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Are all New Yorkers this insufferable? Or just most?

My office has a guy from corporate (in NYC) working here temporarily this summer.

First of all, he tells everyone, again and again, that he's from New York. He's been here six weeks now, and I still hear him say "New York" at least a dozen times a day.

He also makes sure to tell everyone that everything is better in New York, or that it started there. He'll say stuff like "Food trucks? We invented those in New York."

The most surprising thing is how little he knows about anywhere but New York. He seems to lack basic geographical knowledge. Yesterday, he was claiming that Denver is part of "the South."

Everyone in the office is eagerly awaiting his final day. Sept. 13!

by Anonymousreply 22301/27/2015

They are all that insufferable, OP. New York's main exports to the other 49 states are unwarranted arrogance and strident unhappiness.

by Anonymousreply 108/13/2013

So, did you fuck him OP?

by Anonymousreply 208/13/2013

Nice touch, OP. As his last day is Sept 13 we will be hearing from you 2 days before. Bravo!

by Anonymousreply 308/13/2013

Uh, no, R2. He's not attractive and he smokes like a chimney.

R3, not sure what your point is.

by Anonymousreply 408/13/2013

I think a lot of people who live in New York are delusional, like R9.

by Anonymousreply 1008/13/2013

My mother is like that guy. Whenever we travel in the US, she refers everything back to New York. Clearly, some people use the status of the city to boost their egos. Kind of like sports fans when their team wins the championship or flyovers chanting "USA! USA!"

But just as clearly, not all do.

by Anonymousreply 1108/13/2013

R10 should get W&W, and not R5's milquetoast post. Just look at R6 and R9. New Yorkers are obnoxious, and have been deserving of comeuppance for many years now.

by Anonymousreply 1308/13/2013

[quote]He'll say stuff like "Food trucks? We invented those in New York."

Ask him which food truck he personally invented. Was it the Korean Tacos? Or the Waffle sandwiches? What? They don't take the mickey out of people outside New York? You're totally allowed to give him shit about it, and in a polite, Midwestern way (if you're in the Midwest), to confuse him.

My guess is that he's not originally from NYC, but rather one of the folks who moved here for or after college and will never shut up about it.

by Anonymousreply 1408/13/2013

R14 beat me to it. I was born and raised in NYC and now live in a different part of the country. I have never felt the need to constantly remind people I am from New York (for one thing, my accent gives me away). Nor do I know any native New Yorkers who feel they need to announce where they are from as well. The non-natives are a different story. Dollar to donuts this guy was born and raised in some boring backwater west of the Hudson, moved to NYC six years ago and now thinks he is hot shit.

OP, if you want to do something to really unnerve him, every time he mentions he is from New York, act like its the first time you heard that.

by Anonymousreply 1508/13/2013

Food truck culture was invented in Los Angeles, not New York. Los Angeles might be the only city in America that doesn't take its cultural or artistic cues from NYC, and that seems to burn a few insecure NYers.

Most NYC transplants I've met in LA have been cool, but every so often you'll meet an insecure douche like OP's. By now, most Angelenos just laugh or roll their eyes because we've heard how much our pizza and bagels and everything else in this city sucks before.

I suspect OP's guy is a lot like lovely Chloe Sevigny in link below.

by Anonymousreply 1608/13/2013

My mother is a third generation New Yorker and she plays the NY card all the time. It has to do with insecurity, not how long you've been here.

by Anonymousreply 2008/13/2013

Well, there is New York City and then..there is everywhere else.

by Anonymousreply 2108/13/2013

I've lived in New York for 11 years now and absolutely love it but anyone who solely defines themselves as a New Yorker is kind of pathetic. If the most interesting thing about someone is their zip code, I know to stay far, far away.

by Anonymousreply 2208/13/2013

I can assure you that almost NONE of the queens on this thread grew up in New York City. They are ALL flyover transplants hiking up their caftans in outrage.

by Anonymousreply 2308/13/2013

[quote]as nonchalent New Yorkers

oh, dear

by Anonymousreply 2408/13/2013

I'm from Connecticut. I actually look down on New Yorkers.

by Anonymousreply 2608/13/2013

[quote]as [bold]nonchalent[/bold] New Yorkers, nothing much [bold]phases[/bold] us

Including your own semi-literacy apparently.

by Anonymousreply 2708/13/2013

[quote] he is a New York native, born in Brooklyn and raised "on the streets of Manhattan,"

A real New Yorker would never admit to something like that. He's a phoney. For one thing, they wouldn't say they were raised on the streets of Manhattan, they would instead identify the neighborhood. Second, "raised on the streets"? Seriously? Thats something to brag about?

by Anonymousreply 3008/13/2013

New Yorkers are so sophisticated they'll wait in line for hours for a hybrid of a croissant and a donut.

by Anonymousreply 3208/13/2013

[quote]"on the streets of Manhattan,"

Haha, in front of a Starbucks or GAP, no doubt!

by Anonymousreply 3308/13/2013

Still trying to figure out where OP is posting from...

by Anonymousreply 3408/13/2013

[quote]I think a lot of people who don't live in NYC are jealous of those of us who do...those of us who were able to escape our small, limited hamlets and find a refuge and great success in this amazing, soaring metropolis where anything is possible and dreams can come true.

You're trolling, right? Surely you can't really believe this.

by Anonymousreply 3508/13/2013

Trolldar indicates R6, R9, R17, R25, R31 are all the same person who thinks the rest of us are inferior for not living in NYC. Just FYI

by Anonymousreply 3608/13/2013

I'm from Boston, we also look down on New Yorkers but then we pretty much look down on everyone who isn't a Bostonian or at the very least a New Englander.

