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Vertigo is on again

And while I always enjoy it, I'm not sure I completely understand it.

by Anonymousreply 10312/31/2014

It's about overwhelming obsession, OP.

You're welcome.

by Anonymousreply 109/05/2013

I love this movie

by Anonymousreply 209/05/2013

You can sum up the movie like this . . .

You always manipulate the ones you love.

by Anonymousreply 309/05/2013

what's not to understand? Becoming obsessed with someone who isn't really what they portray to the public and is unattainable. Every gay man has done that.

by Anonymousreply 409/06/2013

I adore this movie! And it does get better with repeat viewings, even lots of repeat viewings, which is probably why the critics love it so.

As to what it's about... yes, loving someone who doesn't really exist. It's part of every relationship, we all delude ourselves about our partner, so it's universal in a way. But it's also about Hitchcock's habit of creating his ideal woman for films, of turning low-rent bimboes into unreal perfection.

by Anonymousreply 509/06/2013

I have probably seen this movie at least 20 times and it is one of my all time favorites. I think Kim Novak is very good in it - though some think she was over her head. Love the Judy Barton character.

by Anonymousreply 609/06/2013

Hitchcock was the best. Did anyone see Sabotage - 1936 - with Sylvia Sidney? Great movie that I just saw recently. It was less refined than the Hitchcock we think of in the 50's - 60's. no glamour.

by Anonymousreply 709/06/2013

What I don't understand is why, after he sees the necklace, and the jig is really up, does he take her back to the tower?

by Anonymousreply 809/06/2013

I don't believe there was ever a time when parking was that easy in San Francisco.

by Anonymousreply 1009/06/2013

Kim Novak gives a great performance. There are actresses who have won Oscars for less.

by Anonymousreply 1109/06/2013

If you like the suspenseful ending of this movie, check out "Black Narcissus". It influenced Hitchcock greatly in his conception of Vertigo. It will also give you the shivers.

by Anonymousreply 1209/06/2013

Wow, I'd never thought of that before, r12. I can definitely see the relationship between the endings. Love "Black Narcissus."

by Anonymousreply 1309/06/2013

I'm watching Rear Window again at the moment ... one always picks up new little things, how Thelma folds the sheets, how unappealing Stewart looked with his top off ....

by Anonymousreply 1509/06/2013

"Kim Novak gives a great performance. There are actresses who have won Oscars for less."

Believe it or not, very few people ever won Oscars for appearing in Hitchcock movies. Anthony Perkins wasn't even nominated for Psycho (which is INSANE).

by Anonymousreply 1609/06/2013

"I adore this movie! And it does get better with repeat viewings, even lots of repeat viewings, which is probably why the critics love it so."

I've hated this movie from the first, and repeat viewings haven't changed my opinion. They lose me right at the start: We see Jimmy Stewart hanging by his fingers from the roof of a very tall building. It looks like he's about to lose his grip at any second, and there is no one right near him to pull him up. Next shot: We see Stewart in his apartment some time later, apparently having sustained only a minor injury from this experience.

The movie is filled with occurrences that don't make any sense in the real world. So I just don't get it, unless the ENTIRE movie is supposed to be a nightmare. Has anyone advanced this theory? That would be a cheap way out of making a movie that makes sense, wouldn't it?

by Anonymousreply 1709/06/2013

Jimmy Stewart in love with a woman he tries to make over in the image of a dead woman who was really that woman all along posing as a completely different woman.

by Anonymousreply 1809/06/2013

His apartment set from "Vertigo" uses the same three-window setup as the apartment set in "Rear Window."

by Anonymousreply 1909/06/2013

A nice cinematic nod to VERTIGO is OBSESSION.

I think I prefer it actually

by Anonymousreply 2009/06/2013

I find it very difficult to believe someone as beautiful as Kim Novak would ever fall in love with a dull ugly nerd like Jimmy Stewart. He was the Ron Jeremy of fifties mainstream movies, although with competition from Bogart.

by Anonymousreply 2109/06/2013

I really, really, really don't like this film. I don't know why. I've tried to watch it several times over the years and I've never made it all the way through. I think it's just because I never liked Stewart that much in the first place, and his character in this film is so weird and nasty.

by Anonymousreply 2209/06/2013

A clue: his character is supposed to be weird and nasty.

by Anonymousreply 2309/06/2013

Jimmy Stewart ruins this film. If only Hitch had found someone else...

by Anonymousreply 2409/06/2013

I've tried three times to watch this, because it's so beloved. But I never make it through. I just don't care what happens to them.

by Anonymousreply 2509/06/2013

He's really weird in the final scenes.

by Anonymousreply 2609/06/2013

[quote]They lose me right at the start: We see Jimmy Stewart hanging by his fingers from the roof of a very tall building. It looks like he's about to lose his grip at any second, and there is no one right near him to pull him up. Next shot: We see Stewart in his apartment some time later, apparently having sustained only a minor injury from this experience.

