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Macaroni and cheese

Does anyone have a good, simple recipe for this? I tried on off of the food network and it was horrible. It called for cheddar cheese but was very oily and dry. I threw the whole batch out. TIA.

by Anonymousreply 14801/20/2015

When I get a severe hankering for good old fashioned Mac & Cheese, I just use the recipe on the Meuller's macaroni box.

Seriously.

I throw on some buttered bread crumbs, and there you go.

by Anonymousreply 106/24/2010

Kraft

by Anonymousreply 206/24/2010

Could we try to wait at least a month between these threads?

by Anonymousreply 306/24/2010

Boil water, add a little salt, cook the pasta in it. After cooked and drained, add butter, sour cream, grated cheese of choice (can be a mix of cheddar & other cheeses). After the pasta is wet and the cheese melted, add grated parmigiano. Serve.

by Anonymousreply 406/24/2010

OP, there are several good recipes at R3's link. Once you've made it a few times, you won't need to measure -- but the recipes are helpful with that if you're a novice.

by Anonymousreply 506/24/2010

This is what I use.

Soho Grand's Signature Mac & Cheese Recipe Share Wednesday, March 4, 2009 at 5:45pm · 1 Lb Black Diamond Cheddar, grated · 3 oz Monterey Jack Cheese, grated · 3oz Provolone Cheese, grated · 2 lbs Cavatappi Pasta (or any pasta shape, ie macaroni) · 1/4 bottle of Beer · 3 oz chopped Onion · Small bay leaf · 1 sprig of thyme · 1 small Cloves · ½ Tsp Nutmeg · ½ Lb Butter · 1/3 Gal of Milk · 1/3 Cup Flour

Bring a large pot of water to a boil for the pasta and preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Sweat onions, bay leaf and cloves in whole butter. Add the flour an let it cook for 5 minutes. Add the milk and simmer for 10 minutes. Reduce beer in a separate pot by ¾, then add to the bechamel and allow to simmer until thick. Cool the bechamel slightly and combine all cheeses with the mixture. Cook pasta for approximately 3 minutes in a boiling salted water (pasta should be still crunchy), then drain. Place pasta into a big mixing bowl and add the bechamel and mix gently to cool down the pasta. Place mac and cheese in a pyrex dish and top with parmesan cheese. Bake 10-12 minutes until golden brown on top in a 400 degree oven.

by Anonymousreply 606/24/2010

macaroni. cheese.

by Anonymousreply 706/24/2010

I think the best macaroni and cheese includes a variety of cheeses, including cottage cheese.

by Anonymousreply 806/24/2010

The New York Times has an amazing one where you don't cook the pasta before hand. It cooks in the oven while the whole thing is baking. It always comes out incredible, almost more like a Pasta Quattro Formaggi or something you'd get at a nice Italian restaurant. Yum.

by Anonymousreply 906/24/2010

Just call and say macaroni.

by Anonymousreply 1006/24/2010

There's a restaurant in LA called Cafe Wha and they serve a most delectable dish of m&c. Rumor is that one of the ingredents they use is truffle oil.

by Anonymousreply 1106/24/2010

I haven't tried it but this sounds like a good recipe. But it does sound like a bit of work.

by Anonymousreply 1206/24/2010

oily=cheap cheese.

by Anonymousreply 1306/24/2010

You have to add evaporated milk (not the sweet milk) It makes all the difference

by Anonymousreply 1406/24/2010

[italic]Use these two cheeses:[/italic]

bleu cheese

Gorgonzola cheese

by Anonymousreply 1506/24/2010

We need this thread back up where people can find it. I am still trying to learn how to make GOOD macaroni and cheese. Since grilled cheese is up today so this should be too.

by Anonymousreply 1604/29/2013

Buy Stouffer's and throw on 2 oz of truffles per serving. You'll thank me.

by Anonymousreply 1704/29/2013

Actually that Mueller's recipe sounds good...something I'd like. Few ingredients, only the essentials. No fooling around. I bet if you used high quality cheese and good butter, it would be great.

by Anonymousreply 1804/29/2013

Boil Macaroni. Melt velveta brick and pour on top. Doesn't get any simpler than that.

by Anonymousreply 1904/29/2013

Blue cheese, gorgonzola, gruyere are all for people who want someone to notice the cheese taste is "different." Monterey Jack and provolone: nothing. Parmesan: drowned out by anything else. But if you want to "punch up" the cheddar and make it richer without making it taste like fondue, your best addition would be half cheddar, half Romano.

by Anonymousreply 2004/29/2013

Miss Martinez’s Mexican Mac & Cheese

2 tbsp. olive oil

½ cup diced shallots

3-4 pickled jalapenos or Serrano chilies, minced

½ tsp. dried Mexican oregano

1/3 – 1/2 tsp. raw sugar

8 tbsp. (1 stick) butter

4 cups whole milk

2 cups ditalini or elbow macaroni

1 1/3 cups grated cheddar cheese

1 cup grated mild jack cheese

1/3 cup goat cheese

1. In large ovenproof skillet, heat olive oil. Add shallots and chilies and stir. After 2 minutes, add oregano. Sprinkle sugar over shallots, stir for 3 minutes. Once shallots begin to caramelize, turn heat to low and add butter.