I lived in Manhattan for a few years. It was interesting and fun but only because we had money to play with. I don't know how people with normal jobs and salaries do it.

by Anonymousreply 3908/13/2013

[quote]A real New Yorker would never admit to something like that. He's a phoney. For one thing, they wouldn't say they were raised on the streets of Manhattan, they would instead identify the neighborhood. Second, "raised on the streets"? Seriously? Thats something to brag about?

Oh, no, he's very proud that he grew up on the Upper West Side. His dad was a prof at Columbia and his mom had some sort of non-teaching job there, too. I'm paraphrasing a bit, but this is the kind of thing he'll say: "My parents were what you would call hippies, but what I would call bohemians. They allowed me to discover Manhattan on my own, and I did. The streets were my playground, and that's where I came of age."

He apparently grew up near the Dakota, as any time anything remotely related to the Beatles comes up in conversation, he'll talk about how he used to see John, Yoko and Sean in the park all the time. He'll refer to Yoko by her first name only, like they're close buddies or something.

by Anonymousreply 4008/13/2013

OP, he sounds like a rich trust-fund brat; the proliferation of which is making NYC increasingly less edgy and more irrelevant everyday since 9/11. NYC is too expensive and sadly has reached its tipping point. Any artist or struggling young talent has packed their bags to head west to comparatively inexpensive LA.

by Anonymousreply 4108/13/2013

Also, R36 is correct. Funnily enough, that same person is the OP of the "mute point" thread where he says this:

[quote]Life just isn't fair to those of us who are intelligent but nerdy and socially awkward.

by Anonymousreply 4208/13/2013

It reminds me of how on Househunters International a woman from the U.S. when hunting for an apartment in a European country will say 'well, that is not what we consider a master bedroom back in Denver' or 'wow, that's a small refrigerator - back in the states we have a LARGE refrigerator' or 'This bathroom is very much sub-standard - back in Denver we have ceramic tile, a large walk in shower, a bathtub, and beautiful fixtures'.

just insufferable

by Anonymousreply 4308/13/2013

Looks like he's also the OP of the "Sick of the double standard for fraus in the office" thread linked below.

by Anonymousreply 4408/13/2013

According to wikipedia, food trucks actually originated in the United States neither in NYc nor in LA but in the Texas panhandle in the 19th century, with the creation of the chuckwagon.

by Anonymousreply 4508/13/2013

r21 There is no anywhere else, the west bank of the Hudson is a scrim.

by Anonymousreply 4608/13/2013

[quote]Just rememeber that those who mock others usually harbor extreme envy of those they mock. Psychology 101.

But according to troll-dar on this thread and elsewhere, you yourself are mocking others pretty much continuously on Datalounge.

by Anonymousreply 4708/13/2013

[quote]I'm not one to judge.

BWHAAHAHAHAHAH! Wow, you must be a crackhead if you think after reading your posts we are going to believe that.

by Anonymousreply 4908/13/2013

[quote]For one thing, they wouldn't say they were raised on the streets of Manhattan, they would instead identify the neighborhood.

Perhaps he just says 'Manhattan,' because he assumes that people who aren't familiar with New York City would not know individual neighborhoods.

by Anonymousreply 5008/13/2013

[quote]"My parents were what you would call hippies, but what I would call bohemians. They allowed me to discover Manhattan on my own, and I did. The streets were my playground, and that's where I came of age."

Oh, I bet he's an unpublished writer. This reeks of MFA-style self-mythologizing.

Seriously...why do you put up with his bullshit?

by Anonymousreply 5108/13/2013

[quote] NYC is too expensive and sadly has reached its tipping point.

I truly wonder how long the wealth and privilege can keep going up, up, up until something crashes. Seriously, the uber-wealthy Manhattan cannot be sustained indefinitely. I wonder what's going to happen in the coming years.

by Anonymousreply 5208/13/2013

r5 is partially correct. All men are indeed 70 and over in Palm Springs, with the exception of the pool and cabana boys who are between 21 and 25. Once they turn 26 we chuck em back over the border. I am 92 and because of a good surgeon appear 30, even in broad daylight.

by Anonymousreply 5308/13/2013

I can take Manhattan on weekends (it's an hour's drive away) but I can't live here anymore. I work here and at the end of the day, I'm happy to escape to the leafy suburbs.

by Anonymousreply 5408/13/2013

OP conveniently left out where he lived. Maybe this guy is right, maybe your town sucks.

by Anonymousreply 5508/13/2013

R45 is correct. The chuckwagon was the inspiration for the modern food truck.

[quote]If "insufferable" can be defined as educated, intellectually curious, culturally progressive, and fashion forward, and lacking in patience for those who don't possess these qualities, then, yes, we're an absolutely insufferable lot.

The point is that many NY'ers are not intellectually curious if it's not in NY.

by Anonymousreply 5608/13/2013

R17 is definitely one of the people who moved to NYC after college, but acts like he discovered NYC personally

by Anonymousreply 5708/13/2013

I never started to generalize about New Yorkers until I came to Datalounge. Pro-New Yorkers are so uniformly self-important and douchey here that NOT generalizing is difficult. It's a big turn off.

by Anonymousreply 5808/13/2013

I have to admit that this sounds a little like me. I'm always bragging to people in NYC about our Pigs Feet flavored ice cream in West Virginia.

by Anonymousreply 5908/13/2013

The funny thing about R6/9/17 et al is that he's almost certainly a fly-over transplant. The idea that New York is the center of the world is itself a provincialism.

