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The overuse of the word "brilliant" by the Brits

Is irritating. Is it their version of the American "great!"?

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 10011/08/2014

Yes. Colloquially, it just means "wonderful!" or "excellent!", etc: "This grilled cheese sandwich is brilliant!". It has nothing to do with either intelligence or bright light.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 101/28/2012

Amazing!!

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 201/28/2012

Awesome!

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 301/28/2012

I like to hear Brits say that.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 401/28/2012

"tons"

I have tons of shit to do this weekend.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 501/28/2012

Bril.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 601/28/2012

Oh, and the word "massive". "It's gonna be massive."

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 801/28/2012

When did they stop saying "gear?"

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 901/28/2012

[quote]Yes. Colloquially, it just means "wonderful!" or "excellent!", etc:

"Mmmm -- this grilled cheese sandwich is delicious."

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 1101/28/2012

Here in Canada, the overused word is "perfect". It drives me nuts.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 1201/28/2012

Non-native English speakers who pick up British English tend to overuse it too. When I lived in Sweden it was very common for English-speaking Swedes to think that every third thing was "brilliant."

"I adore the TV programme 'Friends'. It's brilliant! Now let's eat some lutfisk."

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 1301/28/2012

I refer to it as "British brilliant."

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 1501/28/2012

True that.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 1601/28/2012

They've been doing that forever. When I lived there 20 years ago everything was brilliant - including deciding to go to KFC to get fried chicken before closing time. "Brilliant!!!"

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 1701/28/2012

"Legend" - Brits like that word too.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 1801/28/2012

At least I get "briliant." There are those weird Britims like "have done" that I can never get. When I think I understand the connotations and meanings, I find some use that completely confounds it.

Have done. Mad. Naft. Pull. I will never get it.

"Mum was so mad she said I should go to hospie when I was knackered. I have done, I said, but nurse said I was a stupid cunt"

Now some brit will tell me how wrong my use of everything was in that wee story.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 1901/28/2012

brill

loads

ghastly

fucking hell

know what I mean

at the end of the day

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 2101/28/2012

Madonna sounded like an idiot saying "tits up" on Graham Norton a couple of weeks ago. At last I got why people are so annoyed by her faux-Brit accent, which I could never perceive before.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 2401/28/2012

I think the Brits' use of the word "brilliant" is lovely.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 2501/28/2012

"Excellent" was overused by Americans for years.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 2601/28/2012

Why do so many British move to Spain? I understand they want sunshine, but why Spain as opposed to Italy, Portugal or southern France?

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 2701/28/2012

The only place on earth where Hetero Men say something is "ever so lovely!"

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 2901/29/2012

Latest trend: "massive"

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 3001/29/2012

'Perfect!' is the new fad in the U.S.

Instead of 'okay' or 'yes', non-thinkers constantly now say 'perfect!'.

I really dislike the use of 'perfect!'

And I dislike how the brits say 'brilliant!' for the most mundane, run of the mill, non-brilliant things.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 3101/29/2012

Spot on.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 3201/29/2012

R24, I've said tits up for years, and never had any idea it was a Brit thing.

I live in a red-state hell around a lot of rubes and rednecks, and I say it to mean someone is dead or passed out supine, and also in reference to myself to mean I need to cheer up or stop dragging my ass or waking up and get some energy.

A friend and I even use the symbol ^.^ to mean tits up, though I also use it instead of a :) to indicate humor or kindness in a text or on FB.

And now you tell me it's an affectation of a Britishism? That's a pain in the ass.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 3301/29/2012

Americans don't say "amazing" as much as the Brits say we do. But they say "brilliant" far more often than we think they do. For such an articulate people they have a limited vocabulary and take a word and beat it into the ground.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 3401/29/2012

R34, you must be kidding - many people in the U.S. say 'amazing!' constantly and many say 'awesome!' constantly.

I do think it shows a limited vocabulary and a great conformity.

Also, they constantly use amazing and awesome to describe things that are NOT amazing or awesome at all. They say the most mundane, ordinary things are.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 3501/29/2012

No they don't, R35.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 3601/29/2012

I hate it, like, when English people, like, don't talk the way, like, real people talk.

And, of course, like, every sentence needs to, like, go up at the end?

Why can't the English, like, learn to speak?

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 3701/29/2012

R37, on the scale of amusing, from 1 to 100 you are at .002.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 3801/29/2012

Lorraine Kelly is the UK's Brilliance Tsar.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 3901/29/2012

brilliant should be used for something spectacular or outstanding, not for the mundane

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 4001/29/2012

r38 --

r37 here. Sorry I bored you. Maybe the satire was a bit heavy handed but don't you find the ignorant arrogance displayed by the Americans on this thread as breathtaking as it is astonishing?

