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Rosemary''s Baby--about the film (not just a running of the lines)

Did you know Tuesday Weld was the original choice for Rosemary? Jane Fonda was also asked (she couldn't because she was making "Barbarella" for Vadim), and Polanski thought of using his wife Sharon Tate (he decided that would be unethical). Robert Redford was the first choice for Guy, but couldn;t do it; Jack Nicholson was considered too sinister looking; so many other actors were considered that Warren Beatty (also asked) joked, "Hey, aren't you considering me for Rosemary?" Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne were the original choices for the Castevets, but they declined.

by Anonymousreply 29409/12/2013

Does anyone know what apartment building that Ira Levin based the Bramford on in the novel? I know they used the Dakota for the movie, and it's perfect--so scary and ancient looking--but I wonder if he had an actual apartment house in mind: if there really is one that has the same kind of history the Bramford has (i.e. housing Satanists and serial killers).

by Anonymousreply 108/19/2010

I love this kind of backstories when it comes to movies and plays and TV shows.

by Anonymousreply 208/19/2010

Also, I know they used the Dakota for the exteriors, but did they also use it for the scenes in the hallways? It's so crumbling and devastated... I wondered if it had really fallen on hard times then if it would have been affordable for people who were not millionaires back then to get in.

by Anonymousreply 308/19/2010

We had a fantastic thread of RB only a few months ago. It really sucks that so many good threads have been deleted.

by Anonymousreply 408/19/2010

r3 I am sure those scenes were filmed on a set, but they might have gotten their inspiration from the real hallways.

by Anonymousreply 508/19/2010

The interiors were created by Richard Sylbert in LA. They are excellent.

by Anonymousreply 608/19/2010

R3, I believe the interiors were all shot on a soundstage. Filming on location inside an old building is a huge pain in the ass in terms of lighting, camera movement, etc.

by Anonymousreply 708/19/2010

r4 or that you can not do a search. I thought the search had started to work, but I see that it has failed again.

by Anonymousreply 808/19/2010

Ira Levin said he was incredibly lucky that the film is the most faithful Hollywood adaptation of a novel ever. Roman Polanski apparently had no idea that he could change things from the novel since he had never adapted one before or worked with Hollywood.

The interiors are incredible--I love the creepy basement where Rosemary meets Terri d'Onofrio while they were doing their laundry.

by Anonymousreply 908/19/2010

Is this the other thread you are looking for?

by Anonymousreply 1008/19/2010

Thanks for looking for it, but, no, that's just the jokey thread that OP refers to in his post. There was a thread that went on for a while; great film analysis, comparisons book to film, locations, everything.

by Anonymousreply 1108/19/2010

Well, we've got a new thread now, r11, and since no one can find the other thread there's no point in crying over spilled milk.

by Anonymousreply 1208/19/2010

Any more interesting back story stuff?

by Anonymousreply 1308/19/2010

Mia Farrow had only been in two movies and had only starred in one up until she was cast, "A Dandy in Aspic," which had not opened when she was cast. But she was a giant celebrity because she had married Frank Sinatra and because she was so beloved for her starring role in the TV series "Peyton Place." Her trademark on that series was her long hair, so it was a big deal when she had it cut in the pixie cut she wears in the 2nd half of the movie: Vidal Sassoon actually cut it on the set and they brought in photographers since it was a huge media event. (Farrow wears a wig for her scenes in the first half of the movie over the pixie cut.)

Sinatra hated her doing the movie because it took her away from him and because he was threatened by Polanski, who was reputed to be a womanizer. He served Farrow with divorce papers on the set of the film, and she dropped to her knees sobbing. Polanski was horrified she was going to be unable to continue with the film, and was about to offer her a hiatus from filming for a few weeks wheile they shot all the scenes she's not in (which are hardly any), but she was there smiling and working the next day as if nothing had happened.

Farrow and Sinatra remained good friends for the rest of his life: memorably, after the news of Woody Allen's leaving her for her daughter Soon-Yi hit the newspapers, Sinatra called her up immediately and offered to punch Woody Allen out... which I guess he thought was a chivalrous gesture.

by Anonymousreply 1408/19/2010

One thing I've never been able to figure out--why does the pain suddenly stop when Rosemary and Guy are arguing about going to see Dr. Hill after the big party? is it just chance? I used to assume it was because Rosemary stopped drinking the special shake Minnie made for her a few days earlier, but she's drinking it again during the ensuing "preparing for the baby" montage, but she doesn't seem to get the pain again.

Also, why does Grace Cardiff speak with a Spanish accent? And who is she--Hutch's lover?

by Anonymousreply 1508/19/2010

R1 the building Levin based the Bramford on was Alwyn Court on 58th and 7th. Polanski made a good choice in choosing the Dakota to use for the film, as the other building is more garish than spooky.

The old, 400 response Rosemary's Baby thread was full of excellent observations about the film, sad that it's been lost to the ages.

by Anonymousreply 1608/19/2010

I always assumed Hutch was gay.

by Anonymousreply 1708/19/2010

r15 I always assumed that the coven realized they were losing her and had something to do with it stopping (they shook their prayer sticks or whatever, off-screen).

by Anonymousreply 1808/19/2010

I love, love, love this movie. Mia Farrow is perfect in it. Her pale waifishness was just the right element the character needed that the other actresses wouldn't have been able to provide.%0D %0D Casting Ruth Gordon as Minnie Castavet was a stroke of genius. Her quirky comic daffiness underscored with Satanic evil and manipulation was absolutely perfect.

by Anonymousreply 2008/19/2010

I watched the full movie (non-edited) for the first time a few months ago. All I could really think about was how this movie seemed to be a commentary on women's rights and the abortion debate. I love the devil stuff - but ultimately it was about a woman trying to have control over her body, over her healthcare, and trying to have some power in her relationship with men. The "traditionalists" were the old people/satanists - intent on Rosemary conforming to their ways.

Am I totally off-base here?

by Anonymousreply 2108/19/2010

The demon-baby starts kicking and the pain stops the instant Rosemary loses her temper. You might say that rage jump-started it. Gotta love John Cassavetes reaction to it kicking - the revulsion that he can't even pretend to hide, and the way Rosemary sees that but doesn't care at that moment, so blindly happy she suddenly is.

by Anonymousreply 2208/19/2010

I think you might be on to something, R21. "Womon's Lib" was a hot issue when the movie was made.%0D %0D It's also a send-up of the fascination with the occult that was happening at the time. At least the Ira Levin book was.

by Anonymousreply 2308/19/2010

Cultural interest in the occult, the paranormal, aliens, etc. often increase because of unsettling societal issues.

by Anonymousreply 2408/19/2010

"Why does the pain suddenly stop when Rosemary and Guy are arguing about going to see Dr. Hill after the big party?"%0D %0D She had also stopped drinking Minnie's herbal concoction a while earlier. I think the baby was supposed to look just like his dad (a monster), but when Rosemary stopped the drink he developed more human-like qualities.%0D %0D Who would be scarier to meet in halls of the Dakota?: 1)Satan; 2)Lauren Bacall; 3) Yoko Ono?

by Anonymousreply 2508/19/2010

Tuesday Weld (who I love) & Jane Fonda (who I don't) both looked too healthy for the role. Mia Farrow looked vulnerable both emotionally & physically even when she was young.

by Anonymousreply 2608/19/2010

I believe I read somewhere that Audrey Hepburn was offered the role and turned it down.%0D %0D Can anyone confirm this?

by Anonymousreply 2708/19/2010

Was the husband actually one of the coven or was he just paid off by the coven to use his wife?

by Anonymousreply 2808/19/2010

I always thought the pain stopped because Rosemary finally rebelled, seizing command of the situation away from Guy, the coven and even Satan who was overseeing everything.%0D %0D Her declared intention to see Dr. Hill might have resulted in an abortion (yes, I know they were illegal) or some other game-changing complication. It was necessary to grant her instant relief so the plans could continue smoothly.

by Anonymousreply 2908/19/2010

[quote]The building Levin based the Bramford on was Alwyn Court on 58th and 7th. Polanski made a good choice in choosing the Dakota to use for the film, as the other building is more garish than spooky.

Thanks for the wiki link. Now I understand why in the book one of Rosemary's friends, upon learning that the Woodhouses are moving to the Bram, makes a remark about gargoyles running up and down the outside of the building.

Just one random observation--while I like John Cassavetes as an actor, I thought he was miscast in this. One look at him and you know he's up to no good. An All-American Robert Redford type would have been better.

by Anonymousreply 3008/19/2010

Anyone remember the made for TV sequel starring Miss Patty Duke? Or was she Patty Duke Astin at the time? I can't remember the title but it wasn't Rosemary's Baby II: Satanic Boogaloo. The son was grown up and looked like a regular human, but that's about all I remember.

by Anonymousreply 3108/19/2010

I agree with you, R30. Cassevetes acts the role superbly but he has a Mephistopheles sort of face that gives away the game. It would have been scarier if Guy had been played by someone more conventionally handsome.

by Anonymousreply 3208/19/2010

It was "Look What's Happened to Rosemary's Baby" and also starred the aging gracefully Tina Louise, R31. If I remember correctly, the baby didn't want to be Satan's son at all. Or something like that.

by Anonymousreply 3308/19/2010

[quote]Anyone remember the made for TV sequel starring Miss Patty Duke?

Yeah, but not much about it, other than Guy was played by George Maharis and he and Rosemary are divorced when the show begins.

Anyone read "Son of Rosemary", Ira Levin's late-in-life sequel? Christ, did that suck. It started off really well--Rosemary awakens from an multi-year coma when Dr. Shand, the last living member of the coven, dies. Great beginning and premise, but it goes off the rails and the ending will make you heave the book across the room.

I think Levin was talked into writing it. He dedicated the book to Mia Farrow, and it's evident that it was intended to be the basis for a movie, much like "Hannibal" was for Thomas Harris.

by Anonymousreply 3408/19/2010

Is it ever made clear in the novel (or in the movie for that matter) at which point was Guy recruited by the witches? Did he bring Rosemary to the building already with the prospect of her giving birth to the baby or was it only after he met the neighbors and they made him the offer of getting him his big break?

by Anonymousreply 3508/19/2010

Ugh yes Son of Rosemary's ending is FUCKING INFURIATING. Hated that book. HATED.

But I've been dying to see the TV sequel for years now. It'll probably just infuriate me like the book though. I'm far too attached to the original (both book and movie).

I like what JC brings to the role. Yeah his face gives away his game but I like the fact that everything's so OBVIOUS and yet Rosemary still can't work it out until it's far too late because no one would ever suspect such a thing until it was too late, even with his devil brows lurching at you. She loved Guy, and couldn't see what was right in front of her.

by Anonymousreply 3608/19/2010

"All I could really think about was how this movie seemed to be a commentary on women's rights and the abortion debate." Duh.

by Anonymousreply 3708/19/2010

Love the movie, and I love the book. I remember my Mom went to go see this when she was pregnant with one of my younger siblings and it spooked her SHITLESS for months. (She'd wake my Dad up and make him 'escort' her to the bathroom in the middle of the night and wait outside the door every time she had to pee.

by Anonymousreply 3808/19/2010

I show the movie to all my pregnant friends.

by Anonymousreply 3908/19/2010

"...and Polanski thought of using his wife Sharon Tate (he decided that would be unethical)..."

Yeah, that's the problem with rapists, they're so damn ethical.

by Anonymousreply 4008/19/2010

R35, my understanding was that Guy was recreuited during that dinner with the Castavets. When Rosemary and Minnie are in the kitchen, you see just a curling puff of smoke through the door where Roman and Guy are sitting; I thought that was when Roman demonstrated something for Guy that convinced him that his powers were real.

When Rosemary rejoins him, Guy has a look on his face of intense concentration and consternation that he's not really able to shake for the rest of the scene; this is guy mulling over the offer he's just been made as he wrestles with his conscience.

by Anonymousreply 4108/19/2010

I had no idea the Bramford interiors were stage sets. They're incredible--the way the Castevets and Mrs. Gardenia decorate them, with books everywhere and everything a kind of great shabby elegant mess, is so real. I hate how Rosemary and Guy redecorate mrs. Gardenia's apartment--they take all the crazy charm out of the place--but that's also very real they would paint everything white and have tiny mid-century modern furniture that looks too small for the place.

by Anonymousreply 4308/19/2010

Why do the Castevets seem so completely unfazed when they are shown Terri's body out on the sidewalk? You'd think they'd be devastated because all their plans had been ruined.

by Anonymousreply 4408/19/2010

I think Nicholson is far more Satanic looking than Cassavetes. The only problem I had with JC is that he seemed so much older than Rosemary, not like a peer at all. %0D %0D And how perfect was it that the TIME cover with "Is God Dead?" on the front of it came out that year? I remember what a big deal that was in my Catholic high school at the time!

by Anonymousreply 4508/19/2010

[quote]The only problem I had with JC is that he seemed so much older than Rosemary, not like a peer at all.

