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Math vs. Maths

Why do Americans use the term: "Math", while Brits/Europeans refer to it as: "Maths"?

by Anonymousreply 8503/02/2013

Math is short for 'mathematics' which is probably why Europeans use 'maths.' As for us Americans, if we can be contrary, then why not?

by Anonymousreply 110/20/2010

Probably because Brits are idiots. For a laugh, ask them to pronounce "aluminum."

by Anonymousreply 210/20/2010

Because the British like to be idiosyncratic about horseshit like that. They did originate the language so they enjoy fucking around with it.

The rest of the normal world calls it "math."

by Anonymousreply 310/20/2010

same reason we say elevator when we want the lift%0D %0D or when we want the brolly when we need an umbrella%0D %0D or ... whatever. It's the same language, different words

by Anonymousreply 410/20/2010

I have even heard of folks saying...%0D %0D higher maths%0D %0D lower maths%0D %0D ...and stuff like that%0D %0D Some South American countries do that as well. %0D %0D It really does not bother me.

by Anonymousreply 510/20/2010

R10javascript:flagWW(9754959,9759113);

by Anonymousreply 610/21/2010

R2--They pronounce it differently because they have a different (though similar) word for the stuff: Aluminium.

by Anonymousreply 710/21/2010

There are differences in plurals between British and American English. Plural nouns that would be followed by a singular pronoun in American English are followed by a plural pronoun in British English. An American would say "drug addict" where an English speaker would say "drugs addict." I don't know why.

by Anonymousreply 810/21/2010

The British would never say drugs addict, it would always be drug addict.

Aluminium is the standard international name for the metal, used throughout most of the world. "Aluminum" is just used in North America (similar to how the US has some weird word for what everybody else calls paracetamol). It's not the British being weird here, it's the US.

by Anonymousreply 910/21/2010

Nor do British people say "drug store". I gave a nice little old lady in Richmond, Surrey a big laugh when I asked for one.

by Anonymousreply 1010/21/2010

Except, R9, Brits do say things like "a drinks problem."

The Maths thing is probably because there is more than one type of math - arithmetic, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, they all taken together are more than one, so the plural, maths.

Here's another thought to blow your mind - one who knows more than one type of math is a polymath, not a polymaths. Hmm.

by Anonymousreply 1110/21/2010

The "drink driving" thing just gets under my skin. They used to call "beepers", "bleepers". They always seem to want to be different, annoyingly so.

by Anonymousreply 1210/21/2010

[quote]Aluminium is the standard international name for the metal, used throughout most of the world. "Aluminum" is just used in North America.

Thanks to the London Metals Exchange.

by Anonymousreply 1310/21/2010

The earliest citation given in the Oxford English Dictionary for any word used as a name for this element is alumium, which British chemist and inventor Humphry Davy employed in 1808 for the metal he was trying to isolate electrolytically from the mineral alumina. The citation is from the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London: "Had I been so fortunate as to have obtained more certain evidences on this subject, and to have procured the metallic substances I was in search of, I should have proposed for them the names of silicium, alumium, zirconium, and glucium."

Davy settled on aluminum by the time he published his 1812 book Chemical Philosophy: "This substance appears to contain a peculiar metal, but as yet Aluminum has not been obtained in a perfectly free state, though alloys of it with other metalline substances have been procured sufficiently distinct to indicate the probable nature of alumina." But the same year, an anonymous contributor to the Quarterly Review, a British political-literary journal, in a review of Davy's book, objected to aluminum and proposed the name aluminium, "for so we shall take the liberty of writing the word, in preference to aluminum, which has a less classical sound."

by Anonymousreply 1410/21/2010

[quote]Here's another thought to blow your mind - one who knows more than one type of math is a polymath, not a polymaths.

Probably because polymath isn't particular to maths. It means knowledgeable about any variety of subject.

by Anonymousreply 1510/21/2010

Yes indeed, R15, but still the interesting point is, polymath, not polymaths. Hmm.

by Anonymousreply 1610/21/2010

R11 blows my mind better than r15.

by Anonymousreply 1710/21/2010

And yet what Americans refer to as "sports" coverage is not pluralized in the UK, as in "BBC News and Sport."

