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How do has been celebrities support themselves?

I mean people who are fairly well known but have not been in a film or tv shows in eons but yet would probably not be seen working at Target. Lori Petty comes to mind.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 25502/05/2015

I've wondered the same thing about disgraced politicians, CEOs and other public figures.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 106/26/2010

They probably sell shirts on cafe press, OP.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 206/26/2010

They take jobs on "Hot in Cleveland".

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 306/26/2010

They rob 7-11s.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 406/26/2010

I remember reading about a soap opera actor (Rick from Guiding Light, I think) who was also a Realtor.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 506/26/2010

How do the ones who'll go to the opening of en envelope afford these huge wardrobes they have? Even the likes of Lindsay Lohan never wear the same things twice.

Do they sew their own clothes in the basement, or shoplift?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 606/27/2010

Doing the autograph circuit, for one.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 706/27/2010

Well, at least some of them do those autograph shows, where you have to pay them to sign their old photos...

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 806/27/2010

The clothes are provided by designers and are returned after they're worn. The biggest way some former stars support themselves is via holding deals.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 906/27/2010

They marry someone with an actual job?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 1006/27/2010

Has anyone seen Lee Majors selling cheapo hearing aids?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 1506/27/2010

Lindsay is looking into sponsorship for her SCRAM "bracelet". I'm thinking 20k is fair.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 1606/27/2010

A lot of has-been scifi actors make huge amounts of money charging $20-50 per autograph at conventions. People pay it by the droves, not to mention appearance fees at panels. An actor can easily rake in $20,000 or more in one weekend doing nothing but meeting fans for a few hours and talking about the show he was on 20 years ago for a half hour on a stage.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 1706/27/2010

__________, Your Ventura Century21 Professional!

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 1806/27/2010

Some serious misconceptions in this thread.

Holding deals, R9? You mean where a network pays someone, like Alex O'Laughlin, to not appear on other networks? You have to be a hot, marketable star to get something like that. Lori Petty is not being held on any sort of exclusivity deal.

Autograph conventions. Yes, some former working actors can make some money selling autographs, especially if they were in something sci-fi related. However, we're talking one, maybe two conventions a year. And we're talking $5,000.00 per convention, unless you're a really big star. $20,000 or more in one weekend, R17? Very few stars can get that sort of money.

There are residuals. Depending on how many movies or television shows that actor did, he or she can expect to earn some money from them every year. For example, I was in a popular, Academy Award nominated movie almost 20 years ago. I had a supporting role in it. I earn about $2000.00 a year off of it still. Other movies pay less. Television shows pay much less.

If that's not enough to live on, then the actor has to get a job. Just like anyone else. I have friends who have become psychologists, lawyers, real estate agents, teachers...

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 1906/27/2010

Memoirs, Cookbooks, paid personal appearances, endorsements, and the occasional hole presentation.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 2006/27/2010

A lot of them do sign network contracts. There are a ton of television shows that get developed but never get picked up. Xenu-freak Leah Remini and hunky Martin Henderson both recently did this for ABC.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 2106/27/2010

An ex-boyfriend was a money manager and had some tv actors among his clientele (nobody that famous--they usually played the next door neighbor or the friend of the star).

He always tried to set them up with enough savings and investments to survive if their current celebrity disappeared.

Also, the smart celebrities were the cheapest people I'd ever heard of. They would book coach airline tickets and cheap hotel rooms then suck up unmercifully at check-in to get free upgrades.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 2206/27/2010

Former TV and movie stars do have a tendency to go into real estate, especially if they choose to stick around LA. It seems like a lot of African American ex-celebs become ministers or gospel singers.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 2406/27/2010

[African American ex-celebs become ministers or gospel singers.]

R24, example please.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 2506/27/2010

It's pretty obvious that some of the younger "one hit wonders" end up peddling their asses and selling drugs.

YOu see these 20 something and 30 something hangers-on making the club circuit and courting attention from the paparrazzi and wonder how they can do it, but they are "working".

Some of them are BFFs to famous stars, and cater to their whims. Mostly these younger ones are hanging on by their fingernails.

Most hope to cop a reality show gig or stay famous long enough to get something going. They have no idea they are losers and that their 15 minutes is over.

If you surf the paparrazzi blogs there are all sorts of references to random people like that. Some are famous for being famous in a third rate kind of way.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 2606/27/2010

Move to New England or Nebraska.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 2706/27/2010

Sell wigs. Beyond Raquel and Zsa Zsa, ,many has-beens have sold wigs. I always thought Jessica Simpson was basically announcing she was done when she came out with a wig line.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 2806/27/2010

I think with some of them, the quicker the resign themselves to the fact it's over, and get something going away from H'wood and that kind of life, they are better off.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 2906/27/2010

R29 = Amanda Bynes

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 3006/27/2010

R25, MC Hammer has become a pastor.

Ditto Clifton Davis, who starred in television's "AMEN" sitcom alongside Sherman Hemsley

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 3106/27/2010

Demond Wilson became a minister.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 3206/27/2010

Actually, a lot of them get unemployment too when they're not working. I'm not kidding. Since you file on a week by week basis(at least in NY), if they didn't have a commercial or weren't shooting anything else - unemployment. Residuals don't count, or at least they didn't when I worked at a talent agency years ago. So, they can rake in the residuals and still file.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 3306/27/2010

I'd like to hear more from R19. Do you know anyone who's able to live on residuals alone? If an actor has just one gigantic hit, could that be enough to live on?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 3406/27/2010

Perhaps some of them lead more frugal lives, made enough to pay cash for a home, etc

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 3506/27/2010

earrings

caftans

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 3606/27/2010

[quote]They would book coach airline tickets and cheap hotel rooms then suck up unmercifully at check-in to get free upgrades.

True! I saw Marcia Cross trying to get special treatment on fucking Southwest Airlines 10 years ago! This was before her "Desperate Housewives" comeback. Honey, it's Southwest - you're cattle just like the rest of us.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 3706/27/2010

It's true about celebrities being extremely cheap. Not even has-beens - Robert DeNiro is one of the biggest tightwads alive.

[quote]Yes, some former working actors can make some money selling autographs, especially if they were in something sci-fi related. However, we're talking one, maybe two conventions a year.

There are NOT just one or two scifi conventions per year, hon. There are dozens and dozens. Some of them are smaller than others, but many have thousands of attendees. DragonCon and ComicCon and a few others have tens of thousands.

[quote]And we're talking $5,000.00 per convention, unless you're a really big star.

$5,000 is the average that nobodies make in one weekend, selling autographs for $20 a pop, that's a mere 250 autographs (I know, I know, they have to pay a cut to their managers/agents). You're not even factoring in appearance fees, if the convention allows it.

Star Trek's Walter Koenig, the original Chekov, has been supporting himself almost exclusively through the scifi convention circuit for a very long time. I know this for a fact, because he told me so himself. He's an asshole, in case anyone was wondering, but at least he's an honest one.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 3806/27/2010

Did you suck him off?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 3906/27/2010

I was there with my girlfriend, so no.

The last time I saw him was before Andrew passed away.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 4006/27/2010

We go back to catering.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 4106/27/2010

R38 -- Walter Koenig and all the original ST cast members are the exceptions, not the rule. There is an insatiable demand for them. And yes, they earn a living just from public appearances.

Other actors, not so lucky. I say 2 autograph conventions a year because my friends who do those things only get to, at most, two a year. The company hosting the event has to provide transportation and housing. Few will be willing to do that if you appear at hundreds of different conventions.

My point still stands -- unless you appeared on a sci-fi series (like Star Trek), you're lucky to get $10,000 a year from autograph signing. And I've been to the one in Burbank -- most 'stars' seemed to be mostly sitting, not signing. Getting 250 people to pay for their autograph seems unlikely.

Yes, many actors I know collect unemployment when they're not working. Under normal circumstances though, you can only collect for 6 months. And you have to have earned something in the year preceding your unemployment claim. So its not like someone who's not working at all can get unemployment. Also, residuals do count against unemployment. If you get a residual check it must be reported to unemployment and your benefit will be reduced accordingly.

