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Everyone Had One...

Ashtrays, some in every room. Even people who didn't smoke had one in case someone came over who did.

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by Anonymousreply 17205/22/2020

I still have this one, it is heavy and could kill you if someone threw it at you.

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by Anonymousreply 105/11/2020

They are a perfect way to serve nuts to your guests.

by Anonymousreply 205/11/2020

R1 is that you Hillary?

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by Anonymousreply 305/11/2020

Ashtrays were a perfect housewarming gift. And an engraved Zippo lighter said "I love you" for any romantic anniversary.

by Anonymousreply 405/11/2020

My finest ashtray. It doesn’t even get used for guests. I once got super drunk and used it though.

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by Anonymousreply 505/11/2020

OP, no many did not have them.

My mother and my grandmother would not have one in the house and if they saw a pack they were on it like white on rice to keep the addicts from lighting up in their homes.

by Anonymousreply 605/11/2020

For your Early American decor

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by Anonymousreply 705/11/2020

Do you enjoy killing threads and conversations, r6?

by Anonymousreply 805/11/2020

We had tons of them but no one smoked.

by Anonymousreply 905/11/2020

I was so bored last week I watched the entire Brady renovation. They didn’t mention it on the show, but in old clips they showed and in the after renovation, there appeared to be cigarette butts in Mike Brady’s dens ashtrays.

by Anonymousreply 1005/11/2020

Fuck. I remember when airlines had ashtrays on the armrests! Light 'em up, boys and girls.

by Anonymousreply 1105/11/2020

R6 Thanks for your comments. R8 is just being a baby.

by Anonymousreply 1205/11/2020

R6; Go smoke a cigarette. Preferably, in front of your mother and grandmother.

Lighten the fuck up.... literally.

by Anonymousreply 1305/11/2020

I don't smoke, but have relatives who do. They used to have a bad habit of putting their cigarette ashes into partially empty soda cans, even though there was an ashtray nearby. The combination of ashes and Coke resulted in a horrible smell.

I'm not familiar with the ashtray in OP's photo. What are the 2 smaller sections for?

by Anonymousreply 1405/11/2020

The small red butane lighter goes in the small hole. And I'd assume loose pipe tobacco goes in the larger one.

by Anonymousreply 1505/11/2020

R14 OH YES! I learned my lesson as a kid about sneaking sips of soda from unattended soda cans! Wasn't there a scene in Caddyshack similar to this - adults dropped their butts into unfinished cocktails and some poor kid wound up puking it all into an open sunroof??

by Anonymousreply 1605/11/2020

Thanks, R15!

by Anonymousreply 1705/11/2020

R14 / R15 The lighter nested into the LARGE hole; you can see the lighter sitting next to tray in the picture. Perfect fit. The small hole has me baffled. Maybe it was for some type of container that held fresh cigarettes?

by Anonymousreply 1805/11/2020

large holes are best

by Anonymousreply 1905/11/2020

My mother was the type that required *everyone* to remove his/her shoes before entering the house, and she never let anyone forget that the living room carpet was white wool. This was the early 1960s. Yet, she had the pale blue, Italian glass, ashtray with a matching lighter that was a glass ball, similar to a paperweight. What cracked me up, even as a young child, was that she has tiny matchboxes that were covered in pale blue flocked paper and had tiny gold plastic cherubs on them. Of course nobody could uses them.

by Anonymousreply 2005/11/2020

R16, I don't remember such a scene, but it's been a long time since I watched Caddyshack. I'll have to see it again.

I was a kid when I first experienced that unholy combination. To me, ashes & soda smelled like vomit.

by Anonymousreply 2105/11/2020

R14/ R15 Looking at the OP picture again, whatever belongs in the smaller hole is pictured in the bottom right but I still can't tell what it is.

OP, what is that thing?

And, yes, I get all the jokes about the big hole and the little hole.

by Anonymousreply 2205/11/2020

I should add that my mother also has a Bitossi ashtray in the family room that went with the blue and green acrylic bunch of grapes. I still have the ashtray. I use it for thumb drives.

by Anonymousreply 2305/11/2020

Yes r18 r22 The thing in the bottom right is a butane lighter. And yes it goes in the small hole.

r15

by Anonymousreply 2405/11/2020

The premise is idiotic and it should read many stupid americans owned these trays for when addicts came over.

It does not kill a thread to point out that it was not everyone, those who were sane wanted nothing to do with ashtrays.

by Anonymousreply 2505/11/2020

R18: I clicked on the link and R15 is correct. It's a lighter that fits in the smaller hole. And as he already mentioned, the larger compartment with matching lid is likely for loose pipe tobacco. Sounds about right.

by Anonymousreply 2605/11/2020

NY to LA non-stop last three rows. It was heaven.