I do love "carpark"

by Anonymousreply 1810/21/2010

I always love that no one is ever in THE hospital, nor do they go to THE hospital.

by Anonymousreply 1910/21/2010

While we're on the topic, I'd like to bring up the BBC. I'd always heard that they were the unofficial authority for the setting of the standards of English pronunciation. But lately, it seems as if they can't come to an agreement on how some words of non-English origin should be pronounced. For example, "Al Qaeda." I've heard them say it as "Al Kay-dah," "Al Ky-dah," "Al Kah-dah" "Al Kway-dah," "Al Kwee-dah" "Al Ky-ee-dah," "Al Ky-ay-dah," "Al Kwee-ah-dah," and no doubt a few more I've left out. At this point, I don't know how the hell to say "Al Qaeda." As I see it, all they'd need to do is check with a few native speakers of Arabic to confirm how it's said, and let that be it. But apparently, none of the announcers have been clued in as to what that is.

Also, it always irked me to hear the way they pronounced the names of some countries like "Af-gah-nis-STAN," "Paki-STAN" or "Azer-by-ZHAN." Their emphasis on the last syllables always struck me as sounding so pretentious - as well as just plain [italic]wrong[/italic].

by Anonymousreply 2010/21/2010

I still think it's hot the way Brits pronounce Himalayas as 'hi-MALL-yas' and Tanzania as 'Tan-zin-EE-ya'.

by Anonymousreply 2110/21/2010

[quote]I've heard them say it as "Al Kay-dah," "Al Ky-dah," "Al Kah-dah" "Al Kway-dah," "Al Kwee-dah" "Al Ky-ee-dah," "Al Ky-ay-dah," "Al Kwee-ah-dah," and no doubt a few more I've left out.

Psych-ops, silly.

by Anonymousreply 2210/21/2010

Brits also say "sport" instead of "sports."

by Anonymousreply 2310/21/2010

Does their shit swirl counterclockwise when they flush the loo or do they save it for the German's scat fetishes?

by Anonymousreply 2410/21/2010

They are not toilet goers, R24.

by Anonymousreply 2510/21/2010

Because calling it "Maths" is just fucking stupid.%0D %0D It's Math. %0D %0D Anyone who says "maths" sounds as retarded as anyone who says "softwares".%0D %0D The plural of math is math. The plural of software is software. The plural of fish is fish. The plural of sheep is sheep.%0D %0D It's not being contrary. It's being informed and non-stupid.%0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 2610/21/2010

[quote]The plural of math is math.

"Math" has a plural?

by Anonymousreply 2710/21/2010

I was watching [italic]Prime Suspect[/italic] when someone said something about "your-eye-nals." I couldn't figure out what she meant until they were in the men's room and I saw the urinals.

by Anonymousreply 2810/21/2010

There is more than one type of math - arithmetic, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, they all taken together are more than one, so the plural, maths.

by Anonymousreply 2910/21/2010

Except the plural of 'math' is just 'math'.%0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 3010/21/2010

All I have to say is the most powerful two words that any Brit can say to an American is "Spotted Dick".

by Anonymousreply 3110/21/2010

And the word 'math' is actually a shortened form of the word 'mathematics', which *is* plural and ends with an 's'.

by Anonymousreply 3210/21/2010

Drink driving, as opposed to drunk driving, cracks me up. I drink drive all the time. But I'm drinking Snapple.%0D %0D And you can die of a "drugs overdose" even if you od on only one drug.

by Anonymousreply 3310/21/2010

The short form of "automobiles" is "autos" in both the US and UK, right?

Why shouldn't the short form of "mathematics" keep the s?

by Anonymousreply 3410/21/2010

Yes, so why would you pluralize a plural?%0D %0D You wouldn't. Unless you [italic]wanted[/italic] to sound retarded.%0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 3510/21/2010

[quote]The short form of "automobiles" is "autos" in both the US and UK, right?

In that case, you have multiple physical objects that are collectively autos.

As a counterpoint, there are sub-types of literature, but you don't refer to the collective discipline as Literatures.

by Anonymousreply 3610/21/2010

Why do people like R6 say "javascript:flagWW(9754959,9759113);"?

by Anonymousreply 3710/21/2010

[quote]The short form of "automobiles" is "autos" in both the US and UK, right?

It may well be but in the UK we say cars.

