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Common Datalounge grammar and usage errors

[all posts by ham-fisted troll a removed.]

by Anonymousreply 11107/14/2014

OP; Good one on pointing out the last one especially.

by Anonymousreply 109/05/2013

Wolferine.

by Anonymousreply 209/05/2013

"I seen" for "I saw", "I have seen", or "I've seen" ... this is the one that irritates me the most, I instantly think less of someone the second it comes out of their mouth.

by Anonymousreply 309/05/2013

Use to for used to.

by Anonymousreply 409/05/2013

"Myself" instead of "Me".

by Anonymousreply 509/05/2013

[quote]Use to for used to.

I've seen this so often that I finally looked it up to be sure I wasn't wrong.

by Anonymousreply 609/05/2013

Oh dear!

by Anonymousreply 809/05/2013

Those examples are mostly spelling errors, not grammar or usage errors.

by Anonymousreply 1009/05/2013

"it's" for "its" and vice versa.

"prolly" instead of "probably"

by Anonymousreply 1109/05/2013

I've seen a lot of "led/lead" weirdness lately.

There's another one that's been bugging me but of course now I can't think of it.

by Anonymousreply 1209/05/2013

Using "that" where "who" would be correct.....Drives me bananas!

by Anonymousreply 1309/05/2013

"I could care less" for "I couldn't care less"

by Anonymousreply 1409/05/2013

"Should have went." I hear that ALL the time these days.

by Anonymousreply 1509/06/2013

"hes" instead of "his"

by Anonymousreply 1609/06/2013

Definately - should be "definitely"

by Anonymousreply 1709/06/2013

"Your" for "you're.". It's kind of ironic that homos can't do homophones.

by Anonymousreply 1809/06/2013

R17, I see "defiantly" for "definitely." Ugh

by Anonymousreply 1909/06/2013

Using "discrete" instead of "discreet."

"Discreet" means private, under the radar, careful. As in, a discreet conversation.

"Discrete" means individual, detached, separated. As in, earthquakes were recorded in small, discrete clusters.

by Anonymousreply 2009/06/2013

This Slate article is appropriately linked here.

by Anonymousreply 2109/06/2013

R20, I laugh when I see a CL ad saying, "Must be discrete." I always want to answer and ask them, "What do you mean exactly?"

by Anonymousreply 2209/06/2013

Those who make these mistakes are not going to bother reading this thread (sadly).

by Anonymousreply 2309/06/2013

I'm expecting someone to respond with "Die in a Greece fire."

by Anonymousreply 2409/06/2013

Irregardless of the regardless-isity thing, or whatever.

by Anonymousreply 2509/06/2013

I love R13

by Anonymousreply 2609/06/2013

"entitled" for "possessing a sense of entitlement".

It's everywhere and it drives me NUTS!

by Anonymousreply 2709/06/2013

Using "drug" as the past tense for "to drag."

Saying things like, "Him and his friends went out" or "Me and my sister walked away." There's a very easy rule for this. Remove the second person and say the sentence as if only one person is involved in the action.

"Him went out."

"Me walked away. "

You see? It doesn't work.

So it's "He and his friends," not "Him and his friends." And "My sister and I walked away," not "Me and my sister."

It works.

by Anonymousreply 2809/06/2013

"Old bitties," has appeared again.

by Anonymousreply 2909/06/2013

Very commonly I see "orientated" and "disorientated."

It's "oriented" and "disoriented."

I was grossed out recently by a news article saying that it traffic was shut down for several hours while first responders "extricated" the deceased driver from the car. First, I wondered why there is even a word "extricated" when "extracted" means the same thing. Second, I really think they could have worded that a little more sensitively. Traffic could have been shut down while the deceased was removed from the scene.

by Anonymousreply 3009/06/2013

I've noticed that when some "should of" people get an "Oh, dear," they have no idea what's wrong.

by Anonymousreply 3109/06/2013

a lot. Dammit it is two words. A LOT. not alot.

by Anonymousreply 3209/06/2013

[quote]"entitled" for "possessing a sense of entitlement".

r27, how about we just stop saying that? You bitches need to find a new insult anyway, this one has been done to death.

by Anonymousreply 3309/06/2013

[quote]"entitled" for "possessing a sense of entitlement".