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by Anonymousreply 2705/11/2020

Back in the 80s my non-smoking parents kept ashtrays for guests. It was socially correct to let guests smoke in your home, if you asked them to go outside it was considered rude and a social faux pas. Crazy to think about that now, but that was how things were back then.

by Anonymousreply 2805/11/2020

A different plane ashtray.

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by Anonymousreply 2905/11/2020

R28 what a horrible house it must have been, reeking of the stench of the addicts.

by Anonymousreply 3005/11/2020

r30 everybody did it back then.

by Anonymousreply 3105/11/2020

As already established it was not everyone.

by Anonymousreply 3205/11/2020

The larger oblong cavity with the lid was for a deliberate tap in an cover of ash, the larger central area would catch any excess as it burned off from lighted resting cigarettes.

by Anonymousreply 3305/11/2020

Regarding homes smelling like smoke... It absolutely depends on a couple of factors. If a couple both smokes, it's hopeless. It's going to stink. If one person smokes, and the house is large enough it doesn't really smell. Also, it's really cigarette butts that leave a lingering smell. The faster you get the cigarette butts out of the house the better.

by Anonymousreply 3405/11/2020

R32, established by whom? Regardless of ones preferences, not allowing smoking in ones home was considered *extremely* rude through the 1960s. Even Quakers, who forbade smoking, had the standard response, "If you must sin, do it outside." It was a reality of corporate culture that one was expected to entertain at home. One could lose one's job if one did not allow business associates to smoke in one's home and many businesses would not allow the compromise of entertaining in a restaurant instead. (To put this in context, a person could be fired for exiting an elevator before a superior, not removing your hat in an elevator, or, in the case of women, applying makeup in a public place. ) Note that the same was true of liquor. Even if one did not drink, one was expected to have a full bar.

by Anonymousreply 3505/11/2020

We had a half dozen ashtrays. Mom would usually use the cheap metal one at the kitchen table, while the nicer ones were in the living room and game room.

by Anonymousreply 3605/11/2020

Remember in "Susan Slade" when the baby takes the cigarette lighter and sets himself on FIRE??? That's good drama!

I have some nice heavy glass ashtrays, a bunch of copper enamel ones, a copper Air Italia one and had a huge ceramic dark green with orange splashes combination cigarette box, ashtray and matching lighter (similar to the one the baby used)! I am not sure if I got rid of it or if it's in storage. This thing was so huge, it belonged on a coffee table in front of one of those massive, curved, shimmery sectional sofas like at Mr Drysdale's house.

Remember those ones with a plunger that activated a spinning disc that dropped all the ashes and butts into a receptacle below? They were very typical in departments stores on those tall stands. I had a small one, found at a thrift store in the '80s, that was a ceramic pot (mostly turquoise, glazed in a plaid pattern) with the screw on top with plunger and disc. I think I eventually broke it. I liked those bean bag ashtrays when I was a kid.

by Anonymousreply 3705/11/2020

ashtray and lighter

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by Anonymousreply 3805/11/2020

my grandmother had a matching marble ashtray & table lighter set, I've only seen her smoke once in my life though

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by Anonymousreply 3905/11/2020

R20, I can't imagine how you turned out gay.

by Anonymousreply 4005/11/2020

Here's one with a built-in cigarette box. Lots of people had cigarette boxes filled with fresh smokes for their guests, too. (Although most smokers I knew had strong brand preferences, I guess if they were desperate they'd take pot luck.)

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by Anonymousreply 4105/11/2020

When I was growing up, the women I knew who made you remove your shoes before entering their home were always nuclear-grade bitches.

by Anonymousreply 4205/11/2020

I remember when you could call what you made ceramics class an ashtray. After 1988 or so you had to call it a candy dish or the teacher would get upset.

by Anonymousreply 4305/11/2020

very classy

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by Anonymousreply 4405/11/2020

[quote]Wasn't there a scene in Caddyshack similar to this - adults dropped their butts into unfinished cocktails and some poor kid wound up puking it all into an open sunroof??

It was Spalding and he deserved it.

by Anonymousreply 4505/11/2020

[quote] Lots of people had cigarette boxes filled with fresh smokes for their guests, too. (Although most smokers I knew had strong brand preferences, I guess if they were desperate they'd take pot luck.)