R34, one gigantic hit? Like a television series? If an actor was on a hit series (ran longer than 5-6 years), he should, if he's good with investments and frugal, have earned enough for life. VERY few actors are frugal enough to do that, however. There's a second chance in that a series like that will have a syndication life. But what he gets paid for syndication residuals decreases year by year, to the point that it is negligible.

I should mention there is also a pension -- several actually: SAG, AFTRA and Equity. I've been vested in the SAG pension, having earned enough over a 20 year period. If I wait and retire at age 65, I'll get a pension of about $7,000 a month.

But the best option for most actors who manage to work at all -- be frugal and invest wisely.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 4206/27/2010

R19, you would be surprised at the # of so-called has beens who have signed holding deals, for as little as 500K a year. The studios can write it off.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 4306/27/2010

The original Star Trek cast and NextGen cast make over $100,000 a year from conventions. If you're Bill Shatner or Patrick Stewart, they can make $50,000 per weekend.

They also make money in royalties and licensing fees for using their pictures on books, videos, spin-off games, etc. And the NextGen cast makes big bucks from reruns of the show.

They're all rich.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 4406/27/2010

Not in this day and age, R43. And what a joke to say "for as little as 500K a year." Like these people are walking around doing nothing on the off chance there might be a project for them and making that kind of money? Not unless you're Alex O'Loughlin and somebody at CBS has a hard-on for you.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 4506/27/2010

Shatner is not really a has been though, r44.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 4606/27/2010

Okay, R45. You know everything and the rest of us know absolutely nothing.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 4706/27/2010

[quote]For example, I was in a popular, Academy Award nominated movie almost 20 years ago. I had a supporting role in it.

Hmmm. Either the lambs have stopped screaming, or you in danger, girl!

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 4806/27/2010

Shatner has made more than a half a billion dollars on Priceline stock.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 4906/27/2010

R19, are you still a working actor?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 5006/27/2010

[quote]If that's not enough to live on, then the actor has to get a job. Just like anyone else. I have friends who have become psychologists, lawyers, real estate agents, teachers...

I was just reading yesterday that Shelley Smith ("The Associates") is now a marriage counselor.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 5106/27/2010

many disgraced politicians become lobbyists. They just go from one disgraced profession to another. Easy peasy!

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 5206/27/2010

I would think a lot of them would go to work on the other side of the camera once they're no longer sought after as performers.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 5306/27/2010

Adrienne Barbeau makes over a million a year from conventions.

Kathy Levine (once the top host on QVC and HSN) also makes a pretty penny as a motivational speaker. She's in very high demand an doesn't have to worry about going back to TV.

Joyce Dewitt and Priscilla Barnes clean up from the "Three's Company" DVD's, which are still hot sellers.

Nichelle Nichols makes up to five million.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 5406/27/2010

Autobiographies

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 5506/27/2010

[quote]Joyce Dewitt and Priscilla Barnes clean up from the "Three's Company" DVD's, which are still hot sellers.

I call bullshit on that one. Even assuming the dubious proposition that "Three's Company" DVD are still hot sellers, there is no fucking way their contract 35 years ago would have included a clause for royalties in recorded media, given that VCR sales of TV shows didn't even exist at the time. You also seem to forget that two of the biggest writers' strikes of the past 30 years, in 1985 and 2007-2008, were over royalties from VCR sales (in '85) and DVD sales (in '07).

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 5606/27/2010

I work in the theatre and wonder about this a lot - those who haven't had a show since the 80's, how do they get by. I know Don Correa and Rex Smith sell real estate, Jere Shea is teaching. But if you think of the hundreds who had a decent show or two and then nothing. How does Chris Groendahl, Betsy Joslyn, Sam Harris, etc. get by. And I especially wonder about Tammy Grimes. Do you think that old bastard of an ex-husband is still paying alimony?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 5706/27/2010

R19 again.

Yes, still a working actor.

These has-beens who supposedly have holding deals at networks? Gosh, I really don't think it's possible. There used to be a system -- over 10 years ago -- where stars of hit series would, in addition to their salary, get a pay-or-play guarantee for a TV movie or two or three. Obviously this was back in the day when networks made a lot of TV movies. I remember a friend who worked at CBS showing me a list of 'stars' who had deals like that. Isabel Sanford and Sherman Hemsley led the list with guarantees for 5 TV movies each. I doubt they were ever made and had to be paid off eventually.

But a holding fee to a has-been? a true has-been? Ehhh... I just can't see it. Network budgets are so tight now. Stars of hit series, after their series ends, often get some sort of deal like that. But I wouldn't call them has-beens.

And R56 is absolutely correct, no way do any of the stars of "Three's Company" share in DVD sales to any great extent. The union contract for that money is terrible.

And Adrienne Barbeau earning a million bucks a year at personal appearances? Gosh, I guess it's possible. Seems very unlikely to me though. I do occasional public speaking events at conventions and get $5,000 an event. I could see her MAYBE getting $10,000 an event. She'd have to do a hundred in a year which is just unheard of.

It's such a terrible time in my business -- a lot of my acquaintances are no longer able to earn a living. Many of them are just going back to their hometowns and kinda disappearing. I'm not sure what they end up doing.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 5806/27/2010

So, R19, just out of curiosity, are you someone who's been gossiped about on DL? If so, have you ever corrected something someone posted about you that was not true?

I'm very much enjoying your contributions to this thread by the way.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 5906/27/2010

I charge $1,000 for oral, $3,000 for vaginal sex, $4,000 for anal and $5,000 for sex with no condom.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 6006/27/2010

Is this about me?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 6106/27/2010

[quote]Has anyone seen Lee Majors selling cheapo hearing aids? Yes, very late at night from the comfort of my Sleep Number Bed.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 6206/27/2010

The ONLY thing Adrienne Barbeau gets a million bucks a year for is letting rich horndogs bury their faces in her voluptuous tits for 5 grand a pop.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 6306/27/2010

If you save your money or invest well, you can live nicely without having to work. Some of these people earned a lot of money back in the day. I mean, if Tom Cruise never got another acting role in his life it probably wouldn't matter - he could live off the money he's already earned (which is a ton)

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 6406/27/2010

Was wondering about the multitude of soap 'stars' that have not been seen in ages. For example, from Another World, I heard that Laura Malone (Blaine) is now a lawyer and Tom Eplin sells real estate but could you imagine Nancy Frangione (Cecile) as a nutritionist or William Gray Espy (Mitch) as a farm equipment salesman ? How do they make the transition ?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 6506/27/2010

[quotre]should mention there is also a pension -- several actually: SAG, AFTRA and Equity. I've been vested in the SAG pension, having earned enough over a 20 year period. If I wait and retire at age 65, I'll get a pension of about $7,000 a month.

R19, Would you expand on that. To get the $7000 what sort of earnings did you have to have over those 20 years? What would your average income per year have been, and is that money you put in or is there an employer match of some kind?

I'm not trying to pry (we're anonymous after all), but that seems like a pretty good pension for a business as dysfunctional as acting. I'm wondering if you're anywhere near average.

Thanks for posting.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 6606/27/2010

there is no sign of love behind the tears.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 6706/27/2010

Betsy Joslyn is a computer expert somewhere. Sam Harris still does concerts (and cruise ships) all over the world.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 6806/27/2010

I was recently appalled at seeing Megan Mullally doing a commerical singing and dancing about butter. I was embarassed for her. So I thought even though she seems to get stage work regularly that her residuals for Will & Grace may not be enough to support her into her later years. Why else would she embarrass herself other than $$. It can't be for the challenge of dancing down a supermarket aisle!

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 6906/27/2010

How does Sally Kirkland support herself? She was never a big earner. She always looks kinda out of it and has awful plastic surgery.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 7006/27/2010

Polly Holliday was so worried about being penniless, kept her Rent Controlled apartment in New York when she got the "Alice" job. When her own show ended, Polly returned to her East 10th Street flat.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 7106/27/2010

R66, I am not an average actor. I guess I'm in the upper 2-3% of SAG members. I used to earn $125K per annum average. Lately I've had more success, so that average is probably more like $200K.

To even be vested in the pension plan you must have 10 years of income over the minimum which I think is 30-some thousand bucks a year now. What percentage of SAG achieves that? Probably 10%.