I thought that was part of the shtick. Older man[slightly] marries subservient younger woman[girl] so she is easier to control. He just hates her female friends. That scene where Rosemary {jokingly?}calls him "daddy" when nags/manipulates her into eating some of the "mouse" is telling.

by Anonymousreply 4608/19/2010

"Why do the Castevets seem so completely unfazed when they are shown Terri's body out on the sidewalk? You'd think they'd be devastated because all their plans had been ruined."

She didn't really kill herself -the Casavets had her killed, didn't they? So they knew what they were walking home to find. Right?

by Anonymousreply 4708/19/2010

R41, R42 Thanks for the explanations, I thought that it was more likely Guy was made the offer after he moved in the building.

I also assumed that the Castevets' original plan was for Terry to be the mother. The only thing that confused me was Minnie telling Rosemary at the end that Satan chose her among many women.

But I guess that might be a phrase you tell a girl who just gave birth to baby devil.

by Anonymousreply 4808/19/2010

Weld, of course, would have been very good, and Fonda would have been excellent, but I don't think anyone would have been as good as Farrow in that role. Cassavettes was a perfect blend of sexy and smarmy.

by Anonymousreply 4908/19/2010

Guy is never shown as being particularly interested in the Bramford or the Castavets at first. Plus, the story works much better if he is tempted by a proposal that comes out of the blue and that means fame and money.%0D %0D It's a very strange part of the story. That Guy is so quickly made to believe such a preposterous supernatural plot, that the devil is coming to impregnate his wife. But Polanski and Levin handled it very well by keeping it a complete secret until the end.

by Anonymousreply 5008/19/2010

Do you think there has ever been a coven of wealthy, influential witches/satanists in NYC in real life?

by Anonymousreply 5108/19/2010

R51 Definitely yes, people in the 19th century were obsessed with spiritualism, holding seances, invoking ghosts and making persons levitate.

There must have been dozens of these hypnotists, magicians and mediums and beside them no doubt some black magic practitioners.

I'm certain there must be an American equivalent of Aleister Crowley, I just don't know the name.

by Anonymousreply 5208/19/2010

I think Guy is tantalized by the idea that the coven can give him everything he's really wanted but he doesn't really believe it until they actually manage blind Donald Baumgart, giving him the role he wanted.

One of the things I love about Cassavetes is that his guy is so narcissistic: if you watch the film focusing on him and not Farrow (which you can only do after you've seen the film a few times before), he's really remarkable. His character has an arc--going from not being interested in the Castevets at all (he thinks they will get completely in their lives, which they do), to being intrigued by Roman's stories of the great actors of the Edwardian era, to being greedy for what Roman can offer him, then to being terrified once he gets what he wants with Baumgart's blindness of hurting Rosemary, then chucking all that aside and wanting to get her drugged up so she can be impregnated, then to being unable to look her in the eye when she's pregnant and in pain, then to being desperate when she wants to go to Dr. Hill. He's also always imitating the other characters (Elisha Cook Jr. and Ruth Gordon) and playing up to Rosemary because he can't stand not to be the center of attention--he is a true narcissist, which is what Roman exploits to get what he wants.

by Anonymousreply 5308/19/2010

r52, Adrian Marcato was mostly based on Aleister Crowley.

But there was also a huge interest during the 60s with Satanism because of Anton LaVey, who wrote the Satanic Bible--there were even rumors that he was the actor in the devil's suit during the dream sequence (which wasn;t true).

by Anonymousreply 5408/19/2010

Too bad they didn't use Aleister Crowley's real name. The anagram scene would have been more interesting: Aleister Crowley = Oily Rectal Sewer

by Anonymousreply 5508/19/2010

Not sure if this was mentioned in the other thread, but the voice of "blinded" actor Donald Baumgart is Tony Curtis.

by Anonymousreply 5608/19/2010

[quote]She didn't really kill herself -the Casavets had her killed, didn't they? So they knew what they were walking home to find. Right?%0D %0D That was always my interpretation. For some reason Terry didn't work out so they had her killed. Or maybe when Rosemary came along they thought she would be a better candidate.

by Anonymousreply 5708/19/2010

r57 I believe Terry didn't work out because they told her what was going to happen and she freaked, so to keep her from running away and telling such a tell they had her killed.%0D %0D I remember Ruth Gordans character stating to someone (and I think it was Rosemary)about how Terry wouldn't work. Could have been the part when Ruth hands Rosemary the tannis root charm.

by Anonymousreply 5808/19/2010

Would someone post the ending of the book sequel? Clearly marking it spoiler of course. All the comments about how dreadful it is has me interested.

by Anonymousreply 5908/19/2010

R57 and R58 - I believe you're both mistaken. Roman Castavet told Terry what was happening and she freaked out, and killed herself. In order to avoid suspicion and inquiry, they write the "suicide note" and then leave the apartment, only to return so that it appears they were not around when Terry killed herself.%0D %0D We hear Minnie say to Roman "I told you not to tell her; I told you she wouldn't be open-minded". And Roman identifies her handwriting on the suicide note by saying "definitely..absolutely" to the obvious satisfaction of the police officer, since the officer asks nothing further about it.%0D %0D When you think about it, Roman offers that affirmation too quickly and assuredly. He and Minnie hardly know Terry.

by Anonymousreply 6008/19/2010

[quote]I believe Terry didn't work out because they told her what was going to happen and she freaked, so to keep her from running away and telling such a tell they had her killed.

[quote]I remember Ruth Gordans character stating to someone (and I think it was Rosemary)about how Terry wouldn't work. Could have been the part when Ruth hands Rosemary the tannis root charm.

In Rosemary's dream where she sees the nuns bricking up the windows and hears the voice of Sister Whosis (Minnie's voice through their bedroom wall), she actually learns what happened. Minnie says to Roman something along these lines: "I told you not to tell her [Terry]. Now we'll have to start all over again. It didn't have to be her--all she has to be is young, healthy and not a virgin. I don't know how you're in charge of ANYTHING." Ouch.

Didn't the cops find Terry's suicide note taped to the window with a band-aid? I'm wondering if the coven gave her a choice--jump or we'll kill you.

by Anonymousreply 6108/19/2010

"Son of Rosemary"

by Anonymousreply 6208/19/2010

Son of Rosemary - from Wiki%0D %0D The novel begins in November 1999 with Rosemary Woodhouse waking up in a long term care facility after the last member of the coven from the first novel is killed in a car accident. She learns that she has been in a coma since 1973, the result of a spell cast on her by the coven when they discovered that she planned to remove her son Andy from their influence. Rosemary immediately becomes a national sensation after waking up from such a long coma. In her absence, Andy was raised by Minnie and Roman Castevet, the leaders of the coven.%0D %0D Andy is now 33, the same age as Jesus is said to have been when he died -- he also has twelve assistants and a girlfriend called Judith S. Kharyat who threatens to reveal his parentage and is spectacularly murdered with thirty silver knives. He is the leader of a charitable foundation with a worldwide influence. Rosemary immediately suspects that Andy's foundation has a demonic purpose, but he reassures her that he has fought his evil side, and is trying to do good work. Supporters wear pins that say "I (heart) Andy" -- in fact, this is the first thing Rosemary sees when she wakes -- and after Rosemary's story becomes known, they begin wearing "I (heart) Rosemary" pins as well. Andy consorts with Republican Party members and members of the Religious Right, who want him to endorse a slightly retarded millionaire for President. Throughout the book, various characters playfully mention the well-known riddle "roast mules", often out of context or %C3%83%C2%A0 propos of nothing.%0D %0D The foundation has distributed candles worldwide with the intention that they be lit at midnight on New Year's Eve to help usher in the year 2000. Rosemary gradually comes to suspect that all is not right with the candles, but her concerns fall on deaf ears. The candles then play a part in the climax of the book, as Andy's real father returns for a visit, and takes Rosemary with him to Hell. After being taken to Hell, Rosemary wakes up in bed with her husband Guy and finds that it is 1965 again. The events of the entire first book and nearly all of the sequel are revealed to have been a vivid dream of Rosemary's. Even the Bramford, the apartment building where Guy and Rosemary lived in the first book, was revealed to be a creation of Rosemary's mind after reading Bram Stoker's book, Dracula. Rosemary then receives a call from her friend Edward Hutchins (who in the first book was killed to prevent his revealing the coven's existence). He offers her and Guy a rent-free apartment in the Dakota Apartments (the model for the Bramford) for a year. Hutch then makes a comment about "roast mules", and about the candle lighting, causing Rosemary to sense danger. Guy questions why she would want to turn down a chance to live at the Dakota, but Rosemary takes Hutch's remarks seriously as a warning.%0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 6308/19/2010

S*P*O*I*L*E*R*

[quote]Would someone post the ending of the book sequel? Clearly marking it spoiler of course. All the comments about how dreadful it is has me interested.

S*P*O*I*L*E*R* * P * O * I * L * E * R *

It's all a dream. The clock resets itself to 1965, and Rosemary wakes up next to Guy. The phone rings with an offer from a realtor to look at the apartment whose lease they wriggled out of to take the apartment in the Bram. I don't have the book any more, but IIRC, Rosemary says something to Guy about her crazy dream, and Levin's implication is that they won't be moving into the Bram this time around.

by Anonymousreply 6408/19/2010

[quote]Judith S. Kharyat

...Really??

by Anonymousreply 6508/19/2010

[quote]One of the things I love about Cassavetes is that his guy is so narcissistic.

He is in the book, too, and I think it's a fair bet that Levin wasn't all that fond of actors in general. Actually it's a pretty good joke--narcissistic actor willing to sell his wife's body and his own soul to become a star. My guess is that Roman didn't have to work all that hard to close the deal, even with Guy's fright over Donald Baumgart's blindness.

BTW, in the book it's mentioned that there's a ten-year age gap between Guy and Rosemary.

by Anonymousreply 6608/19/2010

Yeth, dath the nameth.

by Anonymousreply 6708/19/2010

I remember that the officer says Terri's suicide note is as short as it gets, which would suggest the Castevets wrote it. But I don't see them having the power (or the physical strength) to make Terri jump out of the window (their witch craft seems to work only towards blinding people or putting them in deadly comas), and Minnie's comments to Roman about being mad he told Terri about their plan makes me think she likely killed herself.

I think whoever said she killed herself but then they wrote the suicide note and went out for a walk is probably correct--they didn't want the police to snoop into their private business, but I don't think if they had killed her they would have (or could have) made her fall out the window.

by Anonymousreply 6808/19/2010

I read that sequel. Forgot the ending but now that it was posted it's come back. It was like Pam's dream on DALLAS. Horrible ending.

by Anonymousreply 6908/19/2010

I firmly believe that Polanski wanted us to believe Guy knew about the Castevets before they go to look at the apartment- despite what the book says (perhaps Roman went backstage after that play he saw Guy in?). The apt. is too expensive for them. And there are many shifty looks Cassevetes gives while they're inspecting the apt. But he lets Rosemary believe it's all her idea.

by Anonymousreply 7008/19/2010

"after the news of Woody Allen's leaving her for her daughter Soon-Yi hit the newspapers, Sinatra called her up immediately and offered to punch Woody Allen out... which I guess he thought was a chivalrous gesture."%0D %0D I think he offered to do more than that. In Sinatra's world, putting out a contract on somebody is like a Hallmark card: "When you care enough to send the very best".%0D

by Anonymousreply 7108/19/2010

"the voice of "blinded" actor Donald Baumgart is Tony Curtis."%0D %0D Mia Farrow didn't know who would be speaking Baumgart's lines, but the voice was obviously familiar to her. This lent hesitancy and a little polite confusion to her expression as she tried to place the voice.

by Anonymousreply 7208/19/2010

I firmly disagree, R70. Polanski followed the book almost to the letter. Guy is indifferent about the Bramford and openly opposed to their befriending the Castevets until the night Roman works his magic on him over cigars after dinner. %0D %0D One of the most wonderfully subtle plot points in the book (that can only be glanced at in the film) is that it is Rosemary alone who is determined to live in the Bramford. They've already signed a lease to live elsewhere. Rosemary seduces Guy into lying to the lease-holder about a non-existent job in California that forces them to break the lease. In Rosemary's estimation, it's a "little white lie," a small but necessary evil to get something she truly desires. %0D %0D Having broken an honest contract made in good faith she inadvertently delivers herself into a deal with the devil. I think its a very deliberate point on Levin's part that Rosemary is a sort of modern Eve tempting her Adam into sin and finding herself ultimately expelled from God's protection.

by Anonymousreply 7308/19/2010

"Just one random observation--while I like John Cassavetes as an actor, I thought he was miscast in this. One look at him and you know he's up to no good. An All-American Robert Redford type would have been better."