Vertigo is a dream-like film, and I think when you look at it literally, one overlooks what it's all about.

Re Stewart suspended in the opening sequence: as critic Robin Wood wrote, "The effect is of having him, throughout the film, metaphorically hanging over a great abyss." Or put another way: "the tension between the desire to fall and the dread of falling."

It's not a coincidence that the last image of Vertigo is of Stewart with his arms slightly outstretched and his hands open.

by Anonymousreply 2709/07/2013

I love those dreamy scenes of his following her around San Francisco - but yes the whole film is about the dread of falling, after that pre-credit sequence of him hanging on to the gutter while the cop falls. Obviously he is rescued but Hitch does not need to show us that, just the aftermath where he has resigned from the force because of his fear of heights.

Bel Geddes is wonderful too as Midge. The bit that does not work for me is the blank reaction of Novak when Stewart suddenly turns up at her hotel room door - she does not know he followed her in the street, so here he is again and she looks totally blank, after deceiving him. And why does she put on that necklace, does she want him to know how they deceived him?

by Anonymousreply 2809/07/2013

She briefly sees him as she is talking to her girlfriends from work but doesn't let on to anyone that she recognizes him. She's not stupid and I'm sure she knew that one day they would spot each other. After all, she didn't leave town.

by Anonymousreply 2909/07/2013

Her look and makeup though as the second woman is really trashy looking, you would hardly imagine he would see any of the original Madeline in her.

by Anonymousreply 3009/07/2013

Thats the other thing: shouldn't she have left town - then he would never have found her.

by Anonymousreply 3109/07/2013

I hate everything about this dated film. And I love most Hitchcock movies (don't get me started on Psycho or Rear Window).

To think it's been voted best film of all time by the BFI while Mulholland Drive (a film about the illusion of cinema, no less) says a lot about how behind those established film critics are at the moment.

by Anonymousreply 3209/07/2013

I her recent TCM interview Kim spoke about how much she hated wearing the grey suit and that it was really the only disagreement she had with Hitch.

But years later, with hindsight, she realized how brilliant it was of him to make her wear it as it brought out in her a woman who was not comfortable in her own skin.

Fabulous interview, btw, if you have not seen it!

by Anonymousreply 3309/07/2013

"Thats the other thing: shouldn't she have left town - then he would never have found her."

She'd not only developed real feelings for him in the first act, she quickly realized the earlier events had driven him crazy and she felt horribly guilty. She stayed and put up with his crazy makeover because of the guilt, she wanted to help him and make up for what she'd done.

Like I've always said, you don't really get this movie until you see the events from Judy's POV. Even her attraction to the aged Scotty isn't that unbelievable, she's a low-rent bimbo and her last BF was much more likely to push women into the surf than pull them out.

by Anonymousreply 3409/07/2013

I saw that interview r33. It was great. Kim came across very well although perhaps a bit damaged by her Hollywood career. She went on and on about mental illness. Sounds very happy now. I guess she never had kids.

by Anonymousreply 3509/07/2013

"Vertigo is a dream-like film, and I think when you look at it literally, one overlooks what it's all about."

Sorry, R27. I think any movie like this has to be grounded in reality before the weird stuff starts happening. And although I have huge problems with the plot and characters of the film throughout, that bit right at the beginning really destroys the whole movie for me before it even really gets started, because from what we see, there is NO WAY Jimmy Stewart's character would not have fallen from the roof of that building and been killed.

So yes, R28, I do think "Hitch" should have shown us exactly how he was rescued, because it's 100 percent unbelievable to me.

by Anonymousreply 3609/13/2013

Novak's grey suit and the "cool" musical score (Bernard Hermann?) were both meant to evoke the soft, dreamlike quality of San Francisco's ever-present fog.

Re: The Barbara Bel Geddes character. Can someone explain to me why she just disappears right in the middle of the film? It's the same type of mysterious vanishing that happens to Thelma Ritter In All About Eve.