I love New York and visit it often. While I've met and known some good New Yorkers, the reputation for (often ludicrous) self-importance is true more often than not.

by Anonymousreply 6008/13/2013

Heh, I recently worked with a girl from NYC (a trustifarian I suspect), and she would constantly tell me how educated her family was and how cultured they were- arts, politics, etc. Of course, she co-opened up a clothing shop in Williamsburg.

by Anonymousreply 6108/13/2013

He certainly does sound insufferable, op. The worst New Yorkers are the ones who simply refer to New York as "the city". Like it's the only fucking city on the planet.

by Anonymousreply 6208/13/2013

[quote] The worst New Yorkers are the ones who simply refer to New York as "the city". Like it's the only fucking city on the planet.

People who say "the city" are long time New Yorkers. Probably born and bred. It was always called "the city" because Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx were total shitholes. They didn't want anyone to think they had anything to do with those boroughs

by Anonymousreply 6308/13/2013

OP, The guy from Manhattan sounds quite interesting. Maybe you should get to know him.

by Anonymousreply 6408/13/2013

Why are there so many New Yorkers living in LA? It's hardly the other way around. If your city is so great then stay there. We could really use some relief on the 405 freeway.

“For in that city [New York] there is neurosis in the air which the inhabitants mistake for energy.”

by Anonymousreply 6508/13/2013

Tell us about New Yorkers.

by Anonymousreply 6608/14/2013

Fuck you, Florida, you're being punished and you know what you did.

by Anonymousreply 6708/14/2013

[quote]For example, if you live in southern CT or northern NJ you'll say

oh dear

by Anonymousreply 6908/14/2013

[quote]Well, there is New York City and then..there is everywhere else.

Thank god there is an alternative.

by Anonymousreply 7008/14/2013

OP, insufferable people are everywhere.

You just happen to be dealing with the Manhattanite variety.

Like him, I live on the Upper West Side, also very close to the Dakota, and yes, I've seen Yoko Ono too. (I will use her full name, as I do not know her personally in the least.)

Many New Yorkers who are born here remind me of Dubya, born with silver spoons firmly entrenched in mouth but confusing that birth fact with actual accomplishment and status. Sounds like your co-worker is one of these gems.

We're not all that obnoxious. I love this city, and I love my neighborhood, but I know NYC is not for everyone, nor should it be.

by Anonymousreply 7108/14/2013

R39 = Mayor Bloomberg

by Anonymousreply 7208/14/2013

Oh dear what, r69? Do you even live in the NY metro area?

by Anonymousreply 7308/14/2013

Absolutely, yes, OP. They are fond of pulling the NY card whenever they feel need to get aggressive (dealing with bad service, shitty drivers, etc). I have a few friends who grew up in Long Island and West Chester County and they love to say things like, "don't fuck with me, I'm from New York" ((cringe)). I'm embarrassed for them.

by Anonymousreply 7408/14/2013

Your little flyover bergs are merely stops on the way to NYC, which is THE DESTINATION. And deep down you all know it.

by Anonymousreply 7508/14/2013

We stop there to take a shit and then go to real cities like London and Paris.

by Anonymousreply 7608/14/2013

Honestly, R75, if your life as a NYer is so full and busy and exciting, why do you apparently spend your days posting bitter, defensive screeds on Datalounge? Trolldar reveals that you're by far the most pathetic poster in this thread.

by Anonymousreply 7708/14/2013

[quote]Studies have shown time and time again that our diets are much healthier than those of average people.

Is this why your mayor felt he needed to issue an edict banning large sodas? I noticed the health-minded New Yorkers you speak of weren't too happy at the thought of giving up their jumbo-sized, sugary soft drinks.

You're a buffoon. Keep posting.

by Anonymousreply 7808/14/2013

LOL, R74. "Don't fuck with me, I'm from New York"? What are they going to do? Hit someone? Your friends sound like an insecure losers.

by Anonymousreply 7908/14/2013

Tourist goes up to a New Yorker and says, "Can you tell me how to get to the Empire State Building or should I go fuck myself?"

by Anonymousreply 8008/14/2013

Show him Denver on the map, tell him he is an ignorant cunt and he should shut up or the office is going to stuff him in the trunk of his car, for a few hours. Problem solved.

by Anonymousreply 8108/14/2013

No R81, they should lock him in the hot dog truck.

by Anonymousreply 8208/14/2013

LOL @ R76

by Anonymousreply 8308/14/2013

[quote] I think a lot of people who don't live in NYC are jealous of those of us who do...those of us who were able to escape our small, limited hamlets and find a refuge and great success in this amazing, soaring metropolis where anything is possible and dreams can come true.

Your post is absolute dreck for the following reasons:

A) There is no approval process to go through when moving to New York. Any schmuck from anywhere in the world is allowed to move there. But many people do not chose to move to New York. And New Yorkers just cannot comprehend why people chose not to move there, and that makes them insecure and jealous.

B) Anything is possible and dreams can come true? That's a very idealized idea of a city...of any city actually. That's quite a ciche and mostly untrue.

C) Those of you who escaped your small hamlets, I congratulate you. But a lot of people in the world are not so superficial that they need their place of residence to fill a void in their lives.