To a Holocaust survivor like Polanski, a Redford type might look more sinister than a Cassavetes type.

by Anonymousreply 7408/19/2010

Rosemary ends up evoking a pregnant Auschwitz prisoner once she makes it to Dr Hill's restroom. Polanski has a lot of stuff down there, doesn't he?

by Anonymousreply 7508/19/2010

This is my favorite movie and it always amazes and impresses me that the threads on it here at DL are always able to go on and on and I learn something new or figure out some new angle to look at it every single time it comes up. It's really one of the most interesting films ever made - it's like looking in a fun-house mirror at half of the last century, endlessly fascinating on a hundred different levels. Feminism and politics and religion - all that and it's a hoot!

by Anonymousreply 7608/19/2010

A significant scene from the novel got cut out of the movie: Guy and Rosemary are having lunch, and she cajoles him to invent a story for the other landlord so they can get out of the lease. She tells him, "You're such a marvelous liar." Of course this later comes back to haunt her.

I also love all the lapsed Catholic stuff, and the idea that apathy is worse than outright hostility. (She even talks about apathy to Terri in the laundry room.) Ultimately, it's her apathy about religion in general and Catholicism specifically ("I was brought up a Catholic; now I don't know.") that leaves her vulnerable. Not that I agree, but the idea fits in nicely in the whole story. Later in the story, she goes back to her (childish) notions of religion for comfort ("God bless Dr. Hill."), but it's too late for all that.

It's true what was stated earlier: the movie barely deviates from the novel at all. The dialogue is very nearly verbatim from the book.

by Anonymousreply 7708/19/2010

One of the few things that Polanski left out of the book was Rosemary's problems with her lapsed Roman Catholic faith. At the very end of the book, she even thinks seriously about jumping out the window with the baby, but then decides the baby's parentage is a matter for the pop and the cardinals to settle someday, "not little Rosemary Woodhouse from Omaha." One thing I was really sorry Polanski left out at the end was Rosemary's insistence at the very end that the baby be called "Andrew" rather than "Adrian." Roman protests, but Rosemary says, "No, this is the one thing where I am going to absolutely have to insist. This and the thing about wearing all black nursery clothes." Then all the Satanists (including Minnie) say, "Hail Andrew" and "Hail Rosemary, Mother of Andrew" and Roman is left sulking. It's a nice little throwaway to show us that Rosemary was not completely outfoxed in the end by Roman.

by Anonymousreply 7808/19/2010

Was Jack Nicholson really considered for this? Wasn't he a B-movie actor at the time?

I wonder who they wanted for the Victoria Vetri cameo. I can't imagine Vetri was the first choice.

by Anonymousreply 7908/19/2010

r79, since in the book Rosemaruy's first words to Terri Gionoffrio are, "Excuse me, are you Anna Maria Alberghetti?" rather than "Excuse me, are you Victoria Vetri?" I would assume that's whom Polanski wanted for the part. I wonder though if they even dared ask Alberghetti.

by Anonymousreply 8008/19/2010

None of you ever talk about Polanski's The Ninth Gate, which has several of the same themes as Rosemary's Baby. It's not as good a film a RB, but it's one of my all-time faves and it seems to have found a cult following. People are just now discovering what a good film it is.

by Anonymousreply 8108/19/2010

Johnny Depp's character in The Ninth Gate, Corso, IS Rosemary's Baby himself... Adrian. Watch them together, it all makes sense.

by Anonymousreply 8208/19/2010

[quote]Then all the Satanists (including Minnie) say, "Hail Andrew" and "Hail Rosemary, Mother of Andrew" and Roman is left sulking.

Not exactly. Laura-Louise is left sulking when Roman cajoles Rosemary into rocking the baby's cradle. True, he's not happy when Rosemary insists on calling the baby "Andrew", but when Minnie lets out a "Hail Andrew", Roman shuts up ("I don't know how you're in charge of anything"). I suspect Minnie wasn't all that crazy about her loony father-in-law.

[quote]I think whoever said she killed herself but then they wrote the suicide note and went out for a walk is probably correct.

The timing's wrong in view of the fact that Terry went out a front window, bounced off a parked car and landed on the sidewalk in full view of passersby. If the Castevets killed her, they wrote the note first, then killed her, left the building through a back entrance and returned to the scene after Rosemary and Guy identified Terry to the cops.

[quote]To a Holocaust survivor like Polanski, a Redford type might look more sinister than a Cassavetes type.

Oh please. Even if this were true, Polanski was savvy enough even then to know it wasn't what he thought, but how an American audience would react that would determine the success or failure of the film. More likely the studio felt Cassavetes' price was right, so he got the part.

by Anonymousreply 8308/19/2010

It was Polanski who wanted to cast Tuesday Weld and Robert Redford originally--he wanted all-American types for both parts.

by Anonymousreply 8408/19/2010

"If the Castevets killed her, they wrote the note first, then killed her, left the building through a back entrance and returned to the scene after Rosemary and Guy identified Terry to the cops."%0D %0D The Castavets may not have actually pushed her out of the window, but could have caused her to have hallucinations that would have made her jump. I always thought their appearance was too convenient to be accidental; they may well have gone out of the building and walked around the block to the front, to "discover" the body. %0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 8508/19/2010

[quote] I always thought their appearance was too convenient to be accidental

I see what you mean, but the fight the Castevets have later (which Rosemary overhears through the wall) make it clear that Terri's suicide is a set-back. Roman informed her, and she couldn't handle it. ("I told you she wouldn't be open-minded!") Minnie takes over and the next try, Rosemary is kept in the dark.

by Anonymousreply 8608/19/2010

R86, you are right. I couldn't place the time and occasion of the "open-minded" conversation.%0D %0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 8708/19/2010

Wasn't there talk of a remake just a short time ago?

by Anonymousreply 8808/20/2010

I also think they wrote the note, caused the "suicide" then walked around to the front of the building.%0D %0D The conversation thru the wall I viewed as sort of a post script to the entire incident. They were re-hashing the whole Terri episode and the necessity of dumping her.%0D %0D Another angle I think Polanski touched on with the movie was the whole ambition thing with broadway, Hollywood, fame, etc. I thought about Mike Nichols movie "Wolf" with Jack Nicholson and how, in so many ways, it was a deliberate satire of the publishing world in NYC.%0D %0D I thought, one facet on RB, was the obvious lampooning of the actors life and the Theatre.%0D I thought John Casavetes (JC!) was perfect. He was sleazy, desperate, and weak of character. A wonderful choice. %0D %0D Mia was almost childlike at times, yet remarkably canny at others.(The "wonderful liar" line.) If you agree with the analogies to the womens rights themes, you would want to include the issue of trust as a corollary. Mia was trusting of her husband, her neighbors, that doctor, etc. Didn't recognize that he was so evil or that she was the visctim of a conspiracy of evil.%0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 8908/20/2010

"Mia was almost childlike at times, yet remarkably canny at others.(The "wonderful liar" line.) If you agree with the analogies to the womens rights themes, you would want to include the issue of trust as a corollary. Mia was trusting of her husband, her neighbors, that doctor, etc. Didn't recognize that he was so evil or that she was the visctim of a conspiracy of evil. "%0D %0D Just wanted to add, from the whole feminist perspective, she saw herself as subordinate and these others, her husband, the doctor, the older neighbors, as authority figures who were making decisions about her life and her body. It was pretty outrageous shit!

by Anonymousreply 9008/20/2010

Cool. I actually like the ending of Levin's sequel. Why are people so upset by it?

by Anonymousreply 9108/20/2010

R91- it seemed like a sell out. Take a gret book and movie and then Levin blows it all up with his dream theory.%0D %0D I guess we should be happy that everyone turned out all right and that the baby was never born or that Rosemary Woodhouse was in jeopardy.

by Anonymousreply 9208/20/2010

The Castevets did not kill, have killed, or cause the suicide of Terry. She had to have jumped to her death after learning that the spawn of Satan was growing inside her.%0D %0D The telling line is Minnie's "I told you not to tell her, I told you she wouldn't be open-minded." If they had killed her (or had her killed) there would be absolutely no reason for this line. The only reason for the argument scene that contains this line is that somehow, Terry frustrated their plan.%0D %0D She jumped to her death, causing Minnie and Roman to have to find a new "mother" and start over, and that's what prompts the arguement we overhear which includes Minnie's line quoted above.

by Anonymousreply 9308/20/2010

In the interview with Polanski on the DVD, he does say that he initially wanted an all-American, "milk-fed" type to play Rosemary rather than a waifish actress like Farrow. I think he mentions Tuesday Weld.

by Anonymousreply 9408/20/2010

There are few moments as hair-raising, whether in print or on film, as Rosemary trying to figure out Hutch's anagram, and then moving the Scrabble tiles to re-form "Steven Marcato" into "Roman Castevet". As Levin wrote, she did it "with no hesitation and no false moves". And then "the baby stirred slightly within her".

Masterful.

by Anonymousreply 9508/20/2010

This movie and the book on which it is based, still hold up beautifully. Masterful direction. It's a classic. Every time I watch it I get sucked in and I know what's coming. It's that good.

by Anonymousreply 9608/20/2010

Mia had a bit of a music hit on her hands when the theme from "Rosemary's Baby" was released on 45. It played on the AM radio pop stations late summer and into fall of 1968. There was also a soundtrack LP too.

by Anonymousreply 9708/22/2010

Mia's Top 40 hit from summer 1968.

by Anonymousreply 9808/22/2010

I thought Mia had the pixie 'do when she was midway through her run on "Peyton Place" which shocked people.

by Anonymousreply 9908/22/2010

I think you're right, R99. When the film came out I remember being surprised at how different she looked as Rosemary, pre-Vidal (and wearing a wig). There's no doubt the 'do helped her achieve that skull-faced look when Rosemary is in such pain.

After the great comments here, I re-watched the film yesterday, and I have to say Sidney Blackmer's incredibly satisfied reading of "He has his Father's eyes" stole the film this time around for me.

I really hated Sapirstein's line to Rosemary after she gives birth and he tells her the baby's dead: "I could have done something if we were at the hospital, but no, you wouldn't listen." Talk about sticking the knife in (no pun intended). I guess he just wanted to get back at her for causing him such grief.

IMO, John Cassavetes still gives the game away. In the Guy/Rosemary scenes I couldn't stop thinking "How can she ever believe a word he says?"

by Anonymousreply 10008/22/2010

R99-R98-- she cut her hair during the filming of Peyton Place. But I think she wore a wig.

by Anonymousreply 10108/22/2010

"IMO, John Cassavetes still gives the game away. In the Guy/Rosemary scenes I couldn't stop thinking "How can she ever believe a word he says?" "%0D %0D I am sure we are meant to see that. Deep inside, Rosemary is still a good little Catholic girl who respects authority. When asked if she still believes, she says, "Now...I don't know" when it's fairly clear that she still does, but Guy has ridiculed her so she pretends otherwise. She is such a Guy cheerleader, she doesn't want to believe he is what he is. %0D %0D Even right at the end, I wonder if it's not clear to her that Guy has sold her out until he tells her she "hasn't REALLY been hurt" and that they can have lots of other babies, and then she spits in his face.%0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 10208/22/2010

R100, it creates much more suspense if we know things that characters in a film don't know.%0D %0D Hitchcock once illustrated this to an interviewer by describing people sitting at a table talking while the audience knows that there's a bomb about to go off underneath the table that the characters can't see.%0D %0D We can see right through Guy and know that this is someone not to be trusted, but we have to wait for Rosemary to discover it for herself.

by Anonymousreply 10308/22/2010

One of the things I love about Farrow's performance is that in the beginning of the film she's so pretentious and irritating when she prattles on about Guy's career ("He was Luther and Nobody Loves an Albatross, and he's done a lot of television and commercials"), but then you begin to feel so sorry for her, especially at "It's not fair to Doctor Sapirstein!" That's where the film is really tapping into Levin's feminist awareness of how badly women were treated before women's liberation. His next book, of course, was "The Stepford Wives," which is really about how badly the male Establishment treated women.

by Anonymousreply 10408/22/2010

I love the person who suggested that Hutch was gay. I see what you mean, but he had a daughter....not, of course that that means anything.%0D %0D I also find it bizarre that Mia wasn't even nominated for an Oscar. Minnie actually won an Oscar didn't she?%0D %0D I've been reading Rupert Everett's autobiography and he talks of the fact that the woman who plays the other neighbour with the heavy glasses was his neighbour in LA and he has some amusing anecdotes about her.%0D %0D For me, the weak point of the film is the way Guy is won over by the Castavets so easily at the beginning of the film. It just seems so quick and easy.

by Anonymousreply 10508/22/2010

The running of the lines! St. Patrick's Cathedral! On Nob Hill!

by Anonymousreply 10608/22/2010

[quote]it creates much more suspense if we know things that characters in a film don't know.

Agreed, but in this case a lot of the ambiguity is lost. The book is one of the best-plotted suspense stories ever, because Levin consistently keeps you wondering whether Rosemary is just paranoid or something evil is really going on. I think Cassavetes-as-Guy is just one of those issues in which peoples' mileage may vary.