And the pension is funded by employer contributions. Every time you work as an actor under a SAG contract, your employer makes a contribution to SAGPH for pension and heath insurance.

And no, R59, I've never been gossiped about here. I'm just one of those actors, fifth to tenth on the call sheet, whose name almost never appears in print.

And R65, Nancy Frangione lives on Cape Cod, I believe. Divorce was good to her.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 7206/27/2010

Thank you, R19. That's very interesting, especially the fact that it's funded by the Companies.

On first reading it seems very unfair that the companies are paying pension money for the 90% of the actors who will never vest, but I guess that's probably no worse than the average company. I doubt if 10% of the people who ever work for Coca-Cola stick around long enough to collect a pension either.

I wish you would tell us more. You're the sort of actor we never hear about, but you're what the industry is all about.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 7306/27/2010

[quote]How does Sally Kirkland support herself? She was never a big earner

She's done lots of commercial voiceovers.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 7406/27/2010

R66 I think the finances of the pension and health care plan depend on all those contributions that never result in insurance or a pension.

I'm happy to share any info I have about the biz, but usually it's not what people want to read about. I see Hollywood as a very blue collar town. I'm like a factory worker. It's really not that glamorous.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 7506/27/2010

I am fantasizing that R19 is Hector Elizondo...

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 7606/27/2010

Some of us open restaurants.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 7706/27/2010

R19, I understand you may not want to identify yourself, but could you let us know what medium you most frequently worked in? Film, Stage, Primetime TV, Daytime TV, etc.

Thanks, and I echo the earlier poster that I appreciate your contributions to this thread.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 7806/27/2010

And I'm picturing R19 as Patrick Fabian, hot daddy.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 7906/27/2010

Sci-fi and comic book conventions are so exploitative of people on the autistic spectrum.

I have no idea why, and I have no idea what the neurology of the issue is, but men with asperger's / autism LOVE to go to those conventions and shell out $$$ for autographs and comic book drawings.

My autistic adult cousin goes to those all the time. He doesn't have a job. But he will wait in line for some comic book artist guy to draw him a picture of spiderman and batman together, or whatever, and then pay $50 for it.

It's so wrong. It's like preying on the weak to take money from people like that.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 8006/27/2010

They sell their used panties on EBAY.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 8106/27/2010

R80, it makes him happy. Would you rather he spend it on hookers and blow?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 8206/27/2010

My name is Tom Cruise.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 8306/27/2010

Not so much a celebrity as a former sports star and referring back to a new thread about Jennifer Capriati...how does she support herself and here drug habit?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 8406/27/2010

Getting back to OP using Lori Petty, a quick check of her IMDB entry suggests she makes a decent living in the biz.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 8506/27/2010

A lot of them become agents and managers, too. At these sci-fi conventions, a lot of the hot new talent's managers and agents are quite recognizable in their own right. Erin Gray, of Port Charles/ Silver Spoons/ Starman/ Baywatch fame is now a manager for a lot of actors, for example. I guess they pass along their hard-won wisdom or something.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 8606/27/2010

Some start acting schools or teach acting classes. Though why an aspiring actor would take lessons from a washed-up actor who can't get work anymore is beyond me.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 8706/28/2010

[quote]I was recently appalled at seeing Megan Mullally doing a commerical singing and dancing about butter.

IIRC, all four stars of "Will & Grace" got either high-six-figure or million-dollar paydays for the last season or two. Megan should not need the money unless she somehow spend it or invested it disastrously. That said, I thought the butter commercial was cute.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 8806/28/2010

Thanks Working Actor for your contributions to this thread. It is great to hear a jobbing actor's point of view.%0D %0D The other night, I was watching TV and saw an ad for Magnum ice cream with Benicio Del Toro in it. The guy is an Oscar winner and he is shilling ice cream in a truly cringe worthy commercial? He must really need the dough, he is notoriously picky about movies.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 8906/28/2010

A lot of actors don't think twice about doing a foreign ad since "supposably" hardly anyone who is American will see it. Brad Pitt does beaucoup Japanese commericials.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 9006/28/2010

In 1997 George Reinholt placed an ad in a local paper offering his services to take women to parties or other events. Some of the press implied he was selling sex. Reinholt was furious and appeared on the Sally Jessy Raphael show to clear the record.%0D

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 9206/28/2010

So, what is little Joanie Cunningham doing these days?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 9306/28/2010

Thanks for answering my question, working actor. I'd like to hear about the blue collar side of the profession - what do you think are the main misconceptions?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 9406/28/2010

I saw one of those Intervention shows featuring an actress who played a background nurse, on ER during the first season or two. Her particular addiction was shopping, a habit she supported with her checks from the syndication run- something to the tune of $50,000 a pop. I was shocked that she was still pulling in that kind of dough. It seemed as if she hadn't worked much since, if at all.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 9506/28/2010

Lots of actresses find work as yoga teachers, for some reason.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 9606/28/2010

[quote]I was recently appalled at seeing Megan Mullally

Why? She is a Broadway musical performer. For two days work, a day to record the song and rehearse the dance, another to shoot, she get's I think, the technical term is "oodles" of money. She gets a sponsor contract and then paid every time it airs. She also gets to show the world who only knows her as Karen and may never see her on Broadway, what she can do.

Betty Buckley and Tony winner Victoria Clark teach singing, Sally Kirkland and Louise Lasser, acting coaches. My friend a former voice over agent says many actors who you haven't seen on screen in years can make a million annually in voice overs.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 9706/28/2010

[quote]says many actors who you haven't seen on screen in years can make a million annually in voice overs.

If that's true that would be the way to go. No one sees you. You wouldn't have to be even remotely famous.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 9806/28/2010

Thanks R19 for being a voice of reason and reliable information. As you can see, this thread would have gone off on some wacky tangents if you hadn't shown up.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 9906/28/2010

I believe many actors also go the animated route where their voices never get old or balding, etc. Unfortunately, great actors find themselves at a loss for work due to the aging process so voice work is a good alternative. There are also many well known stars who do foreign commericals and that brings in money long after their careers in the US are done.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 10006/28/2010

Some of the clients who are managed by Erin Gray must have been pissed that she used her influence to book a new commerical for dog treats for herself instead of one of them. %0D %0D Just a little conflict of interest.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 10106/28/2010

You marry someone successful in the biz, and then you kill er, your spouse commits suicide, and you're set for life.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 10206/28/2010

Until I saw her twirling with that tub of artificial butter, I'd forgotten that she was a singer/dancer.%0D %0D Get Megan Mullally on the phone, we've found the star for our new musical!%0D %0D "Talkin' bout nutrition"

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 10306/28/2010

I have to think real hard to answer this one.%0D %0D Hmmmmm- I've got it!%0D %0D They either have enough money well invested to live on- %0D %0D Or, they continue to work in some capacity.%0D %0D Kind of like all people.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 10406/28/2010

Charlie, the question is about people who were once featured performers in a TV show or movie but who haven't been in much of anything since. They have name recognition but no roles or verifiable income.

The sad truth is, many of these people continue to think that stardom is just one break away and will continue to go on auditions and resist getting a "normal" job because they think have a "reputation" to maintain. They could never work at Macy's or be a receptionist. Their "fans" would be appalled and even worse, their dream of fame and fortune would die. I've got relatives in the business (behind the camera) and I've heard stories about people who just don't know when to pack it in.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 10506/28/2010

I was recently looking up Andrea Thompson of NYPD Blues, Babylon 5, and CNN on IMDB. I was surprised to find she posted this on her message board:%0D %0D "I have two beautiful sons and a position as head of marketing for the US and Canada for a British manufacturing company."

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 10606/28/2010

R79, he's a hot daddy indeed!!

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 10706/28/2010

[quote]The sad truth is, many of these people continue to think that stardom is just one break away and will continue to go on auditions and resist getting a "normal" job because they think have a "reputation" to maintain.

I would love to read R66's comments on that. I think you're right, to have tasted fame and lost it must be tough, but surely it's not just about image, is it?

It would seem to me that a very poor day in the movie business is still far superior to a good day in an insurance claims office in Orange County.