Huh? That usage is perfectly legit. OTOH, it bugs me when I see it used instead of "titled" in context of a book, movie, etc.

by Anonymousreply 3409/06/2013

I just saw a post today that used "who's" instead of the proper "whose."

And don't get me started on "lie" vs. "lay."

by Anonymousreply 3509/06/2013

[quote]You [bold]bitches[/bold] need to find a new insult anyway

That's right on target, Jackass.

by Anonymousreply 3609/06/2013

R34

Perfectly legit? No, it isn't. "Entitled" means "justified in receiving something", or "genuinely owed something", as in "a worker is entitled to his wages", not "believing oneself to be entitled". The term for that is "having a sense of entitlement" or "feeling entitled".

I hate misuse of this word because it destroys the word by distorting its meaning, taking a useful word out of the English language. Now no one can use it anymore because it has a different, incorrect meaning which makes no sense.

Also, it contradicts what the speaker actually wants to say, which is that the person is not really entitled to what they seem to think they are. So it makes the speaker sound like an idiot:

"Oh that Gwyneth Paltrow is so entitled". She is? Then why are you bitching about her?

by Anonymousreply 3709/06/2013

The "doggie dog world" is really common. I see it on more and more message boards. It makes me wonder what people think they are saying. "It's a doggie dog world" doesn't mean anything.

by Anonymousreply 3809/06/2013

Thank you, R20, that was the other one that's been bugging me that I couldn't think of earlier.

by Anonymousreply 3909/06/2013

Maybe the speaker means that there are invisible quote marks around the word entitled, thus meaning he means it ironically or sarcastically.

by Anonymousreply 4009/06/2013

[quote]First, I wondered why there is even a word "extricated" when "extracted" means the same thing.

First, have you never heard of synonyms? Many English words have identical or similar meanings.

Second, "extract" and "extricate" really don't mean the same thing. To extract something is to remove it from the larger whole that it is part of, as in extracting the juice from an orange. To extricate something is to remove something that is stuck inside something else (but unlike juice in an orange, does not belong there), as in extricating a dead body from a totaled car, a fat man from a too-small chair, your head from your ass, etc.

by Anonymousreply 4109/06/2013

Nah, r40, if you've spent any time on DL, you should have seen that dozens or more posters here think "entitled" and "possessing a FALSE sense of entitlement" mean the same thing, when in fact they have opposite meanings.

by Anonymousreply 4209/06/2013

Snuck for sneaked.

by Anonymousreply 4309/06/2013

'Presently' to describe something happening now. Currently is correct.

by Anonymousreply 4409/06/2013

r44, "currently" might be correct for your writing style. They mean the same thing.

by Anonymousreply 4509/06/2013

Boring instead of BORING!

by Anonymousreply 4609/06/2013

Yes, r44, "presently" can mean either "soon" or "currently." As the link below notes, many people mistakenly believe that the latter usage is incorrect, but it's really not.

by Anonymousreply 4709/06/2013

That hanged is the past tense of hang when referring to the act of hanging some one. He was hanged for stealing a goat, not he was hung for stealing a goat, otherwise people would be stealing a lot of goats.

by Anonymousreply 4809/06/2013

[quote]Very commonly I see "orientated" and "disorientated." It's "oriented" and "disoriented."

In the US, yes. But "orientated" and "disorientated" are widely used in the UK, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand.

by Anonymousreply 4909/06/2013

"Hanged" vs. "hung" is pretty minor compared to the grammatical disaster you've wrought is just two short almost-sentences, r48.

by Anonymousreply 5009/06/2013

I think most of the grammatical errors made on DL are by the same one or two people.