[quote]I also find it bizarre that Mia wasn't even nominated for an Oscar. Minnie actually won an Oscar didn't she?

Yes, Ruth Gordon won, but Mia's non-nomination was a case of Hollywood politics: the industry backed Sinatra over his young soon-to-be ex-wife. Mia had originally agreed to co-star with Sinatra in "The Detective", but at the last minute decided she couldn't pass up "Rosemary's Baby", a project which Sinatra loathed in any case. As they say, the Sinatra/Farrow marriage went "pfffffft", Lee Remick played his wife in "The Detective" and Hollywood punished the young upstart.

For my money Mia Farrow was stupendous. She's wonderful throughout, but her scene with Dr. Hill, when she's explaining about "all of them witches" is incredible. She sounds nuts and knows it, and she makes you begin to doubt whether any of this is real.

[quote]For me, the weak point of the film is the way Guy is won over by the Castavets so easily at the beginning of the film. It just seems so quick and easy.

Part of the problem in translating a novel into a film is condensing and discarding important information. In the book it's made very clear that Guy is on the verge of missing the window for becoming a star--Levin underscores the fact that he's stuck in supporting roles on stage and most of his income is derived from commercials and bit parts in soaps. He goes to screenings and parties with his agent to network, but no one is apparently biting. He's 33 which is nothing now, but in the mid-60's he would have been considered to be on the verge of obscurity. The part that Donald Baumgart got really was probably his last good chance at getting noticed, and he had to get it.

by Anonymousreply 10708/22/2010

"For me, the weak point of the film is the way Guy is won over by the Castavets so easily at the beginning of the film. It just seems so quick and easy."%0D %0D Yes, that didn't take up much plot time, but Guy was desperate to be a successful actor - his "career" hadn't added up to much so far, and if that TV ad we saw was any indication, he was going nowhere fast. He was so amoral that sacrificing his wife probably seemed like a good trade, especially if he was told she wouldn't get hurt and would never know what happened. He couldn't see any down side to this little deal at all.

by Anonymousreply 10808/22/2010

[quote] One thing I was really sorry Polanski left out at the end was Rosemary's insistence at the very end that the baby be called "Andrew" rather than "Adrian." Roman protests, but Rosemary says, "No, this is the one thing where I am going to absolutely have to insist. This and the thing about wearing all black nursery clothes."

I read the novel after I'd seen the film, and I had the same reaction. I guess it's hard to dramatize her inner monologue: "Well, the kid is half me, so he's not all bad. As his mother, I can cultivate the good side."

I also think Polanski wanted to leave the audience with a clear message of "They won", which would have been weakened if Rosemary had asserted herself. As it is, we're left with a feeling of horror and helplessness.

by Anonymousreply 10908/22/2010

The reason Mia didn't desert the project at Sinatra's request was because she saw the rushes and was told by the producer that her performance was better than Audrey Hepburn in Wait Until Dark, and that she was definitely going to win the Oscar for it. Incentive enough to stay.

by Anonymousreply 11008/22/2010

I think people are wrong about the ending to "Son Of Rosemary." It isn't just a dream. Satan has doomed her to relive her story over and over for eternity - her personal hell. The "roast mules"/somersault anagram is the key. She comes full circle and starts right again at the beginning of her story. A somersault.

It's still a crap book but if you re-read the ending again you'll see the "it was only a dream" theory isn't right.

by Anonymousreply 11108/22/2010

[quote]in the beginning of the film she's so pretentious and irritating when she prattles on about Guy's career%0D %0D What a delicate little flower you are.

by Anonymousreply 11208/22/2010

"One of the things I love about Farrow's performance is that in the beginning of the film she's so pretentious and irritating when she prattles on about Guy's career ("He was Luther and Nobody Loves an Albatross, and he's done a lot of television and commercials")..."

She must be used to having to explain his career in this way to the many people she encounters who have no idea who Guy is, as his career is so invisible to people outside his business. I don't think she sounds a braggart, she has just condensed a lot of secondary credits into a manageable sentence that sounds somewhat impressive and tries to make his career sound important and viable.

by Anonymousreply 11308/22/2010

I agree that there is something queeny about Hutch and his exactitude and skepticism, and personally I don't see him and Grace Cardiff as a couple, but maybe she was just a good friend. She certainly asserts her friendship with him to Rosemary during their phone call, but she doesn't seem upset after the funeral. Perhaps she was just relieved that his coma ordeal was over, but this has always bothered me.

by Anonymousreply 11408/22/2010

[quote]What a delicate little flower you are. And what a miserable piece of shit YOU are!

by Anonymousreply 11508/22/2010

[quote]we learn so much about each other on Datalounge%0D %0D Apart from the fact we don't actually know who anyone really is.%0D %0D No one seems to discuss/speculate on the Sharon Tate Murders and how they may have been brought on by Polanski and his making a film about the devil. Much is said about The Exorcist from that perspective, though I can't remember any of the details.%0D %0D Also, two years later Mia gave birth to twins and initially had horrendous problems with the health of one of them, which I believe were ultimately sorted out.

by Anonymousreply 11608/22/2010

Why are they moving to new digs anyway? More proof that Guy has a plan- getting her away from meddling Hutch.

by Anonymousreply 11708/22/2010

[quote]Why are they moving to new digs anyway? More proof that Guy has a plan- getting her away from meddling Hutch.

In the beginning of the book they've been living in Guy's small apartment since their marriage. They've been on the waiting list for the Bram for quite some time but gave up waiting; instead they sign a lease for an apartment in a much newer building. Only then do they get a call that the Bram has an opening which they ultimately take, with Guy getting out of the lease by lying about going on a USO tour.

by Anonymousreply 11808/22/2010

R111: Great find!

by Anonymousreply 11908/22/2010

I like how Cassavetes plays Guy as a bad actor. At least that's how I perceived it- he needs all the help he can get.

by Anonymousreply 12008/22/2010

If you were in Manhattan, especially around Times Square, around the time the film opened there were stencils all over the streets saying "Pray, pray for Rosemary's Baby." I was a kid and I have always remembered those. I think they were in light blue and really stood out.

by Anonymousreply 12108/22/2010

Hit a nerve did I r115/delicate little flower. My you are irritating and pretentious!

by Anonymousreply 12208/22/2010

It's been decades since I've seen this movie and I do remember loving it.

The ending... I remember Rosemary making a decision to be a mother to the devil-baby. She takes over rocking the cradle, yes? That seems a much more clever, movie shorthand way to tell the same ending -- Rosemary insisting on the name for the baby that is in the book. She still takes over and asserts herself, she does it in a way that works in a movie.

by Anonymousreply 12308/22/2010

r123, interesting that you mention the cradle-rocking scene because I was just going to comment on it. For me, it was one of the creepier scenes without being actually scary. It's strange how the one witch is violently rocking the cradle back and forth, with seemingly no care or emotion towards the baby. Rosemary walks in and asks her to stop and then takes over the care, with the other witches giving her their blessing as it were.

by Anonymousreply 12408/22/2010

The radio ads were even spookier; you heard a baby crying for several seconds, and then the voice saying, "Pray...pray for Rosemary's baby..."

by Anonymousreply 12508/22/2010

R125 Yes those radio jokes were a riot--I think they ran on WBLS in NYC, an R&B station, and ever so often the dj wailed "Pray for Rosemary's Baby."%0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 12608/22/2010

[quote]I'm certain there must be an American equivalent of Aleister Crowley, I just don't know the name.

Betty White.

by Anonymousreply 12708/22/2010

I do remember a remake being announced, but can't find it on IMDB.

I hope if they do make one, they hire Mia Farrow to play Minnie.

by Anonymousreply 12808/22/2010

Yes, I remember those radio adds not. OMG, I forgot all about them. RB was really quite the rage when it first opened. I remember how everyone at school could not wait to see it and of course many of us were Mia fans from PP. I don't think any of us ever heard of JC. I also remember a lot of parents wouldn't let their kids see it. %0D %0D I saw it about 6 times in the theater and one of those times a friend's parents took us to see it at my suggestion and throughout the film the mother kept loudly whispering to her daughter, "This is the kind of movie your friend said we should see." LOL, her mom didn't want me hanging around with her after that. %0D %0D I guess maybe it didn't help when I told the mother she should worry more about what her son, my friend's older brother, was doing in my friends room with her instead of what movies she was seeing. No more invites to that house, but I saw that coming.%0D

by Anonymousreply 12908/23/2010

One of the greatest scene-stealing moments is Minnie eating cake in the dinner party scene.

by Anonymousreply 13008/23/2010

[quote]it didn't help when I told the mother she should worry more about what her son, my friend's older brother, was doing in my friends room with her instead of what movies she was seeing

You talked like that when you were a kid? Weren't you the sassy little priss?

by Anonymousreply 13108/23/2010

Please stop saying 'witch'. It wounds.%0D %0D They are loony Satanists, not Wiccans.%0D %0D There's a difference.%0D %0D Learn it.

by Anonymousreply 13208/23/2010

I remember it was always an amusing shock in the 1980s and 1990s when I came across this film on TV and realized it was a young unknown Charles Grodin playing the young doctor, esp. because he was so associated with satiric comic roles when he became a leading character actor. He's so far off the radar now, his name hasn't even been mentioned in this thread.%0D %0D And Ruth Gordon was completely forgotten by the general public for years when she re-surfaced in this film...what a comeback! Patsy Kelly, as well, in the small role of Laura Louise. Of course, the younger audiences of the 60s didn't know either lady at all.

by Anonymousreply 13308/23/2010

Polanski must be one haunted man. WWII, The Manson murders, the rape.. No wonder he can't make a comedy.

by Anonymousreply 13508/23/2010

Um, Patchouli Moonjean, the name of the book Hutch sends Rosemary is ALL OF THEM WITCHES, not all them wiccans, so if you have a problem with that, bring it up with Ira Levin.

by Anonymousreply 13608/23/2010

I even remember the television ad for it in '68.%0D A black baby carriage sitting on top of a hill on a dark night. Then the announcer intones, "Pray...(and then there's the sound of a bell)...for Rosemary's baby." Terrifying!

by Anonymousreply 13708/23/2010

When I write my memoirs, it's going to be called ALL OF THEM BITCHES: MY LIFE ON DATALOUNGE.

by Anonymousreply 13808/23/2010

Terrifying movie to this day. Love Patsy Kelly.

The only thing that throws me - just momentarily - is the idea that a struggling actor and his non-working wife could move into the Dakota.

by Anonymousreply 13908/23/2010

I wasn't that young a kid R131. I was almost 15 but definitely prissy and a smart mouth. Besides, I knew my friend's brother was doing her. He was nearly 33, still lived at home and she was 14. It was really quite obvious so it pissed me off that her mother would be worried she'd see a movie like RB, at my suggestion, and not worried about what was being done to her daughter in her own room.%0D %0D PS, the brother was one of these guys that considered himself a real lady's man but his only charm was he was rich with his daddy's money and his fancy car. He was a disgusting perv. Although to the mother's credit it was obvious what I was, even then. I guess she figured I was a safe friend for her daughter. Who knows, maybe she knew what the brother was doing and was okay with it. I know my friend sure as shit wasn't.%0D %0D %0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 14008/23/2010

I forget but remind me....the Woodhouses were just renting that apartment, not buying it right? Middle class people didn't know to buy in those days.

by Anonymousreply 14108/23/2010

"The only thing that throws me - just momentarily - is the idea that a struggling actor and his non-working wife could move into the Dakota."%0D %0D I still think there was some great diabolical plan (even greater than Roman's) by which Rosemary was chosen and guided to the Bramwell's unholy ground. Maybe Roman's little chat with Guy was merely a formality. And maybe Minnie was right when she said "HE chose you out of all the women in the world to give birth to his only son!"%0D %0D Minnie thought Roman was a bumbler and wondered aloud at how he'd ever come to be in charge of anything. And I wouldn't say that either of them, or people like Laura-Louise and Dr. Shand were at the top of the intellectual totem pole. I don't think they were powerful in invoking the Devil, perhaps they were only the weak portals that allowed him in.%0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 14208/23/2010

I got distracted and forgot to say that part of this great diabolical plan could have been putting Rosemary and Guy in the right place at the right time at an affordable rent, and in effect created an offer they couldn't refuse (much as Guy couldn't refuse Roman, and Rosemary couldn't refuse ANYTHING).

by Anonymousreply 14308/23/2010

[quote]The only thing that throws me - just momentarily - is the idea that a struggling actor and his non-working wife could move into the Dakota.%0D %0D The Bramford isn't supposed to be the Dakota. Outside of NYC the Dakota was not a famous building until this movie (and later John Lennon's assassination) made it famous. The Bramford was a run-down Gothic relic whose long waiting list was based on its old-fashioned charm. Most of the people who lived there were neither rich nor famous. %0D %0D I don't understand why so many people prefer to interpret events in a way that deprives all the characters of their free will. I think Terry chose to kill herself and I think Rosemary became the mother of the anti-Christ because she inadvertently placed herself in the path of the Satanists by her own choice to live at the "Black Bram." (I think Minnie is only trying to flatter Rosemary into accepting her role as mother when she tells her that Satan chose her.) To me, it's much less scary if the victims are all passive puppets of pre-determined events over which they have no control.

by Anonymousreply 14408/24/2010

Scariest film ever.

by Anonymousreply 14508/24/2010

"I don't understand why so many people prefer to interpret events in a way that deprives all the characters of their free will."%0D %0D I don't understand why you are unable to perceive people as evil and manipulative. Do you have Asperger's?%0D %0D I believe: 1) Guy took Rosemary to the Bram knowing the Castevets already; 2) The Castevets had someone push Terri out the window because they found a better sow; 3) That there is no God so there is no Satan; these are just a cult of evil, power-hungry kooks- the flipside of today's Xtians; 4) Rosemary agreed to mother her child because the maternal instinct in mammals is very powerful. The sound of her baby crying would have been irresistible.

by Anonymousreply 14708/24/2010

[quote]2) The Castevets had someone push Terri out the window because they found a better sow; %0D %0D I don't think this point is true. Why would Rosemary make a better candidate? Terri was already pregnant. It would have made more sense to let her have the baby and THEN push her out the window. %0D %0D No, I think the earlier interpretations are correct that Roman told her what the deal was, she freaked, and jumped out the window of her own accord.

by Anonymousreply 14808/24/2010

[quote]Terri was already pregnant.