Most smokers are like this. When I smoked, I could only smoke Marlboro or, in a pinch, Parliament. I didn't like any other brands and wouldn't smoke them even if the cigarettes were free. Menthols gave me a splitting headache.

by Anonymousreply 4605/11/2020

R40, you don't know the half of it. The living room was a hoot. The coffee table was a glass oval that was supported by Corinthian capitals finished in antiqued gold and silver leaf. There were two gold and white Regency armchairs with pale blue cotton velvet seats. There was a very long, low casegoods piece in the Hollywood Regency style (It was so low, that a really don't know what its purpose was). Above the white sofa was a faux Louis V mirror. On one wall was a Van Luit mural wallpaper of the Acropolis. I am fairly certain that my mother went to furniture store and bought the whatever was the store window display.

R42, My mother was that with a heavy layer of passive/aggressive on top. She would tell someone who just had a miscarriage that clearly the person was not meant to have children, but in a tone dripping with sweetness and concern.

by Anonymousreply 4705/11/2020

Bulllshit R35.

by Anonymousreply 4805/11/2020

Jeez they still make theses! My Grandmother in the 70's had one in her purse at all times, your own portable ashtray.

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by Anonymousreply 4905/11/2020

I don’t smoke but I’ve bought a few of these. They’re cheap too because smoking isn’t what it used to be.

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by Anonymousreply 5005/11/2020

[quote] If one person smokes, and the house is large enough it doesn't really smell.

That isn't really true. In fact, it's a load of horseshit, and smells even worse. My mother was the only smoker in our house, and the place reeked of it.

Do you lie like this in every aspect of life, r34?

by Anonymousreply 5105/11/2020

Smoking inside is disgusting. I know two lesbians who live in a small house and smoke like chimneys. I cannot visit them unless we sit outside. Spending even one minute in their house means I need to shower and wash my clothes because it stinks like I’ve been out clubbing in the 90s.

by Anonymousreply 5205/11/2020

R51, did your mother clean? Or did she spend her entire life grunting out fat stupid children?

by Anonymousreply 5305/11/2020

R53, cleaning had very little to do with it. You can clean hard surfaces, but cigarette smoke gets into everything: upholstery, books, carpets, porous wood, etc. There was no Fabreze back then, though I really don't think Fabreze would work on nicotine. Those "cottage cheese" sprayed ceilings were the worst. No way to clean those.

by Anonymousreply 5405/11/2020

Memories...

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by Anonymousreply 5505/11/2020

I remember growing up on Long Island when you could smoke in a movie theater and UA theaters would charge more for the Smoking Loge Section and it had better upholstered rocking seats.

by Anonymousreply 5605/11/2020

The Caddy had six.

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by Anonymousreply 5705/11/2020

[quote]There was no Fabreze back then, though I really don't think Fabreze would work on nicotine.

There still isn't. It's FEBREZE.

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by Anonymousreply 5805/11/2020

r56 I remember smoking in theaters too (SF Bay Area in the '60s.)

by Anonymousreply 5905/11/2020

R53, cleaning has everything to do with it. Admit it - you grew up poor. It is nothing to be ashamed of. But Anderson Cooper will obviously never love you.

by Anonymousreply 6005/11/2020

Everyone had ashtrays in their home in the 70s and 80s. Everyone, EXCEPT YOU, R6.

by Anonymousreply 6105/11/2020

For the formal living room, the one you weren't allowed in to.

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by Anonymousreply 6205/13/2020

How did they clean these ash trays that were built in cars and airplanes? It’s seems like it would be a real pain.

by Anonymousreply 6305/13/2020

Ashtrays were also used as a bit of tablescape decoration. Finding the right ashtray for your living room cocktail table was paramount. My mother preferred to use antique saucers and such, because they looked less like ashtrays and had more style. Every table in our house practically had an ashtray. It was part of the decor as well as being functional. If you pay attention, people still put similar things out on cocktail tables today, just because it adds a little color and interest to a stack of books on a cocktail table, for example, to have a fun little dish or something on top. It's replaced the ashtray as a decorative device.

by Anonymousreply 6405/13/2020

R63, the ash tray part was removable.

by Anonymousreply 6505/13/2020

[quote]How did they clean these ash trays that were built in cars and airplanes? It’s seems like it would be a real pain.

It WAS a real pain! The little built-in ashtrays could be removed, but to do so you had to stick your fingers inside of them—and of course the ashtrays were full of ashes and cigarette butts. At the carwash, the attendants would routinely take the vacuum hose to the ashtrays.