I mean Americans telling the English how the language should be spoken?

It's like straight men deciding how a musical should be done.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 4101/29/2012

Well lovelies if you don't like to hear it then there is a very simple answer. Don't listen. Noone forces anyone to watch TV from other countries etc. If this is all there is in life to annoy you then think yourselves incredibly fortunate.

Excuse me while I go away to give myself a good slap for opening another anglophobic thread.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 4201/29/2012

R37 is right. Like totally like right.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 4301/29/2012

I don't think I've ever used the word "brilliant" in my life.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 4401/29/2012

I've virtually never heard it used by a fellow Brit except for a shade of paint and I'm ancient.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 4501/29/2012

[quote]Why do so many British move to Spain? I understand they want sunshine, but why Spain as opposed to Italy, Portugal or southern France?

Back in the days of the Franco dictatorship Spain was dirt cheap and the government allowed massive development of the coast and the islands. Coupled with cheap no-frills flights between Spain and the UK and suddenly working class Brits could afford sunny vacations.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 4601/29/2012

Is this thread taking the piss??

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 4701/29/2012

Epic.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 4801/29/2012

Major!

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 4901/29/2012

This thread is going all wonky!

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 5001/29/2012

...and pear-shaped, no doubt.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 5101/29/2012

Everyone in the NY theater community is obsessed with the term "spot on" these days to describe something they love.

Is that a Britishism or did it derive from Ben Brantley using it and thinking it was a Britishism?

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 5201/29/2012

I worked in Montreal about 15 years ago and all the locals there under me said "perfect" whenever they meant "yes, I agree with you and will do your bidding."

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 5301/29/2012

Considering we Americans tend to use "awesome" as a tacit response to everything from someone stating their hometown to someone stating where they put the groceries... I don't feel we have room to judge.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 5401/29/2012

The Brits don't overuse the word 'brilliant'. The Americans do overuse the word 'awesome', however.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 5501/29/2012

I worked as a copy editor on a Middle East expat-run newspaper; the senior management was British, the reporters mostly Canadian and American. We were supposed to enforce 'British' English. Nothing upset our senior Brit managers more than the use of the word 'awesome'. Drove them crazy whenever a reporter used it, even in speach. We also had to substitute daft Britishisms like 'lorry' for 'truck'.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 5601/29/2012

I used to work with a lot of Brits and whenever I did something they approved of, they would say "You're a star". It would drive me up the wall. God smacked is another repulsive expression.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 5701/29/2012

R57, the term is gobsmacked.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 5801/29/2012

You do realise that in 20 years time this thread will be the Chinese bemoaning the way Americans don't speak correctly?

No one speaks 'correctly'. Just because America has a monopoly on everything else in the world it doesn't mean you can ditate the use of English.

Americans also over-use stupid, inane words which have now all but lost meaning. However because you are so used to it you don't recognise it.

(And I hope that Lorraine Kelly and all of her 'brilliance' will be quickly sent back to Scotland once they achieve that freedom that they so desperately desire)

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 5901/29/2012

Most overused word by gay men: "fabulous"

Funny how straight guys never seem to use it.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 6001/29/2012

"Funny how straight guys never seem to use it."

"Fabulous" was W's favorite word when he was in the White House.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 6101/29/2012

My peeve is the Brit overuse of "actually."

In one of Stephen Fry's novels, there's a character named "Ashley," who, upon arriving at university, thinks the posh crowd is constantly talking about him. He quickly realizes that they're just using "actually" in every sentence.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 6201/29/2012

[quote] Everyone in the NY theater community is obsessed with the term "spot on" these days

It's an affectation that sounds ridiculous coming from American mouths, as does, "Good on you."

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 6301/29/2012

"At the end of the day, I'm not bovered."

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 6401/29/2012

And the Americans overuse of AWESOME is any better? You know what's AWESOME the Grand Canyon. End of story.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 6501/29/2012

R61 = James Dale "Jeff Gannon" Guckert

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 6601/29/2012

Brits think all Americans say "amazing" because they hear American celebrities say it a lot on their TV screens on chat shows and the like. Celebrities are not representative of the population at large. However Brits all say "brilliant" no matter who they are and that's a fact.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 6701/29/2012

R67, I am a former NYer living in flyover land, and I hear Americans who are not celebrities overuse amazing and awesome everywhere I go: here in redneckland, and in NY when I'm visiting friends and family, and in other parts of the country, when I'm just traveling.