How do you come to that conclusion? Minnie's yelling at Roman for "telling her in advance" clearly refers to the plan to get her pregnant by Satan, not an actual pregnancy. Terri saw no way out--she had to get away from the Castevets, but if she left, she'd no doubt go back to drugs and prostitution in short order. And don't forget a suicide victim is always autopsied, and the pregnancy and blood analysis would have revealed some weird goings-on (which was why Dr. Hill wanted Rosemary to return for additional bloodwork).

On another topic I assumed the Bram was rent-controlled. Remember the Elisha Cook Jr. character saying at the beginning of the film that they'd raised the rent if they could?

by Anonymousreply 14908/24/2010

Here is a video of various "mistakes" in the editing of RB (my apologies if this has been posted before):

by Anonymousreply 15008/24/2010

[quote]I don't understand why you are unable to perceive people as evil and manipulative. Do you have Asperger's? %0D %0D I hope you're not a psychologist or professor of literature. There is no evidence in either the book or the movie (both of which are well-told and unambiguous) that Guy knew the Castevets beforehand or that the Castevets pushed Terry out the window. You may "believe" those plot points but you invented them yourself unsupported by the author or the flimmaker. %0D %0D The story states with certainty that Satan is a real entity who can assume anthropomorphic form. You don't have to believe that in your own life but it is an established reality in the fictional world of this movie.

by Anonymousreply 15108/24/2010

We know the coven didn't bring Rosemary to the Bram specifically to be the mother of Satan's baby because they state that the only qualifications for the job are that the woman be Catholic and not a virgin. They go through the whole impregnating ritual with Terry (which Rosemary overhears.) They wouldn't bother with this if they knew that the "real" mother was already living on the other side of the Castevet's closet.%0D %0D We also know that Terry killed herself because(as someone else mentioned earlier in this thread) Rosemary overhears the argument between Roman and Minnie that the plan they thought was well underway has been thwarted and that they have to start all over again from scratch. Why would they be having this fight if they knew all along that Terry was never going to be the real mother and that Rosemary was?%0D %0D Later, Guy tells Rosemary she doesn't HAVE to be a mother to her newborn, only that it would be better if she did. Knowing this, we know there would have been no need to kill Terry just because she didn't approve of the knowledge that she was carrying Satan's child. In the first place, the Satanists wouldn't anger their Lord and Master by killing his unborn child. In the second place, no one knew Terry lived with the Castevets except Rosemary. All they'd have had to do with Terry was keep her restrained until the baby was born then dispose of her afterwards if she still resisted.

by Anonymousreply 15208/24/2010

[quote]How do you come to that conclusion? Minnie's yelling at Roman for "telling her in advance" clearly refers to the plan to get her pregnant by Satan, not an actual pregnancy.%0D %0D See R152's reply above. It explains everything.%0D %0D Terry was already pregnant and the plan was well underway. Roman told her what was going on and she killed herself, thereby thwarting their plans and forcing them to turn their attentions to Rosemary and Guy.%0D %0D Otherwise there would have been no reason for Terry to be in the movie at all.

by Anonymousreply 15308/24/2010

Sorry, R153--we're going to have to agree to disagree.

IMO Minnie's remarks are ambiguous: we don't know what she didn't want Roman to tell her in advance. If your theory is correct that Satan knocked Terri up on the night Rosemary first hears chanting through the wall, there's a problem. Terri's been clean and sober for a while and presumably not whoring around anymore, so there's little chance of a cover story for a pregnancy, i.e., that she got knocked up by a trick. Under your theory Minnie Castevet would have preferred to wait until Terri's stomach popped out to say "Why hello! And guess who your baby daddy is?". I don't buy it.

And the "plan" Minnie refers to could just have been conjuring Satan to impregnate any mortal woman (I get the impression the coven never tried this before). Or getting Terri clean and sober and trusting and dependent enough on them to do whatever they asked, which is my take on it. And in that case there's still a big reason for Terri to be in the book and the movie--her discussion of the Castevets makes them seem like benevolent grandparents and she shows Rosemary the charm that the latter will recoil at receiving from Minnie. A gift via a dead girl certainly ups the creep factor.

Speaking of which, the chanting and that weird flute accompaniment that Rosemary hears through the wall is one of the eeriest sounds I've ever heard.

by Anonymousreply 15408/24/2010

I think Terri got pregnant the same way Rosemary did. While knocked out on some drug and it all just seemed like a bad dream.%0D %0D When she noticed she was pregnant, but couldn't remember sleeping with anyone (and we don't know that she didn't) she confided in the Castavets. Roman, to explain matters, tells her the whole story.

by Anonymousreply 15508/24/2010

And then Rosemary and Guy show up and because they are married and presumably having sex they are much better candidates than Terri. So it's a nice coincidence that Terri is out of the picture.

by Anonymousreply 15608/24/2010

I always got the feeling that Levin was setting up Terri as the inverse of the Biblical Mary's own sister-in-law Elisabeth, as well as the story where Mary while pregnant visited her old barren sister who suddenly becomes pregnant after Mary "prayed and asked God" for it and her sister recognized her as "the Lord's Wife" from the moment she entered the house. Since Levin is turning Catholicism on its head it would make sense for him to use Terry as a foil for Rosemary and to have Terry subtly recognize Rosemary as "Satan's Wife".

Also, bringing this together with theories in this thread, Terri could very well have been a guinea pig or the test-case for Rosemary to make sure the coven got it right when it counted (didn't the baby have to be conceived on a specific date to be born on the "chosen" date?) Maybe they instigated Rosemary and Guy coming to the Bram, maybe not, but Terri's story is definitely there as a parallel and a dramatic foreshadowing.

The conversation between Rosemary and Terry in the laundry room contains a lot of clues, too. I'll have to go back and read the book and watch that scene again to see what similarities Levin is drawing between Rosemary/Terri and Mary/Elisabeth in the Bible story of the pregnancy with Jesus.

This is a great thread, the other one from a few months ago was just as good (even better since it was twice as long, but this has great stuff, too!).

by Anonymousreply 15708/24/2010

Okay, I have now been convinced, by some very astute comments and observations, that there was really no big diabolical plan which lured Rosemary and Guy to the Bram, and that many of the plot points (finding the apartment and getting out of the other lease, making friends with the Castavets, Guy's decision to sacrifice Rosemary for future success, Teri's suicide) were simply events that flowed from accident or chance.%0D %0D Which actually makes it scarier: the realization that any of our lives could take a sudden wrong turn and everyone we knew and trusted could suddenly desert us. %0D %0D Great thread, excellent discussion.

by Anonymousreply 15808/24/2010

I agree. I love this thread.

by Anonymousreply 15908/24/2010

[quote]Since Levin is turning Catholicism on its head...

Absolutely, Mike. Great observation about the biblical Elizabeth.

And let's not forget the white-suited Mr. Stavropoulos who shows up with "gifts for the child" at the end of the film.

by Anonymousreply 16008/24/2010

bump

by Anonymousreply 16108/24/2010

At what point in the movie is the chanting and the flute heard through the wall? I want to check it out on youtube.

by Anonymousreply 16208/24/2010

I never thought Terri was pregnant. I thought Minnie and Roman pitched it to her, she refused and they had her killed.

by Anonymousreply 16308/24/2010

I see Tuesday Weld as Rosemary.

by Anonymousreply 16408/24/2010

[quote]At what point in the movie is the chanting and the flute heard through the wall? I want to check it out on youtube.%0D %0D Just after Guy and Rosemary move in, I think.%0D %0D But it's been a while since I've seen it.

by Anonymousreply 16508/24/2010

Here's a link I found to the movie on youtube. Why is it in black and white most of the time, then it switches to color for a few seconds, only to switch back again? I think the entire movie was in color when I last checked it a few weeks ago.

by Anonymousreply 16608/24/2010

OK, that does it. I need to get a DVD copy of this brilliant film.

by Anonymousreply 16708/24/2010

Copyright issues r166. The person who put it up thinks Paramount/YT won't take it down if s/he puts it up in B/W.

by Anonymousreply 16809/07/2010

watching it again.

so, was diego a witch?

also, mia farrow is so adorable and love her clothes.

by Anonymousreply 16909/07/2010

[quote}I can no longer associate myself....

Mrs. Gardina was killed by the coven. Put into a coma and then died. So, who moved the large check of drawers in front of the secret door that led to Minnie and Roman's apt?

Also, Ruth Gordon was perfection in this movie. Her cake eating DID steal the dinner scene.

by Anonymousreply 17009/07/2010

I love that scene because it shows how lazy, shifty and smartass Guy is. Explains why he'd rather have Satan find him acting jobs than fight for them himself.

by Anonymousreply 17109/07/2010

"Mrs. Gardina was killed by the coven. Put into a coma and then died. So, who moved the large check of drawers in front of the secret door that led to Minnie and Roman's apt?"%0D %0D I actually think she moved it herself (it probably gave her a hernia). She may have discovered what was going on in the Castavets' apartment the same way Rosemary did, by going through the closet to investigate the singing and the music. Then she became so afraid she pushed the chest in front of the door without even moving her towels or her vacuum cleaner. %0D %0D "I can no longer associate myself..." might have been part of a letter or a diary that snoopy Minnie discovered. She had obviously been in Mrs. Gardenia's apartment a number of times, and it would have been easy for Minnie to take some personal belonging with which to cast the spell.

by Anonymousreply 17209/07/2010

DL Rosemary's Baby threads belong in the pantheon.

by Anonymousreply 17309/07/2010

Saw a SCHLOCKTASTIC remake/rip-off of ROSEMARY'S BABY over the weekend, the absolutely wretched BLESSED. Heather Graham seems to be trying, but it is an absolutely horrible movie with a completely unrecognizable David Hemmings looking almost literally like a pile of wrinkly white shit with Kabuki eyebrows! It is verging on the grotesque.

Also, the worst CGI I think I have EVER seen, and the movie is only 4 or 5 years old! Truly a 0 on a 4 star scale. DL might enjoy the hunky husband but don't let his nude (but obscured by a bathtub) first scene fool you into thinking he'll show any more because he doesn't. It's on Cinemax every 10 minutes if you're drunk, bored and curious.

by Anonymousreply 17409/07/2010

[quote] So, who moved the large check of drawers in front of the secret door that led to Minnie and Roman's apt?%0D %0D %0D The old lady did. She knew there was a secret door. She was part of the coven and then decided to disassociate herself. She was afraid they'd come through the door and kill her. She didn't reckon on them puting her into a coma with one of her possessions.

by Anonymousreply 17509/07/2010

Rosemary's Baby might very well be the creepiest movie ever made with all the seemingly mundane details acquiring scary double meanings on repeated viewings. Like the fact that Mrs Gardenia didn't even take the time to take the vacuum cleaner out of the closet before barricading the door. Makes you wonder what exactly took place in that apartment right before she died.

r174, I too had the misfortune of watching the shameful-even-by-today-standards "Blessed"... My eyes, my eyes, what have they done to my eyes...

by Anonymousreply 17609/07/2010

[quote] IMO Minnie's remarks are ambiguous: we don't know what she didn't want Roman to tell her in advance.%0D %0D I'm not the person you were addressing, but there is nothing ambiguous about Minnie's remarks. Go back and watch the scene. Watch it more than once if you must to get the whole meaning of it. %0D %0D Rosemary is drifting off to sleep when she hears Minnie saying "I don't know how you can be the leader of anything. I TOLD YOU not to tell her! I told you she wouldn't be open minded.... we wouldn't have had to do THIS (nun points to window). Now we have to start all over again from scratch."%0D %0D Next morning, Minnie shows up at Guy and Rosemary's apartment -- she is starting from scratch, gleaning information from Rosemary and finds that Rosemary wants to turn the dining room into a nursery. "You're pregg-a-nant?" Millie exclaims. No, says Rosemary, but they're going to try. This results in Minnie asking Rosemary and Guy to the Castevet apartment for dinner that night. Minnie wants to gauge the situation with both of them, especially Guy, since he is an actor and is looking to make it big. A fertile young married woman who wants to get pregg-a-nant. A demon looking to impregnate a human woman. An ambitious actor in a city full of anonymous actors. It's perfect.%0D %0D The near-dream Rosemary is having while hearing Minnie berate Roman over having to kill Terry contains one of those subconscious moments of truth. The nun points to the window. Subconsciously, Rosemary knows that when Minnie says, "We wouldn't have had to do THIS!" it involves Terry going out the window.

by Anonymousreply 17709/07/2010

"The old lady did. She knew there was a secret door. She was part of the coven and then decided to disassociate herself."%0D %0D Duh. That she might have been part of the coven handn't even occurred to me! %0D %0D And R177, you have iluminated another part of the whole scheme for me. Jeez, how stupid am I? I have seen that movie more times than I can count and I am obviously still learning.

by Anonymousreply 17809/07/2010

[quote] Subconsciously, Rosemary knows that when Minnie says, "We wouldn't have had to do THIS!" it involves Terry going out the window.