The only thing I miss about not smoking is getting to buy novel ashtrays, lighters and other smoking paraphernalia. I really liked these little amenities. But I like being tobacco-free better.

by Anonymousreply 6605/13/2020

They were the most disgusting things. I remember playing in the ones that had sand in them when I was a kid

by Anonymousreply 6705/13/2020

[quote]I remember playing in the ones that had sand in them when I was a kid

Well that's the saddest thing I'll read all day and we are in a pandemic.

by Anonymousreply 6805/13/2020

I collected a bunch of mid-century ashtrays at the time people stopped smoking in the house. They were cheap and you could find great ones in thrift stores.

I keep wallet and keys in one that has two wells (the smaller well can hold coins). There's an enormous one about 10"x10" that goes under the pets' water dish in the kitchen. Another one in my office to hold USB cords and such. And another one on the coffee table in the living room for remotes.

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by Anonymousreply 6905/13/2020

Art Deco Darlings.....

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by Anonymousreply 7005/13/2020

I don’t remember my house smelling like smoke. My dad smoked Kent’s and drank Blatz beer and Jim Beam. I remember he had nesting pewter ashtrays that someone had probably bought at a colonial themed gift shop. He had highball glasses with little blue and white tableaux of Greeks lounging and eating grapes. He would sit in his armchair, drinking and smoking and watching “The Rockford Files.” He still had the energy to rise at dawn and do all kinds of crafts and garden projects. I don’t remember the adults smoking during the day, it was more a cocktail hour activity. I still think it seems really fun, but I have asthma so I can’t do it.

by Anonymousreply 7105/13/2020

I adored the standing ones in my old relative's homes.

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by Anonymousreply 7205/13/2020

another

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by Anonymousreply 7305/13/2020

My grandfather and his second wife had a beautiful silver filigree cigarette box, a big silver and crystal ashtray and matching lighter. We would go have dinner with them and then they would pass the box around for after dinner cigs.

by Anonymousreply 7405/13/2020

I am in my late 50s. When I was in college and young and whenever I was making money I would stock cigarette boxes in my apartments. I had traditional ones and kitschy ones from the 50s and 60s. Also there were porcelain cigarette bowls that were placed on dinner tables. People smoked between courses. I loved having guests and everyone in the 80s and 90s would smoke even if they pretended they did not smoke, a couple drinks in, they would smoke. My friends weren't fancy and found it very glamorous to smoke my house cigarettes. I was still getting away with this in Paris and London in 2000 then it all ended quickly, nobody smokes. Maybe just in Italy and Spain.

by Anonymousreply 7505/13/2020

R30 - I remember my grandfather was a tenor and he smoked non-filters and my grandmother did not. Their house never smelled though and, he wore a smoking jacket and fine Italian suits and was the epitome of an elegant European gentleman. I remember him kissing my cheek when I went to visit and he literally smelled good. I don't know how they did it back then. People today don't smoke a pack a day and are still slobs that smell after 30 minutes at the gym.

by Anonymousreply 7605/13/2020

Well up to the 90s, fragrances were made of beautiful strong long-lasting natural materials, and were designed to complement tobacco smoke. All together, it made something intoxicating that today's culture cannot remember, and could never tolerate. I can remember how THICK the smoke was in Paris in cinemas, bars, restaurants, and all the wonderful fragrances, and then champagne to clean it all away. If I was in NY for a long time and go back to Paris I could get choked out of certain bars. If you can't beat them, join them.

by Anonymousreply 7705/13/2020

Maybe the cigarettes didn't have all the additives like they do now.

by Anonymousreply 7805/13/2020

Dang I want a cigarette now.

by Anonymousreply 7905/13/2020

How I knew I was officially an ex-smoker: a couple of years after I quit smoking I bought a new car. I owned it for six months before I realized it had neither an ashtray nor a cigarette lighter.

by Anonymousreply 8005/13/2020

Just put it in the suitcase, they WANT you to take it.

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by Anonymousreply 8105/13/2020

[quote]then it all ended quickly, nobody smokes.

It seems to me it isn't that nobody smokes anymore, it's that nobody BUYS their own cigarettes anymore. Lots of people "don't smoke" until they see somebody smoking, and then that poor person is hit up for cigs by everybody, like he's the free cigarette dispenser.

by Anonymousreply 8205/13/2020

[quote] I remember playing in the ones that had sand in them when I was a kid.

