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Down Syndrome college kids

My friend's special ed daughter is going to college (College of Charleston in SC). She's high functioning and she did graduate high school. But I had no idea she was considered college material. I'm surprised there are college programs like this.

by Anonymousreply 911/08/2013

2013 Bachelors degree = 1983 high school diploma

by Anonymousreply 111/04/2013

Depending on the college, it can be equivalent to a grammar school degree plus software skills.

by Anonymousreply 211/04/2013

They don't graduate with the same degrees as the regular students, do they? If MR kids can graduate, I think that would devalue the degree.

by Anonymousreply 311/04/2013

Did this girl pass the high school regents and take the SATs like everyone else? The special needs students in my high school were doing 5th grade level math and getting 4.0 GPAs while the rest of us took calculus.

It just seems like a vanity project for wealthy (white) parents who want their special needs children to be "normal". I get it if they want to take non-academic classes, but it's like a twisted affirmative action to hold other students to a certain level, and then give the same grade, the same credit, and the same degree to a student with Down Syndrome who isn't expected or required to complete coursework on the same level as everyone else.

I think it's admirable for those who want to continue learning, but don't call it a Bachelor's degree.

by Anonymousreply 411/05/2013

[quote]It just seems like a vanity project for wealthy (white) parents who want their special needs children to be "normal".

Spot on.

I had a long talk one day with a client who was an EA for special needs kids for 20 years. She said even high functioning DS kids plateau in their learning abilities, usually before they hit high school. In her time, she never met someone who could get a high school diploma without so many concessions that it was effectively meaningless.

School boards are afraid to deny these hyper involved parents anything for fear they'll be sued.

by Anonymousreply 511/05/2013

Everybody can do anything!

by Anonymousreply 611/08/2013

First, maybe the kid was a savant in some area. If not, I am really not familiar with those programs.

I am familiar with secondary school programs, however. There is no reason to deny education to these young people, especially at the high school level. Having worked with special education kids for years, the classes help them reach their potential in some areas. Without the classes, they can really go backward. In school, they learn social skills, completing tasks and a number of other skills in addition to basic academic skills that can prepare them for work or living. And Downs kids can have quite a range of intellectual functioning. They never quite reach normal, but they can go from borderline retarded or even low average down to profoundly retarded. Early developmental learning can really make a difference in how much they are able to master. The very low functioning kids learn toileting, feeding, dressing and basic life skills. These take a long time, however. And it helps having experts working with these kids on skills. Parents get help, advice and support in raising these children, plus they get a break during the day when the child is in school.

by Anonymousreply 711/08/2013

Money Money Money, always funny, in the Rich Man's world.

by Anonymousreply 811/08/2013

Some parent want their intellectually disabled children to have the "college experience" (I.e. Living in a form, etc.), but what this means in terms of academics I do not know. I've been teaching college for 35+ years! and I support education for all people, but I have no training in Special Education.

by Anonymousreply 911/08/2013
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