2. After 2 minutes, add milk and stir. Add macaroni. Turn heat to medium. After another minute, sprinkle in 1 cup of cheddar cheese, jack cheese and goat cheese. Stir for 30 min.

3. Preheat oven to 350 F.

4. Remove skillet from heat and sprinkle rest of cheddar on top. Put skillet in over for 10 minutes, then broil 3-4 minutes, until cheddar is lightly browned. Serves 4 – 6.

by Anonymousreply 2104/29/2013

This one from Pioneer Woman. Best I've ever made.

by Anonymousreply 2204/29/2013

Grown Up Mac and Cheese

Ingredients

4 ounces thick-sliced bacon

Vegetable oil

Kosher salt

2 cups elbow macaroni or cavatappi

1 1/2 cups milk

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 4 ounces Gruyere cheese, grated

3 ounces extra-sharp Cheddar, grated

2 ounces blue cheese, such as Roquefort, crumbled

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Pinch nutmeg

2 slices white sandwich bread, crusts removed

2 tablespoons freshly chopped basil leaves

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Place a baking rack on a sheet pan and arrange the bacon in 1 layer on the baking rack. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until the bacon is crisp. Remove the pan carefully from the oven - there will be hot grease in the pan! Transfer the bacon to a plate lined with paper towels and crumble when it is cool enough to handle.

Drizzle oil into a large pot of boiling salted water. Add the macaroni and cook according to the directions on the package, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain well.

Meanwhile, heat the milk in a small saucepan, but don't boil it. Melt the butter in a medium pot and add the flour. Cook over low heat for 2 minutes, stirring with a whisk. While whisking, add the hot milk and cook for a minute or 2 more, until thickened and smooth. Off the heat, add the Gruyere, Cheddar, blue cheese, 1 teaspoon salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Add the cooked macaroni and crumbled bacon and stir well. Pour into 2 individual size gratin dishes.

Place the bread slices in a food processor fitted with a steel blade and pulse until you have coarse crumbs. Add the basil and pulse to combine. Sprinkle the bread crumb mixture over the top of the pasta. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, or until the sauce is bubbly and the macaroni is browned on the top.

by Anonymousreply 2304/29/2013

Make a basic white sauce, and melt shredded cheese into it. Pour over cooked macaroni.

Either that or just get Velveeta Shells & Cheese and be done with it.

by Anonymousreply 2404/29/2013

"Boil water, add a little salt, cook the pasta in it. After cooked and drained, add butter, sour cream, grated cheese of choice (can be a mix of cheddar & other cheeses). After the pasta is wet and the cheese melted, add grated parmigiano. Serve."

Huh? After you mix all the ingredients together, aren't you supposed to BAKE the mac and cheese?

SOUR CREAM? WTF?

by Anonymousreply 2504/29/2013

Why the fuck would you bake something that's already cooked?

by Anonymousreply 2604/29/2013

Pick up phone, call Delicatessen in Soho, order Mac & Cheese, pay delivery boy.

by Anonymousreply 2704/29/2013

LOL @ R26!

by Anonymousreply 2804/29/2013

Don't get Kraft until they change the recipe. There's two food dyes to give it the orange color, and they're not considered safe. They were phased out in Europe, but nothing changed here, until two women decided to publicize it and started a petition. Kraft relented and agreed to reformulate their American M&C like they have for European markets. But the change hasn't taken place yet. The women aren't satisfied because it's just the tip of the iceberg, but at least it's a start.

by Anonymousreply 2904/29/2013

thisiswhyyourefat.com

by Anonymousreply 3004/29/2013

Stop it. Just STOP IT. I am still trying to master GRILLED cheese and now you want to throw MACARONI in. I am NEVER going to get this.

by Anonymousreply 3104/29/2013

Is it Macaroni and Cheese or Cheese and Macaroni?

by Anonymousreply 3204/29/2013

"Why the fuck would you bake something that's already cooked?"

I feel bad for today's young people, they are so lazy and clueless.

Stirring up the ingredients in a pot, doesn't mean they are cooked!