I honestly have nothing against New Yorkers, but I have a thing against ignorant, myopic, provincial people with limited world views. And that means you.

by Anonymousreply 8408/14/2013

r78, that law was meant for those poor creatures who don't reside in Manhattan Proper. And if you need to have "Manhattan Proper" defined, then it's not worth asking.

by Anonymousreply 8508/14/2013

It IS difficult to comprehend why someone would not want to live in New York by choice. If you can't afford it, just admit that.

"But a lot of people in the world are not so superficial that they need their place of residence to fill a void in their lives. "

It's not about filling a void. It's about having a love affair with a city. If you can't understand this try checking out some of the countless films and songs that explain why there is so much to love here. Maybe you think it's cheesy and cliched, but it's the truth.

by Anonymousreply 8608/14/2013

R86, you know, it IS possible for people to love their own cities that are not New York. Why is it so difficult for you to comprehend? How do you know I don't have a love for my city? How do you know I don't live in Paris, which has hundreds of songs and films written about her too? You're quite arrogant.

Maybe I can afford to live in New York. You don't know that. But why would I want to live in a city that only caters to the wealthy? New York used to be affordable and attract the best in cultural world. Now it just attracts rich, smug, selfish narcissists. I feel bad that I missed out on the NYC of the 70s, 80s and 90s. That is NOT New York anymore. New York is a capitalistic utopia for the wealthy. There's very little originality in New York anymore.

I'm sorry r86, but you just don't sound like a very nice person that I'd want for a neighbor. If you want to market the city you love so much, I'd suggest brushing the chip off your shoulder and give actual reasons New York is a great place to live instead of acting superior and making fun of the rest of the world. It makes you seem rather...well, limited. That's not what I want in a hometown.

by Anonymousreply 8708/14/2013

I would love to live in Milwaukee but there are no paying jobs.

by Anonymousreply 8808/14/2013

[quote] If you can't afford it, just admit that.

In addition, I have discovered that even though this is a liberal, gay-oriented chat board, statements like this reveal that we have quite a emulators of the Mitt Romney mindset posting here.

Arrogance. Sheer arrogance.

by Anonymousreply 8908/14/2013

There really is no city as wondrous as New York City. I've been here for five years, and I can't imagine living anywhere else. The diversity, the restaurants, the pace, the grit and grime, the struggles...all of these elements are heightened in this city and contribute to an unrivaled energy and vibrancy that has never been duplicated elsewhere, despite futile attempts.

by Anonymousreply 9008/14/2013

[quote]It IS difficult to comprehend why someone would not want to live in New York by choice.

Oh God, where should I start? The climate sucks. There are people absolutely EVERYWHERE--above, below & on all sides of you. Terrorists are dead set on blowing the city off the map. New Yorkers are smug assholes. That annoying ACCENT. Real estate is laughably overpriced, with the only other option being to throw away ludicrous amounts of money on rent. Taxes are high. Hurricanes! Need I go on?

by Anonymousreply 9108/14/2013

I live in New York south, aka Florida. Ex-New Yorkers are quite possibly the most annoying bitches ever. This is some ex New Yorkers, not all. They are huge complainers, always talking about how everything in New York is like heaven, yet all they want to do is use up as many resources as possible while sitting on their asses. I guess this is a way of life in NYC.

And the accent is the most awful sounding one in the United States, by far. I'd rather listen to someone born and raised in Houston talk all day than have to listen to a New Yawker's.

by Anonymousreply 9208/14/2013

Agree OP and I'm originally from NY!

by Anonymousreply 9308/14/2013

This thread is why j'adore the DL.

It's the Platonic Form of pointless cuntiness.

by Anonymousreply 9408/14/2013

A newcomer in my neighborhood is from NYC. I haven't met her yet but no one else likes her. They say she seems to consider herself superior & condescends toward the rest of us. Unfortunately for her, Californians aren't impressed with where people are from -- we just think everyone should feel lucky to be here.

by Anonymousreply 9508/14/2013

I've lived in both NYC and L.A., though neither one at present, and would say I understand the pros and cons of both. To referee a few things on this thread: any argument about "food trucks" is going to end up on a long, endless slippery slope. In the most technical of terms: yes, they were invented in Texas in the 18th century. Blue-collar workers on construction sites and the like, at sites distant from any restaurant, have eaten from food trucks for nearly 100 years. And yes, New Yorkers have been routinely buying coffee and hot dogs from mobile food carts for decades. HOWEVER, in terms of the recent fetishization of food trucks as objects of gourmand desire, L.A. wins by a landslide ... which, landslides being common in L.A., shouldn't be a surprise. It's simply much easier, logistlcally speaking, for food trucks to exist in L.A., given its car-centric culture and readily available street parking.

As for this:

[quote]Los Angeles might be the only city in America that doesn't take its cultural or artistic cues from NYC

Bitch, *please*. Did it slip your mind that LACMA hired a NEW YORK GALLERIST to run the place? Granted, the idea was an epic fail, but to say L.A. doesn't get any cultural or artistic hues from NYC -- and coupling it with the comment that every other city *does* take cues from it -- is fucking absurd. Some of the most all-time-successful products of Hollywood/entertainment pop culture have been set in, yep, NYC. "I Love Lucy." "The Honeymooners." "All in the Family." "Seinfeld." "Sex and the City." And so forth.

And this:

[quote]There's a hot dog cart down the street that really seems to get his goat. It's the most basic, standard, no-frills hot dog cart -- the same one you would see in a million places -- but for some reason he HATES it, and goes on and on about how stupid people are for eating there and how inauthentic it is.