Is it that the character has served her purpose and there is no need for her anymore?

by Anonymousreply 3709/13/2013

Vertigo and Rear Window, Hitchcock in his highest level, classics.

by Anonymousreply 3809/13/2013

You couldn't pay me enough to see it.

by Anonymousreply 3909/13/2013

"The Barbara Bel Geddes character. Can someone explain to me why she just disappears right in the middle of the film? "

She probably realized that she was wasting her life. She had always loved Scotty, and presumably thought they'd get together someday. But when Scotty fell for someone else, and was so batshit crazy for her that losing her drove him to a mental hospital, she realized that it was never going to happen. She'd had enough.

Any other questions?

by Anonymousreply 4009/14/2013

Midge will be there again to pick up the pieces once more while Scotty recovers from losing Kim the second time, and this time is for good.

The big mistake in Rear Window is getting Stewart topless for his massage by Thelma - his body looks so unappeaaling ... would any woman, least of all Grace Kelly, find that attractive?

Thelma incidentally vanishes from All About Eve, when the story moves away from Margo's apartment - for the second half where Eve and Karen and Addison take central stage. Margo is also sidelined then to a degree, so there is no more room for Birdie.

by Anonymousreply 4109/14/2013

Jeff has an exciting lifestyle and is a challenge, since he's not keen on marriage. That's why Lisa is attracted to Stewart in Rear Window, not because of his looks.

by Anonymousreply 4309/14/2013

When Midge repaints that portrait and puts her own face and eyeglasses on it -- hilarious! But Scotty didn't think so, which was also hilarious.

by Anonymousreply 4409/14/2013

That was probably the only part I liked about the movie, R44

A companion movie to this piece would be Gaslight. Needless to say I like Gaslight much better. Vertigo is boring, boring, boring, annoying to boot.

by Anonymousreply 4509/14/2013

I looked at Psycho again last night r42 - and noted 3 things about it:

she only steals forty thousand dollars,

the opening titles state it is December 11 - but there is no mention or look of christmas,

and yes, the toilet bowl - first time one was seen or flushed in an American movie, though Marion is only flushing away her torn page with the figures on it.

The score also is so terrific, it is not just the shrieking violins of the shower scene.

Not sure though if I want to see its latest reboot as Bates Motel, on tv.

by Anonymousreply 4609/15/2013

Bates Motel isn't good, except for Vera Farmiga's over the top performance. Rich Juzwiak at Gawker put together a reel of her best meltdowns.

by Anonymousreply 4709/15/2013

r42, in an interview with Dick Cavett, Alfred Hitchcock said he learned after the fact that what happened to the boy was a mistake. I think the interview is on youtube. It's been shown on TCM.

by Anonymousreply 4809/16/2013

[quote]the opening titles state it is December 11 - but there is no mention or look of christmas,

There are Christmas decorations displayed when she's driving out of town with the money.

by Anonymousreply 4909/16/2013

[quote]she only steals forty thousand dollars

That is about $240,000 in today's money. That could support two frugal fugitives for a long time. A real woman doing Marion's job probably made no more than three thousand dollars a year.

by Anonymousreply 5009/16/2013

They had to put the December date on Psycho because when the 2nd unit went out to film the background shots they accidentally filmed all those Christmas decorations

by Anonymousreply 5109/16/2013

My favorite character from Vertigo is Midge (Barbara Bel Geddes). Of course I like Bel Geddes is just about anything. Midge obviously loved Scottie so much and he was completely oblivious.

by Anonymousreply 5209/16/2013

Awesome movie, just shown at SF Castro Theatre - in 4K. Beautiful.

by Anonymousreply 5310/18/2014

Why didn't Scotty question why didn't Madeleine jump OFF the GG Bridge, rather than NEAR it? That always irked me.

by Anonymousreply 5410/18/2014

[quote]And while I always enjoy it, I'm not sure I completely understand it.

Stop watching it on Univision, were it's dubbed in Spanish.

by Anonymousreply 5510/18/2014

I love it, I love Obsession, I love that final shot in Vertigo. One of my favorite final scenes.

by Anonymousreply 5610/18/2014

[quote]Why didn't Scotty question why didn't Madeleine jump OFF the GG Bridge, rather than NEAR it? That always irked me.