Get ready for a lot more. My son and his friends don't care one bit for spelling or grammar and their schools couldn't care less. They're never marked wrong. Spelling doesn't count. Grammar doesn't count. It's their IDEAS that are important, they say. And their teachers agree.

Frankly, I don't think their teachers understand grammar and spelling rules. They are some of the stupidest people I've ever met. Could be the school district. You have to inherit a job with the school district. You can't apply and be hired because you're the best candidate.

by Anonymousreply 5109/06/2013

[quote]Frankly, I don't think their teachers understand grammar and spelling rules.

BINGO!!!!!!

High school students who read at a 5th grade level go on to college. They continue through college at the same reading level. Before you know it, they're teachers.

by Anonymousreply 5209/06/2013

[quote]compared to the grammatical disaster you've wrought is just two short almost-sentences

Oops. Speaking of grammatical disasters, that should have been "IN just two short sentences."

by Anonymousreply 5309/06/2013

What state is this, R52?

by Anonymousreply 5409/06/2013

[quote] It makes me wonder what people think they are saying. "It's a doggie dog world" doesn't mean anything.

Most people DON'T think about what they're writing. They simply repeat what they think they heard somewhere, without bothering to reason it out. I'm a college teacher, and I'm amazed by the common words and phrases that students get wrong. I recently had a student write a paper accusing the media of always "sugar coding" the truth.

by Anonymousreply 5509/06/2013

One of the worst:

"If I would have known..."

by Anonymousreply 5609/06/2013

'cruelty' for 'kindness' or 'compassion.'

by Anonymousreply 5709/06/2013

R42

That's an improvement, although a "sense of entitlement" stands alone as a pervasive attitude which goes beyond any true entitlement in any individual situation.

R40

It never appears in print with quotation marks. I guess I could give the benefit of the doubt to verbal speakers and give SOME ease to the grammatical stick up my butt.

by Anonymousreply 5809/06/2013

r36, "jackass" is not a proper noun, you jackass.

by Anonymousreply 5909/06/2013

"Amount" used for count nouns: "the amount of people"

by Anonymousreply 6009/06/2013

[quote]Perfectly legit? No, it isn't. "Entitled" means "justified in receiving something", or "genuinely owed something", as in "a worker is entitled to his wages", not "believing oneself to be entitled". The term for that is "having a sense of entitlement" or "feeling entitled".

[quote]I hate misuse of this word because it destroys the word by distorting its meaning, taking a useful word out of the English language. Now no one can use it anymore because it has a different, incorrect meaning which makes no sense.

Language changes. Deal with it.

by Anonymousreply 6109/06/2013

"Change out" or "change up" for "change."

by Anonymousreply 6209/06/2013

"Sign off" for "sign".

This is one of the most annoying for me! You "sign off" a radio broadcast; you "sign" a paper.

by Anonymousreply 6309/06/2013

R63- But you can sign off on a project.

by Anonymousreply 6409/06/2013

R61

Ndlajn$$4ere aIns;lde alkjenrys ansliner aslkjdl 9anv09 3 an""9 nkwsoe00 nvaLH L eRR:- JNOUdnne NN880w34" ...reL89355

I'm sure you appreciate my above message, since you don't care about intelligible communication.

by Anonymousreply 6509/06/2013

"Continue on". "Continue" is sufficient.

by Anonymousreply 6609/06/2013

Using "too" or "as well" when you mean "either."

"I didn't like him as well."

by Anonymousreply 6709/06/2013

Many people don't know when to use "effect" and "affect" properly.

When in doubt, just keep "effect" strictly a noun, and "affect" strictly a verb, and save yourself the embarrassment.

by Anonymousreply 6809/06/2013

r45, At present, means now. Presently is in the near future.

by Anonymousreply 6909/06/2013

R61 seems to think that language changes on its own, like mold growing on old bread -- can't be prevented, bound to happen over time, we just have to put up with it!