Even after decades there's still a little magic about being in motion pictures, isn't there? Or is it really just punching a clock?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 10806/28/2010

I'm a working actor. Mostly guest starring parts on primetime dramas. I make probably $200,000 a year, that includes guest star parts, commercials, and residuals, but a big chunk goes from conventions. I played a role on a sci fi drama, the character was only on for two episodes but made a big impact on the show. I show up at one or two autograph signings and ComicCon each year. Once the parts completely dry up, I can see living off of the convention money.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 10906/28/2010

Really R105?%0D %0D You mean they keep earning money and but not at the level they did to earn their fame, but will not "pack it in".%0D %0D I merely suggest that they have enough or work, like anyone does- at their career, at another job- they work. After all, they have to, just like you and me. %0D

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 11006/28/2010

r109 completely made that up.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 11106/28/2010

I have so many friends who are in perilous economic shape right now -- all of them facing a decrease in jobs and income from acting. Each of them had some success at some point in their career and you'd probably recognize their faces, but not their names. It's mostly hope and the dream that keeps them going.

You become an actor in the first place by not being too overwhelmed by the terrible odds. That you have a career at all is a miracle. So to stick it out and hope for another miracle isn't so unreasonable.

It is amazing how little sustenance that hope needs to keep it going. You hear about an acquaintance having a sudden career surge after years of not working, and you think, 'it worked for him, why not me?'

And yes, you try every way imaginable to earn money as an actor. I live in LA, so earning a living in theater is almost impossible. Right now, television is working for me. It used to be I earned most of my income from movies. At one point it was commercials. If nothing else is working, you try voice-overs or video games. You do whatever you have to do to earn a living.

But sometimes, nothing is working. That's what some of my friends and acquaintances are facing. You use up savings, you run up debt, you take out a second mortgage, you hit up the family for money... And eventually there's nothing else to do. Dreams die hard. The wisest friends saw the writing on the wall years ago and took steps then -- got that master's in social work/counseling, went to law school, whatever -- but for some of my friends... Ay yi yi.. They're in their 50's and have no way to earn a living. I'm really not sure what they'll do. They could get a job at Starbuck's I guess... And of course, in all this, I project my own fears -- that could so easily be me and most likely WILL be me some day.

I think of myself as a blue collar worker probably because I work mostly in television. The grind of producing an hour or half hour of television in today's economic condition is not exactly a recipe for art. We're making sausage and not very good sausage. If a scene is OK and people mostly hit their marks and didn't screw up their lines, you print it and move on to the next scene. The idea of honing, perfecting a scene is gone largely.

And I'm not Patrick Fabian! But he's a great guy.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 11306/28/2010

Two vague recollections: I seem to recall Susan Sarandon saying that it wasn't at all easy for her to make enough as an actor to support herself and her kids. This surprised me. I also seem to recall Corey Feldman saying something like, "Being a busboy sucks enough. Try being a busboy that every asshole recognizes!"

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 11406/28/2010

[quote]Some of the clients who are managed by Erin Gray must have been pissed that she used her influence to book a new commerical for dog treats for herself instead of one of them. Just a little conflict of interest.

No, she gets celebs booked at autograph conventions only. She's not their agent or manager for acting work. She is still a working actress and attends conventions on her own too. No conflict of interest.

[quote]Who, pray tell, is Lori Petty?

She's a Peach!

quote]which "Academy Award nominated" film were you in 20 years ago? "Goodfellas"? "Bugsy"? "Field of Dreams"? "Ghost"?

"Goodfellas"? "Bugsy" & "Ghost" are Academy Award WINNING films.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 11506/28/2010

"Though why an aspiring actor would take lessons from a washed-up actor who can't get work anymore is beyond me."%0D %0D %0D %0D %0D Being washed-up doesn't mean you aren't a good actor. Everyone's career dies down eventually. Robert DeNiro is a has-been but I'd kill to take lessons from him.%0D

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 11606/28/2010

You miss the point, R116. Robert DeNiro is not a has-been and does not offer acting lessons. Think of someone like a Grant Cramer, who had a brief moment of fame in the '80s and now teaches acting in L.A.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 11706/28/2010

"Robert DeNiro is not a has-been and does not offer acting lessons"%0D %0D %0D %0D I know he doesn't offer acting lessons but he IS a has-been. He hasn't dona anything of note in years. My point is that being a "has-been" doesn't mean you aren't talented. I would take lessons from a "has-been" if that person is talented.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 11806/28/2010

Only on DL, by a very few people, is DeNiro ever called a has-been.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 11906/28/2010

Robert De Niro is not a has-been. Sure, his great roles were decades ago but he can still find work when he wants it. He's done several films in the past decade. Besides, he's over 60. Give him a break. Thank goodness he's not overexposed like many of the younger "stars" are.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 12006/28/2010

r116 Are you talking to me, are you talking to me, who the fuck are you talking to?

Asshole.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 12106/28/2010

Robert De Niro has been in all those Focker movies. He probably made a few buck$ from those.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 12206/28/2010

[quote]Megan should not need the money unless she somehow spend it or invested it disastrously. That said, I thought the butter commercial was cute.

Also, she comes from $$$.

[quote]If that's true that would be the way to go. No one sees you. You wouldn't have to be even remotely famous.

Linda Hunt makes very good $$$ as a voiceover artist. So did Sally Kellerman.

[quote]Has anyone seen Lee Majors selling cheapo hearing aids?

Lee invested in real estate during his heyday and is very well off financially.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 12306/28/2010

[quote]Has anyone seen Lee Majors selling cheapo hearing aids?%0D %0D %0D No, and I haven't heard him either.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 12406/28/2010

"My autistic adult cousin goes to those all the time. He doesn't have a job. But he will wait in line for some comic book artist guy to draw him a picture of spiderman and batman together, or whatever, and then pay $50 for it."

How much do you think Stan Lee would charge to fart in my face?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 12506/28/2010

part of an email a friend sent me when I told him about this discussion:%0D %0D The funny thing about this business is that the average person assumes omniscience on the subject of the entertainment business and there isn't much you can do to persuade them otherwise.%0D %0D With the 24/7 entertainment media it is easy to understand how somebody can feel like an authority on your business when in fact they have just been manipulated by publicists spinning bullshit fantatsies about their clients trying to position them favorably.%0D %0D %0D I guess if there were magazines in every dentists office about accountants, I would consider myself an expert on them.. human nature, it is understandable.%0D %0D I have made a decent living [at times, at others not] and have some good credits on Broadway, TV Film but my family and friends outside the business are always expressing dismay about why I didn't audition for the lead in the last movie they say or their new favorite TV show, after all, I have been on "Law & Order" the world should be my oyster....LOL. %0D %0D %0D %0D It takes quite a bit of work to explain that you don't get to just waltz in and read for whatever part you like.. %0D %0D The casting director brings you in for something specific and unless your agent can negotiate you into being seen for a better part your only chance of being upgraded is if the director sees you or your tape and gets interested in you for something better.%0D %0D I am not complaining, I guess I am aware enough that every job I get no matter how small, is a victory. I have don't soaps, Broadway, TV and lots of theater but I draw the line at commercials, mostly because I can't seem to get arrested in them.%0D %0D

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 12606/28/2010

I guess I'm unique, because I've never had the fantasy of being the next Harrison Ford, but I think a career in the movies would be endlessly entertaining, mostly because you would be surrounded by such interesting people all day.

My fantasy is a role like the guy who answered the phone at the desk on ER or Gunther the coffee shop guy on Friends-- you get two lines every episode, but you're in every episode.

The classic role was Sam the bartender on Gunsmoke. He stood there for 20 years and put his kids through college on not much more than "What will you have?" and "Should I go get the sheriff, Miss Kitty?"