Traditionally, mac & cheese is baked in a Pyrex pan after the ingredients are mixed in a bowl, the only cooked ingredient in mac & cheese would be the elbows, or the shell macaroni, which is added to the mixture.

That's how my mom cooked home made mac & cheese, she baked it in a large Pyrex pan. She never used Velveeta either!

Most of you probably grew up in households with none or very few home cooked meals. My mom had a career, yet still cooked and baked because she enjoyed cooking. My father also cooked and was an amazing baker. My paternal grandparents owned a bakery and passed on their knowledge.

by Anonymousreply 3304/29/2013

Great recipe, R4. I'm not one of those "make a roux" people who starts with flour for a cheese sauce. Coming up as a kid, I had my mac and cheese made for me similarly to the way you described it--no flour involved.

by Anonymousreply 3404/29/2013

OP, there's a great recipe on epicurious.com that has a panko crumb crust, should be easy to find.

by Anonymousreply 3504/29/2013

I have to have vegetables in mine such as broccoli or leek, otherwise I feel closer to death.

by Anonymousreply 3604/29/2013

These are great but I think we all still know nothing is better than Kraft.

by Anonymousreply 3704/29/2013

If you like cancer, r37.

by Anonymousreply 3804/29/2013

That's an actual link at r30. Some of the stuff there looks pretty good (not healthy, just good).

by Anonymousreply 3904/29/2013

R38

We still know nothing beats Kraft. Cancer or not.

by Anonymousreply 4004/29/2013

R33, my parents made everything from scratch, including making bread with every meal.

And mac-and-cheese is made on the stove-top. In a sauce-pan. And served. There's no unnecessary "baking" step required. Just great, creamy, delicious mac-and-cheese (they created many variations using dozens of varieties of cheeses).

Again: it's all cooked. There's no need to bake it. And that's not "the way it's done". Nobody in my extended family has ever done that. Why would they? It's completely redundant and unnecessary.

by Anonymousreply 4104/29/2013

R41, you should get out more. There is such a thing called baked macaroni and cheese. How sad that you have such a limited palate.

by Anonymousreply 4204/29/2013

R41

People bake Macaroni and Cheese because it gives you an entirely different texture. It's all about preference.

Some of you are such idiots.

by Anonymousreply 4304/29/2013

R42, I know very well some people bake mac-and-cheese.

I'm pushing back against the assertion that baking is the "only" way to make them, or that you need to bake it because it's "not cooked". That's all just bullshit.

Clear now?

by Anonymousreply 4404/29/2013

R41

And anyone else who thinks baking Mac & Cheese is done on the stove top or redundant in the oven.. the traditional Mac & Cheese recipe is done IN THE OVEN. It's a casserole dish.

by Anonymousreply 4504/29/2013

r39, that reminds me of the Gilda Radner joke about guys preferring skinny girls with cancer, to fat girls. It's a joke until it happens to you, as it did to Gilda.

by Anonymousreply 4604/29/2013

Well, sorry your hillbilly family never understood the French principle of multiple cooking methods, R41.

But similar to microwaving your Stove Top stuffing in a bowl and bringing it to the table, your version of Macaroni and Cheese might lack a complexity of flavor and texture that you would get if you made a roux into a bechamel, added cheese and spices, and slightly underdone pasta that would absorb sauce and flavor in a second cooking method.

Then, you may want to introduce the mixture to dry oven heat to concentrate the cheese flavour and provide a contrast soft and crunchy textures, one that non-Americans prefer over having all their cud pre-chewed, as your Appalachian kinfolk might prefer.

Open a Julia Child book on the rationale for cooking technique before you put your Kool-Aid recipe on the wine list.

by Anonymousreply 4704/29/2013

Just look at yourselves.

by Anonymousreply 4804/29/2013

BTW. I can't stand any Mac & Cheese that uses egg. I find it disgusting. Anyone else?

by Anonymousreply 4904/29/2013

most of all, you should make it with love

by Anonymousreply 5004/29/2013

R50 and an uncircumsized penis.

by Anonymousreply 5104/29/2013

Datalounge queens have more food issues than a room full of teenage underwear models.

by Anonymousreply 5204/29/2013

R47, your attempts to be superior just make me laugh.

Both my parents are gourmet cooks, and solidly upper middle class. I find you hilarious in your pompous arrogance.

You clearly didn't get what I was saying, so you should probably just stop.

Yes, some people like "crunchy" mac&cheese. I am not one of them. I like it creamy. And I make it with a roux, and melt cheese into it. Again, all from scratch. I assure you, I've had better mac & cheese than you in my life (and I've had a nice long life).

