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What year did doctors begin telling women they couldn''t drink or smoke during pregnancy?

I'm starting to see more and women drinking during pregnancy now, well the 2nd or 3rd trimester. Have the doctors changed their position on drinking while pregnant?

by Anonymousreply 4212/04/2009

Years after I had Gwyneth...unfortunately.

by Anonymousreply 112/02/2009

Post 1969, because my mom always told the "hilarious" story about her last pregnancy (me), wherein I would kick the ashtray off her stomach while in utero.

Good thing she's never been a drinker; I'd be retarded *and* have asthma.

by Anonymousreply 212/02/2009

It was definitely after 1953.

by Anonymousreply 312/02/2009

No OP, just too many pregnant women watching "Mad Men"

by Anonymousreply 412/02/2009

I remember a friend in the early-mid '70s who was pregnant and who was a big alkie, pill head, pot head and cigarette smoker.

She tried to quit everything and eventually went back to cigarettes and pot, but stayed off pills and booze.

Her child appeared to be OK when he was born, but of course there are a lot of problems that might not show up until later.

by Anonymousreply 512/02/2009

I was born in 1954 and my mother quit smoking when she found out she was pregnant with me.

So it may not have been a requirement then, but it was apparently part of the conventional wisdom that smoking wasn't good for pregnant women to do.

by Anonymousreply 612/02/2009

paging Betty Draper...

by Anonymousreply 712/02/2009

A lot of doctors are saying that a couple drinks a week (after the first trimester) isn't going to harm the baby. But because they don't know exactly how much booze is safe or not, they advise women just not to.

Smoking is just bad all around, so no one is going to say that's okay.

by Anonymousreply 812/02/2009

Jackie Kennedy smoked throughout all of her pregnancies.

by Anonymousreply 912/02/2009

My friend J had her kids in the early 80s, and she quit absolutely everything when she started "trying". Not just booze and the odd toke, but no medications of any kind - not even an asprin if she had a headache. This was a bit extreme for the time, but not by much.

IMHO the whole thing started in the 1960s when the thalidomide babies were born, and people realized how disastrous things could get during pregnancy. This was also the time period when everyone clued in that cigarettes caused cancer.

by Anonymousreply 1012/02/2009

If drinking and smoking during pregnancy were as harmful as they say, the entire nation of France would be deformed and brain damaged.

by Anonymousreply 1112/02/2009

I think it's more that there are just more female drunks these days.

by Anonymousreply 1212/02/2009

My mom didn't drink but she was a heavy smoker who smoked throughout her pregnancies. No one was going to tell her to knock it off because the obstetrican who delivered me used to smoke in his office. Not during exams or the actual delivery, though; that would have been [italic]de trop[/italic] even way back in 1964.

by Anonymousreply 1312/02/2009

My Mom smoked through her pregnancies, including my turn in the oven. She would agree her children are pains in the ass, but not in a deformed way.

Mom wasn't a drinker, but my bio-dad's sperm could've been so loaded with liquor it turned the womb into an Irish pub for months.

I don't think any of the in-utero stuff has a fraction of the effect genetics do. I'm a raging inexpressive highly-disturbed genius, with a philisophical fondness for suicide and sudden blurted ideation. But it's because my anscestors were too, and they passed along obnoxious DNA.

It's not because Mom enjoyed her Salem Lights and pink cans of TAB. (Okay, maybe that had some small thing to do with the gay part, but nothing more.)

It's because our family kept breeding long after any joy was possible. It's because we keep making it worse and worse for newer and newer generations of us.

What horror should we expect from the creatures we've already squoze forth?

The very newest horror.

by Anonymousreply 1412/02/2009

My Mom smoked through her pregnancies, including my turn in the oven. She would agree her children are pains in the ass, but not in a deformed way.

Mom wasn't a drinker, but my bio-dad's sperm could've been so loaded with liquor it turned the womb into an Irish pub for months.

I don't think any of the in-utero stuff has a fraction of the effect genetics do. I'm a raging inexpressive highly-disturbed genius, with a philisophical fondness for suicide and sudden blurted ideation. But it's because my anscestors were too, and they passed along obnoxious DNA.

