply 2405/29/2016

las Meniñas the best painting in history?

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by Anonymousreply 2505/29/2016

Excellent video, R25.

by Anonymousreply 2605/29/2016

Try:

Camille Paglia’s “Glittering Images: A Journey Through Art From Egypt to ‘Star Wars,’ ”

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by Anonymousreply 2705/29/2016

R19, I'm also a fan of John Singer Sargent's 'elongated' style of Edwardian portraiture. Likewise, I've always admired Howard Chandler Christy's evocations of Gatsby-esque era luxury. Here's his portrait of first lady Grace Coolidge.

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by Anonymousreply 2805/29/2016

nothing news

by Anonymousreply 2905/29/2016

Always a favorite!

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by Anonymousreply 3005/29/2016

Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji -- Hokusai

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by Anonymousreply 3105/29/2016

Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Hiroshige)

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by Anonymousreply 3205/29/2016

Renaissance:

I think the Venetian Renaissance was somewhat upstaged by the goings on in Florence and Rome. Giorgione and Bellini are both wonderful examples of the Venetian aesthetic. Especially "The Tempest".

Dutch Golden Age:

Check out Jacob Van Ruisdael. Breathtaking stuff. The Impressionists owe him a huge debt. When I have a billion dollars I'll have one of his dreamy paintings hanging on my wall. Uncle Saloman was great too.

Other good great landscape guys to check out: Whistler's Nocturnes (but his portraits were kind of crappy) and Turner.

Moody Realists:

This grouping isn't by period but by theme. It's kind of all over the place but the stylistic through line is there:

Durer DaVinci Zurbaran (stunning still lifes) De La Tour (nobody does candlelight better) Andrew Wyeth Thomas Eakins

Enjoy!

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by Anonymousreply 3305/29/2016

Kandinsky

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by Anonymousreply 3405/29/2016

Lincoln and T.R. were included with Nixon and Dubya, and the others. Oh the horror!

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by Anonymousreply 3505/30/2016

A Princess of the House of Naples - Francesco Laurana

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by Anonymousreply 3606/01/2016

Another vote for Kandinsky

by Anonymousreply 3706/01/2016

Art began in 1872 when Monet painted "Impression, Sunrise" and ended in 1956 when Pollock drove into a tree.

The entire estate was sold to the rich by Warhol. Art is now bought and sold like pork bellies.

by Anonymousreply 3806/01/2016

I was at the National Gallery of Art recently.

God, that place is beyond beautiful. I can spend hours there (and have).

Renoir is my guy.

They have many of the ones R5 listed there. I took pictures of them, too. 😛

by Anonymousreply 3906/01/2016

Following up on R8, another amazing Belgian surrealist, Paul Paul Delvaux Too bad The Art Institute of Chicago keeps his Masterpiece "In The Village of The Mermaids" in its archives. It used to be in the main surrealism gallery, but not for years, especially now that it is cafes and shops and less art.

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by Anonymousreply 4006/01/2016

Just one Paul. I didn't type that, I swear.

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by Anonymousreply 4106/01/2016

Remember the days when they prohibited photos in museums? Why is it that this is allowed today? Was it always a retarded rule? Or was there a valid reason for it?

by Anonymousreply 4206/01/2016

I was also at the Church of the Immaculate Conception and there is a display of chairs where the last few popes have sat. We could take pictures but without flash photography.

I guess they figure the bright lights will degrade the material? Maybe they figure only easily-impressed tourists (like me 🤓) will take pictures?

Regardless, the docent was so happy that I was enjoying the pictures so much. He said a lot of people go and walk around but don't appreciate or even understand what they are looking at.

I saw some idiot walk by and glance at Renoir's A Girl With A Watering Can as if he was walking past a movie poster or something equally unremarkable. I could look at that painting forever.

by Anonymousreply 4306/01/2016

Joan Crawford, photographed by Ruth Harriet Louise

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by Anonymousreply 4406/15/2016

Dorian Leigh by Cecil Beaton

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by Anonymousreply 4506/15/2016

Fort Peck Dam by Margaret Bourke-White

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by Anonymousreply 4606/15/2016

My favorite class in college.

by Anonymousreply 4706/15/2016

OP you are sort of a lost cause if you don't know how to learn about a major topic in world civilisation. Nor how vast it is. Just go your local library and get a book on art history. A general college textbook would do. Or a splashy big book with beautiful reproductions and a good easy ons some period. Then, IF you develop an interest, you can easily read and look further. You do realise ALL the major world museums have very helpful websites and high-definition reproductions of their masterpieces, with little essays on many of them. You have PLENTY of access to museums, virtually, and for free.

by Anonymousreply 4806/15/2016

Also, any decent sized American city will have a museum with a good collection as will many colleges and universities. You cant be all that far from one.

by Anonymousreply 4906/15/2016

Mark Rothko

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by Anonymousreply 5006/15/2016

Horizon Ocean Blue by Richard Diebenkorn

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by Anonymousreply 5106/15/2016

The BBC series Simon Schama's Power of Art is excellent for your purposes, OP. It can often be found on YouTube.