The type of change being complained about here is not caused by some inexorable force of nature, it's the result of ignoramuses making mistakes that are perpetuated by other careless users. Educated people with standards need not accept such sloppiness merely because it's widespread.

The concept of language evolution does not refer to mere change, but to progress, such as good slang & new words that meet a need. "Uptight" is an onomatopetic term for "tense" -- "google" as a verb is an efficient way to say "use a search engine to find information about a subject on the internet". Those words are creative and serve a purpose -- mumbo jumbo such as "irregardless" and "I could care less" are just plain errors and will never be anything more no matter how many illiterate people repeat them.

by Anonymousreply 7009/06/2013

Bravo R70!

by Anonymousreply 7109/06/2013

[quote]"Should of" for "should have"

There is an exception where "should of" is gleefully acceptable:

"I should of went"

by Anonymousreply 7209/06/2013

[quote] mumbo jumbo such as "irregardless" and "I could care less" are just plain errors and will never be anything more no matter how many illiterate people repeat them

Not completely true. Many barbarisms (for instance, "gonna", "wanna" in spoken English, and "Could I have a soda?" used to mean "May I...")do eventually find a way into acceptance in the language. Moreover, egregiously incorrect syntax (or solecisms), like ending a sentence in a preposition, also can get a pass, due to common usage ("due to" is another example!).

It's just that purists like me just have to put up with them and cringe while the change is happening. I suggest you do the same. "Could care less" is already there. On the other hand, redundancies like "irregardless", or "I don't know nobody" will never make the transition.

by Anonymousreply 7309/06/2013

The one I'm seeing everywhere lately is "payed." I get that some words are commonly misspelled, but why is it that people suddenly start misspelling the same word in the same way?

by Anonymousreply 7409/06/2013

R73, of course the world is fraught with bad behavior of many kinds. I know I can't prevent it, but that doesn't mean I have to engage in it myself, & I'm free to look down on those who do.

Whichever biblical character it was who cautioned us against judging others was not referring to sins of grammar (in which I include syntax, usage, spelling, & punctuation).

By the way: Sept. 24 is National Punctuation Day!

by Anonymousreply 7509/06/2013

The stupidest kid on my block became a teacher. He was left back twice. He went to a state college that specialized in teaching kids with learning disabilities. He married the daughter of the local school district superintendent.

by Anonymousreply 7609/06/2013

[all posts by ham-fisted troll a removed.]

by Anonymousreply 7709/06/2013

Adding apostrophes for no reason. Eg. The Obama's are a stunning couple.

Using "then" rather than "than". Eg. I like peanuts much better then cashews.

Drives me crazy.

by Anonymousreply 7809/06/2013

Let's add "per say" to "doggie dog" and "sugar coding." Are those are technically all mondgreens, or does mondegreen only apply to misheard song lyrics?

by Anonymousreply 7909/06/2013

"Wah lah!"

by Anonymousreply 8009/06/2013

[quote]"I don't know nobody" will never make the transition.

I ain't never got nothin' from nobody, no time!

And until I get somethin' from somebody, sometime,

I don't intend to do nothin' for nobody, no time!

by Anonymousreply 8109/06/2013

[quote] "Wah lah!"

Oh Lord, when I see this one I want to crawl under a rock on behalf of the poor soul who uttered it.

by Anonymousreply 8209/07/2013

"then" for "than"

"He's gayer then me"

by Anonymousreply 8309/07/2013

Just slightly off topic but I'm driven insane by the standard American broadcast pronunciation of DRAMATIC. They pronounce it "drurr-matic". The over-pronounce an 'r' where no 'r' exists!

by Anonymousreply 8409/07/2013

Using "myself" instead of "me" or "I."

by Anonymousreply 8509/07/2013

"based off" instead of "based on"

by Anonymousreply 8609/07/2013

R85 I'm noticing that happening everywhere these days, and it seems to cut across generations too. WTF is up with that?

by Anonymousreply 8709/07/2013

Wahlah=Voila? Doggie dog=dog eat dog?