I'm not in the business in any way, shape, or form, but in my next life I want to be.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 12706/28/2010

Three questions:%0D %0D 1) Didn't Lindsay Wagner get rich off of income from some pharmaceutical company she bought years ago? That's what I heard anyway.%0D %0D 2) I've often wondered how actors who are regulars on TV series get paid -- e.g., if Charlie Sheen makes 5 million per episode, do they make a direct deposit to his bank account every Friday, every other Friday or once a month? (I assume it's the same process for everyone, from the top stars on down.) Good Lord, just imagine if you can having that kind of money coming into your checking account every motherfucking payday.%0D %0D 3) Would it be reasonable to say that the only two people who are not former "Star Trek" cast members who could probably make a mint off of conventions are David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson? I would think their appearances at an "X-Files" gathering would be freaking huge and would rake in major bucks off the obsessed fans of that show.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 12806/28/2010

R127, I also think about the actress who plays the coroner on all of the "Law & Order" shows. She must've made a fortune by now.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 12906/28/2010

[R19], here's a suggestion for you: write a book.

I'm an editor (in a non-fiction/reference genre), but it seems to me you have at least a proposal in you, and you are very well-spoken on the 'net. I'm not talking about the "I've got lots of dirt on people," book, because you keep working because you AREN'T blabbing. This wouldn't be for a major non-fiction imprint, BUT there are still several theater and film-specific publishers and imprints.

I'm thinking along the lines of Anne Lamott's "Bird by Bird." Who knew that her little text on keeping yourself moving forward on writing and dealing with all the side distractions (and emotional roadblocks) was going to be a perennial seller, the book recommended to almost all beginning writers? That book's probably bought her a house and put her kid through college.

Go to Drama Books or a store that has a large theater/film selection, and look at the how-to books. There are very specific books on things like auditioning, and acting on film, and collections of essays about the art and craft of acting.

Figure out the book that you wish you had, that you know how to write.

Then buy another book...how to write a book proposal. (Or take a class on it; there are a lot of those out there, and I know people who have gone to seminars and walked out with at least strong interest from an agent or publisher).

What it is, is a pitch you're creating, like the ones that screenwriters hone when they get a meeting with a studio. And yes, you do have to have something that's the equivalent of a logline. "Bird by Bird meets Adventures in the Screen Trade." Or: "Chicken Soup for the Actors Soul meets Respect for Acting."

Along those lines...

And, because you do know how to present yourself as an actor, you can also do the marketing end of things: interviews, podcasts, panels, etc.

Do it. I'm telling you.

So either work to develop one on your own, or ask your acting agent or manager to point you to a literary agent.

This is not huge money we're talking here: maybe if you're lucky, a few grand as an advance. BUT, if it turns into another Bird by Bird or The Artist's Way, it'll turn into a regular money earner, like a piece of real estate or a play that's part of the standard repertory.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 13006/28/2010

Most former TV stars, who were on hit shows and didn't have heavy duty drug or alcohol problems, most likely invested wisely. They also didn't invest in one place, they spread their money around.

Others went back to school, especially those who were young enough to re-invent themselves.

I recall reading about one of the women who replaced Suzanne Sommers on "Three's Company", she owned a few apartment buildings while she was on the show.

Despite what some people think about real estate being a bad investment, everyone needs a place to live. If your property is already paid for, you can simply collect rents, pay your taxes and hopefully over the years you've made decent connections with trustworthy repair people.

A friend's ex is loaded, from real estate, he was a cop, he retired young then got into real estate.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 13106/28/2010

"I guess I'm unique, because I've never had the fantasy of being the next Harrison Ford, but I think a career in the movies would be endlessly entertaining, mostly because you would be surrounded by such interesting people all day."

Why do you assume all people in showbiz are "interesting"? They aren't.

I guess you would actually have to spend some time on a set to find out they are just as annoying, mean, spiteful and boring as 'regular people' in any other profession.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 13206/28/2010

Payment for series regulars is very routine. Sheen is rumored to be earning about $2 million an episode. The first payday after the completion of an episode, seems to be Thursdays on most shows, a check in the amount of $2,000,000.00 made out to Sheen's corporation is sent to his agent. The agent cashes that check -- agencies have signed authority to cash such checks -- and puts 90% of it into a clients trust account. (Actors commonly pay out 10% of their income in commissions.) A check, made out to Sheen's corp. for $1,800,000.00, is sent to Sheen's business manager, who then deposits it. And that happens week after week after week...

Hour-long salaries are different only in that they take 7-10 days to shoot instead of 5, so the paychecks come every 1.5 to 2 weeks.

That's the standard way an actor gets paid. Of course a manager can take another 10% and a money manager can take another 5%... But it still works the same way.

I was curious about the coroner on L&O, so I looked her up on IMDB. Leslie Hendrix. Between L&O and L&O CI, she's done 243 episodes! I'm pretty sure she was never a regular -- I could be wrong, I don't follow the shows. It's hard to say what she earned. It could be anything from a dayplayer contract for $2000 an episode like the recurring nurses on ER or an over top of show weekly contract up to $10-15K an episode. Who knows?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 13306/28/2010

And to N. Editor at R130 -- thanks for the suggestion. Perhaps some day. One more arrow in my quiver to battle poverty and obscurity!

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 13406/28/2010

Thanks, R19.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 13506/28/2010

I've seen a bunch of "where are they now" shows and it seems like a lot of formerly famous people seem to find a more behind the scenes careers or switch to something boring but respectable.

Charlie Korsmo went to law school and was an intern at the firm where I worked. Nice guy, if a Repug. Years ago when I was temping I wound up working at Wayne Rogers' business management company. He was on MASH decades before and still got a lot of fan mail, much of it completely wacked out.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 13606/28/2010

Good times and bum times - I've seen them all and my dear, I'm still here

Plush velvet sometimes, sometimes just pretzels and beer - but I'm here

First you're another sloe-eyed vamp, then someone's mother, then you're camp

Then you career from career to career

I'm almost thru my memoirs, and I'm here!

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 13706/29/2010

Robert DiNiro has a sequel to the Fockers movies coming out later this year titled Little Fockers. There's already a teaser trailer out for it. Looks like complete crap though.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 13806/29/2010

R19 - from what you've described SAG seems mostly about getting actors paid and getting them pensions. But do you have a union that works to get you the best working conditions, or perhaps to try to level the playing field so that more talent can work?

From your description, it sound like actors are treated mostly like cattle anyway and talent doesn't seem to be a factor in getting work as much as "product placement" by an agent.

So, given that, if I'm correct, why not use a union to improve working conditions, improve actors a.k.a workers' control over their own work lives, and increase the width and depth of work for people, and level the playing field a bit?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 13906/29/2010

I sat nude in a hot tub with Robert DeNiro once...

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 14006/29/2010

[quote]Didn't Lindsay Wagner get rich off of income from some pharmaceutical company she bought years ago? That's what I heard anyway.

Well next week if your in Jersey you can buy an autograph or just have dinner with her for $299. Scroll down for the dinner deal.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 14106/29/2010

For what its worth, R19 has absolutely no clue what he's talking about. He is obviously been pulling your legs.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 14206/29/2010

R141, I guess that sleep number thing isn't going to well either.%0D %0D 12 people per table. $299 per person. That's $3000 for Lindsay after whomever else get their share. Kind of pathetic.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 14306/29/2010

If you're a certain bit actress who most recently starred on an Intervention episode, you leach off your parents while slurping fentanyl suckers, sleeping in a dentist's chair, and periodically lying on your back and throwing your legs wide open to relieve your "joint pain."

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 14406/29/2010

[quote]These has-beens who supposedly have holding deals at networks? Gosh, I really don't think it's possible.%0D %0D I know someone (her name is Jessalyn Gilsig) who may not be a household name but she has exactly that kind of deal with Fox. She's like a salaried employee, or a baseball player waiting to be called from the bench in the dugout. They keep her in the stable and she's been in a lot of Fox and F/X series, most notably Nip/Tuck but also the first year of Prison Break, and others. She makes a great living. (But I wouldn't imagine this is commonplace.)

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 14606/29/2010

If you know her R146, why didn't you mention that she is on Glee, one of the top rated series of this past season?%0D %0D Odd thing to leave out.....

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 14706/29/2010

Aren't there quite a few ex-TV stars that become television directors?%0D %0D I assume this is why as series becime hits, the stars seem to be able to direct episodes as perks. To get their feet wet?%0D %0D Clark Johnson from Homicide, Peter Horton from Thirtysomething. and I think Kerri from ER too(Can't remeber her name) that I can think of off of the top of my head. I am sure there are more.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 14806/29/2010

[quote]Aren't there quite a few ex-TV stars that become television directors?