Yes, there's that, but the window reminded Rosemary about an incident that happened to her in Catholic School: the whole "I told Sister Veronica about the windows, and she withdrew the school from the competition..." It's clearer in the novel that this incident was, in fact, from her past.I guess the 'window' reminded her, and it's a nice little touch that Minnie's voice becomes that of the scolding nun. On the edge of sleep, I often do this too -- incorporate ambient noises into whatever I'm half-dreaming.

by Anonymousreply 17909/07/2010

The scenes right after Rosemary gets raped is really horrible.

Guy wakes her up the next morning and makes her make him breakfast, instead of letting her sleep.

Told Rosemary he had sex with her after she 'passed out' and scratched her with his nails. Instead of being sweet and apologizing, he makes light of it to make her dismiss the whole thing.

Guy telling Rosemary she's looks horrible with the short hair cut (when he in fact, she looks so cute) and telling her "it's the worst mistake she's ever made."

Guy was a fuck and the real monster of the movie.

by Anonymousreply 18009/07/2010

[quote]Rosemary is drifting off to sleep when she hears Minnie saying "I don't know how you can be the leader of anything. I TOLD YOU not to tell her! I told you she wouldn't be open minded.... we wouldn't have had to do THIS (nun points to window). Now we have to start all over again from scratch."

OK, you make an excellent point over the timing of Minnie's remark, "we wouldn't have had to do THIS" while the nun points to the windows. However, we see the windows being bricked UP at that point. Coincidence, or Rosemary's subconscious effort to deny a suspicious situation, namely that Terry was happy, so why would she kill herself? Only the Shadow knows.

In the book what Rosemary sees in Mrs. Gardenia's handwriting are the words: "...than the intriguing pastime I believed it to be. I can no longer associate myself...". So there's no doubt that Mrs. Gardenia had been involved with the coven, but attempted to leave when she found out either the extent of the coven's powers or that the game plan was to produce Satan Jr.

by Anonymousreply 18109/07/2010

"I can no longer associate myself..."."%0D %0D I think in the movie these were the only words we heard, as Rosemary read them. The rest of the quote from the book (which I had apparently forgotten) makes it very plain that Mrs. Gardenia was indeed one of the coven. %0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 18209/08/2010

I really can't believe that some of you have even watched the movie based on the astonishingly clueless questions you ask. You don't have to be a genius to figure out why the pain stopped, when Guy was recruited by the coven and that Terri was thrown out the window by Laura Lousie and other coven members while Minnie and Roman went out for the night to have an excuse for being away when the "suicide" took place and to give the police an alibi ("She got depressed every three weeks or so.")%0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 18310/13/2010

When ROSEMARY'S BABY was reissued (for sub run or drive in engagements) it was often on a double feature with a rather ODD choice, Neil Simon's THE ODD COUPLE.

by Anonymousreply 18410/13/2010

The film is up on youtube.

by Anonymousreply 18510/13/2010

I think Warren Beatty would have made a good Guy Woodhouse.

by Anonymousreply 18610/13/2010

When I read the book, I kind of envisioned Rosemary as a Paula Prentiss type.%0D %0D But Farrow was very good, especially at the end when she is dressed in blue and white (like Mary, Jesus's mother) and has baby oil in her eyes in the crying-in-Minnie-and-Roman's-apartment scene

by Anonymousreply 18710/20/2010

[quote]When Rosemary and Minnie are in the kitchen, you see just a curling puff of smoke through the door where Roman and Guy are sitting; I thought that was when Roman demonstrated something for Guy that convinced him that his powers were real.

I love that scene. A beguiling little puff of hell-smoke curling towards Guy...I always wondered if Roman wasn't casting a spell on Guy at that moment off camera, leaving Guy bewildered and a little shaken as he comes in to retrieve Rosemary to leave.

Great movie!

by Anonymousreply 18810/20/2010

Whenever I watch the film and I see that puff of smoke, I always think "Where there's smoke, there's fire!"

by Anonymousreply 18910/20/2010

Roman is also photographed in shadow and in half-shadow when sitting in the chair chatting, "You name a place, I've been there."

by Anonymousreply 19010/21/2010

The Roman scene begins @ 4:49. It's in black and white, but wtf.

by Anonymousreply 19110/21/2010

I saw on some documentary, either about Polanski or cinematography (and PLEASE correct me if I'm wrong with any of the facts), a wonderful story about how it was the cinematographer's idea to film only part of Ruth Gordon's body in a scene where she's on the phone in another room, and how Polanski argued with him about shooting it that way... then, at rushes at the end of the day, they screen that piece of film and Polanski sees everyone in the screening room leaning to one side, as if to look around the corner and see more of Ruth Gordon, and realized it was a brilliant stroke to help create uneasiness and paranoia on the audience's part.

by Anonymousreply 19210/21/2010

Opposite, R192. The cinematographer didn't understand why Polanski only wanted to show a sliver of Ruth gordon in the shot. When he saw a preview audience lean to try and look around the corner, he understood it was a great idea.

by Anonymousreply 19310/21/2010

Thank you for the correction, r193... I knew someone did something with a shot of Ruth Gordon, and that it was brilliant. :)

by Anonymousreply 19410/21/2010

overrated

by Anonymousreply 19510/24/2010

I have done a web search, and IMDB, but cannot verify that Lotte Lenya was the voice of Hutch's friend on the telephone, who tells Rosemary that Hutch has died.

Da, or nein?

by Anonymousreply 19610/25/2010

I never understood why Dr. Hill asked Rosemary if he could keep her replacement witch book (the red one) that she got after Guy threw away Hutch's. I know something was obviously up with Dr. Hill since he gave her away to Saperstein and Guy, but why did he want her book? It was odd.

by Anonymousreply 19710/25/2010

R196, wouldn't the voice telling Rosemary Hutch has died belong to Grace Cardiff, Hutch's friend? She was played a woman named Hanna Landy according to the imdb.%0D %0D Dr. Hill probably wanted to show the book to Guy and skim it himself to see if it contained any of the "crazy ideas" he was sure this deluded woman was spouting. Taking the book was also a way of winning Rosemary's trust and confidence. He probably thought was necessary because she was possibly about to be committed to a psychiatric hospital.

by Anonymousreply 19810/25/2010

Did the actress who played Terri shoot her bf in L.A. a couple of weeks ago?

by Anonymousreply 19910/25/2010

Not a BF, her husband.

by Anonymousreply 20010/25/2010

'Look What's Happened to Rosemary's Baby' is on YT as well:

by Anonymousreply 20110/25/2010

[quote]Not a BF, her husband.%0D %0D Now she'll have to start all over again from scratch!

by Anonymousreply 20210/25/2010

Bump for the other thread

by Anonymousreply 20310/26/2010

Hey, she was sick, starving and doing dope (and a lot of other tings), so I guess that will be her defense for the shooting.

by Anonymousreply 20410/26/2010

I could NEVER understand DL's obsession with this film. I've always liked it, but that was about it.

For some reason, I now LOVE it, and have watched it about 10 times in six weeks.

I'm still up in the air about John Cassavetes performance. I'm not sure if it's bad acting, or if Guy is supposed to be a bad actor, and that's why he needed black magic to help, or what..

by Anonymousreply 20510/27/2010

I'm not crazy about Cassavetes, either. I heard Jack Nicholson was up for the role but Polanski thought he was too devilish-looking. What? Compared to Cassavetes? Cassavetes looks like a wary, conniving wolf from the get go. He seems irritated by nearly everything Rosemary does and he dislikes Hutch even before Guy even meets the witches. Hutch is a character and looked after Rosemary and her friends after she arrived in NYC from Omaha.

by Anonymousreply 20610/27/2010

Dr Hill was definitely a dream boat. If Rosemary hadn't been heavily pregnant, i bet she would have tried to jump his bones first chance she got.

by Anonymousreply 20810/27/2010

When kids complain that Rosemary's Baby isn't scary, I tell them, "It's a horror film, not a scary movie."%0D %0D The horror is the betrayal of someone by those closest to her. Her one and only ally is murdered. Her friends are kept away from her.%0D %0D I wish the film had made mention of Rosemary's relationship with her family. They are not on good terms because she has married a non-Catholic, has fallen away from the church, has moved far away and besides, there are so many other children (and grandchildren) in the family that Rosemary's parents can occupy themselves with. She's from a big family, and in many big families, someone gets overlooked or shunted aside.%0D %0D Horror isn't just war scenes or people running away from the guy with the big knife.

by Anonymousreply 20910/27/2010

I thought Cassavetes was a very weak link in this film. He was a bad actor and a very over-rated film maker. Along with his one note performance wife.%0D %0D I don't understand why Mia didn't appear in the excellent retrospective 'Making Of...' film that's on the DVD. Everyone else turned up.%0D %0D I'll also never know why Mia wasn't nominated for an Oscar. In fact she's never been nominated for any Oscars, I think. She should have at least been nominated for Purple Rose Of Cairo.

by Anonymousreply 21010/27/2010

Mia is a stilted actress. The fact is that her stiltedness works in "RB" because Rosemary is a fish out of water. Her husband in irritable and chiding her nearly all the time;, her family is far away; her neighbors are elderly and pushy; the one new friend she makes flies out the window one night and ends up a bloody mess on the sidewalk. She wants a baby and her husband is not agreeable -- until it suits his purpose. Then, when she does become pregnant, her pregnancy is hijacked by her neighbors, who insist she see their doctor. The doctor is elderly, condescending, irritable. Her paternal figure hutch is disparaged by her husband and eventually taken out by the coven.%0D %0D Mia's stilted acting works in this film in the way that some people say Kim Novak's stilted acting worked in "Vertigo." %0D %0D (I think Novak didn't work that well in Vertigo, but it's a matter of opinion.)

by Anonymousreply 21110/27/2010

Thanks for your long precis of Ro's character and situation, R211. But your points do not back up your 'Mia's stilted' opinion, at all.%0D %0D Personally I don't find Mia's performance stilted at all, in this or in most of the things she's done.%0D %0D Her Rosemary is very naturalistic. Mia carries Rosemary's Baby.

by Anonymousreply 21210/28/2010

[quote]Mia's stilted acting works in this film in the way that some people say Kim Novak's stilted acting worked in "Vertigo." %0D %0D I always felt that THE BIRDS was enhanced by the blankness that is Tippi Hedren. The sheer lack of star power made her the veritable eye of the hurricane of masterful storytelling and effective character acting that revolved about her. And as her only other film was MARNIE, a film I don't like and never re-visit, she exists in my mind strictly as Melanie Daniels.

by Anonymousreply 21310/28/2010

I always think of Melanie Daniels as a parakeet or a lovebird, like the birds she gives to Cathy. Hitchcock gave her parakeet colors -- yellow head, green body.%0D %0D She is flighty, she is brittle, she's a caged bird set free and unsure of what to do out in the wide world.

by Anonymousreply 21410/28/2010

devil baby bump

by Anonymousreply 21511/25/2010

I WON'T HAVE AN ABORTION!!!

by Anonymousreply 21611/25/2010

[quote]Cassavetes played it to perfection - i wanted to throttle the hyperactive, condescending bastard after 5 minutes - THAT my friends is a great performance.%0D %0D No, he's just a very bad actor who was succesful because of his looks. He's one of those untalented people who garners enormous unwarranted repect for some reason. If you knock him, people get angry. His wife was also a shocking actress.%0D %0D Polanski hated him and they fought a lot during the movie.%0D %0D I think Polanski wanted him to show his ass or something in the 'Let's make love scene' & Cassavetes wasn't having it.

by Anonymousreply 21711/25/2010

I want to kill myself.

by Anonymousreply 21811/25/2010

What was the significance of using Tony Curtis as the voice of the actor who went blind?

by Anonymousreply 21911/25/2010

Pre Christmas bump.