That’s nothing, I played in sandboxes with buried cat poops in them.

by Anonymousreply 8305/13/2020

R82 that's true, especially in countries that tax the shit out of cigs and they are very expensive. I used to travel when I was a smoker. 2nd and 3rd world supply and at duty free prices were a few bucks a carton. I seem to remember "luxury" cigarettes were under 20 bucks a carton in Duty free and not that long ago.

by Anonymousreply 8405/13/2020

Smoking on the street in NYC is just too much to bear now, you get ten people asking to bum a cig off of you in two seconds. Nobody wants to buy their own anymore.

by Anonymousreply 8505/13/2020

wedgewood cig set

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by Anonymousreply 8605/13/2020

spode cig set

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by Anonymousreply 8705/13/2020

baccarat cig set

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by Anonymousreply 8805/13/2020

again

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by Anonymousreply 8905/13/2020

ah worthpoint doesn't link. sorry.

by Anonymousreply 9005/13/2020

[quote] I can remember how THICK the smoke was in Paris in cinemas, bars, restaurants

I was once enjoying dinner in a little restaurant in the Marais where the air was so thick with smoke the manager actually stood in the middle of the dining room and asked everyone to ease up on the smoking.

by Anonymousreply 9105/13/2020

My parents didn't smoke but they had ashtrays all over the house in case visitors wanted to light up. My mom also had a large glass candy jar where she stuffed all the matchbooks she collected from restaurants, hotels, shops, etc. And I remember when their visiting friends wanted to smoke, they just casually lit up wherever they sat. No going outside, no asking for permission. This was in the '70s-'80s. It was really a different mindset back then.

by Anonymousreply 9205/13/2020

IIRC, it was the early/mid 90s when people started going outside to smoke. By the end of the 90s, it was the norm.

Before that, though, smoking indoors was extremely common and nobody thought anything of it. As has been said, it was considered rude and gauche for a host/hostess to ask a person to go outside to smoke until the 90s.

by Anonymousreply 9305/13/2020

[quote]My parents didn't smoke but they had ashtrays all over the house in case visitors wanted to light up. My mom also had a large glass candy jar where she stuffed all the matchbooks she collected from restaurants, hotels, shops, etc.

Almost the same with my family, but my parents smoked.

They had a dense marble ashtray that could be used as a murder weapon.

by Anonymousreply 9405/13/2020

R77 - true about fragrances as well as everything else. When my grandfather died I went through his things and was amazed at the quality of the fabric on his suits, the colors had not faded, his handkerchief and colognes still smelled good. When he came to visit us in LA in the 90s a couple of old queens lived across the street in a nice Spanish style home and they assumed he was gay as well because he was so dapper and stylish. Sadly they found out he was ogling Latin women but, since one of them was a retired salesman from Bloominfdale he said he remembered when they sold stuff like that until the multifiber agreement killed the quality of men's clothing.

by Anonymousreply 9505/13/2020

....

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by Anonymousreply 9605/14/2020

From Woolworth....

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by Anonymousreply 9705/14/2020

Dirk Van Erp (1860-1933) Arts & Crafts Ashtray

Sold - $369

Provenance: Penny Marshall Collection

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by Anonymousreply 9805/14/2020

To Tiffany...

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by Anonymousreply 9905/14/2020

great thread, brings back so many memories, the stench on planes from those back rows of smoking....my dad smoking 2 paks a day and the house having a white vapor cloud from it (I know have copd from it)…..crazy ceramic ashtrays, ….the stand up ones with a horse at the top....aunt Gerry lighting up the most fowl cigs I ever smelled, conversation stopped when she smoked (viceroy?)…..s&h stamps having cute ashtrays.....smoking at restaurants !!!

by Anonymousreply 10005/14/2020

When I was in college in the previous century, all the best parties on campus were at the Lambda Chi house. And in their common room in the basement (where the keg of beer was "hidden") there was a toilet next to the bar that was filled with sand. That was the communal ashtray.

And people still just dropped their butts on the cement floor and ground them out with the toe of the shoe.

by Anonymousreply 10105/14/2020

[quote]I remember growing up on Long Island when you could smoke in a movie theater and UA theaters would charge more for the Smoking Loge Section and it had better upholstered rocking seats.

Forgot to add to my warm and fuzzy memory of movie theater smoking at our local theater, they had a cigarette machine in the lobby for your convenience. And being a theater, as with today concessions were always pricey and I remember waiting in the lobby for the next show and my Mother looked at the cigarette machine and declared "75 CENTS! I would never pay 75 cents for a pack of cigarettes". Of course thru the years she did and now in NY the minimum amount a store can charge under law is $13 for one pack. and people pay it.

by Anonymousreply 10205/14/2020

I remember when the price of a pack of cigs went up to $2.50 and people thought that was outrageous. That was just too much!

by Anonymousreply 10305/14/2020

R92--I have purchased two matchbook collections at estate sales. The first one came in an enormous brandy snifter and it has almost all matchbooks from the '60s--'80s surf & turf steak houses of California in it. The second collection was much smaller and I was able to cull the crappy matchbooks out and get the keepers into the snifter.

by Anonymousreply 10405/14/2020

r104 I have a bunch of matchbooks (mostly '70s and '80s.) What can I do with them?

by Anonymousreply 10505/14/2020

My grandparents (Great Depression/WWII generation) Had those big glass ashtrays and table lighters in the common rooms of their house. Similar to the ones at the link. To a little gayling like myself, I thought it looked so sophisticated lol! I have one lighter and ashtray of theirs, which are never used. I just like having them as a reminder of my grandparents.