But go ahead. I'm SURE preferring baked mac & cheese makes you SUCH a superior person (giggle).

by Anonymousreply 5304/29/2013

[quote] I assure you, I've had better mac & cheese than you in my life (and I've had a nice long life).

Go outside and say that out loud to the first person you see. It should be instructive.

by Anonymousreply 5404/29/2013

Once you've made your mac and cheese drizzle some truffle olive oil over it.

by Anonymousreply 5504/29/2013

No, R49, I love it. Egg acts as a binder for when you bake it.

by Anonymousreply 5604/29/2013

[quote]Go outside and say that out loud to the first person you see. It should be instructive.

I was speaking to someone who seemed to think this was vitally important. I have no illusions that it's utterly trivial.

by Anonymousreply 5704/29/2013

Wait wait wait...

R53 you're trying to call out R47 for having a superiority complex?

Enjoy your mac & cheese that's better than anyone else has ever had the good fortune of eating.

by Anonymousreply 5804/29/2013

R58, you don't comprehend what you read very well do you. (sigh)

But yes, I am mocking him for his completely off-target attempts to mock me.

by Anonymousreply 5904/29/2013

I make a version of Martha's "Mac & Cheese 101," with cheddar, gruyere, and Parmigiano-Reggiano. It's roux-based and it goes in the oven for 30 minutes. It has buttered bread chunks on top (that's for the benefit of anorexics R30 and R48).

As for the baked v. not baked controversy (which I did not know existed until today), yeah, I bake it. If you don't bake it, Rwhoeverdoesn'tbakeit, doesn't the leftover portion become congealed beyond further edibility? Do you mix anything with the cheese doing it that way?

I love just plain cavatappi with P-R and a little butter, so I don't automatically dismiss unbaked M&C, but that's a lot of cheese you're working with. I'd hate to see it all separate when you reheat in the next day.

by Anonymousreply 6004/29/2013

Paula Deen. Why the fuck did anyone not mention this?

by Anonymousreply 6104/29/2013

Keep typing, R53/7/9. It's like watching Romney at the 'proceed Governor' moment of the Presidential debates.

by Anonymousreply 6204/29/2013

[quote]doesn't the leftover portion become congealed beyond further edibility?

What left-overs? Because I'm not trying to fill a casserole dish, I make just enough for the number of people eating. I've never had left-over mac & cheese.

It's really easy to make just one serving too.

And I don't have to wait over half an hour to eat either.

by Anonymousreply 6304/29/2013

Only in your imagination, R62 :-)

by Anonymousreply 6404/29/2013

R63 Just a regular roux, or thicker? It actually sounds very good. And yes, easier, though I never make M&C as a last-minute dish. Yours could be kind of last minute, though.

by Anonymousreply 6504/29/2013

R59

My reading comprehension is just fine, thanks.

But it's typical of people like you who once get called out for something to then say, "I was just being sarcastic and you didn't get it."

Um, yeah, that wasn't sarcasm, you were trying to act superior and several of your previous posts have shown the same.

But (sigh), it's obvious you have no self-awareness.

by Anonymousreply 6604/29/2013

[quote]We still know nothing beats Kraft. Cancer or not.

Only to those of you unfortunate enough to have grown up eating Kraft. I think Kraft tastes like chemicals instead of food.

by Anonymousreply 6704/29/2013

I have never eaten Kraft.

by Anonymousreply 6804/29/2013

R66, and you have no psychic ability, and no awareness of how bad your reading comprehension is... but obviously can't stand being called out. Whatever. I know what I meant, and who I was talking to, and why... even if you don't.

by Anonymousreply 6904/29/2013

R69

Ha.. we all know why.

But you just keep telling yourself that.

by Anonymousreply 7004/29/2013

R69

If thats the case you also lack communication skills because R66 isnt the only one who reads you that way.

by Anonymousreply 7104/29/2013

R71, then explain it to me.

Someone gets all superior. So I specifically say to them, with them as the audience, that I've probably eaten better mac & cheese than them ... mocking their "superiority". Nowhere did I claim that was important... the person I was talking to claimed it was.

So why aren't you all over HIS case? Hrm?

Yeah, I don't get why you're reacting the way you are to me... and reacting to things I didn't say and don't feel and am not. It's just weird. You're projecting a lot maybe?

by Anonymousreply 7204/29/2013

What R60 said. Martha Stewart's recipe. It's the best. I have dreams about it.

by Anonymousreply 7304/29/2013

R72

Uh Im not reacting any way to you. I just commented that the person at R66 has a point. You didnt come off as being sarcastic. The tone of your reply and subsequent ones do sound like youre trying to come off as superior.