A Little History of Art, mentioned up thread, would be a nice and broad compliment to the BBC episodes.

by Anonymousreply 5206/15/2016

Lavender Mist, Number One by Jackson Pollock

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by Anonymousreply 5306/15/2016

Paul Jenkins

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by Anonymousreply 5406/15/2016

More Mark Rothko

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by Anonymousreply 5506/15/2016

I love the energy of Mondrian's Broadway Boogie Woogie.

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by Anonymousreply 5606/15/2016

R50, R51, R53, R54 and R55, those paintings were posted on previous art threads. Please DO make an effort, sweetie.

Why don't you post something really impressive like a Tom of Finland drawing or a joky Donald Trump like you did on this thread?

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by Anonymousreply 5706/16/2016

Sister Wendy

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by Anonymousreply 5806/16/2016

Travelling on my holiday! I have narrowed down my museums visits to ones I have never seen before.

What are your top 5 essential works at...

The Prado in Madrid - www.museodelprado.es/en/the-collection

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam - www.vangoghmuseum.nl/en

The Victoria and Albert in London - www.vam.ac.uk/collections

And, if I have time...

The Tate Britain in London - www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-britain

The National Gallery in London - www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/explore-the-paintings/30-highlight-paintings

by Anonymousreply 5906/17/2016

Our top five won't be your top five.

by Anonymousreply 6006/17/2016

Another lazy thread about the fine arts on DL. It's so bloody irritating. Can't anyone start a thread where people discuss the topic seriously and go beyond the usual canon name dropping and the modernist -isms? Why not talk about the auction houses? Traditional ones like Sotheby's and Christie's and the online versions such as Paddle 8 or the global art market network with its biennials, fairs and specialist publications. Strangely enough, many museum directors and curators are gay but they never get talked about on DL. It's such a wasted opportunity as I'm sure someone could spill on people like him:

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by Anonymousreply 6106/17/2016

OP, this story is an important primer on the nature of contemporary art, i.e. hucksterism.

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by Anonymousreply 6206/17/2016

R61 again. Another suggestion could be to discuss people like Anthony Blunt one of the most memorable directors at the Courtauld Institute in London; at some point Surveyor of the King's/Queen's pictures? Also double agent spying for the Russians and nearly tried for treason under Thatcher's government. World expert on Poussin and super gay to boot?

by Anonymousreply 6306/17/2016

Btw R61 is DR NICHOLAS CULLINAN director of the National Portrait Gallery in London

by Anonymousreply 6406/17/2016

But I want it all splained to me. I have no aesthetic intelligence whatsoever. I want to see the "top five" then head over to a GOURMET restaurant. I heard they eat snails in Paris. It disgusts me but I just might try one. I am gonna get one of those french breads, too.

by Anonymousreply 6506/17/2016

R64 But he's a ginger and maybe uncut. That disgusts me too, like snails. Do all those nudie statues have uncut dicks? If so, I don't know if I will like them, or see their beauty with disgusting dicks on them.

by Anonymousreply 6606/17/2016

Babe, they are nudes not naked bodies. Nudes are a pictorial genre like portraiture or still lives or landscapes; they are not supposed to be sexually arousing.

by Anonymousreply 6706/17/2016

Fuck off r65

by Anonymousreply 6806/17/2016

I went to the Kimball Museum in Fort Worth, specifically because it had been featured by Sister Wendy.

by Anonymousreply 6906/17/2016

Can someone recommend some good introductory art history books?

by Anonymousreply 7012/17/2019

VanGogh, Aubrey Beardsley, Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustav Klimt. In general, the artists of the Symbolist movement, an example of which appears below: Death and the Grave Digger by Carlos Schwabe..

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by Anonymousreply 7112/17/2019

Modigliani. His style is not able to be classified - Cubism with a bit of Dada and Neoclassicism.

I just like the long necks and the pupil-less eyes.