My grandfather smoked unfiltered Pall Malls like a chimney and somehow miraculously lived to his 80s. God only knows how that happened, with his constant smoking.

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by Anonymousreply 10605/14/2020

R106 my great aunt is 101 and was a party girl for most of it.

by Anonymousreply 10705/14/2020

1) Tastefully display them in an appropriate glass vessel

2) Use them to light things till they are all gone

3) Give them to someone who'd like them

R105 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

by Anonymousreply 10805/14/2020

Cut the covers off and glue them to a vintage coffee table in a checkerboard pattern (One could actually make a checkerboard!) Cover with several coats of polyurethane.

by Anonymousreply 10905/14/2020

R105 - glue them onto a large board, take a photo of them (then toss them) and have that photo printed onto tea towels or something like that. And then take the tea towels, package them up in some kind of box, and light the whole thing on fire.

by Anonymousreply 11005/14/2020

Do old matchbooks have any value to collectors?

by Anonymousreply 11105/14/2020

very old hoarders like matchbooks

by Anonymousreply 11205/14/2020

Since both parents smoked we had ashtrays in every room except in the kid's bedrooms. Some rooms had more than one - even the kitchen. One set I remember were made of glass with three (small, medium and large) ashtrays that would fit inside each other. I found one on eBay that shows an ashtray that was once part of the set.

After our dad passed away, and I was getting the house ready for renters, we had to have all of the rooms painted with paint that covered up (sort of) the smell.

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by Anonymousreply 11305/14/2020

Found a picture that shows the set of three.

by Anonymousreply 11405/14/2020

Looking back now, it is just amazing how smoking indoors was tolerated for so many years. Guests smoked in your home, people smoked in restaurants and office buildings, etc. It was everywhere. It's incomprehensible today how people just put up with it.

by Anonymousreply 11505/14/2020

R115

1) Elevators!

2) Planes!

3) Doctor Offices!

by Anonymousreply 11605/14/2020

[quote]It's incomprehensible today how people just put up with it.

People didn't "put up with it", it was just accepted and part of everyday life.Doctor's orders!

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by Anonymousreply 11705/14/2020

r116 Hospitals! Schools!

I remember I had a class in college (in the '70s) with a TA who was such a chain smoker that she had a new cigarette started before she finished the first one. And this was indoors, in a classroom.

by Anonymousreply 11805/14/2020

In my university in the 1990s, there were ashtrays mounted on the hallway walls in most of the buildings, so naturally we smoked in the hallways while waiting for class to begin. During my senior year is when they took them all down, this was around the time California had enacted smoking bans in bars and restaurants and enclosed buildings, and of course, many of us were outraged at this infringement of our civil rights.

Today, I'm no longer a smoker, but I just cannot imagine lighting up indoors. It's strange how after so many years of doing things a certain way, we've been trained or conditioned to do it another way until it becomes natural. Like buckling up before we start our cars. Or wearing a helmet when riding a bike or motorcycle. Or putting our kids in car seats. Those were things that we never used to do.

by Anonymousreply 11905/14/2020

[quote]In my university in the 1990s, there were ashtrays mounted on the hallway walls in most of the buildings, so naturally we smoked in the hallways while waiting for class to begin.

My high school had an official outdoor "smoking area" at the end of the 1980s — at the time, the prevailing attitude was "We don't want kids to smoke, but we also don't want them doing it in the bathrooms ... plus the 18-year-olds are legal and have the right to do so." Plus a LOT more high schoolers smoked at the time.

College had those ashtrays in the halls, but smoking in class was not allowed.

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by Anonymousreply 12005/14/2020

Actually it wasn't tolerated by everyone originally. In the 19th century and early 20th century, there were designated smoking areas in hotels, trains, etc. Smoking around women was considered very ill-mannered. Men had designated spaces for smoking. Smoking was very nearly banned right before WWI. The tobacco companies used WWI to change public opinion- Why deprive our boys their one bit of pleasure?, etc. After WWI, when women started to smoke and cigarette companies aggressively went after the female market is when things changed.