I didnt say thats actually how you meant it- Im saying thats how youre coming off. At least to more than one person.

by Anonymousreply 7404/29/2013

And yet you're still going after me, who is MOCKING someone who was going all 'superior', and not that guy? Why is that? Hrm?

Perhaps you should re-read R47, who is the one I was replying to?

(just shaking head)

by Anonymousreply 7504/29/2013

R75

How am I "still going after" you. I made two comments and certainly the last one I made can in no way be construed as going after you.

by Anonymousreply 7604/29/2013

R76 Don't bother. This guy just doesn't get it.

by Anonymousreply 7704/29/2013

R77, don't worry. You can't explain it either, so ...

by Anonymousreply 7804/29/2013

R77

Noted.

by Anonymousreply 7904/29/2013

R58 didn't get it and got inexplicably offended, and it's somehow [italic]my[/italic] problem?

Right.

by Anonymousreply 8004/29/2013

Apparently no one got it and no one is getting it R80. You're just too smart for everyone.

Now who the fuck cares? Why are you still harping on it?

Can we get back to delicious Macaroni and Cheese or Cheese and Macaroni?

And thank God none of you bitches mentioned putting shit in it like Tuna or Beef.

by Anonymousreply 8104/29/2013

R73 is correct. Martha Stewart's macaroni and cheese recipe is excellent. I admit I'm thinking seriously about that two tablespoons of dry mustard called for in the Pioneer Woman's recipe.

by Anonymousreply 8204/30/2013

My mom always made it with a teaspoon of dry mustard in the sauce. And always finished with freshly ground black pepper when served.

by Anonymousreply 8304/30/2013

Most people with actual tastebuds get some tomato or other acidic flavor into mac 'n cheese. Otherwise it sits like a brick on your stomach.

by Anonymousreply 8404/30/2013

I always combine it was vegetables r84, boiled in with the noodles for the last 5 minutes. I've had it with tomato slices too and that's also yummy.

by Anonymousreply 8504/30/2013

I top it with slow-roasted, shredded pork, and crispy onions.

by Anonymousreply 8604/30/2013

I've always served it with sliced tomatoes when they're in season.

I'm definitely going to try it with dry mustard next time. I'm not crazy about mustard, but Pioneer Woman said the dry mustard rounds out the flavor without adding a detectable flavor of its own. I know she has said her husband and sons are picky about anything unusual, so she probably knows.

by Anonymousreply 8704/30/2013

Everyone uses mustard and nutmeg, but this is one dish that can use the brightening taste of cardamon!

by Anonymousreply 8804/30/2013

I hate when people add nutmeg. I don't know why. I love nutmeg in other contexts (cookies, cakes, that sort of thing). But not in mac & cheese or in fettuccini alfredo (it seems to be a weird regional thing).

Just a pinch or trace of cardamom can be good.

And yes, R87, the dry mustard doesn't add a mustard taste at all, it just deepens the flavors.

by Anonymousreply 8904/30/2013

Thanks, R89. That gives me something new to try.

A pinch of cardamom might be nice too.

by Anonymousreply 9004/30/2013

I love bitchfights in the food thread. YOU WERE TOO ACTING SUPERIOR!

by Anonymousreply 9104/30/2013

Mac and cheese restaurants are the new cupcake shops.

by Anonymousreply 9204/30/2013

[quote] I've had it with tomato slices too and that's also yummy.

Use of "yummy" = 350 lb frau

by Anonymousreply 9304/30/2013

Your local mac n cheese restaurant

by Anonymousreply 9404/30/2013

Cook the macaroni. Combine melted margarine (2 sticks), cheez-whiz, velveeta and then just microwave that mess. Pour over cooked pasta and serve. If it's a special occasion I add a few hot dog bites.

by Anonymousreply 9504/30/2013

*Boil 2 cups of macaroni noodles in salted water. Drain, rinse with cold water. Add a little butter to the noodles. *Mix 16 oz of shredded/grated sharp cheddar cheese with a little Velveeta. You can try to grate the Velveeta or cut it up or cube it. Use maybe 1/2 cup to 1 cup of Velveeta. I wouldn't use that shredded stuff in the bag that they have out now, just buy the brick and cut it yourself. *Whisk 2 eggs in a bowl with 2 cups of Evaporated milk. Add a dash of hot sauce. Add a little salt and pepper to taste. *Layer some noodles, some cheese, some noodles, some cheese in a casserole dish. 13X9. *Gently pour the milk and egg mix over the noodles and cheese. Sprinkle with paprika. *Cover and bake at 350 for 30-40 minutes until the custard sets. Let stand before serving.

by Anonymousreply 9604/30/2013

The recipe linked at R22 is my standby. I don't even bother to put extra cheese on top and bake it in the oven; I just make the cheese sauce and mix the cooked pasta in. Everyone I've served it to says it's the best they've ever had. The ground mustard really makes it, I think.