Sorry, but he's probably right. No city has mastered the art of a proper hot dog cart better than New York. There is most *definitely* a right and wrong way to sell hot dogs out of a cart, even if people outside of NYC may not "get" the concept at all. I'd say the same thing about Guinness and Ireland; there may only be a handful of places in a given American city that know the proper method of pouring a pint of Guinness and the proper way of keeping the lines it goes through clean.

So: NYC has better hot dogs, and L.A. has better Korean barbecue. Happy now?

by Anonymousreply 9608/14/2013

[quote]Unfortunately for her, Californians aren't impressed with where people are from -- we just think everyone should feel lucky to be here.

One of the many reasons I'm glad I no longer live there: Angelenos are just as insufferable in some ways as New Yorkers are. Never mind the absurd cost of living, the constant threat of annihilation by earthquake, the polluted beaches, and most of all the CONSTANT, CEASELESS traffic: by God L.A. gets 330 days of sunshine a year, so of course *everyone* would be "lucky" to live there!

by Anonymousreply 9708/14/2013

Yes OP, they are all insufferable. That is why i don't shake hands with any of them.

by Anonymousreply 9808/14/2013

As Ray Charles once put it:

"So, save your time and trouble, Save your railroad fare .. Cuz when you leave New York City, .. You ain't goin' nowhere!"

by Anonymousreply 9908/14/2013

[ Unfortunately for her, Californians aren't impressed with where people are from. ]

Why should Californians be impressed with New York? There is a reason people choose to live in LA vs. New York. Let's not play dumb...I think you all know why.

by Anonymousreply 10008/14/2013

Enjoy your rats, tenements,and funky taxi's and please stop moving to LA.

by Anonymousreply 10108/14/2013

NYC may have its faults, but I guarantee that you flyovers will never find yourself dining at a table next to Patti LuPone, Victor Garber, and Jerry Adler at your Red Lobsters and Olive Gardens.

by Anonymousreply 10208/14/2013

I wouldn't say all but sadly many are. Some of the biggest offenders are the fucking transplants though! True story-last year I made a friend who was in grad school for 2 years in my city. He's from the Detroit suburbs but had lived in NYC for college and a few years after. I'm in another well-known northeastern city. It's not NYC, but it's not the boondocks. My friend complained constantly how much he hated it here and how it can't compare to NYC blah blah. This past June he graduated and finally moved back to his precious NYC. I liked him except for the whining and putting NYC on some super pedestal.

by Anonymousreply 10308/14/2013

The posters bashing NYC have either never lived here or ran back to their little flyover thingy after not being able to make it here. It takes a lot to survive here, both in terms of money and strength of character, so I understand those who were unable to live here on a long-term basis. We experience the highest of highs but also the lowest of lows. Because we've endured some much suffering and adversity, we take very little in life for granted. We know how precious every minute is, and live life to the fullest. Every day is a party, a new adventure. I truly believe that this is what sets us apart from others...the ability to live life as if every second counts. It's quite thrilling in a way.

by Anonymousreply 10408/14/2013

All those talking about how expensive New York is, do they know that New York doesn't even crack the top thirty worldwide?

by Anonymousreply 10508/14/2013

I lived in New York for a summer and enjoyed it. I liked the hustle and bustle feel of the city. But maybe it was due to the job I had (theater internship) but I still don't know why people seem to think it's so hard to make it in New York--at least arts-wise. Obviously, it'd be easier to be a local success in Bumfuck, Iowa but in my experience, ALL of the large markets are hard especially for things like the arts: Chicago, LA, San Francisco. The only thing I can think of is that New York has so many people that it's hard to stand out from the crowd. That's understandable for sure. But I find that you have to hustle just as hard in places like LA and Chicago.

by Anonymousreply 10608/14/2013

Referencing R105, how the fuck is Moscow more expensive than Paris?? That seems off. Maybe they're judging based on standard pay too

by Anonymousreply 10708/14/2013

[quote]Honestly, [R75], if your life as a NYer is so full and busy and exciting, why do you apparently spend your days posting bitter, defensive screeds on Datalounge? Trolldar reveals that you're by far the most pathetic poster in this thread.

R75 - who is also R102 and R104 and the vast majority of the cunty responses here - has got to be a troll. If so, well done, trollina.

by Anonymousreply 10808/15/2013

It is typical of New Yorkers to deflect criticism and blame transplants and tourist. I have come across born AND bred New Yorkers that do this.

I live in a medium sized north eastern town that gets a lot of migration from NYC. A lot will randomly compare NYC with my town(I don't like it here either but still) unfavorably. It comes across as rude, especially since it is often times random.

And when I was in Philadelphia, this one New Yorker-- not a transplant but a native was VERY loud in talking about how Philly sucks.I also had this one guy shut this down guy down that was raving about a good pizza store because apparently after having New York pizza he wouldn't touch anything else. Not all New Yorkers are obnoxious--- obviously. But these are not isolated cases. I think people from big cities tend to do this, but there is something about New Yorkers that makes this more common.

by Anonymousreply 10908/15/2013

[quote]NYC may have its faults, but I guarantee that you flyovers will never find yourself dining at a table next to Patti LuPone, Victor Garber, and Jerry Adler at your Red Lobsters and Olive Gardens

Who?

by Anonymousreply 11008/15/2013

[quote]New York has so many people that it's hard to stand out from the crowd.