One thing that is interesting is how often cigarettes are used a currency: prisons, during war time, etc. Through the 1970s, this was common with my family. When my family did the tour of Indian reservations in 1969, we brought cartons of cigarettes and traded rather than used cash. We also did it in Hawaii, since cigarettes were so much more expensive there. We also brought cigarettes on our trip ti Europe in 1970 to use instead of tips. Mind you, no one in my family smoked (No shoes in house/white wool carpet household.)

by Anonymousreply 12105/15/2020

We had an ashtray on the coffee table, but no one one smoked in the family and no one would have been allowed to smoke in the house or use the decorative ashtray. It taught me that utilitarian object on display are never intended to be used.

by Anonymousreply 12205/15/2020

[quote]Today, I'm no longer a smoker, but I just cannot imagine lighting up indoors.

What has been weird lately are people who smoke during Zoom AA meetings. I know I can't smell it, but I'm not used to looking at it anymore, either. Someone I sponsor is completely freaked out over it: "Those people aren't sober!!!" I don't take it that far, but I'd rather not look at someone smoking.

by Anonymousreply 12305/15/2020

Ceramic companies made a fortune.

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by Anonymousreply 12405/15/2020

Early Disney merch

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by Anonymousreply 12505/15/2020

in the 70s my mother had a boomerang shaped ceramic ashtray in avocado green, I don’t smoke but i wish I still had it just because it was so mid century stylish.

by Anonymousreply 12605/15/2020

[QUOTE] Someone I sponsor is completely freaked out over it: "Those people aren't sober!!!" I don't take it that far

since when do AA people freak out over smoking? My experience is that they TURN into smokers during rehab.

by Anonymousreply 12705/15/2020

It's a nasty, dangerous addiction. I say that as an ex-smoker. I'm glad society frowns upon it.

What I don't like is the zero-tolerance tactics of the anti-smoking zealots being carried over into other areas of society.

by Anonymousreply 12805/15/2020

My mom always used a Waterford crystal ash tray.

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by Anonymousreply 12905/15/2020

well , smell R129

by Anonymousreply 13005/15/2020

At better hotels they used to have those floor stand column ashtrays with the bowl at the top filled with sand and the logo stamped thereon. Pure eleganza.

by Anonymousreply 13105/15/2020

I remember being on a smoking flight to Spain. They even had a “smoking section” but it was pointless.

by Anonymousreply 13205/15/2020

R6's singular experience does not hold true for everyone else. Ashtrays were indeed everywhere - it was the default item for kids to make in arts and crafts classes.

by Anonymousreply 13305/15/2020

[QUOTE] My mother and my grandmother would not have one in the house and if they saw a pack they were on it like white on rice

American protestants from Flyoveria, I’d say.

by Anonymousreply 13405/15/2020

Remember department stores had ashtrays outside the restrooms? People could sit and have a cig when they wanted to take a break from shopping.

The teacher's lounge in my elementary and middle schools allowed smoking (1980s) and the hallway outside of the lounge always smelled of smoke. By the time I got to high school, smoking had been banned on school grounds.

by Anonymousreply 13505/15/2020

R131 - "thereon". Look who went to Miss Borders Finishing School for Young Girls.

by Anonymousreply 13605/15/2020

Cars used to have ashtrays and lighters, not just up front for the driver, but also on the door panels for each passenger. For the kid passengers, this was where we disposed our chewing gum, gum wrappers, straw wrappers, etc.

When I was 9-12, my best friend's dad would drive us to our little league practice in his luxury car, while chain smoking away with the windows rolled up. Nobody spoke of second-hand smoke in those days, so it was never an issue for adults to smoke in an enclosed environment with children present.

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by Anonymousreply 13705/15/2020

Oh god yes everybody smoked in front of their kids, no one thought anything of it. I don't remember anyone going outside to smoke in the 80s, everybody smoked in their homes.

by Anonymousreply 13805/15/2020

When I was a kid, we would take long car trips, and my Dad would smoke in the car with the windows rolled up.

by Anonymousreply 13905/15/2020

[quote]Oh god yes everybody smoked in front of their kids, no one thought anything of it.

Honey, millions of women smoked while pregnant.

by Anonymousreply 14005/15/2020

That too r140.

by Anonymousreply 14105/15/2020

[quote]My mom always used a Waterford crystal ash tray.

What are you saying?