Do NOT forget the egg while making the sauce. I did this recently and I was very sorry.

by Anonymousreply 9704/30/2013

If you aren't making your own pasta don't do this dish! Also sour cream and paprika instantly transforms it into Macaroni Romanoff.

by Anonymousreply 9805/01/2013

R95 = basura blanca

R98: Do you have one of those electric machines that makes tubular pasta, or do you make something more like lasagne?

by Anonymousreply 9905/01/2013

Anyone who hasn't had a baked M&C doesn't know the joy of eating the crusty part on top. Even without breadcrumbs on top.

by Anonymousreply 10005/01/2013

Panko crumbs crunch top. Excellent.

Anybody ever use corn or pinneapple?

by Anonymousreply 10109/23/2013

R101 both sound like a recipe for vomit.

by Anonymousreply 10209/24/2013

[quote]oily=cheap cheese

Not necessarily. The OP probably used a cheddar cheese that was aged or too sharp. With some notable exceptions, aged cheeses aren't usually the best for cooking. They tend to separate into oil and milk protein particles. Really nasty. Young cheddars are best for mac and cheese. Better yet, you can mix the cheddar in with some not too old Gruyere for a really nice flavor.

by Anonymousreply 10309/24/2013

Boiled elbow macaroni put into a greased casserole dish. Stir in some ham(finely diced);shredded aged cheddar; a sprinkling of Parmesan. Pour on enough whole milk to completely submerge everything, bake at 350 until the top is crusty. Shower it with lots of FGBP, and serve. Rarely any leftovers.

by Anonymousreply 10409/24/2013

Love Ina Garten's mac and cheese recipe.

by Anonymousreply 10509/24/2013

[quote]Soho Grand's Signature Mac & Cheese Recipe Share Wednesday, March 4, 2009 at 5:45pm · 1 Lb Black Diamond Cheddar, grated · 3 oz Monterey Jack Cheese, grated · 3oz Provolone Cheese, grated · 2 lbs Cavatappi Pasta (or any pasta shape, ie macaroni) · 1/4 bottle of Beer · 3 oz chopped Onion · Small bay leaf · 1 sprig of thyme · 1 small Cloves · ½ Tsp Nutmeg · ½ Lb Butter · 1/3 Gal of Milk · 1/3 Cup Flour

Can you fucking people at least TRY to make things legible and properly formatted?

by Anonymousreply 10609/24/2013

For a twist, get some of that herbed cheese (Boursin?), put it in a bowl with some of the pasta water to make a sauce. Toss w/ cooked pasta. Not the usual mac'n'cheese, but not half bad and it only takes about 10 minutes.

by Anonymousreply 10709/24/2013

Try adding a variety of cheeses. Try not to choose anything that is stringy when hot, for ex. mozzarella. Toss in plenty of chopped, fresh chives. Don't be afraid to add spices or seasonings, for ex. southwestern spices coupled with Jack cheese or maybe a blend of cheeses. I use sharp Cheddar plus whatever I care to experiment with. I also make more cheese sauce than the a recipe will call for, SOMETIMES. Chopped tomatoes in Mac n cheese is good. Peel and seed in hot water first, however.

by Anonymousreply 10809/24/2013

Just look for the 7 cheese recipe, it's great.

by Anonymousreply 10909/24/2013

The best is a traditional Mornay sauce with a salty, acidic addition or two.

2 oz flour, 2 oz butter, cook on medium low for a full two minutes. Then add 16 oz. heavy cream, salt, pepper. Cook on medium until smooth and heavy, take off heat, and add half a cup of pecorino romano, and a teaspoon of parlsey flakes, and a half teaspoon of paprika. Do not substitute cow's milk romano. If you can't find pecorino romano, use half a cup of gruyere and half a cup of parmesan instead. That is your sauce to go with your macaroni. But to spice it up, as some chopped bacon and sundried tomatoes.

by Anonymousreply 11009/24/2013

.

by Anonymousreply 11109/24/2013

Here's Smitten Kitchen's adaptation of a Martha recipe.

by Anonymousreply 11211/08/2014

I'll flame out here. I made one a few years back that was absolutely beyond good. Unfortunately, it took about 3 hours to make, involved 3 different kinds of cheese, and messed up every pot and pan in the house, with no dishwashing machine at the time. I got one serving of it. The bf liked it a bit too much, played little piggy and ate the rest.