Speak for yourself!

by Anonymousreply 11108/15/2013

I love New York, but it's really hard to take the city seriously. It smells like urine and garbage, and in the summer, baked urine and steaming garbage. And as great a city as it is, no one likes to acknowledge this basic truth. It's like the Norma Desmond of cities.

by Anonymousreply 11208/15/2013

R97, most of California is different from L.A., & much better.

by Anonymousreply 11308/15/2013

The way the New Yorker OP talks about is so dated. I didn't realize any of them acted that way after 1990. Are you talking about a 75 year old New Yorker?

by Anonymousreply 11408/15/2013

What's so wonderfully singular about NYC is that, unlike in Flyoverdullsville where people blur, EVERYONE has a spellbinding story to tell. If it's not communicated verbally, you can read it in the faces of each and every New Yorker. Stories of extreme success, triumph, heartbreak and loss. It's all quite dramatic, really. Simply living here in the equivalent of live, electrifying theater 24x7. Whether you're apt to play a featured role or be the star, i.e., observe or bask in the spotlight yourself, all eyes are on you all the time. It's truly quite a magical place.

by Anonymousreply 11508/15/2013

Yea R115, all eyes are on you. You're a fucking superstar. All because you live in NYC.

by Anonymousreply 11608/15/2013

[quote]It's like the Norma Desmond of cities.

And R115 is the Norma Desmond of Norma Desmond city. LOL!

by Anonymousreply 11708/15/2013

I lived in NYC for many years. I also attended/graduated from college there. One of the things I love about NYC is that it's a huge melting pot with all types of people from different cultures. The natives are much like the OP described.

Yes, NYC is great but unless you're making six figures, you cannot really appreciate it for all it's worth. I found being packed in subways with smelly, gassy people at rush hour wasn't very glamorous. In fact, I found quite often that I would wake up in a glorious mood only to have it shot down after a crammed subway ride. You really do pick up on other people's energy. That said, after I left NYC, I missed it like crazy. I lived in LA, the total anti-NYC where people weren't as direct, something that I actually appreciated from NYers.

The last time I went to NYC, it had changed dramatically from when I lived there. Fuck Rudy for what he did to my beloved Times Square. I realized I didn't want to move back to the NYC of today. I wanted the NYC of the 80s/90s.

I live in SF now and I love it. No, R9. NYC Isn't the greatest place on earth. Not everyone is jealous of your city. You really should travel more.

by Anonymousreply 11908/15/2013

As a fourth generation native New Yorker, I find the biggest offenders to be the transplants.

The wealthy flyovers, the wealthy hipsters and the wealthy foreigners are the most odious, especially the ones working in the arts or in fashion.

These people never miss a beat going on about some 'hip' new place or art opening they attended and well, they have to be on top of everything which is different. If they miss something, they feel so out of the loop. These people seem to be defined by these events, by name dropping and other such nonsense.

Next time you assume 'New Yorkers' are insufferable assholes, ask these people where they originally came from! Once while the subway was stalled for almost an hour, I got into a conversation with a young Greek woman sitting next to me, she asked me where I was from. She told me, "Everyone in my neighborhood is from another country or a different state." I told her, "I was born here in NY." It's become an assumption that many NYers are not from here.

As for the bagels in California being horrible. I remember when a late uncle moved to LA, he hated the bagels there. He'd ask another relative to bring lots of NYC bagels when they visited him, he'd freeze them. I guess it's the NY water which makes he difference?

by Anonymousreply 12008/15/2013

NYC people are always antsy. Poor things.

by Anonymousreply 12108/15/2013

I don't think it's the transplants. I think it's the locals that are most insufferable. Unless they're upper class and went to school out of the city, born-and-bred NYers are obnoxious and an irritant in an otherwise OK city.

They're the ones that are all about the alleged superiority of bagels (Montreal's are better), food trucks (LA, Portland, Miami all better), club scene (Berlin), theatre (London), art (Beijing, London), street life (Madrid, Paris, Amsterdam), fast pace (Hong Kong, Tokyo, London), 24/7 everything (Hong Kong, Mexico City), architecture (Chicago, London), restaurants (Tokyo, San Francisco, Paris), hot people (Buenos Aires, Madrid). Etc.

NYC used to be quite unique, but the rest of the world has caught up, and in many cases, passed it by. It's those locals who never have experienced not just what's worse, but what's better about London, Berlin, and yes, other US cities. And that accent is annoying, too.

by Anonymousreply 12208/15/2013

as an insufferable native ny-er, I would agree with everything you just wrote r122 except montreal and bagels. i lived there for a couple of years and i never had one that came even close to H&H or even Tal.

by Anonymousreply 12308/15/2013

R110 you have got to be joking. How can you not know who Patti LuPone, Victor Garber and Jerry Adler are/were? (Of course, you couldn't be sitting next to Jerry Adler because he died 3 years ago, but you should still know who he was.)

by Anonymousreply 12408/15/2013

I love how NYC got thoroughly dismantled in this thread - it's a new era, ladies and gents. Even more amusing, though, was how stridently some of the New Yorkers clung to their defenses of that city. The denizens of the Big Apple were revealed to be superficial, brittle people who based their worth solely on place, and not on actual substance.