She knew he was following. It was all set up so he could "rescue" her.

by Anonymousreply 5710/18/2014

Scotty is an unstable, ill person, and this is the only movie in which I find James Stewart sexy. And that's disturbing. And it's supposed to be.

A GREAT movie.

by Anonymousreply 5810/18/2014

I love VERTIGO. But every time I watch it I hope Stewart will reach out and grab Novak before she falls.

by Anonymousreply 5910/18/2014

Also love this James Bond medley from the BBC Proms. The conductor looks like a very excited character from the Yellow Submarine movie.

by Anonymousreply 6210/18/2014

R61 is tiresome.

by Anonymousreply 6310/18/2014

The location shots in Vertigo are great, which makes one wonder why the house in Psycho looks so ridiculous and inauthentic.

by Anonymousreply 6410/19/2014

"High Anxiety" was on TCM today.

by Anonymousreply 6510/19/2014

"Why didn't Scotty question why didn't Madeleine jump OFF the GG Bridge, rather than NEAR it? That always irked me."

She knew he was following. It was all set up so he could "rescue" her. (R57)

R57, what I mean to say is after that incident, wouldn't Scotty query Elster that if his wife wanted to commit suicide, wouldn't a fool-proof method be jumping from ATOP the GG Bridge? I know it would end the movie (and certainly not part of the devious plan), but it is a curious and practical query to anyone.

by Anonymousreply 6610/19/2014

Why would a genuinely suicidal woman jump off the rocks at Ft. Point and not the Golden Gate bridge?

The Golden Gate bridge walkways are full of tourists who might stop a jumper, while the spot she chose is nearly private. It's a long walk out from the GG bridge parking lots to a good jumping spot, and she was wearing uncomfortable high heels. Maybe Fort Point has some association with the Legend of Carlotta.

There are a lot of reasons a man might not question that particular act, starting with the futility of trying to understand the motivations of crazy people.

by Anonymousreply 6710/20/2014

What was the metaphorical significance of the redwood trees in the film?

by Anonymousreply 6810/20/2014

Well, R64, you see---it was two different films. That is to say that the film "Psycho" had nothing to do with the film "The Birds" and vice-versa.

by Anonymousreply 6910/20/2014

They brought the past into the present, R68.

And they looked great.

by Anonymousreply 7010/20/2014

Masterpiece. My all-time favorite film. Anyone else catch it tonight?

by Anonymousreply 7110/20/2014

Martin, I am watching it on Blu Ray now. What a great movie. Kim Novak is a revelation.

by Anonymousreply 7210/20/2014

R69 - what does "The Birds" have to do with R64 referencing "Psycho" house with "Vertigo" locations?

by Anonymousreply 7310/20/2014

R72, Revelation indeed. I lost my virginity to Vertigo.

by Anonymousreply 7410/20/2014

Psycho was a better film - you really feel her anxiety as she is escaping and imagines the police chasing her. But the Victorian heap of a manse that looks like a child's drawing of a haunted house is just ridiculous.

by Anonymousreply 7510/20/2014

I know I'm in the minority here but I've never liked any of Hitchcock's color films. They're all too....colorful....for the subject matter.

Much prefer the b&ws: The Lady Vanishes, The 39 Steps, Shadow of a Doubt, Strangers on a Train, Lifeboat, Notorious, Spellbound, even Psycho.

All of his color films look very artificial (and unthreatening) to me.

by Anonymousreply 7610/20/2014

"Revelation indeed. I lost my virginity to Vertigo."

Martin. That means you lost it at about age 15 when "Vertigo" was released.

by Anonymousreply 7710/21/2014

They made a movie about Michael Jackson's skin condition?

by Anonymousreply 7810/23/2014

Hee Hee!!

by Anonymousreply 7910/23/2014

They score owes a lot to Wagner's opera "Tristan und Isolde", to put it politely.

And R76, this is the only one of Hitchcock's color films that I love unreservedly. There's a lot of 19th-century love/death romanticism about "Vertigo", and the lush, painterly colors really bring it out. They also make the most of the setting, there are times when you can see the fog creeping across the top of the frame, and I can *smell* the cool San Francisco air. You can't do that in black and white!

by Anonymousreply 8010/23/2014

I saw "Vertigo" in its original release in theaters. Too young to really understand everything, but was very surprised at how good Kim Novak was in the film.