My dad made a very easy version of it. 8 kids in the family, so he used 2 boxes of the Kraft mac and cheese. He'd cook it per the box instructions (be sure to use milk). Then, he'd throw in a pound of chopped up cheddar cheese (I prefer the extra sharp) and about 2 tablespoons of all purpose flour. Stir it all together in the pot until the cheese is melted, then dump it in a pan. Put in the oven at maybe 350 for 30 minutes or so until the top is light brown.

by Anonymousreply 11311/08/2014

Check out America's Test Kitchen for recipes.

by Anonymousreply 11411/08/2014

300 lb thread alert

by Anonymousreply 11511/08/2014

I've run into this problem a lot as well. By the time you make the bechamel sauce then throw the cheese in, the finished cheese sauce just tastes really bland and flavorless like wallpaper paste. Worse yet, popular cheeses like sharp cheddar naturally have a tendency to separate on you, resulting in a grainy oily sauce.

The one that worked well for me was "Issac Mizrahi's Favorite Mac & Cheese". I don't think I can post links here, but it's easy to find on Google.

The Muenster is a must, since it melts better than cheddar and offsets how easily the cheddar breaks. It also calls for Mild Cheddar instead of Sharp, since sharp separates more easily.

You can probably swap out the hot sauce with cayenne, so you don't have to worry about the vinegar in it curdling anything.

I think the key thing in this recipe is it does not call for mixing the cheese in with the bechamel sauce, you just toss the pasta with the sauce then the cheese with the pasta, and it will all melt together in the oven. This kind of minimizes the risk of the cheese getting overmixed and becoming grainy and oily.

by Anonymousreply 11611/08/2014

...Oh and don't use pre shredded cheese, buy it by the block and grate it yourself. Pre shredded stuff is coated with powders to keep it from sticking.

by Anonymousreply 11711/08/2014

I've made Martha Stewart's Mac & Cheese mentioned above and it is very good.

Question: Is there anything that can be done so when reheating it the next day it doesn't all separate?

by Anonymousreply 11811/08/2014

Correction:

Here's Smitten Kitchen's adaptation of a Martha recipe.

Worse yet, popular cheeses like sharp cheddar naturally have a tendency to separate on you, resulting in a grainy oily sauce. You can always add Velveeta, Cheeze Whiz or some other processed cheese food product. The addition of processed cheese create the desired texture.

The use of emulsifiers in processed cheese results in a product that melts without separating when cooked; with prolonged heating, some natural cheeses (especially cheddar and mozzarella) will separate into a lumpy, molten protein gel & liquid fat combination. The emulsifiers (typically sodium phosphate, potassium phosphate, tartrate, or citrate) reduce the tendency for tiny fat globules in the cheese to coalesce and pool on the surface of the molten cheese.

[see offsite link on smittenkitchen.com]

by Anonymousreply 11911/08/2014

[quote] Eat a sweet potato instead. Much better for you then boiled dough with greasy cheese on it.

Why choose between the two. You can have both.

by Anonymousreply 12011/08/2014

R119, maybe the OP doesn't have to worry about that.

by Anonymousreply 12111/08/2014

I made Martha Stewart's recipe once. Oh my God. It turned out great, but I was exhausted after and I think every pan, pot and utensil in my kitchen was dirty afterwards. Never again.

by Anonymousreply 12211/08/2014

No such thing. Mac and cheese is fucking NASTY, not to mention unhealthy. No wonder 2/3 of our country is so fucking fat.

by Anonymousreply 12311/08/2014

From the kitchen of Jennifer Lopez's grandmother.

Julia Rodriguez Mexican Mac & Cheese

2 tbsp. olive oil

½ cup diced shallots (can use red onion)

3-4 pickled jalapenos or Serrano chilies, minced

½ tsp. dried Mexican oregano

1/3 – 1/2 tsp. raw sugar

8 tbsp. (1 stick) butter

4 cups whole milk

2 cups ditalini or elbow macaroni

1 1/3 cups grated cheddar cheese

1 cup grated mild jack cheese

1/3 cup goat cheese

1. In large ovenproof skillet, heat olive oil. Add shallots and chilies and stir. After 2 minutes, add oregano. Sprinkle sugar over shallots, stir for 3 minutes. Once shallots begin to caramelize, turn heat to low and add butter.

2. After 2 minutes, add milk and stir. Add macaroni. Turn heat to medium. After another minute, sprinkle in 1 cup of cheddar cheese, jack cheese and goat cheese. Stir for 30 min.