Also of note: Smithsonian Magazine recently revealed that Houston is actually the most racially diverse city in America. So New York can't even lay claim to that anymore...

by Anonymousreply 12508/15/2013

Every time the NYers go into overdrive on here regarding how much better they are than the rest of us, I remember a Cheers episode in which Diane gave a short (for her anyway) speech on how sad it was that all the guys in the bar seemed to get most of their self-esteem from nothing more than whether the Boston sports teams won or lost on that particular day. I spend a week in New York every year. Other than the theater district (where you can see a live performance of any of several older movies), it doesn't have much of anything else that any larger city doesn't have-and none of the individuality/charm of cities such as Nola, San Francisco, and Miami.

by Anonymousreply 12608/15/2013

The transformation of NYC into a playground for the 1% and the ridiculously expensive housing costs have really taken off the blinders for a lot of people. NYC just doesn't seem all that interesting anymore. And like others have said, other cities around the country have caught up, and you can find the same interesting lifestyle choices elsewhere. Gone are the days when NYC was the center of everything.

And I'm saying this as someone who lives in NY. If I were a person in my late teens/early 20s today, I don't think I would want to move here like I did 20 years ago.

by Anonymousreply 12708/15/2013

[quote]R110 you have got to be joking. How can you not know who Patti LuPone, Victor Garber and Jerry Adler are/were?

R110 *was* joking, but you missed the point: NOBODY CARES about these people besides the uber-gayest Broadway show queens. In any event, it's a moot point: you're practically guaranteed to encounter a celebrity at some point (or, more likely, many points) if you live in either NYC or L.A.

[quote]What's so wonderfully singular about NYC is that, unlike in Flyoverdullsville where people blur, EVERYONE has a spellbinding story to tell. If it's not communicated verbally, you can read it in the faces of each and every New Yorker. Stories of extreme success, triumph, heartbreak and loss. It's all quite dramatic, really.

No, but it's certainly all MARY! As if NYC has some sort of monopoly on human tragedy -- though many of its residents certainly think so. One friend of mine, a native New Yorker who moved away for five years and just moved back, could *never* make it through a conversation without at least one reference to 9/11 or Hurricane Sandy or some other tragedy that happened to hit the region.

[quote]unless you're making six figures, you cannot really appreciate it for all it's worth.

COMPLETE bullshit. You can still appreciate NYC even if you're stuck living in a studio walk-up in Queens. The "New York Experience" isn't exclusively limited to expensive entertainment options like orchestra seats at the Met and dinner every night at Per Se.

[quote]Referencing R105, how the fuck is Moscow more expensive than Paris?? That seems off.

I take it you don't travel much, hon. Moscow is now insanely expensive, having embraced capitalism to its fullest. Meanwhile, Paris is actually considerably more affordable than most other parts of Western Europe, particularly London. Hell, even Berlin's gone from cheap to quite pricey in under a decade.

[quote]I guess it's the NY water which makes the difference?

No, it's the fact that the correct way to make a bagel is via boiling, and most bagel makers outside of NYC don't do it that way. OTOH New Yorkers are deluded in their belief that you can't find a good bagel *anywhere* but New York. What, you don't think L.A. has its large share of picky Jews who demand 100%-authentic bagels? Hell, a few places even have them in my current large "flyover" city of residence.

Anyway, I also agree R122 is mostly correct, with a few blatant errors. Chicago a bastion of fine architecture? Seriously?? Honey, please: Millennium Park alone doesn't making Chicago an architectural star. Mexico City is hardly "24/7 everything," even if its nightlife tends to follow that of Spain and Argentina (don't bother dining before 10pm unless you enjoy empty restaurants). San Francisco restaurants? Now you've *really* lost the plot (and no, you don't get to count Yountville eateries as part of "San Francisco" proper). Portland is a far more vibrant dining destination these days than SF, as are Houston and Austin. Also, Paris is for the most part terribly passe in terms of dining: the gourmand avant-garde has moved on to Stockholm, Barcelona and London.

by Anonymousreply 12808/15/2013

[quote]it doesn't have much of anything else that any larger city doesn't have-and none of the individuality/charm of cities such as Nola, San Francisco, and Miami.

NOLA has the second-highest crime rate in the country, plus the parts of the city flooded by Katrina remain barren wastelands. SF has the largest number of schizophrenic homeless in America, and among many other "pleasant" encounters with them I've had one whip down his pants in a fashion, open up his butt cheeks and start spraying shit -- IN THE MIDDLE OF THE STREET. And Miami? Charming? Um, no. It has about the same (nonexistent) charm level as Vegas: all flash and no substance.

by Anonymousreply 12908/15/2013

Thank you, R96, for putting R115 in his place. How can anyone issue such a paean with a straight face? NYC is no more 'magical' than any other city. If anything, it's rapidly declining.

by Anonymousreply 13008/15/2013

New York is unarguably the pinnacle of human civilization. Even the dog excrement in New York has a hardened, gritty look about it, full of rich brown history, scented with the aroma of the world's artistic Mecca, and sparkling with the promise of potential success, as if to say, "You have arrived."

by Anonymousreply 13108/15/2013

Can someone diagnose R115? Is that the effects of a drug or is he in a manic state?

by Anonymousreply 13208/15/2013

I actually wasn't joking...I have no idea who Patti LuPone, Victor Garber or Jerry Adler are. Should I?

by Anonymousreply 13308/15/2013

I have been on DL for 12 years, and the cuntitude of the person at R96 / R128 is indeed impressive. Well done.

by Anonymousreply 13408/15/2013

Yes you should.

by Anonymousreply 13508/15/2013

oh my, r132, you are droll, aren't you? I'm neither drugged nor manic, though from your limited flyover point of view, I can fathom how you could mistake having a NYC state of mind for being high or manic. Everything is splendidly enhanced, gloriously heightened, and highly intellectualized in New York City, including the way we express ourselves both verbally and physically. We don't suffer dullards very well.

by Anonymousreply 13608/15/2013

Must be an eIdergay thing?

by Anonymousreply 13708/15/2013

r96/128 is really working overtime to justify it's ridiculous rent.

by Anonymousreply 13808/15/2013

R110/R133, Yes you really should know who they are. They come up in constant conversation and if you admitted in public that you weren't aware of these people you would receive raised eyebrows and several cold shoulders.