And, I would like to know the answer to that question too, R219.

by Anonymousreply 22012/14/2010

BUMP

by Anonymousreply 22101/21/2012

This movie wasn't scary at all. Most overblown horror movie of all time.

by Anonymousreply 22201/21/2012

Isn't Grace Cardiff the name of the little girl at Will/Kate's wedding who looked like a spawn of Satan?

by Anonymousreply 22301/21/2012

Her name was Grace but I don't think Cardiff was her last name. I think it started with a C and had an L in it.

by Anonymousreply 22401/21/2012

I agree mia should have been oscar nominated. She was nominated for the golden globe but lost to joanne woodward. The film wouldnt be a classic without mia being the center of it and all the complexities she brought to rosemary. Barbra streisand or katharine hepburn should thank her. With the popularity of the film if she would have been nominated i still think she would have lost but the voting would have been off and i dont think there would have been a tie between kate and barbra. One of them would have lost. Glad ruth gordon won at least. One of the top 5 best supporting actresses.

by Anonymousreply 22501/22/2012

What the fuck is wrong with you, r221, that you keep bumping dead threads from two years ago (or more).

You're sick.

by Anonymousreply 22601/22/2012

Was Mrs. Gardenia a witch too? Her apartment has an herbarium, and she writes that unfinished note, "I can no longer associate myself- " (later Minnie takes over the herb-growing duties). Why did she fall out of favor with the Castevets?

by Anonymousreply 22701/22/2012

I assume she was, r227.

She up and left the coven, and then they got rid of her.

by Anonymousreply 22801/22/2012

Isn't Tuesday Weld a Satanist herself?

by Anonymousreply 22901/22/2012

The Criterion DVD comes out on Tuesday!

by Anonymousreply 23010/28/2012

Article on Gawker: "Rosemary's Baby Has Never Been More Crucial"

by Anonymousreply 23110/29/2012

R21, the "abortion debate" didn't start until after the 1972 SC decision in Roe v. Wade. Rosemary's Baby was released in 1968.

by Anonymousreply 23210/29/2012

At the time of "Rosemary's Baby", Mia Farrow was unpopular with the oscar voters. A big part of the game of oscars, is that one cannot offend the insiders, which is what she did with her off-screen behavior in those days. With the passing of time, one can see many performances that were bypassed because they weren't in with the in-crowd. For the record, those who were nominated, were: Joanne Woodward, Patricia Neal, Katharine Hepburn, and Vanessa Redgrave. The fifth spot went to co-winner, Barbra Streisand. Many oscar buffs strongly feel that she shouldn't have been in the race, and that Mia Farrow was wrongly denied that nomination.

by Anonymousreply 23310/29/2012

Great point, R233. Most of the people winning are the brown nosers playing the game and saying all of the right things. THe best of the year(in any category) rarely wins, and is often not even nominated. And even when something good is nominated, there are five bad/calculated movies, performances, etc. to go along with the legit nominations.

by Anonymousreply 23410/29/2012

Weird thought, but I think Sharon Tate would have made a good Rosemary. She had a breathy, fawn-like quality that the audience could empathize with and root for.

by Anonymousreply 23510/29/2012

What movies are similar to this one?

by Anonymousreply 23610/29/2012

How to explain Katharine Hepburn who never had a nice word to say about The Academy, never bothered to show up to accept her Oscars and nevertheless won 3 Oscars?

by Anonymousreply 23710/29/2012

The Castevets didn't kill Terry.

Laura Louise and the other coven members killed Terry.

Roman stupidly told Terry the plan. Minnie did not want him to tell her. Laura Louise and the others held Terry at the apartment; the Castevets went out so that they wouldn't be home when the "suicide" took place. Roman conveniently tells police that Terry "became severely depressed about every 3 weeks."

When Rosemary goes to bed on the night Terry died, she has a semi-dream. A nun appears. A window (significant-- remember the suicide that night) is being bricked up. The nun walks closely up to the camera and she speaks with Minnie Castevet's voice.

"Sometimes I wonder how you can be the leader of anything! DON'T TELL ME WHAT LAURA LOUISE SAID! I tThe Castevets didn't kill Terry.

Laura Louise and the other coven members killed Terry.

Roman stupidly told Terry the plan. Minnie did not want him to tell her. Laura Louise and the others held Terry at the apartment; the Castevets went out so that they wouldn't be home when the "suicide" took place. Roman conveniently tells police that Terry "became severely depressed about every 3 weeks."

When Rosemary goes to bed on the night Terry died, she has a semi-dream. A nun appears. A window (significant-- remember the suicide that night) is being bricked up. The nun walks closely up to the camera and she speaks with Minnie Castevet's voice.

"Sometimes I wonder how you can be the leader of anything! DON'T TELL ME WHAT LAURA LOUISE SAID! If you'd listened, we wouldn't have had to THIS! (The nun points to the window -- again, the window is significant). If you'd listened, we would be all set to go now instead of stsrting from scratch! I TOLD you not to tell her in advance! I told you she wouldnt be open-minded."

Remember what Laura Louise later says to Rosemary? "Shut up with your 'Oh God!'s or we'll kill you, milk or no milk!" Laura Louise is no stranger to killing for the cause.

by Anonymousreply 23810/29/2012

The coven killed Mrs Gardenia, Hutch, Terry and a newborn in the 1950s which turned out not to be Satan's spawn. They blinded Donald Baumgarten. Terry wouldn't kill herself -- she'd try to escape and let somebody know about Tje coven. That's why she had to be thrown out the window.

by Anonymousreply 23910/29/2012

Rosemary is from a large Irish Catholic family in Nebraska. In the book, she was estranged from her family because she married a non-Catholic actor and took off for NYC. Guy grew up in an orphanage and his real name was Sherman Peden. Rosemary's family felt she should marry a catholic and stay near the rest of her family, popping out numerous Catholic babies.rosemary didn't want that.

So in some ways, Rosemary is a modern woman. More modern than her parents and siblings and the church. She and Guy use birth control and want to plan a family. Her family believes you take all the babies you can get from God.

In the book, one of her sister's calls Rosemary saying she had a feeling of dread, that something was wrong with Rosemary. She tells her sister no, things are great. Later that night, she is raped by the Devil. In the book, Rosemary has an orgasm during sex with Satan. She feels guilty, because the Pope has just popped up beside her.

Rosemary is traditional in many ways. She doesn't work and doesn't plan on ever working. She is obedient to her husband. She doesn't experiment with pot. She thinks the pope should be respected. She refuses to have an abortion if something is wrong with the fetus. Sex and religion play a big part in the book and in the movie. Women were on the cusp of freedom from Kirk and Kinder in the 1960s. Rosemary is not a Baby Boomer. She is not as free of all of her traditions (which hippies would call "hang ups") as women would be in just a few years.

by Anonymousreply 24010/29/2012

This movie wasn't Ruth Gordon's comeback. The year before she was Oscar nominated for Inside Daisy Clover...

by Anonymousreply 24110/29/2012

R1 and R16, Ira Levin lived in the Osborne, on 57th and 7th, when he wrote the book. He refers to two sisters who had lived there since the building was built. Those sisters lived on the 6th floor of the Osborne. No original tenants lived in the Alwyn Court, which was totally emptied when the apartments were chopped up.

Ralph Bellamy, who played the obstetrician, lived in the 4th floor of the Osborne, and his apartment (4DA) was used to film the interiors of the Castavets' apartment.

by Anonymousreply 24210/29/2012

Incidentally, the Osborne was evacuated today because of the crane dangling over the new construction which blocks the sun to its east-facing windows.

Levin refers to that view in the book, although in a way that could conceivably be from the windows of the Alwyn Court. (But wasn't.)

by Anonymousreply 24310/29/2012

[quote]Isn't Grace Cardiff the name of the little girl at Will/Kate's wedding who looked like a spawn of Satan?

[quote]Her name was Grace but I don't think Cardiff was her last name. I think it started with a C and had an L in it.

Grace Van Cutsem. The child's names was (and presumably still is) Grace Van Cutsem. An absolutely delightful, fun loving child - and such a natural beauty, too.

by Anonymousreply 24410/29/2012

[R237] Katharine Hepburn, as far as I've researched, wasn't a campaigner for the oscar. Nevertheless, she had four Best Actress oscars. Bette Davis made a strong statement that Katharine Hepburn should have been awarded the Best Actress oscar over her, for "Alice Adams", saying something like it was far and away the best performance by an actress that year. Bette won for "Dangerous". And the way that goes, many claim it was a "make up" oscar because of the "outrage" in the industry over her being by-passed the previous year, for "Of Human Bondage". Marlon Brando is another who degraded the idea of giving awards. That came after he finally got one for "On the Waterfront".

by Anonymousreply 24510/30/2012

Guess I should add that Marlon Brando was a favorite to win another oscar, the year following "The Godfather". For the younger people, MB had a Filipina/German actress dress up in "native american" clothing and had her hair done in braids. He, himself, didn't attend the oscars. Instead, he had this actress, now named Sacheen Littlefeather, to refuse the award for "The Godfather" when and if his name was called. The next year, Joyce Haber, the movie columnist for The Los Angeles Times, apparently decided that Marlon Brando was not going to win the oscar for "Last Tango in Paris". She successfully campaigned for Jack Lemmon, for "Save the Tiger" in her industry column. My take is that I'm glad Brando didn't win that year. Lemmon, Pacino, Nicholson all deserved it, as well. Redford? No, imo.

by Anonymousreply 24610/30/2012

Who would you rather run into in the basement doing laundry: Terri D'Onofrio or Vincent D'Onofrio?

Another bit of trivia: one of the elderly female witches was played by Hope Summers, in a major departure from her usual roles (like Clara Edwards, the gossipy neighbor on "The Andy Griffith Show"). When I saw the movie for the first time (in a theater when I was in high school), I was deathly afraid to look when those elderly witches were naked! (Possibly contributed to my current sexuality!)

by Anonymousreply 24710/30/2012

Ira Levin was a playwright. The book, Rosemary's Baby, is basically a play written for the movie screen. A screenplay. Polanski didn't need to deviate from the book. It was already its own screenplay. Stepford Wives also was a quickie that reads like screenplay or stage play. Levin wasn't trying to write the Great American Novel. .

by Anonymousreply 24810/31/2012

i think the movie is about being stuck giving birth to the child of a bad husband and not having the choice to leave the marriage. The Castavets are really just stand-ins for annoying in-laws. They are, in effect, Guy's parents. The witchery/Satanist element is just for dramatic effect and hyperbole. Like the robot concept in Stepford Wives.

by Anonymousreply 24910/31/2012

R249 is telling you that to lull you into a false sense of security. He departed the thread with one of your personal items in his possession.

by Anonymousreply 25010/31/2012

R249 hands out lockets of tanis root.

by Anonymousreply 25110/31/2012

1.) Guy was already a Satanist and steered Rosemary to the Bram

Guy did not steer Rosemary to the Bram. Rosemary wanted a bigger apartment because she wanted to have a a baby. Guy didn't want a baby. In the book, it comes up as a contentious subject. Guy wants to wait until his career is better established.

When he meets with Roman to hear his "stories." then, all of a sudden, Guy was all, "Let's make a baby."

Guy does not want to to go to the Castevets for dinner when Minnie invites Roseamary the day after Terry's burial.. He says once you get friendly with an old couple like that, you can't get rid of them.

Plus, they'd already signed a lease on another apartment and had forgotten about the Bram.

2.) The Bram was too expensive for Guy and Rosemary

Though the Bram is more expensive than the other apartment, it's not out of reach, otherwise the rental agent for the Bram wouldn't have given them a lease. In NY, it's always three months upfront in an aboveboard rental or you aren't getting in. And when Rosemary says that Guy was in a lot of commercials, the rental agent notes "Yes, well that's where the money is."

And remember, it wasn't the Dakota. It was an old, worn down apartment building with crumbling hallways and a creepy reputation. The Dakote just played the part of the Bramford in some of the film's exterior shots.

by Anonymousreply 25210/31/2012

Thank you for all your good points well stated, R252.

I like how Roman hooks Guy like a fish by complimenting him on a lifelike gesture he made in LUTHER. No better way to flatter a serious and self-absorbed actor than to admire his craft. There is a payoff to this scene later on when we learn that Guy has become Roman's pupil of manipulative flattery, coaxing Donald Baumgarten to part with his tie by praising it.

by Anonymousreply 25311/01/2012

[quote]Was Mrs. Gardenia a witch too? Her apartment has an herbarium, and she writes that unfinished note, "I can no longer associate myself- " (later Minnie takes over the herb-growing duties). Why did she fall out of favor with the Castevets?