James Widdoes, who played Hoover in [italic]Animal House[/italic], is a successful TV director. I don't know that he ever made it to celebrity status, but he was certainly recognizable for a while after AH came out.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 14906/29/2010

Geordi and Riker of ST:TNG and Belanna of ST:Voyager are directing too. Deanna and Worf do a lot of voice over.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 15006/29/2010

Michael Lembeck who you'd recognize as McKenzie Phillips husband on "One Day At A Time" and had a good acting career going moved into directing, won an Emmy for directing "Friends" and moved onto the big screen directing with "The Santa Clause 2&3" and last year's "The Tooth Fairy".

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 15106/29/2010

"James Widdoes, who played Hoover in Animal House, is a successful TV director. I don't know that he ever made it to celebrity status, but he was certainly recognizable for a while after AH came out."

He played the Dad on the original "Charles In Charge" also.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 15206/29/2010

"Years ago when I was temping I wound up working at Wayne Rogers' business management company. He was on MASH decades before and still got a lot of fan mail, much of it completely wacked out."

IIRC, Wayne made a killing in real estate because of "MASH" and "House Calls."

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 15306/29/2010

Betty Thomas "Hill Street Blues" made the jump from acting to directing.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 15406/29/2010

I remember Michael Lembeck from "Kaptain Kool and the Kongs"

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 15506/29/2010

I understand why these former actors repeatedly do these conventions and these private dinners/meet and greets..but it still comes off as cheesy and pathetic.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 15606/29/2010

R19, blue collar/factory workers don't end up with the amounts of money/pension you have/will. You can look at it as that if you want, but it's really nothing like blue collar/factory work in most any way.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 15706/29/2010

I don't know R146. But boy, that Lea Michele is a real CUNT.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 15806/29/2010

Not as much as Deb Messing, R158

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 15906/29/2010

For some reason Eric McCormack is doing Glengarry Glen Ross in a local stage production this summer in Vancouver.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 16006/29/2010

and Fred Savage directs on Party Down

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 16106/29/2010

[quote] It would seem to me that a very poor day in the movie business is still far superior to a good day in an insurance claims office in Orange County.

Pushing papers is pushing papers, whether in the movie business or an insurance claims office in Orange County.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 16206/30/2010

[quote] Megan should not need the money unless she somehow spend it or invested it disastrously. That said, I thought the butter commercial was cute.

[quote] Also, she comes from $$$.

No, her late father's family HAD money at one time, but his eccentric lifestyle took care of that in no time.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 16306/30/2010

George W. Bush will be on the public dole for the rest of his life, a reward for eight years of running the country into the ground. By the way, Gawge, thanks for Eye-rack.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 16406/30/2010

"For some reason Eric McCormack is doing Glengarry Glen Ross in a local stage production this summer in Vancouver."

He made so much money off of Will & Grace that he never has to work again. If he wants to do an extremely well-written classic play by a legendary writer in Vancouver, then so be it. He is billed as the lead, he is the most prominent face in the poster, he is making the play marketable, and he is Canadian. Sure, he's really from Toronto, but it's still Canada. Maybe it's a play and an opportunity that he's always looked to do. If I had more than enough money to last my entire life, and all I really wanted was to take on roles that I had always dreamed of, this wouldn't be a bad start.

He's also produced several shows, so perhaps he doesn't have the desire to be in the spotlight as much these days. He is into his late 40's. Maybe this is what he wants, and he doesn't care what some bitchy queen says on DL?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 16506/30/2010

Michael Bergin sells real estate in the San Fernando Valley. He alsodoes spec houses andhas made some money. His biggest check came from Liz Claiborne when he was the claiborne for Men model.Over half a million which he invested. Actually very savvy. Surprise!

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 16606/30/2010

[quote]Over half a million which he invested. Actually very savvy. Surprise!

I wonder how the movie business compares with professional sports in terms of money pissed away vs. money saved and invested?

Maybe that should be the entertainment business in general since I bet there's some real horror stories in the music side of things.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 16706/30/2010

R167, the sports field is even worse in terms of retirees losing their shirts.%0D %0D The sport celeb culture is set up for failure. You become part of an elite scene, making tons of money, and being enticed to spend it. And many of these celebs are not savvy about anything but their chosen sport, and all the hangers on and managers are happy to take their money from them.%0D %0D And the shelf life for a pro athlete is much shorter than the average movie/tv star. %0D %0D There have been articles written about all the ex-sport stars being totally poor.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 16806/30/2010

[quote]The sport celeb culture is set up for failure. You become part of an elite scene, making tons of money, and being enticed to spend it. And many of these celebs are not savvy about anything but their chosen sport, and all the hangers on and managers are happy to take their money from them.%0D %0D Doctors fall into the same category. "The Millionaire Next Door" was an interesting book which hit upon this topic.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 16906/30/2010

How does Joey Lawrence support himself, his wife and kid(s)? I know he did Dancing with the Stars, but does he get residuals from his old shows? I don't know whether his wife works but Joey apparently has a big house and a respectable car collection, so he appears to be doing relatively well.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 17006/30/2010

Article about celebrity side businesses:

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 17106/30/2010

I now live in L.A. but years ago before moving here I wrote a letter to a beefy hunky TV actor I had jacked off to numerous times. He had a series in the 80's along with a few TV movies/mini-series after that. Hairy and muscular, always taking his shirt off at least once in any show he was in. No names will be mentioned, sorry, I still admire the guy.

In the letter I basically told him he was a fantasy of mine, along with mentioning how hard it would be to keep my hands to myself if we ever met in person.

There were a few rumors of the guy being gay so I felt pretty OK with telling him I basically fantasized about him in a sexual way. In the letter I mentioned a trip to L.A. would not be a hindrance to me, to meet him for dinner, along with a payment for his time not to exceed $5000.00.

Off in the mail the letter went and about 1-1/2 months later I got a call from an L.A. number, which I did not answer because I didn't recognize it. Just one word on the message, my name, but I knew the voice. I called him back, made a date for a few weeks later and off to L.A. I went. Met him at a little Italian place, now since closed, for a quick dinner. Then back to my hotel. I'll never forget unbuttoning his shirt and burying my face in that hairy chest. A 1/2 hour blow job for him, a hands free cum shoot for me, and $5000.00 to him in an envelope as he left.

No mention if he had done this before, but every now and then he still shows up on TV. Still hot for his age.

And yes, I've paid to have other fantasies come true. So call me names if you must!

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 17207/01/2010

[quote]A 1/2 hour blow job for him, a hands free cum shoot for me, and $5000.00 to him in an envelope as he left.

Um, $5K for a nonreciprocal blowjob is, quite simply, fucking pathetic. You are a loser to the thousandth degree.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 17307/01/2010

[quote]I remember reading about a soap opera actor (Rick from Guiding Light, I think) who was also a Realtor.

R5, you might be thinking about Rick Hearst who had a fairly large role on Guiding Light. After his character was written off the soap, Hearst became a house painter to support his family. He said people recognized him, "Hey aren't you...?"

Anyway, eventually he got a job on General Hospital and he went from there to B&B. He said one of the very first things he did when he got his General Hospital job was to invest well enough to make sure that never happened again.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 17407/01/2010

Good for you, R172.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 17507/01/2010

Better to have spent $5000 living out a fantasy than pissing it away in the stock market.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 17607/01/2010

Just saw on DListed that Jon Secada is doing Chippendales appearances

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 17707/01/2010

Teach acting...small town theater, marry money the usual.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 17807/01/2010

[quote] and Fred Savage directs on Party Down

Not anymore he won't. Show's been canceled.

Amanda Bearse is another one who has moved into directing.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 17907/01/2010

Just from watching the credits on many shows over the years, it seems to me that if you are on a long-running show, and not an asshole, you can learn about the process of directing as you work, and I've also noticed that on the longer-running shows, you'll see the actors start to direct episodes as the run goes on. Eric Laneuville started directing on St. Elsewhere, I think; and Laura Innes ended up directing a lot on ER (as did Paul McCrane and Anthony Edwards, I think), and then on other series (West Wing?)