Maths is a shortened form of the word mathematics, which isn't a plural in British English but is the word for the science of magnitude, number and number relations.

by Anonymousreply 3810/22/2010

Britons are idiots. There's really no point in trying to make sense of how they do things.

by Anonymousreply 3910/22/2010

Americans are always so perplexed by the English spoken in the rest of the world. You really need to get out more.

by Anonymousreply 4010/22/2010

No one says 'drinks problem' here. I can see the logic in both 'maths' and 'math'. 'In hospital' is more consistent than 'in the hospital' as you Americans would say 'in college' or 'in school', not 'in the college' or 'in the school'. What I don't understand is why so many Americans think their way is right, and any other way is wrong, insted of just appreciating the difference.

by Anonymousreply 4110/22/2010

"Now your sat here..."

by Anonymousreply 4210/22/2010

R11 is certainly no polymath.

by Anonymousreply 4310/22/2010

[quote]What I don't understand is why so many Americans think their way is right, and any other way is wrong, insted of just appreciating the difference.

We have a bigger penis, that's why.

by Anonymousreply 4410/22/2010

R44 - Just the one, dear?

by Anonymousreply 4510/22/2010

It's a METAPHORICAL collective genderless penis, R45.

by Anonymousreply 4610/22/2010

Well then, can someone tell me why these rubber gloves have got no space for fingers?

by Anonymousreply 4710/22/2010

May I remind the gentlemen on DL that first there was Britain, and then, under the reign of George III -in the 18th century- you gained independence. That means British English sets the standard for the language. Period. %0D All your mumbling on the site is not going to do you any good.

by Anonymousreply 4810/22/2010

Sorry, R48. Doesn't follow. We have a bigger dick. Period.

by Anonymousreply 4910/22/2010

And who gained their independence? Plucky British settlers fighting a German king employing German mercenaries

by Anonymousreply 5010/22/2010

Ask them to say lieutenant.

by Anonymousreply 5110/22/2010

Dear British people, Why do you enjoy mangling other people's words too? I am thinking of words like oregano, jalapeno, and jaguar.

by Anonymousreply 5210/22/2010

How do we mangle them? O-re-gar-no. Hal-a-peneo. Jag-u-ar

by Anonymousreply 5310/22/2010

[quote]Tan-zin-EE-ya

But that's how we say it in the US, too. How do you think it's supposed to be pronounced? Tan-ZANE-ee-ya? Oh, dear.

by Anonymousreply 5410/22/2010

R53, in the US they're o-REG-a-no (as in the Spanish orégano) and JAG-war (two syllables). Neither side mangles it more than the other; it's all random anyway.

by Anonymousreply 5510/22/2010

R5, you really made me laugh. That South-americans say that in English? Why would they if their native language is Spanish? Although I can think of other countries that don't speak Spanish, like Brasil -in that case it could be Portuguese.

by Anonymousreply 5610/22/2010

Let's call the whole thing off.

by Anonymousreply 5710/22/2010

British say "Or-ee-GA-no", which is just fucking weird.%0D %0D I've never heard a Brit say "jalepeno", but it's "hal-a-pen-nyo" or "hal-a-peen-nyo". And yes, the "h" is aspirated, not silent.%0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 5810/22/2010

R56

Your powers of inference are none to very good my dear.

Gosh.

by Anonymousreply 5910/22/2010

The plural of math is mave.%0D

by Anonymousreply 6010/22/2010

Yall may have a bigger dick but 9/11 castrated you

by Anonymousreply 6110/23/2010

yes r55, but how do the fucking ITALIANS pronounce it?

by Anonymousreply 6210/23/2010

When people say they are "in college", they are referring to a process not a singular object or place. The same people will say "I am going to 'the' college to pick up my books", when they are referring to the physical building or location.

Normally in America, this is understood and needs no explanation. It is completely obvious as it carries the context of meaning.

Math is an abbreviation of mathematics, and if you notice, mathematics does not contain an S after M-A-T-H. The word maths, is therefor redundant as well as an incorrect form of abbreviation.

by Anonymousreply 6303/01/2013

How common! Wonderful!

by Anonymousreply 6403/01/2013

Math vs. Maths

by Anonymousreply 6503/01/2013

Doesn't matter if you are Aussie, Cockney, Jamaican, or Yankee. English differs regionally in every country.

by Anonymousreply 6603/01/2013

There are many different sciences, but I don't say I'm on my way to "sciences class" when I'm heading for Biology. It's science class. I studied a lot of sciences in college, but I only have an MS degree -- a master of science. Not sciences.

by Anonymousreply 6803/01/2013

R67, Dat isn't troo. I risint it. Amuricans r da bess at errythang! Doo nawt evur mizunderestimayt us! Gawd blez Amurica! USA! USA! USA! USA!

by Anonymousreply 6903/01/2013

Americans say it right.