In the book Mrs. Gardenia's note goes something like, "... what I thought was an amusing pastime has become something else. I can no longer associate myself ..."

I took it to meant that she was part of the coven because she thought it was fun. She grew herbs for Minnie. But when she found out that they were for real and were willing to kill and so on, she decided to leave.

Or maybe her role was simply as a herb-grower for Minnie and the coven and THAT was the amusing pastime she was referring to. When she found out what they were doing with the tannis root she decided to get out of the herb business and have nothing further to do with the witches.

See, that's the thing that's so great about Rosemary's Baby. So much of it is ambiguous and up for debate and interpretation.

by Anonymousreply 25411/01/2012

Terri was murdered in the Castevet's apartment. They got blood all over the carpet. That's why a new one was laid.

by Anonymousreply 25512/06/2012

r180, not only does Guy make Rosemary make him breakfast after delivering her into Satan's loins the night before, but Minnie also asks her to pick up some eggs and stuff at the grocery ("I'll pay you later"). That brief scene at Minnie's door is extremely creepy to me. These people drugged Rosemary, tied her naked body to a bed and watched her getting raped, then they treat her like a slave, and Rosemary does as she is told.

Very skeevy.

by Anonymousreply 25612/28/2012

[quote]his apartment (4DA) was used to film the interiors of the Castavets' apartment.

No it wasn't. All the interiors were filmed in the soundstage at Paramount in LA.

by Anonymousreply 25712/28/2012

I just got the Criterion Collection blu-ray for Christmas, and I'm going through all the special features.

It's nice to have on blu-ray, but the print isn't as clean and crisp as I thought it would be. They could've shelled out a few extra bucks to make sure it looked it's best.

by Anonymousreply 25812/28/2012

I absolutely love that Levin made the whole thing a dream in his sequel. I think RB works better when you imagine it the hallucinations of a mad woman, especially when you look at it as part of Polanski's "apartment" trilogy.

by Anonymousreply 25912/29/2012

r219, Curtis was a friend of Farrow's, and was used without Farrow's knowledge to throw Farrow off in the filming of the scene. Polanski called "action!", Farrow talked into the phone and heard Curtis on the other end for the first time - her performance is enhanced by the actress trying to figure out whose familiar voice she is listening to on the other end while successfully managing to continue on with the scene.

What I love most about this movie is that it plays so much with the imagination. Today's films show everything - nothing is left for the viewer to play with and make the film their own experience.

Two of the creepiest scenes in the film for me have nothing to do with sensationalism: when Rosemary first notices Roman's pierced ear(that actually makes my skin crawl) and when Rosemary is in the phone booth trying to get through to Dr Hill (I still can't pinpoint why that scene makes me so uncomfortable).

by Anonymousreply 26012/29/2012

[quote](I still can't pinpoint why that scene makes me so uncomfortable).

Claustrophobia?

by Anonymousreply 26112/29/2012

To me the two creepiest scenes are:

The sound of Guy's and Roman's murmuring voices and the cigarette smoke drifting through the Castevets' living room doorway.

Rosemary reaching across the doorway to stop the rocking cradle with a burcher knife.

Actually, this film is FULL of "doorway scenes" once you start thinking about it.

by Anonymousreply 26212/29/2012

I concur with your first choice, r262.

I was also creeped by the armoir shoved against the connecting closet door.

by Anonymousreply 26312/29/2012

Maybe a little bit of claustrophobia, but perhaps it is the suppressed anxiety, the emanciated gaunt look of Farrow's, that feeling that someone might be watching or following her. I have no clue.

Btw, that man that is waiting to get into the booth is the horror film director William Castle. Castle wanted to direct the film, but Paramount gave the project to Polanski instead. It's a good thing - Castle wanted the baby at the end to be shown as a little demon monster; Polasnki wanted the audience to imagine the worst on their own.

by Anonymousreply 26412/29/2012

Watched this again last night. The whole movie is creepy. When Guy starts pushing the Castevets on Rosemary, that's when you know he's sold his soul and Rosemary's completely alone. That was the worst part for me. And also every time the door bell rings, you know it's THEM. They are so intrusive those people.

I wonder if 666 Park Avenue is sort of a rip-off of Rosemary's Baby?

by Anonymousreply 26512/29/2012

Yes, r265 - or at least the Gothic infrastructure in the middle of a modern hubub metropolis containing sinister Satanic secrets is.

by Anonymousreply 26612/29/2012

My favorite scene is the kitchen party scene where Rosemary's girlfriends convince her that Dr. Sapperstein is a nut. I love those women.

by Anonymousreply 26712/29/2012

"And also every time the door bell rings, you know it's THEM."

The fish-eye view of Minnie through the peephole is cleverly horrifying.

I also found the brief summer twilight scene (outside Dr. Hill's office) to be a little respite of normalcy: evening falling, people catching cabs and going home from work. This is such a claustrophobic movie in so many respects, it's almost surprising to see that the rest of the world is still carrying on unaware.

by Anonymousreply 26812/29/2012

[quote] Castle wanted the baby at the end to be shown as a little demon monster

Hey, it worked for Alien.

by Anonymousreply 26912/29/2012

Pain be gone. I will have no more of thee.

by Anonymousreply 27012/29/2012

Whenever I get fed-up with the Katherine Heigl and Seth Rogen shit available on DVD, I pop this on and bliss out. It's such a perfectly made film, perfectly acted and perfectly creepy. What if your worst fear came true: that everyone in the world was secretly conspiring against you. Or perhaps worse- someone you loved (a baby)?

Despite what the book says, I think the director wants us to believe that Guy guided Rosemary to The Bram that day of apartment-hunting. The weird expressions from the elevator operator, the guy drilling an eyehole in the door. And Guy being evasive and fake-reluctant to rent the space, letting his wife believe that it's her idea.

He is an actor, after all.

by Anonymousreply 27112/29/2012

The fact that Rosemary is a Catholic school girl who still thinks the pope is a holy man helps define some of Rosemary's psychology. She is used to obeying authority. She is used to obeying men (priests, pope). She is used to conforming.

Rosemary wants to be a new 60s woman, but she's not quite there. She is still a product of the 50s. She wears mod clothing, she is more sexually liberated than her mother and sisters, she moves to NY from Nebraska, her guests smoke pot and maybe she did too before her pregnancy. But she's still a catholic school girl.

Remember the Jesuit motto -- give me the child until he is seven and I will give you the man.

Same for girls.

by Anonymousreply 27212/29/2012

There's nothing in the book or the movie suggesting Guy guided Rosemary there. Polanski followed the book to the letter.

by Anonymousreply 27312/29/2012

Who would you rather run into in the basement doing laundry: Terri D'Onofrio or Vincent D'Onofrio?

Heh. She was Theresa Gionoffrio.

by Anonymousreply 27412/29/2012

R273 no but it's pretty clear that the reason Guy got the part vacated by the blind actor is because he basically sold his soul to the devil. He suddenly wants to be a part of the Castevets' lives, tries to force Rosemary to eat the chocolate "mouse" and pushes them on her relentlessly. I don't think he drew them to the building. I think once they moved there the coven decided Rosemary was a better fit for the devil's child than Terry (I think that was her name), the girl who plunged to her death after meeting Rosemary in the laundry room. But I didn't read the book so I don't know if this is the case. Just basing it on my view of the film.

by Anonymousreply 27512/29/2012

Guy bringing Rosemary to the Bram as part of a predetermined agenda doesn't make sense, what with Teri's appearence in the story. It just makes sense that Teri was the original "sacrfice" for the Satanists; Rosemary doesn't become their next choice until Teri rejects taking part in their ritual.

Everything is so cleverly ambiguous that you can read anything you want into the proceedings. Guy could have brought Rosemary to the Bram and hoped to offer her to this cult he heard about; Teri could just have been objecting to "sacrifice" Rosemary. It's all pretty open-ended that you can read your own interpretation of things.

However, I tend to think Fate brought this version of Joseph and Mary to the spot where she would be impregnated by the Devil. It's all in the stars for it to happen, for the year is 1966.

by Anonymousreply 27612/29/2012

The Criterion blu ray is great looking.

by Anonymousreply 27712/29/2012

[quote] Two of the creepiest scenes in the film for me have nothing to do with sensationalism: when Rosemary first notices Roman's pierced ear(that actually makes my skin crawl) and when Rosemary is in the phone booth trying to get through to Dr Hill (I still can't pinpoint why that scene makes me so uncomfortable).

Rosemary was desperate to get help, she was frantic, and it was hot as hell. plus there was someone (Producer William Castle in a bit part) waiting to use the phone.

by Anonymousreply 27812/29/2012

One part that creeped me out. Rosemary figuring out the name with the game word pieces. Audience just half a step ahead of her when she finally gets the name.

by Anonymousreply 27912/29/2012

[quote] It's nice to have on blu-ray, but the print isn't as clean and crisp as I thought it would be. They could've shelled out a few extra bucks to make sure it looked it's best.

That is how the film is supposed to look. The film was made in 1968, not 2012. The restoration and color timing of the film is accurate to how it is supposed to look given the technology and film stock available at that time. Film = grain and removing grain = loss of detail. Criterion did a fabulous job restoring the film. It sounds like you want artificial "enhancements" to modernize the look of the film. Shame on you.

by Anonymousreply 28012/29/2012

Any modernized enhancement to the "look" of the film would damage the overall affect of the film. That "look" helps tocreate the creepy atmosphere. But I'm one of those guys who thinks HD has actually worsened the affect of film.

by Anonymousreply 28112/29/2012

I don't want this thread to go away!!!!!!!!

by Anonymousreply 28212/31/2012

"Ira Levin said he was incredibly lucky that the film is the most faithful Hollywood adaptation of a novel ever. Roman Polanski apparently had no idea that he could change things from the novel since he had never adapted one before or worked with Hollywood."

Lucky for us it's a novel that just as it is works extremely well cinematically. That's not always the case. Being too loyal to a book can be a huge mistake (as can departing from it for no legitimate purpose).

by Anonymousreply 28312/31/2012

[quote]It's all pretty open-ended that you can read your own interpretation of things.

Not if you read the damned book, it isn't. The author couldn't have made his intentions more clear.

by Anonymousreply 28412/31/2012

It's on Netflix Instant Watch and I'm watching it now.

Still a great movie.

by Anonymousreply 28502/16/2013

Kanye, Kim and their own unborn spawn should star in a sequel.

by Anonymousreply 28602/16/2013

If there is a remake of this film, Mia would be great as the old lady role. Remember how scary she was as the nanny in the remake of The Omen?

by Anonymousreply 28702/16/2013

That bitch dropped a knife and left a mark on my floor!

by Anonymousreply 28802/16/2013

This is a great film. Pitch perfect. Terrifying because it all seems so plausible and everyone seems so real. Mia F was amazing- can't imagine anyone else. Cassavetes wasn't given props at the time- he was excellent. True, Redford's looks more polar opposite to being as heartless as Guy, but John C was great. And Ruth is a gift from above here- she makes the movie. Favorite scenes? When Ro comes back from the funeral with the book & gets the Scrabble tiles out and realizes. And the climactic final scene is amazing start to finish.

by Anonymousreply 28903/25/2013

Rosemary bump

by Anonymousreply 29007/08/2013

She was good in that R287.

by Anonymousreply 29107/08/2013

Ira Levin wanted Brad Pitt to play the grown-up Andy in the film adaptation of Son of Rosemary.

by Anonymousreply 29207/08/2013

How were they going to deliver the baby? During Rosemary's flight to the elevator to escape Guy and Saperstein, she falls onto the floor from the elevator. This seems to bring on her labor. She is given a sedative by Saperstein and the baby is delivered in her apartment.

But they didn't know Rosemary was going to find out about the coven or about Saperstein being a part of it. They didn't know she'd escape from them and run to Dr CC Hill.

So what was going to happen if Rosemary didn't find out about the coven? She was expecting to go into a hospital for her delivery. What if she had gone into labor while she was out in the city and called a cab to take her to the hospital? Wouldn't it have been rather alarming to deliver the son of Satan in a hospital? He has cloven hooves for hands and feet and animal eyes.

How would they have been able to spirit the baby out of the hospital and tell Rosemary it was dead after it was delivered in a hospital with a normal labor?

And when Saperstein came in and said he was going to take Rosemary to a mental hospital if she mentioned anything about witches or witchcraft, why didn't she say, "Go ahead"? At least she would know she and the baby would be safe if she delivered it in a mental hospital. She could have begged CC Hill to call an ambulance to take her to a mental hospital, telling him she'd feel safer there and that she wanted psychiatric help immediately.

by Anonymousreply 29309/12/2013

And why didn't Rosemary grow her hair back? She got it cut in autumn or winter and everyone told her it looked bad, so why didn't she let it grow? By June, when she had the baby, it would have been much longer.

by Anonymousreply 29409/12/2013
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