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House Of Cards

Which was better, the original UK series or the recent US version?

Ian Richardson or Kevin Spacey?

by Anonymousreply 3902/13/2014

I couldn't possibly comment.

by Anonymousreply 110/02/2013

THE LATTER ONE CONTAINS THE FAT ASS OF COREY STOLL!

by Anonymousreply 210/02/2013

The British, by far.

by Anonymousreply 310/02/2013

The British is always better. They were doing I, Claudius in the 1970s for christ's sake and it took Americans 20 plus years to come up with a Sopranos counterpart.

by Anonymousreply 410/02/2013

Yes, the British version was much better in my opinion. Quite scary. I could not accept Spacey in the same role.

by Anonymousreply 510/02/2013

here's an old-fashioned Datalounge Bump

by Anonymousreply 710/03/2013

This is what makes the American version better -

by Anonymousreply 810/03/2013

Well, the American one fucking sucked, so....

by Anonymousreply 910/03/2013

I hope Robin gets some more interesting plotlines next season. I liked her character, but most of her scenes were like watching paint dry.

Get rid of Kate Mara too. Kill her off. Can't stand her.

by Anonymousreply 1010/03/2013

I like Ian Richardson but he always played the same character no matter what he appeared in.

by Anonymousreply 1110/04/2013

The British one! When he throws the girl off the roof at the end to keep her from going public, it was awesome!?

by Anonymousreply 1210/04/2013

Another vote for the British version. Richardson was dastardly in a way that was a little fun and a little scary - clearly everyone was having a good time.

The American version takes the material too seriously. The way the character so frequently manages to subvert his enemies just isn't believable.

Spacey can be fun but the cynical world-wearniness of this performance weears thing (he's done this performance elsewhere) and it lacks the "I'm having a great time being evil" quality that kept you interested in Richardson.

by Anonymousreply 1310/04/2013

Daddeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

by Anonymousreply 1410/04/2013

I've never seen the British version, but I love the American series. I'm actually glad I didn't see the Brit one first, perhaps it would have dampened my enthusiasm for this one..

by Anonymousreply 1510/04/2013

Where can I see the British series?

by Anonymousreply 1610/04/2013

When I watch the American version I am distracted by the fact that no one ever turns enough lights on.

by Anonymousreply 1710/04/2013

Richardson of Spacey by a mile!

by Anonymousreply 1810/04/2013

R16 - Netflix has it on DVD and via streaming.

by Anonymousreply 1910/04/2013

Thanks R19. I'm only on episode 3 of the US series - should I stop and start the Brit series, or finish this one first?

by Anonymousreply 2010/04/2013

Finish the U.S. version first. No need to switch horses midstream.

by Anonymousreply 2110/04/2013

They should call it "Kevin Spacey Fails To Convince As A Straight Man: Part 27".

by Anonymousreply 2210/04/2013

I didn't see the American one, but I thought the British one was so cartoony.

by Anonymousreply 2410/04/2013

Ian Richardson was a gay as well, no?

by Anonymousreply 2510/04/2013

Spoilers below.... [R22], Kevin Spacey's character is bisexual.

by Anonymousreply 2610/04/2013

They're different. Both are good. The British one is more of a satire and has more comedy. The American one is more of a political drama with thriller elements. Let's not worship the original too much, each series ended with the same "solution" to the problem at hand. 2nd series was the best.

by Anonymousreply 2710/04/2013

Season 2 is released (all episodes) tomorrow on Netflix! Get ready to binge-watch.

by Anonymousreply 2802/13/2014

I loved the British one when it came out and it's probably the better version but Spacey's is good. I'm looking forward to binge watching season two.

by Anonymousreply 2902/13/2014

The American one is more serious and real, while the English one is more camp. Both are good, though the english version is necessarily more dated... And Robin Wright is good and has a more prominent role than the wife in the other version.

by Anonymousreply 3002/13/2014

While I enjoyed the American House of Cards season one, I did think it wasn't as good as the hype suggested. Then I discovered that the local PBS station was showing the original British House of Cards. I watched that and I very much prefer it to the American version.

This piece from The Atlantic articulates much better than I could why I found the British version to better.

[quote]It's different in the UK version. Richardson's Francis Urquhart reminds us that his is the nation whose imagination produced Iago, and Uriah Heep, and Kingsley Amis's "Lucky Jim" Dixon. This comedy here is truly cruel -- and, one layer down, even bleaker and more squalid than it seems at first. It's like the contrast between Ricky Gervais in the original UK version of The Office and Steve Carell in the knock-off role. Steve Carell is ultimately lovable; Gervais, not. Michael Dobbs, whose novel was the inspiration for both the U.K. and the U.S. House of Cards series, has told the BBC that the U.S. version was "much darker" than the British original. He is wrong -- or cynically sarcastic, like Urquhart himself.

by Anonymousreply 3102/13/2014

I'm English but prefer the American version. I saw the American one first and loved it, watched a few episodes of the British series but gave up on it. I was turned off by the campiness and it's very dated.

The American one is beautifully shot (love the opening sequence!) and more of a political drama, which is more my taste.

by Anonymousreply 3202/13/2014

I also gave up on the British "House of Cards" halfway after the first installment of the second series ("To Play the King") and haven't seen the American one. Ian Richardson is always fun to watch but I'm just not a fan of the "Respectable professional by day! Serial killer by night!" genre.

Richardson does register as gay (his Henry Higgins in "My Fair Lady" was the gayest Higgins ever, judging by the cast album) but that could be an artifact of mimesis. Claude Rains also registered as [term we do not use on this forum] because of his painstakingly trained upper class English diction (he was a Cockney and Richardson was a Scot.)

by Anonymousreply 3302/13/2014

R25 He had a wife (who he married as a young man and stayed with for the rest of his life) and according to her in an interview after his death, he once had a thing for Helen Mirren when she was starting out. And there doesn't seem to be any Alec Guiness-esque stories about him. I think it's just his old fashioned genteel manner and posh RP voice (he's actually Scottish but he would have been from the generation who had to lose their natural accent while training to be an actor)

by Anonymousreply 3402/13/2014

"He had a wife (who he married as a young man and stayed with for the rest of his life)"

Okay, that's a three-alarmer.

by Anonymousreply 3502/13/2014

Ian Richardson is brilliant in the original, the only thing is his FU now feels like a character from a bygone era, even for 1990 (which wasn't all that long ago) An old fashioned posh geezer like Urquhart would never become the leader of a party now, the current government may indeed be full of toffs but the difference is they're all much younger now.

by Anonymousreply 3602/13/2014

R35 Well I couldn't care less but if you google "Ian Richardson gay" nothing seems to turn up.

by Anonymousreply 3702/13/2014

Well r10, If they follow The British version, Kate Mata will get killed off. The British version was superior in every way.

by Anonymousreply 3802/13/2014

Ian Richardson clearly played a character that knew how to wear a mask. The fatal flaw of this current version is that Kevin Spacey isn't Wearing a mask. He's an obvious dirt bag. There's no fun for the audience in seeing the mask come off.

by Anonymousreply 3902/13/2014
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