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by Anonymousreply 14205/15/2020

R140 - they still do out here in Romania. I have to grant it to some of the women that they have the smarts to pull back their hair as they smoke and would come back to the office and head to the bathroom and wash up and use mints. I noticed that they sit at cafes in the morning when I went to the office and drink espresso and smoke one of those super long skinny (menthol is illegal here). The men are also smokers but really hit the Marlboros a lot.

by Anonymousreply 14305/15/2020

40k a month to stare at a wall of shelves with intermittently cluttered with useless dull objets. I'd rather live in the dog-eared Dallas renaissance fantasie on the other thread.

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by Anonymousreply 14405/15/2020

Menthols are about to be illegal in Massachusetts.

by Anonymousreply 14505/15/2020

My Dad told me "Don't smoke. But if you do smoke, don't smoke Menthols."

He said he say a guy in the army die from smoking Methols cigarettes. That was enough for me.

by Anonymousreply 14605/15/2020

[quote] Menthols are about to be illegal in Massachusetts.

Who, exactly, is this law targeting?

by Anonymousreply 14705/15/2020

[QUOTE] Who, exactly, is this law targeting?

Menthol cigarette smokers, Rose.

by Anonymousreply 14805/15/2020

So, you mean the minorities?

by Anonymousreply 14905/15/2020

I only smoked Menthols. I was in NY and people stop me all the time and ask to bum one but the second I told them it was Menthol, 99% would say no thanks. I loved me my Benson & Hedges Deluxe Ultra Light Menthol 100's.

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by Anonymousreply 15005/15/2020

I could never stand menthols, they gave me a headache.

by Anonymousreply 15105/15/2020

I don't think Benson & Hedges are made anymore. Several brands from back in the day have disappeared or are hardly sold anymore. Vantage, Kent, True, Tareyton and a few others. It's all Marlboro, Camel, American Spirits now.

by Anonymousreply 15205/15/2020

R151, are you still a pussy?

by Anonymousreply 15305/15/2020

We had them everywhere in the 60s

by Anonymousreply 15405/15/2020

why would he do that to a sister? mind boggles. completely uncalled for. And she might have shot him dead, like that skank at Dollar Tree had her brothers do.

by Anonymousreply 15505/15/2020

Menthols are gross r153.

by Anonymousreply 15605/15/2020

minorities like menthols better than regular cigarettes? Which minorities?

by Anonymousreply 15705/15/2020

That’s racist

by Anonymousreply 15805/15/2020

Black people overwhelmingly favor menthol cigarettes, particularly Newports. Older black people like Kools.

Various cigarette brands have a particular demographic, it's kind of interesting. Not just racial demographics, but socioeconomic as well.

by Anonymousreply 15905/15/2020

[quote] And as he already mentioned, the larger compartment with matching lid is likely for loose pipe tobacco. Sounds about right.

No! Pipe tobacco isn't kept out of its sac, the other section with the lid is for books of matches.

by Anonymousreply 16005/15/2020

[italic]Salem! Que Frescura![/italic]

by Anonymousreply 16105/15/2020

I am in my late 50s. When I was in college and young and whenever I was making money I would stock cigarette boxes in my apartments. I had traditional ones and kitschy ones from the 50s and 60s. Also there were porcelain cigarette bowls that were placed on dinner tables. People smoked between courses. I loved having guests and everyone in the 80s and 90s would smoke even if they pretended they did not smoke, a couple drinks in, they would smoke. My friends weren't fancy and found it very glamorous to smoke my house cigarettes. I was still getting away with this in Paris and London in 2000 then it all ended quickly, nobody smokes. Maybe just in Italy and Spain.

by Anonymousreply 16205/15/2020

I remember this thing. It was for making cigarettes at home. You would by the loose tobacco and empty paper with filters attached. It never took off.

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by Anonymousreply 16305/16/2020

Gurls, smell Miss R162! She's a veritable cosmopolite.

by Anonymousreply 16405/16/2020

terribly sophisticated, R162. And you know the conversation. between courses was never silly either, it was European politics or perhaps intense discussion on film or literature.

by Anonymousreply 16505/17/2020

Edith Heath

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by Anonymousreply 16605/17/2020

Royal Haeger

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by Anonymousreply 16705/17/2020

All the kids had these!

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by Anonymousreply 16805/22/2020

And cigars!

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by Anonymousreply 16905/22/2020

We had these.

Anchor Hocking

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by Anonymousreply 17005/22/2020

R51, don't be silly. My mother smoked until I was in college and our house never smelled. But she cleaned like crazy and had plants. I've been in homes where the drapes smelled like smoke, but they never did in our home.

by Anonymousreply 17105/22/2020

Uh huh and DENIAL ain't just the setting of "Aida". Sweetie, people never smell their cat's litter boxes either.

by Anonymousreply 17205/22/2020
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