3. Preheat oven to 350 F.

4. Remove skillet from heat and sprinkle rest of cheddar on top. Put skillet in over for 10 minutes, then broil 3-4 minutes, until cheddar is lightly browned. Serves 4 – 6.

by Anonymousreply 12411/08/2014

There is a restaurant in NYC that makes a gourmet Mac and cheese that is out of this world. They use Asiago, Brie, Stilton and Dutch oude kaas. They have to be added at different times because of the way they break down. They also add a bit of lemon thyme and a hint of cognac . It is not baked. Velvety smooth with a rich, deep cheese flavor to die for. The elbow mac is very small and cooked to perfection. Never gooey or sticky. Just heaven.

by Anonymousreply 12511/08/2014

Bowl macaroni.

Melt cheese of your choice.

Fold in the cheese.

Season as desired.

Eat.

by Anonymousreply 12611/08/2014

Cheese and macaroni. Macaroni and cheese.

by Anonymousreply 12711/08/2014

I have a crockpot recipe for it, really easy but it contains some velveeta so I would probably get flamed for it here.

by Anonymousreply 12811/08/2014

Why do we have two macaroni and cheese threads? If you know how to use a computer, smart phone, or tablet, you must know how to search for recipes. Get a grip, OP.

by Anonymousreply 12911/08/2014

Just buy the Bob Evans kind in the refrigerator section or Stouffers in the freezer section.

by Anonymousreply 13011/08/2014

My italian mama made it her way.

She used small ziti or penne.

She made a typical bechamel sauce. She added cheddar, some mozzarella, some ricotta. Stirred it with the penne, topped it with grated italian cheese, baked it for about 30 minutes.

Served with a green salad.

by Anonymousreply 13111/08/2014

Pioneer Woman's macaroni and cheese recipe I've ever made.

by Anonymousreply 13211/08/2014

Was it any good R132?

by Anonymousreply 13311/08/2014

No. No, it wasn't. No macaroni and cheese ever is. Ever!

by Anonymousreply 13411/08/2014

OK. You go take your meds now.

by Anonymousreply 13511/08/2014

[quote]Pioneer Woman's macaroni and cheese recipe I've ever made.

[quote]Was it any good?

The Pioneer Woman = Oklahoma's Sandra Lee

by Anonymousreply 13611/08/2014

Cottage cheese helps too.

by Anonymousreply 13711/08/2014

Mac & cheese? You people are white trash.

by Anonymousreply 13811/08/2014

R138 some comfort foods are very white trashy but it still doesn't take away their qualities.

by Anonymousreply 13911/08/2014

Go eat some beanie weenies and chew on a pickled pigs foot.

by Anonymousreply 14011/08/2014

Now that's a little too white trash R140.

by Anonymousreply 14111/08/2014

My favorite is Barefoot Contessa's.

by Anonymousreply 14211/08/2014

Some of these recipes seem really good, but an inexpensive and time-cutting shortcut would be to make it out of the box. Whole Foods has mac and cheese for $1.19, you only add a little milk to the cheese sauce, and you get two sizable portions. (I think you're supposed to add some butter as well, but you can skip that.) Fish sticks and mac and cheese is a great dinner with a green salad.

by Anonymousreply 14311/09/2014

I make both stove top (if in an hurry, and yes it is very creamy and more "saucy") and I make baked as well, as the crusty top makes it more special. If mac & cheese is the main dish, rather than a side dish, I bake it as the presentation is much better. But for everyone who expresses amazement that some people make it on the stovetop, think about all the diffential opinions of "Kraft is the best" on this thread... as far as I know Kraft is always made on the stovetop and served immediately.

by Anonymousreply 14411/09/2014

for fuck's sake you people have horrible taste. mac & cheese is disgusting and so unhealthy.

Just eat a good pasta dish, not this trashy shit.

by Anonymousreply 14511/09/2014

For a commercial product, Stouffer's is pretty good. My grandmother made a great one, that didn't require a white sauce( she figured the pasta was starchy enough to make a béchamel as it baked, and she was right) Just the boiled elbows(1/2 lb) plus 2 cups or so of grated cheeses(Cheddar, Brick, Swiss, etc.) Finely diced ham is optional. Put into an overproof baking dish and add enough milk to submerge everything by an inch.A dusting of Parmesan on top is a good addition. Bake about 20-30 minutes @ 375F. Check halfway through, in case you want to add more milk(for the creamy-disposed) Crusty/crispy on top and creamy below, mmmmmmmmmm................

by Anonymousreply 14611/09/2014

Sweetie Pie's Baked Macaroni and Cheese

by Anonymousreply 14711/09/2014

Okay people, you've had enough time to reach your New Year's goals. Time to get back on the carbs.

by Anonymousreply 14801/20/2015
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