It's not because Mom enjoyed her Salem Lights and pink cans of TAB. (Okay, maybe that had some small thing to do with the gay part, but nothing more.)

It's because our family kept breeding long after any joy was possible. It's because we keep making it worse and worse for newer and newer generations of us.

What horror should we expect from the creatures we've already squoze forth?

by Anonymousreply 1512/02/2009

My Mom smoked through her pregnancies, including my turn in the oven. She would agree her children are pains in the ass, but not in a deformed way.

Mom wasn't a drinker, but my bio-dad's sperm could've been so loaded with liquor it turned the womb into an Irish pub for months.

I don't think any of the in-utero stuff has a fraction of the effect genetics do. I'm a raging inexpressive highly-disturbed genius, with a philisophical fondness for suicide and sudden blurted ideation. But it's because my anscestors were too, and they passed along obnoxious DNA.

It's not because Mom enjoyed her Salem Lights and pink cans of TAB. (Okay, maybe that had some small thing to do with the gay part, but nothing more.)

It's because our family kept breeding long after any joy was possible. It's because we keep making it worse and worse for newer and newer generations of us.

What horror should we expect from the creatures we've already squoze forth?

by Anonymousreply 1612/02/2009

My Mom smoked through her pregnancies, including my turn in the oven. She would agree her children are pains in the ass, but not in a deformed way.

Mom wasn't a drinker, but my bio-dad's sperm could've been so loaded with liquor it turned the womb into an Irish pub for months.

I don't think any of the in-utero stuff has a fraction of the effect genetics do. I'm a raging inexpressive highly-disturbed genius, with a philisophical fondness for suicide and sudden blurted ideation. But it's because my anscestors were too, and they passed along obnoxious DNA.

It's not because Mom enjoyed her Salem Lights and pink cans of TAB. (Okay, maybe that had some small thing to do with the gay part, but nothing more.)

It's because our family kept breeding long after any joy was possible. It's because we keep making it worse and worse for newer and newer generations of us.

What horror should we expect from the creatures we've already squoze forth?

by Anonymousreply 1712/02/2009

My mother quit smoking on the way to the hospital to deliver my older sister because they announced smoking was bad.

1967

by Anonymousreply 1812/03/2009

"What horror should we expect from the creatures we've already squoze forth?"

Triple posted replies, for one.

by Anonymousreply 1912/03/2009

"I don't think any of the in-utero stuff has a fraction of the effect genetics do. "

Look up pictures of children who were born just after Chernobyl, if you want to know what in-utero stuff can do. And also look up "fetal alcohol syndrome".

by Anonymousreply 2012/03/2009

Pregnant and hungover:

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 2112/03/2009

My grandmother smoked two packs a day, unfiltered, and all three of her pregnancies had no complications.

by Anonymousreply 2212/03/2009

My mom only smoked during one pregnancy, which was with me, because she was depressed.

I am the only one in the family with Asthma.

by Anonymousreply 2312/03/2009

My mom had 5 kids and smoked with all of us, and we're all fine.

by Anonymousreply 2412/03/2009

My grandmother smoked like a chimney during all of her pregnancies and had cocktails every night though I don't think she ever got really smashed. My mother never smoked but she did indulge in the cocktail hour. It's the way it was back then. Remember the hospital waiting rooms with ashtrays? I'm not saying it's good for a pregnancy but I think a lot of this no smoking, no alcohol is to help protect doctors from lawsuits. I think if alcohol were truly that bad for pregnancy then the entire human race would have major problems going back to our early ancestors who probably drank beer and wine more than water because the water was no good for drinking. Now, a raging alkie guzzling alcohol 24/7 may indeed be a problem and I think hard drugs are definitely bad. I do think the human genome is little bit hardier than people give it credit for from many centuries of weeding out the weakest.

by Anonymousreply 2512/03/2009

r17 = Cary Tennis.

by Anonymousreply 2612/03/2009

Don't you think they've gone a little overboard?

