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Andy Warhol was humble and kind

He did not have the haughty arrogance or attitude that so many of his peers maintained. He tipped heavily and said thank you a lot.

by Anonymousreply 2409/05/2013

Yes, of course. That's why Valerie shot him.

by Anonymousreply 109/02/2013

Warhol was kind because he tipped well?

Warhol was a lot of things, but I would not have wanted to be his friend.

by Anonymousreply 209/02/2013

Read "Holy Terror" if you want to know what he was really like.

by Anonymousreply 309/02/2013

In his will, he left some money to an assortment of people to have them write something nice about him from time to time after he was gone. I'm thinking about doing that too.

by Anonymousreply 409/02/2013

Well, that is nice to hear. He always sounded so strange.

by Anonymousreply 509/02/2013

He used people.

by Anonymousreply 609/02/2013

I love the portrayal of him in "Men In Black".

by Anonymousreply 709/02/2013

[quote]Read "Holy Terror" if you want to know what he was really like.

It was written by Bob Colacello who worked at Interview with Warhol for a long time and had an axe to grind. He was also an opportunist who wouldn't have had much of a career without Warhol.

by Anonymousreply 809/03/2013

Bob Colacello sucked Nancy Reagan's cock.

by Anonymousreply 909/03/2013

Did he pay his assistants well?

Didn't they do most of his painting? What happened with him and Basquiat?

by Anonymousreply 1009/03/2013

I always get a sense that AW betrayed those who trusted him - just like Truman Capote. Then again, most of his biographers probably saw a relationship with him that didn't exist in his mind.

Perhaps he wasn't so humble and kind or wicked. Perhaps he was a self-respecting adult - as defined by Joan Didion.

What I wrote makes even me vomit, but I'm leaving it. You could probably stand to lose a few pounds.

by Anonymousreply 1109/03/2013

Andy had a small, close inner circle who were with him and loyal to him for decades until his death. This includes Pat Hackett, Brigid Berlin, Fred Hughes, Vincent Fremont, and others. I'm assuming he was kind and loyal to them as well.

Others, like Bob C, came and went from the fold. In his diaries Waarhol said that he couldn't understand why Bob decided to leave and why he was getting so grand. Bob was a social climber and wanted to worm his way into hetero high society. He was more interested in the skinny rich ladies who lunch than art.

Warhol valued money highly and was notoriously cheap, so I doubt he paid his employees very well. But the experience and the exposure to celebrities and the art world that they got was invaluable. It was their ticket to ... anywhere.

by Anonymousreply 1209/03/2013

Of course, Andy was nice. He grew up poor in Pittsburgh. And, in the words of Vera Charles, "When you're from Pittsburgh..."

by Anonymousreply 1309/03/2013

"Warhol's will dictated that his entire estate — with the exception of a few modest legacies to family members — would go to create a foundation dedicated to the "advancement of the visual arts". Warhol had so many possessions that it took Sotheby's nine days to auction his estate after his death; the auction grossed more than US$20 million.

In 1987, in accordance with Warhol's will, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts began. The foundation serves as the estate of Andy Warhol, but also has a mission "to foster innovative artistic expression and the creative process" and is "focused primarily on supporting work of a challenging and often experimental nature."

by Anonymousreply 1409/04/2013

I sat next to him in the audience of an Off-Broadway play, "Slab Boys" in 1983, starring then-unknown Sean Penn, Val Kilmer and Kevin Bacon.

He seemed very nice.

by Anonymousreply 1509/04/2013

R16: Stop projecting.

R15: Good to know.

by Anonymousreply 1709/04/2013

Thank you R17. R16 is really the eldercunt.

by Anonymousreply 1809/04/2013

Bump. What ever became of Bob Colaciello?

by Anonymousreply 1909/05/2013

Smug and manipulative, perhaps.

by Anonymousreply 2009/05/2013

I would agree with manipulative. But most people who knew him well say he was anything but smug - very humble.

by Anonymousreply 2109/05/2013

Colacello writes fawning pieces about society women for "Vanity Fair".

by Anonymousreply 2209/05/2013

He gathered those offbeat people around him in the 60's as creative inspiration- and to make him appear younger. What he really wanted was to be "up there", with the richy rich.

He tolerated artsy-types until they got "nutty" (Edie Sedgwick, Valerie Solanos, etc.) then he banished them, lest they tarnish his reputation.

Humble? Ask his plastic surgeon.

by Anonymousreply 2309/05/2013

His printmaker Rupert passed on shortly after Andy died.

by Anonymousreply 2409/05/2013
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