Amanda Bearse, James Widdoes, Ted Bessell, Betty Thomas, etc. So it seems like a career trajectory for a lot of working actors if you're motivated enough.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 18007/02/2010

But they can't all be making a living directing.

Maybe we need a thread on how unemployed directors support themselves.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 18107/02/2010

Just saw Fred Savage listed as director of a "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia" episode.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 18207/02/2010

A lot of actresses marry guys with money. The list is endless.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 18307/02/2010

They start working in production

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 18407/02/2010

What's a director earn for doing a sitcom, say one episode of Community?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 18507/02/2010

R185, DGA minimum for a director for a half-hour is almost $22K. For an hour -- $37K

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 18607/02/2010

BUMP

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 18711/28/2010

R186, 37K per episode? Wow.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 18811/28/2010

You think that sounds like a lot? A freelance director is very lucky to string together 4 eps a year. Take away commissions and taxes and the expense of living in LA, you're not talking a lot of money.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 18911/28/2010

I have a girlfriend who graduated acting school about 8 years ago.

she's 32.

She did a lot of plays in NYC -- but off-off-off B'way and self-financed plays with her own theater company.

She moved to LA a few years ago and has been auditioning, but I've never seen her in a commercial or a tv show on tv. She's in a lot of free UCLA student films and films by people I've never heard of.

If you can't get cast as a waiter, check-out person, mom, teacher, etc in LA, in a commercial or TV show, does that mean you should give it up?

Meaning, if no one pays you for your acting work?

Or do lots of actors get paid nothing, do local plays and thesis projects, until they make it?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 19011/28/2010

If an actor or writer/producer has the good fortune to land on a TV series that runs five to seven seasons, they should be set for life.

If they're not once the TV gig has ended, they are living beyond their means and thinking they will always be able to land such work.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 19111/28/2010

I always wondered what became of some of the child stars that I grew up with did when they apparently left the business. I found some info in IMDB in the bio section. Wiki also has some info.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 19211/28/2010

[quote]Also, residuals do count against unemployment. If you get a residual check it must be reported to unemployment and your benefit will be reduced accordingly.%0D %0D I don't see how that's possible. You didn't "work" during the time of the UI check. The form you fill out asks if you if you worked in the last two weeks. %0D %0D That's like expecting to have to report stock dividends, 401k disbursements, income from rental property, etc.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 19311/28/2010

Ronald Reagan became POTUS.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 19411/28/2010

I think r5 is thinking of Scott DeFrietas, who played Andy Dixon on "As the World Turns." He's a realtor now. %0D %0D Eric Laneauville, most famous for playing Luther on "St. Elsewhere," is a very successful TV director now.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 19511/29/2010

They could become hand models.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 19611/29/2010

What about on cable like an HBO show? I know someone on True Blood. In fact they were in my will. How much do they make? Should I take them out? They are just one of the supporting players.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 19711/29/2010

A lot of them are still working as actors but just doing straight to dvd crap that a lot of times never even make it to DVD

I remember how Patrick Dempsey had that big comeback with Grey's Anatomy but if you look at his resume he had been working constantly but just in stuff nobody ever saw.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 19811/29/2010

really interesting thread.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 19911/29/2010

Actors don't just stop acting. If they're a has-been, they just do a soap or resort to a sitcom. If they want to stay in film, maybe they do a direct-to-DVD movie like Jessica Simpson. Or star in a reality show, maybe do some hosting.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 20011/29/2010

[quote]Has anyone seen Lee Majors selling cheapo hearing aids?

Lee Majors is now headlining the Comic Autograph Shows now that "The Six Million Dollar Man" is out on DVD. Charging $60.00 an autograph and $60.00 to have a picture with him, and he's getting it. That's pretty steep but he's new, that won't last after he does the whole circuit. Only person higher I have seen is Shatner who charges $75.00 but he will always get that much.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 20111/29/2010

Isn't William Shatner a jillionaire by now? Not only ST tv and movies, but other tv shows and those silly priceline commercials (plus he got stock in Priceline when he signed on to do the ads years back).

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 20211/29/2010

Shatner is VERY wealthy but has very expensive hobbies -- horses. He also loves to work and love to be busy. If he's got a free week and the Thailand Film Festival wants him as a judge, he's off to Thailand. He's avoided most of the autograph/Trek convention stuff. But sometimes... if he's free and the money's right, he'll be there.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 20311/29/2010

I am in the middle of reading this thread and I believe working actor is Michelle Forbes.

Two episodes of BSG iirc and I adore her.

I am not a big enough buff to remember if she was in an Oscar nom'd film though.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 20404/28/2011

Richard Grieco produces the soft core documentary Gigolos for Showtime and occasionally acts in shit like this:

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 20504/28/2011

Nice guess R204 and I love Michelle Forbes, but she was also in ST:TNG which would give her a LOT more scifi con cred than BSG. Also, I couldn't find any Oscar nominated films for her, although she was in "Swimming with Sharks" and "Kalifornia," both of which were nominated for a lot of other awards.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 20604/28/2011

A guess for Working Actor could be Elizabeth Dennehy. She was in the Oscar-nominated "Clear and Present Danger" and had a big role in "Star Trek: The Next Generation" in the 2-part fan favorite episode "The Best of Both Worlds".

Whether Working Actor is Dennehy or not, both she and Michelle Forbes should be set for a long time with convention appearances and television jobs, they're both terrific.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 20704/28/2011

Eric McCormack is doing a show on TNT that is premiering in the summer or fall (I think)

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 20804/28/2011

If an actress is lucky, she'll find a rich guy to marry when her career slows down and she'll never have to worry about working again.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 20904/28/2011

Nikki Blonsky (HAIRSPRAY) now is working in a shoe store in her hometown.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 21007/08/2011

And what about someone like Patty Duke who was a huge star but in recent years with the demise of TV movies rarely is seen today. I know that she does the autograph conventions and sells her signature, so how much do you think she pulls in?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 21107/09/2011

basic cable

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 21207/09/2011

Real Estate

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 21307/09/2011

celebrity boxing

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 21407/09/2011

r211, Patty Duke should be independently wealthy enough that she does not need to work just to support herself.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 21507/10/2011

r215 from what? All the money from that she earned from the Patty Duke Show was spent by her managers on the "good life" for them. And in those days you didn't make the kind of money that TV stars make today. Also before she was diagnosed with manic depression she would spend money like it was water. So, I do not think that she is independently wealthy to the point where she doesn't have to work.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 21607/10/2011

Yes they become "spokespersons" for mattresses, and cars, and reverse mortgages.%0D %0D But there are a lot of "one hit wonders" out here who no longer draw a crowd at an autograph signing, or some ridiculous fan gathering, and they resort to selling information about other actors and actresses to the tabloids, or they peddle drugs. True dat.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 21707/10/2011

Patty is a working actress. She has done a lot of work in TV movies and stage but that doesn't make you a millionaire. She has just started the convention circuit and she is very loved. Lines for hours and she gives everyone a great time as opposed to others that see it as an assembly line, next, next. Some producer needs to snap her up for a nice supporting role in a drama series. She wants the work too.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 21907/10/2011

Patty was on Joy Behar Show a few weeks ago and said she was hit by the recession.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 22007/10/2011

OP, rent Galaxy Quest.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 22207/10/2011

Motivational/guest speaker. Ann Jillian is for hire about overcoming cancer and various hardships. Ditto Mariette Hartley for sexual abuse, suicide, divorce, alcoholism.

A friend of mine puts together a lot of AIDS benefits which a lot of has beens get hired for: Joanne Worley, Lorenzo Lamas, Susan Anton, etc. DL fave Bonnie Franklin was nuts by the way.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 22307/10/2011

Do you guys remember Queensryche? They had Iiterally onehit -silent lucidity - in 1991?

Guess how much money their companies for merch, royalties and recording, and touring made in past 5 years. Guess.

14.5 million freaking dollars. Holy shit. How is that possible? Anyone here know?