Today, women can't have caffeine or fish while they're pregnant either.

by Anonymousreply 2712/03/2009

In 1980 a co-worker was pregnant with her second child. She smoked, drank liquor, and coffee. The child was born with Down Syndrome.

by Anonymousreply 2812/03/2009

Down Syndrome is the result of a chromosomal abnormality, not the mother's health habits during gestation.

by Anonymousreply 2912/03/2009

LOL at @r11

by Anonymousreply 3012/03/2009

r28 Down Syndrome has nothing to do with alcohol, caffeine or nicotine. Down Syndrome is genetic.

by Anonymousreply 3112/03/2009

OP, They started a big public awarness campaign about not drinking or smoking during pregnancy in the late 70s/early 80s.

But throughout most of the 80s, doctors would tell pregnant patients that if they smoked less than 10 cigarettes a day, the fetus should be fine.

The initial emphasis was on people who drank heavily or smoked heavily while pregnant.

by Anonymousreply 3212/03/2009

OP, it's similar to smoking in general: in the '70s everyone did it everywhere; in the '80s public health campaigns started dissuading it; in the '90s it started being banned in places like airplanes; and now, in 2009, most cities categorically ban it in the workplace and in restaurants and bars. Doctors started advising moderation in the early '80s, and by 1990 were telling all women to avoid all drinking and smoking.

There's been a little relaxation on the drinking ban; most doctors these days tell patients a glass of wine with dinner a couple times of week is perfectly fine. I have three friends who are pregnant or were recently, and all have/had at least a few sips every now and then.

by Anonymousreply 3312/03/2009

This is who to thank for the US avoiding the thalidomide disaster.

Thanks to Frances Oldham Kelsey, she blocked every attempt to allow the use of thalidomide in the US because she wasn't convinced it was safe. This was in the face of enormous pressure. We can learn from this as nothing's changed today, corporations are still trying to force all sorts of things through regulators in spite of the science (or lack of it) about the safety of their products.

Offsite Link
by Anonymousreply 3412/03/2009

R11 I think you just proved the point.

by Anonymousreply 3512/03/2009

Based on the sixth finger on my right hand, some time after I was born.

by Anonymousreply 3612/03/2009

I just don't understand why women used to smoke and drink and eat fish and drink pop and coffee and deformed baby rates weren't higher then, then they are now.

by Anonymousreply 3712/03/2009

I was pregnant with my first child in 1978 and the doctor told me no smoking (I wasn't a smoker anyway), no caffeine, but I cold have a glass of wine or two on occasion, but warned against daily consumption during the remainder of my first trimester. By the time I had by third child in 1984 (different OB-GYN) there message was no alcohol, in addition to no smoking and caffeine.

My uncle was an OB-GYN and during my pregnancies said "everything in moderation." During my first pregnancy I told him how hard it was to forgo coffee in the morning. He said he doesn't advise his patient not to drink caffeine - then mentioned that the study that showed the potential negative impact of caffeine on a fetus was based on giving mice the caffeine equivalent of drinking 30 cups of coffee a day. He said he'd be surprised if a mouse didn't have some type of adverse affect. Not sure if caffeine is still on the list of things to avoid.

by Anonymousreply 3812/04/2009

[quote]Not sure if caffeine is still on the list of things to avoid.

It is, and a few things have been added to it, e.g. shellfish (potential for mercury poisoning).

by Anonymousreply 3912/04/2009

My ob/gyn told me I could have a cup of coffee in the morning.

by Anonymousreply 4012/04/2009

R37, if deformities are up it's probably because of things individuals can't control - pollution and radiation. They're everywhere, and BTW if you're squeamish don't read up on birth defect rates in the world's current war zones. Modern weaponry is full of "teratogenic" stuff like depeleted uranium.

But these days, if a woman is only going to have a couple of pergnancies in her life, it just makes sense to avoid any potential dangers she can. If the baby comes out with three eyes, you'll blame yourself for the rest of your life, whether sneaking cigs was the cause or not.

by Anonymousreply 4112/04/2009

[quote]I don't think any of the in-utero stuff has a fraction of the effect genetics do.

Both are important. Beyond that--no need to take chances.

by Anonymousreply 4212/04/2009
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