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Record Stores

Do you miss them?

by Anonymousreply 3309/09/2013

Move to Minneapolis. We still have a bunch of 'em.

by Anonymousreply 109/06/2013

Yes, miss flipping thru the bins and have something unexpected catch my eye. Miss record stores, Borders books. Wait until Bezos has a monopoly and Internet taxes hit.

by Anonymousreply 209/07/2013

Where did all of the freaks who worked at Tower Records end up?

by Anonymousreply 309/07/2013

Cleveland here. Still dozens of great independent record stores. A bunch in nearby Columbus and Buffalo too.

Stupid bitches in NYC throw things away before you realize you still like them. Your problem, haha! Enjoy your $12 coffees.

by Anonymousreply 409/07/2013

"Where did all of the freaks who worked at Tower Records end up?"

Lisa? Your latte is ready.

by Anonymousreply 509/07/2013

Peaches

by Anonymousreply 609/08/2013

Yeah, I miss them. Spending an afternoon in a record store used to be a lot of fun.

by Anonymousreply 709/08/2013

Sort of like browsing in a Blockbustet on Saturday nite to pick up a video.

by Anonymousreply 809/08/2013

There's no challenge because the internet makes it too easy. You can't really have the thrill of discovering anything rare/treasured when nearly everything can be found online now.

I can't decide if it's good or bad. More efficient for sure, but it seems like we lost something.

by Anonymousreply 1009/09/2013

Give me the old days when you had to earn a record.

by Anonymousreply 1109/09/2013

I miss them for sure. Even with the Internet, there are still countless rare and hard to find songs/mixes/albums that are unavailable online. I really miss Tower Records as well. They seemed to have the best selection of import CD's.

by Anonymousreply 1509/09/2013

I wasted a good chunk of my teen years in record stores. I still like to peruse the vinyl at flea markets and secondhand stores - kids now will never get to appreciate the amazing cover art on albums from the 60s and 70s. I do enjoy the feeling of having everything at my fingertips online now, but will never get rid of my lp collection.

by Anonymousreply 1609/09/2013

For R4

by Anonymousreply 1709/09/2013

R13, I switched versions of iTunes and lost some songs in the process, including some downloads I'd bought on iTunes.

I had to go through such a tortured set of steps to get them back, the star among which was changing my password to something I haven't used in the past year, which virtually guarantees I won't remember it the next time I have to use it.

If I had nothing but "files" instead of CDs and LPs, and lost them because of some computer fuckup, I'd be furious. I'm not getting rid of any of them. Screw downloads.

by Anonymousreply 1909/09/2013

I hear ya, R19. I've used iTunes for years and purchased some songs under a previous username/password combo. I'll NEVER get those songs back and I've used every password that I can think of in the last 5 years.

by Anonymousreply 2009/09/2013

Yes and no. 49 yr-old here. As a teen the record stores closest to me were mall ones, like Sam Goody, Listening Booth, etc, and they had limited selection. The closest thing to an internet experience for me was the occasional 30 minute drive out to a Tower Records where their inventory as substantial and I was like a kid in a candy store. Now the internet has replaced that experience. I would rather have the internet than Sam Goody in the local mall.

by Anonymousreply 2109/09/2013

I was turned on to a lot of music I love thanks to in-store sales/promotions and personal recommendations by store employees. I guess I can still get those online, though.

by Anonymousreply 2209/09/2013

Records??!

by Anonymousreply 2409/09/2013

Yes, R23, I have heard of burning to a CDR, but, sometimes things get lost. Seeing as I have over 18,000 songs on my ipod and nearly 24,000 songs on my itunes you can understand how things might get misplaced. And these songs were bought when clouds were just cottonballs in the sky. The point is-it should no be that difficult to get the songs you legally purchased just because you forgot your password.

by Anonymousreply 2509/09/2013

[all posts by racist shit-stain #11 removed]

by Anonymousreply 2609/09/2013

We still have FYE in my area which is good for browsing ... I miss having the Virgin megastore to haunt when I visited Manhattan. What I do miss is 45's ...I used to get a $ 5 allowance and every week got five new singles at Two Guy,s. I used to do my own Top 20 every week (geek) ...yep, songs debuted, moved up and down my own chart. I also miss the 45 picture covers.

by Anonymousreply 2909/09/2013

Me, too, R29. Dan Ingram every Tuesday at 2. Well, 3 if I was in school.

by Anonymousreply 3009/09/2013

It was so exciting going to a video store on Saturday night when they first opened. There was a tiny video store across the street from me in Manhattan that specialized in foreign films and classics. So many people in that little shop (I think it's another Chinese dry cleaners now). Everyone with a friend or a date, or asking an opinion about a film. Everyone was happy and had something to look forward to. One night, it snowed for the first time in a couple of years and everyone was so excited. Cool! We can walk home in the snow and get warm inside watching a movie.

I miss being around happy people sharing an experience. No more video stores, no more music stores. Everyone walking around with headphones in their ears, looking down at some little glowing box and feverishly typing. What is so important that they have to type? "I have leaky gut too, OMG!"

by Anonymousreply 3109/09/2013

For many years I lived around the corner from the Sunset Blvd. Tower Records. I loved killing time browsing there.

I was glad when Amoeba came along.

When I moved out of the country, I took my old LPs to Amoeba and was surprises when one of them fetched 50 bucks. I wonder what price tag they put on it?

by Anonymousreply 3209/09/2013

The HMV in my neighborhood came and went with breathtaking speed. The place was packed to the gills when it opened. I saw that I could buy the songs I liked and they would put them on a cassette for me. A "party mix"! The next time I went there with a list of songs, they no longer offered the service. It was only about a month later.

They had an escalator that you had to wait on a line to take downstairs because there were so many customers. A year later the store was almost empty of customers.

It closed.

It had replaced a Tower Records that had gone out of business.

by Anonymousreply 3309/09/2013
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