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by Anonymousreply 7212/17/2019

R56 Studio Line from L'Oreal

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by Anonymousreply 7312/17/2019

Porcelain seated bodhisattva, late 13th–early 14th century, China - Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

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by Anonymousreply 7409/13/2020

Fairy and immortal boy, 19th century, China - made of coral. The Met

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by Anonymousreply 7509/13/2020

Listening to the Waves by Sakiyama Takayuki, 2004

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by Anonymousreply 7609/13/2020

[quote]Can someone recommend some good introductory art history books?

This looks good: The Visual Arts: A History by Hugh Honour and John Fleming

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by Anonymousreply 7709/13/2020

martin kemp on u tube, is great bout art, he is a da vinci scholar....

by Anonymousreply 7809/13/2020

Who’s the guy that paints with his dick??

by Anonymousreply 7909/13/2020

^^^ So many guys.

by Anonymousreply 8009/13/2020

Celestial dancer, India 11th century.

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by Anonymousreply 8109/13/2020

[quote]Who’s the guy that paints with his dick??

I just googled it - Pricasso. Hilarious name.

by Anonymousreply 8209/13/2020

An example of Pricasso's oeuvre.

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by Anonymousreply 8309/13/2020

The heavyweights I tend be drawn to are Chagall, Botera, and Van Gogh.

by Anonymousreply 8409/13/2020

Botero? Heavyweight?

by Anonymousreply 8509/13/2020

OP - first get a history of art book such that you understand the evolution and different periods and can recognize works by the great masters. It has to have illustrations, though I suspect online there are possibilities too but make sure it is a chronological read. From Antiquity until the present day. It is fun and so worth it.

by Anonymousreply 8609/14/2020

This is an old thread, R86. Everyone before R70 has died of covid by now.

by Anonymousreply 8709/14/2020

The Three Graces by James Pradier

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by Anonymousreply 8809/14/2020

The artist for our times, the late great Zdzislaw Beksinski

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by Anonymousreply 8909/14/2020

Nah, I don't think things are that grim. Maybe in Europe during World War II.

by Anonymousreply 9009/14/2020

All art museums are online and you can virtually visit them for free. Also, there are plenty of art documentaries on the various streaming services. Find an artist that speaks to you and go from there.

by Anonymousreply 9109/14/2020

R90 here's a photo from Oregon.

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by Anonymousreply 9209/14/2020

I'm not denying that wild fires are getting worse with climate change, R92, but brush fires happen every year on the West Coast and though they cause a lot of damage to nature and property, there isn't a huge loss of life. I would think more people die each year in the U.S. from tornadoes, hurricanes, etc.

Even in the worst case scenario, I doubt coronavirus deaths will be as bad as the Spanish flu epidemic in 1918 and definitely not as bad as the bubonic plague epidemics of the Middle Ages.

by Anonymousreply 9309/14/2020

More Beksinski

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by Anonymousreply 9409/14/2020

Oh my. How grim.

"Purgatory" from Les Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry

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by Anonymousreply 9509/14/2020

For Abstract Expressionism, you can’t really beat Franz Kline. I’ve seen two gallery shows by him and you really start to understand his language. Could have been the weed or a true aesthetic experience. I’m going with the latter. I really love his work.

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by Anonymousreply 9609/14/2020

Isis and Wepwawet, ca. 1279–1213 B.C.

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by Anonymousreply 9709/15/2020

Two Women at a Window by Murillo

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by Anonymousreply 98Last Wednesday at 7:37 PM

Young Boys Playing Dice - Murillo

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by Anonymousreply 99Last Wednesday at 9:32 PM

Flora by Paris Bordon

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by Anonymousreply 10015 hours ago

I like Tissot

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by Anonymousreply 10115 hours ago

I really like George Hitchcock, too

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by Anonymousreply 10215 hours ago

Henry Scott Tuke - gay and with an eye for the twinks

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by Anonymousreply 10315 hours ago

Thank you, r48 and r49!

Just how helpless ARE you, OP?!

by Anonymousreply 10415 hours ago

Sascha Schneider, gay himself, created some of my favorite paintings.

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by Anonymousreply 10515 hours ago

[quote]Also, any decent sized American city will have a museum with a good collection as will many colleges and universities. You cant be all that far from one.

What if OP lives in a remote part of Alaska?

by Anonymousreply 10614 hours ago

John Singer Sargent did some hot paintings of naked guys

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by Anonymousreply 10713 hours ago

What about decorative arts?

Sardonyx cup or bowl with dragon handle by Pierre Delabarre. Louvre

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by Anonymousreply 10811 hours ago
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