It is in their drummer Scott rockenfield's court declaration.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 22408/26/2012

Queensryche had several popular albums prior to "Silent Lucidity" and had other hits. Even after their decline they were getting 5 figures per show. There are musicians with no hits who get 10 grand a show- which can come from playing fairly small clubs.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 22508/26/2012

Queensryche have 13 albums from 1982- Present and all made the Billboard charts. 16 charting albums if you count Live and compilation titles. From 1984-1994 they had 5 consecutive albums certified at Gold or higher. Of those 3 were platinum, and the album with their "one hit" sold 3 million in the U.S. The album released 4 years after their "one hit" sold 1 million copies.

They only had 1 pop hit single, but they had 17 singles rank on the rock airplay charts from 1988-2003.

They have toured constantly and play rock festivals.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 22608/26/2012

Wow, who would've thought there'd be so many Queensryche fans/experts on DL?

This place never ceases to amaze me.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 22708/26/2012

R227, anyone is an expert with google and wikipedia

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 22808/26/2012

Speaking of Queensryche, former QR leadsinger Geoff Tate (who's still hot, by the way) was on VH1's "That Metal Show" last night giving his side of the story about being abruptly ousted from the group. He summed it up to the other band members wanting his cut of the profits reaped by their company. He said he's still having a tough time with it and that it was the ultimate betrayal. Apparently, his wife and daughter worked for the band as well, and they were ousted right before he was.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 22908/26/2012

Don't just stand there, say something funny to me.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 23008/26/2012

I remember a story that my friend told me about the guy who plays Lucas (Bryan Dattilo) on Days of our Lives. When he was laid off from the show, he worked (works?) in construction. One day he was assigned to work on the lot where Days was filmed...it was really awkward, apparently. He's hot so he should consider being a kept man like someone else in that cast who just got fired.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 23108/26/2012

I wonder about someone like Mamie van Doren, who is 80 years old but looks (honestly) like a 30 year old party girl. I think she looks fantastic. How does she afford the hair extensions, skanky outfits and Louboutins? Does an 80 year old REALLY have a chance of having a sugar daddy??

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 23208/26/2012

[quote]He's hot so he should consider being a kept man like someone else in that cast who just got fired.

WHO??

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 23308/26/2012

R229 that appearance was a pile of bullshit. Read court declaration by other band guys.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 23408/26/2012

The band was forced to fire Geoff - his wife and he had been acting like dictators. G thought they'd never risk firing him.

If 4 members of a band gross almost 15 million since 07, what xxxodo you think they take home annually each?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 23508/26/2012

What's the exact story behind the Queensryche drama? I only found out about it after watching That Metal Show. Geoff said that after he found out about the firings, he spit in one band member's face during a performance.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 23608/26/2012

and I dont think Patty Duke should be in this thread, she is not a has been celebrity.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 23708/26/2012

How is Tina Louise these days? Is she set?

How about Gilligan? Is he still around?

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 23808/26/2012

I am R225 and 226. I did get stats from charts on Wikipedia, but I generally know about the career of Queensryche.

I first discovered this place because of the Janie Lane thread being posted on a music discussion forum. I enjoy reading here, though I am not the target demographic.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 23908/26/2012

After Frances Farmer was paroled from the state looney bin in the early 50's, she found work as a clerk in a motel and I think she also did the laundry. I know roles were tough to come by because she was permanently branded 'difficult' but didn't people recognize her? Didn't she think she was cheapening her brand by taking work like that? Weren't there opportunities for voiceovers back then? She could have done commercials too.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 24008/26/2012

[quote]I wonder about someone like Mamie van Doren, who is 80 years old but looks (honestly) like a 30 year old party girl. I think she looks fantastic.

No, R232, Mamie van Doren does not look anywhere near 30. She looks exactly like what she is -- a haggard, nasty, old skank. She's had massive amounts of plastic surgery, wears a shit-fuck-ton of make up, and dresses waaaaaaaaaaaaaay too young for her age. She's always showing her nasty, wrinkled cleavage off, too. Barf.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 24108/26/2012

I can't easily type out all the queensryche drama on my phone but basically Susan tate his wife took over as manager and it was a disaster. Google Rockenfield declaration. She wasnt working in interest of band but doing things like putting her daughter on payroll as fancclub manager instead of letting online company more cheaply do out; g was acting like a prima Donna and refusing to sing old metal songs and threatening to quit. She literally climbed on stage with him and posed every nite during a ridiculous queensryche cabaret themed tour last year. The others put up with I think out of fear kicking him out would ruin brand but he was already ruining brand. They each have equal share in companies. Made agreements in 80s

G was an idiot to bad mouth the judge on that metal show - his lawyer must be a moron to think she won't see that.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 24208/26/2012

Some of Susan Tate's amusing antics at link. I think they may be drunks but not sure.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 24308/27/2012

Uhhh this is such a painful thread. Reminds me so of Capucine. How'd you like to be a 50 year old European beauty living in Europe - having left Hollywood because she hated it - and find youself doing nothing but the occasional bad Italian film? I recall an afternoon with her flipping thru magazines. She said she was thinking of doing "something new" but she couldn't think of anything. I suggested interior design because her home was lovely and she subscribed to design magazines. She responded in a dejected manner.. "oh everybody is doing that." It was just awful. She couldn't marry for money for obvious reasons. She couldn't do voice overs in Europe, she had few resources to draw draw from, etc etc. Just awful.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 24408/27/2012

IIRC, r240, Frances Farmer worked in local TV in her home state, hosting a movie matinee show or something.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 24508/27/2012

geoff and Queensryche in the 80s. He was sort of extremely hot but also sort of hideous.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 24608/29/2012

New York area Virgil fans can almost always find Virgil at the Coney Island boardwalk on summer weekends.

I've been there a handful of times over the last couple of summers, and each time there he is: idling the lonely minutes away as summer reveler after summer reveler walks past his lonely table as if he were just another grain of sand on the beach and not an accessible, once-proud member of Vince McMahon's stable of talent.

Having been a young boy and avid wrestling fan at the time of Virgil's "heyday," I was excited when I saw him on the boardwalk the first time.

This wasn't the excitement one might get from seeing a ballplayer they once idolized as a child.

Nay, it was similar to the excitement I might get if I happened to see Jerry Supiran sleeping under a bridge in that box he now calls home or if I drove past a garage in southern California and happened to see Tom Sizemore sleeping on a cot inside.

Some dancing bears are just more entertaining when the music stops, I suppose.

But if revelers follow my example and do stop by to talk to Virgil (I spoke to him, but made it clear I didn't want an autograph, which didn't even bother him; in hindsight, it seems he really did just want someone to talk to), they can expect to hear some vitriol directed at McMahon and Madison Square Garden.

Years later, I still can't make sense of Virgil's ramblings about McMahon and MSG (suffice to say he feels both the CEO and the arena owe him a substantial amount of money, though his explanation as to why that is was unclear), but I do know that after the initial 60 seconds of speaking to Virgil both my friend and I were deeply regretting initiating the conversation and slowly backing away toward the wisely indifferent men, women and children enjoying their time on the boardwalk.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 24709/03/2012

bump

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 24809/04/2012

Bumpita.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 24903/17/2013

Some of us has beens are still extremely popular overseas

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 25002/05/2015

The smart ones know when they're on a hit show or they're a hot property, they should put away a lot of their money for a rainy day. Think Gabe Kaplan. He wisely invested his Welcome Back, Kotter earnings and lives comfortably off his investments.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 25102/05/2015

Tina Louise was on a couple of early Dallas episodes until her character got thrown off a building.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 25202/05/2015

Some save their money, plus there is always royalties.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 25302/05/2015

[quote]Was wondering about the multitude of soap 'stars' that have not been seen in ages. For example, from Another World, I heard that Laura Malone (Blaine) is now a lawyer and Tom Eplin sells real estate but could you imagine Nancy Frangione (Cecile) as a nutritionist or William Gray Espy (Mitch) as a farm equipment salesman ? How do they make the transition ?

Bill Espy comes from old Southern money and lives quietly in his hometown of Dothan, Alabama. I think he invested wisely as well.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 25402/05/2015

Tv critic Tim Goodman tweeted about meeting the guy who played Wojo on Barney Miller. Wojo was working as a stenographer. He said he was filling in for a friend. He did get acting work after that. There's no shame in stenography, but you'd feel like everyone was thinking Loser when they recognized you.

by Didn''t you used to be . . .reply 25502/05/2015
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