It's simply incorrect to say an enormous number of Americans don't use those words to describe a things that are neither amazing nor awesome.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 6801/29/2012

Brits also love calling things "iconic," a bit of hyperbole I find to be quite irritating.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 6901/29/2012

"Iconic" is also overused in the fashion world regardless of country: "the iconic Birkin Bag," "Meisel's iconic 1991 photoshoot," "Yves Saint Laurent's iconic Opium perfume," etc.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 7001/29/2012

Diabolical!

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 7101/29/2012

You've got to wonder what people who describe shoes or potato chips as "awesome!" would say if the Second Coming were to occur in their presence.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 7201/29/2012

Brilliant is overused in the States also. Except in a way that is more tedious. Everybody who has had some mild success, especially in music or movies, at some point it seems has been described as brilliant. Give me a break. There are maybe a handful of truly brilliant people produced by every generation. Einstein was brilliant. St. Augustine was brilliant. Mozart was brilliant. I think I made my point. Madonna is NOT brilliant. Enough already. It's okay to simply say that someone is very talented or accomplished, and leave it at that.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 7303/04/2012

what a load of pricks, since when could an American string a complete sentence together ?

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 7406/21/2013

Didn't "awesome" start out with Bill & Ted and Garth and Wayne. That was the first time I'd heard used in the context we hear it so much now.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 7506/22/2013

Amaaaaaazing

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 7606/22/2013

In the 1960s, Brits overused "super." In the 1970s, middle aged Americans overused "super."

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 7706/22/2013

[quote] I worked in Montreal about 15 years ago and all the locals there under me said "perfect"

I hear a lot of young women saying "perfect."

It makes me say, "Molodyets."

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 7806/22/2013

My Brooklyn Jewish sister in law went to live in ZA and came home using lots of Britishisms from her friends. The most hilarious thing is hearing someone say "cock up" in a thick Brooklyn accent. "The whole thing was a caaaak op!"

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 7906/22/2013

This thread is truly EPIC!

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 8006/22/2013

I also like to hear the british say that, as well as "bloody". I love the british accent, it's bloody brilliant!

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 8109/10/2014

It is much less annoying than "awesome."

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 8209/10/2014

I have an American friend who lived over there for a number of years. He will occasionally refer to something as "brilliant." I generally respond by saying "Brilliant? What is so intelligent about it?" I've done it enough he knows I'm taking a piss on him.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 8309/10/2014

Scathingly brilliant idea!

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 8409/10/2014

The shits...innit! Up the cunty Limeys, too.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 8509/10/2014

Hayley.

Humph.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 8609/10/2014

I remember the first time I heard a London lad say "Whatever!..." in Sainsbury's in Camden Town.

I thought "Oh, it's arrived here now!" That was in '88. Then you started hearing it all the time.

"Go for it!'...early '80s.

"Networking" mid-'80s.

"Wicked!' came from America too, I think. Very annoying.

An English-ism from the '80s & '90s that made my skin crawl was "Hiya!'...sort of, I'm cool and relaxed "Hiya!'

The English sometimes say "Terrific!', but it way too optimistic sounding and they act like they've taken a risk using it.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 8709/10/2014

agreed with OP. They really do say it too much

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 8809/10/2014

AWESOME. This is an AMAZING new sandwich from Arby's. It's UNBELIEVABLE!!!!

It must have been CRAFTED by a sandwich ARTIST!

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 8909/10/2014

[quote]Scathingly brilliant idea!

Now THIS is a catch phrase ready for a revival.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 9009/10/2014

This thread is diabolical.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 9109/10/2014

You know people have beat a word into the earth when they are reduced to adopting a nickname for that word.

"Brill."

(vomit)

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 9209/10/2014

I hear "right!" used in the beginning to almost every phrase.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 9309/11/2014

I agree, I'ld rather hear brilliant than AWESOME!!!

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 9409/11/2014

I remember 40-odd years ago, instead of "briliant" they would say "super".

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 9511/08/2014

Did they ever say "groovy"?

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 9611/08/2014

It's either "brilliant" or "vile"

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 9711/08/2014

I hope they don't continue to say "LMFAO" like the Americans still do. It is embarrassing.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 9811/08/2014

This thread is mega !

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 9911/08/2014

Total bloody nightmare, mate.

by Penelope Rhys-Daviesreply 10011/08/2014
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