"Must of" for "must've" or "must have"

I've dropped a few corkers in my posts from time to time, but it's pointless to offer up a correction, just take your whacks from Mme. Eaux Deere and carry on.

by Anonymousreply 8809/07/2013

R85 and R87: I live in Ireland, and over here the "myself" thing is very common and has been around for ages. It's used by all generations: "You will be meeting with Ann and myself." Some misguided people may use it because they think it sounds more "elegant" or modest than "me," but it's debatable whether it is actually incorrect. Like I said, it is fairly ingrained in Hiberno-English. I even know a guy who refers to his wife as "herself."

by Anonymousreply 8909/07/2013

site/sight

Site is a place Sight is vision

by Anonymousreply 9009/07/2013

'FANK YOU' For Thank you.

by Anonymousreply 9109/07/2013

People on DL often use "straight" when they really mean "bi" or "gay".

by Anonymousreply 9209/07/2013

[quote]Some misguided people may use it because they think it sounds more "elegant" or modest than "me," but it's debatable whether it is actually incorrect.

No, it's not debatable; it is actually, definitely incorrect.

by Anonymousreply 9309/07/2013

Using anxious when a person means eager. And nauseous for nauseated.

by Anonymousreply 9409/07/2013

"As far as..." not followed by "goes" or "is concerned." Or is that rampant across the United States?

"As far as accommodation, I haven't started looking yet."

by Anonymousreply 9509/07/2013

English isn't even my first language.. I still know the difference between the mistakes made in OP's post. Are you guys really THAT bad in English? If so, yikes!

by Anonymousreply 9609/07/2013

"Different than" when "different from" should be used.

by Anonymousreply 9709/07/2013

Anyways instead of anyway

by Anonymousreply 9809/07/2013

R73 There's nothing wrong with ending a sentence with a preposition. Never was!

by Anonymousreply 9909/07/2013

R96, I know a lot of people whose native language isn't English & they all use it properly -- maybe somewhat limited & stilted, & maybe with an accent when speaking, but not fraught with egregious errors.

I think that's because they had to learn it the hard way, from a schoolbook with rules, rather than relying on reading/hearing it from careless writers &/or speakers.

I learned French from a schoolbook for 3 years before being introduced to colloquial usage in movies & magazines, so I knew what the hell I was doing from the outset. The movies & magazines helped me to use the language more casually, but the schoolbooks taught me how to use it correctly.

by Anonymousreply 10009/07/2013

When someone means to convey "congratulations," but instead types "congradulations," my eye begins twitching involuntarily.

When a perspn selects a word that he admittedly does not know how to spell, and then follows that with a parenthetical "sp?"--as in "purrpendikyooler(sp?)", this combination of ignorance with laziness makes me drive nails into my ears.

When someone employs the utterly nonsensical phrase "for all intensive purposes" instead of "for all intents and purposes," I want to shove my arm into a running blender.

by Anonymousreply 10109/07/2013

R101, I thought your last example was usually meant in jest, like "interwebs" and "I resemble that remark."

by Anonymousreply 10209/07/2013

Snuck - Sneaked is correct.

by Anonymousreply 10309/27/2013

Using further to describe distance, which is farther.

by Anonymousreply 10409/27/2013

Beginning a sentence with "Me and ..."

by Anonymousreply 10509/27/2013

Confusion among hanged and hung (and hung, for that matter.)

Are we happy the webmistress has continued selective pruning, without any sense of obligation for responding to questions on practices and policies?

I know I am!

by Anonymousreply 10609/27/2013

x

by Anonymousreply 10707/14/2014

This morning a radio host twice said "when I was woken up."

by Anonymousreply 10807/14/2014

Time for a troll hunt. What's OP been up to? We'll see.

by Anonymousreply 10907/14/2014

Using "less" where "fewer" is correct.

by Anonymousreply 11007/14/2014

"I unfriend you" when we mean, "stay away from me bitch"

by Anonymousreply 11107/14/2014
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