Saying "I did my Maths homework last night" just sounds fucking retarded.

"Mathematics" is singular.

Just like "Physics" is singular, "Chemistry" is singular. "Biology" is singular.

The Brits are just WRONG on this one. Objectively and categorically.

Stop saying "maths" and sounding like a complete retard. And stop using completely bogus justifications and rationalizations like "maths is short for mathematics" ... it just exposes even more of your retarded ignorance.

by Anonymousreply 7003/02/2013

r58/70 boy oh boy, someone has a bee in their bonnet! I have to say that calling the rest of the world 'retarded' for pronouncing words differently (or in most cases correctly) just reeks of American arrogance.

I'm reminded of an episode of the Amazing Race where an American dullard was shouting "Can anyone speak me American?!" in the street of a European country.

That pretty much sums it up... you speak 'American', the rest of the world speaks English.

by Anonymousreply 7103/02/2013

Saying "Maths" is not saying it correctly. It sounds stupid, and it's illogical, and there's just no actual justification for it. It's dumb. Stop it.

by Anonymousreply 7203/02/2013

Wot's fer pudding?

by Anonymousreply 7303/02/2013

Pudding IS A dessert.

Dessert IS NOT pudding.

Cake is cake. Pudding is Pudding. Pie is Pie.

What the fuck to British-folk call *actual* pudding? Do they have "pudding" for "pudding"?

So stupid.

by Anonymousreply 7403/02/2013

Why do so many Americans think "phenomena" (plural) and criteria (plural) are singular? Are they simply not familiar with the words "phenomenon" and "criterion"? It's not that hard, but I've even come across these mistakes in published non-fiction books.

by Anonymousreply 7503/02/2013

R75, it could be sort of like "data" and "datum", where the singular form is simply dying out, and the plural form is standing in for all usages.

Nobody says "datum" any more.

by Anonymousreply 7603/02/2013

I do think that the British do exercise a subtle form of racism in their pronunciation of words that are in some way foreign to their culture. In doing so it emphasizes the 'foreignness' of those words. It is sort similar to the special Kangi alphabet in Japanese for foreign words like Apple Computer or Motorola that don't have a native Japanese equivalent.

Personally I can't stand the way the English say pasta - pahh stah when the rest of the world just pronounces it as pasta and I do think that it is a subtle dig at Italians when they do say that.

Another annoyance phrase which I encountered when living in Australia was the ads for the Hyundai Coupe pronounced Hee UN DAY Coopeee

It sounded totally retarded being stated in that way by a professional radio DJ.

by Anonymousreply 7703/02/2013

[quote]Personally I can't stand the way the English say pasta - pahh stah when the rest of the world just pronounces it as pasta

This is about as unclear to me as it can possibly be. I've only ever heard "pasta" pronounced "pah-stuh" or "past-stah". How do you assume "pasta" SHOULD be pronounced? I'm just curious.

by Anonymousreply 7803/02/2013

R79, as has already been stated (if you'd bothered to read the thread), that's a stupid and ridiculous and nonsensical "justification".

You don't say you study "biologies" or "chemistries", do you?

Mathematics is a field of study, singular. You study MATH.

by Anonymousreply 8003/02/2013

R80, They append the 's' from the end of the word 'mathematics' Anyway, why do you think they need to 'justify' how they speak? Get a life.

by Anonymousreply 8103/02/2013

I know that's what they're doing. But doing so not only sounds retarded, stupid, and awkward, it's annoying and wrong. There's no reason to do that.

Stop saying "Maths". It wounds.

by Anonymousreply 8203/02/2013

I've got double maths on Tuesday!

by Anonymousreply 8303/02/2013

[quote]I do think that the British do exercise a subtle form of racism in their pronunciation of words that are in some way foreign to their culture. In doing so it emphasizes the 'foreignness' of those words. It is sort similar to the special Kangi alphabet in Japanese for foreign words like Apple Computer or Motorola that don't have a native Japanese equivalent.

They used to do similar things at Versailles before the tumbrils -- called avant garde, it had a lot to do with manners. For example one would use the knuckle of one finger to knock on the door of a Duke, and another to knock on the door of a Count, etc. Table manners fell under this, with all sorts of rules about not only which fork to use, but how, depending on the food and company.

With poor people banished to the drains, it was a way rich people could devil each other.

by Anonymousreply 8403/02/2013

Stop using the word retarded r82, you ignorant cunt.

by Anonymousreply 8503/02/2013
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