Lately I read that Columbia lend Novak to Hitchcock in return for Stewart to star with Novak in "Bell, Book and Candle" at Columbia. A great deal for all involved, especially Novak. "Vertigo" is her one great film, glad she's still around to enjoy its success.

by Anonymousreply 8110/23/2014

Ray Milland is awesome in "Dial M for Murder"

by Anonymousreply 8210/25/2014

This film makes David Fincher's movies look like Marvel crap.

by Anonymousreply 8310/25/2014

Fincher's on fumes. Vertigo is psychosis for the ages.

by Anonymousreply 8410/25/2014

I always thought that this movie had an ancient, faraway quality to it, as though it was filmed a thousand years ago in an alternate universe. I still have a hard time believing that Kim Novak is a real person, who is still walking among us.

by Anonymousreply 8510/26/2014

I wish I could get into this film, but I just can't, and I love and adore Hitchcock: NOTORIOUS is probably my all-time favorite, THE BIRDS, SHADOW OF A DOUBT, NORTH BY NORTHWEST...

On and on.

Maybe it's too dry, maybe I just have too much trouble trying to follow the plot.

I feel like I'm missing the party.

by Anonymousreply 8610/26/2014

It's kind of amazing how regard for this movie has risen over the decades and today it is on top of many best film lists.

by Anonymousreply 8710/26/2014

The Saul Bass one sheet.

by Anonymousreply 8810/26/2014

San Francisco never looked more beautiful.

by Anonymousreply 8910/31/2014

I love this portrait of Kim Novak photographed in the florist shop featured in the film. NO actress today who is the same age as Ms. Novak was when this was shot could possibly project the timeless elegance,mystery and femininity she displays so effortlessly here.

by Anonymousreply 9010/31/2014

[quote]San Francisco never looked more beautiful

Nor did Kim.

by Anonymousreply 9110/31/2014

So many people think Grace Kelly was the ultimate Hitchcock blonde but personally I find Kim Novak and 'Tippi' Hedren FAR more compelling and interesting to watch than Grace, whom I've always found to be too remote,patrician and genteel.

Also, I wish Mattel would come out with more Hitchcock Barbies...I thought after "The Birds" Barbie came out they would introduce a complete line of dolls.

A "Madeline", "Marion" and "Marnie" Barbie would look so cool next to the "The Birds","Rear Window" and "To Catch a Thief" dolls I already have in my pop culture display case in my theater room.

by Anonymousreply 9210/31/2014

Eve Marie Saint was the ultimate Hitchcock blonde.

by Anonymousreply 9311/01/2014

The color is so rich. Nobody even tries to have lush imagery like this in modern American popular movies. It's all steely digital blues (like most superhero movies). The most you can hope for is "Gone Girl"'s dust storm gold palette. It doesn't matter what they say, Technicolor film is still light years ahead of digital for atmosphere and mood.

by Anonymousreply 9411/01/2014

People say they fall in love too quickly and finding parking spaces so easily in San Francisco is unlikely, but movies must compress certain things. We can't watch them on 6 or more dates or sweat while they search for available parking - it's too time consuming. Marvelous movie.

by Anonymousreply 9511/27/2014

Absolutely R94! Nothing will ever take the place of Technicolor. And so true about the cold metallic blue most digital movies project these day.

by Anonymousreply 9611/27/2014

Another one who misses the lush, romantic, saturated color of Technicolor.

by Anonymousreply 9711/27/2014

Nicely put, R85.

Vertigo is Hitchcock's darkest and most personal film. It, really, is a story about a man who loses the love of his life, not once, but twice.

by Anonymousreply 9811/27/2014

I just got back from the Hollywood Costume Exhibit in Los Angeles, and it's so fabulous that I'm going to start a new thread on it in the morning, when there will be someone here to read it.

But they had this green costume on display (along with Marilyn's white subway dress, Darth Vader's costume, Helen Lawson's sequined pantsuit, etc.). But this outfit intrigued me in particular, because when you see it up close you realize it's made up of separates that don't match. This girl is supposed to be poor and low-class, and her skirt, sweater, blouse, and pin are all made up of shades of green that don't quite go with each other. The outfit is supposed to look bad, but damn, film just doesn't show HOW bad it really is.

by Anonymousreply 9912/03/2014

100!

by Anonymousreply 10012/03/2014

A wondrous film - full of imagination and beauty.

by Anonymousreply 10112/31/2014

r31 - don't ever become a writer.

by Anonymousreply 10212/31/2014

One of Hitchcock's best and brilliant.

by Anonymousreply 10312/31/2014
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