Patti is a six time Tony nominee (winning twice for Best Actress in a Musical for Evita and Gypsy). She ORIGINATED the role of Eva Peron, and is one of the most beloved divas of all time.

Victor Garber is a four time Tony nominee and ORIGINATED the role of Anthony in Sweeney Todd. (Maybe try reading the cast lists on your OBCRs next time.)

Jerry Adler directed and produced many Broadway shows.

Pay attention a little more next time you're in class.

by Anonymousreply 13908/15/2013

r136 is a brilliant parody post of an insufferable NYer. Well played.

by Anonymousreply 14008/15/2013

[quote]They come up in constant conversation

Maybe at YOUR house, gramps.

by Anonymousreply 14108/15/2013

If this turns into a thread about bagels, I am shutting it down.

by Anonymousreply 14208/15/2013

Well that explains it! I don't give a shit about Broadway shows or theater for that matter. If these people came up in constant conversation then I assume I'd have heard of them by now, which I haven't. I think I've seen the Patti woman's name thrown around here on DL, but I've never cared enough to look her up. Sorry...guess I'm just not one of 'those' gays who cares. I walked into a gay bar in Chicago once where everyone was singing show tunes and have never felt so out of place in my life. It was bizarre.

by Anonymousreply 14308/15/2013

[quote] the Patti woman's name

From this moment on Patti LuPone will be known as The Patti Woman.

by Anonymousreply 14408/15/2013

I'm 30, R141. Hardly "gramps" even by DL standards.

You know, some of do know our theater and aren't over the age of 60.

All of my friends around my age know Patti, Garber and Adler, and we talk about them often, especially Patti.

How else are you supposed to have a "Who was the greatest Rose?" debate without knowing Patti?

by Anonymousreply 14508/15/2013

"I love how NYC got thoroughly dismantled in this thread - it's a new era, ladies and gents"

Watching everyone PASSIONATELY tear into NYC has been incredibly amusing.

R122 is particularly ridiculous, because he has to pick a different city to knock each one of NYC's major attributes - not even realizing whether or not NYC is top in those mostly subjective areas is superfluous - because how many of those cities can even lay claim to dominance in any of the other areas. NY's appeal is that it is t or near the top of ALL of those areas.

That being said, Madrid for hot people? Those Spaniards are among the fattest in Europe. London for theater? You mean the innovators of the Spice Girls show, or worse, Mamma Mia and Matilda? I could go on, but why bother?

Regarding Houston's alleged dominance in being multi-ethnic, give me a break.

by Anonymousreply 14608/15/2013

You sound like quite the beacon of culture, R143.

by Anonymousreply 14708/15/2013

Even if "Patti LuPone, Victor Garber and Jerry Adler" were as important as that deluded NY poster imagines, being seated near them at a restaurant is of little to no real value to anyone other than star-fuckers and Broadway queens.

She sounds super-pathetic.

by Anonymousreply 14808/15/2013

AND if it turns into a Patti LuPone thread, I am shutting this whole website down. You have been warned.

by Anonymousreply 14908/15/2013

Only in New York can you stand next to Patti Lupone having an authentic bagel from an original food truck.

by Anonymousreply 15008/15/2013

"Regarding Houston's alleged dominance in being multi-ethnic, give me a break."

I guess you don't believe in math or statistics, huh, R146? It's been sufficiently documented.

New York is done, and the sight of New Yorkers panicking is delicious.

by Anonymousreply 15108/15/2013

Easy, r150. You are skating on very thin ice.

by Anonymousreply 15208/15/2013

LOL R151, keep posting! You still amuse me.

by Anonymousreply 15308/15/2013

R146 is freaking out. Look at how much he wrote to defend New York... Have we ever seen such prolix defenses from New Yorkers in the past? The final blow is near, and the death knell not far behind. That is why there are such passionate denunciations of New York - we can tell that even New Yorkers don't believe in their 'inherent superiority' anymore.

by Anonymousreply 15408/15/2013

Is NYC's collapse complete yet?

by Anonymousreply 15508/15/2013

It's ovah, r153. Not only is NY no longer unique or a leader in diversity, it's actually now one of the most segregated cities in the country.

NYers live with a LOT of myths about themselves.

by Anonymousreply 15608/15/2013

Did R146/R153 just write 'LOL'? I thought New York was the seat of all learned class and panache.

by Anonymousreply 15708/15/2013

Chicago gives the theater scene a good try, but other than that none of you flyover or LA types can say that your cities have anything on New York.

Theater, Opera, Ballet- we've got it all. These reasons alone make it stupid to live anywhere else.

by Anonymousreply 15808/15/2013

When a person defines themselves by what city they live in and you attack said city, it hurts them at the very core of their being. It's as if you're attacking them personally. Also when a person pays up the ASS for something, they feel more pressure to love and justify their expenditure, which only puts further pressure on this already sick individual.

by Anonymousreply 15908/15/2013

Last time I checked, r158, many cities around the world have theater, opera and ballet.

And call me crazy, but somehow I'm just not getting the sense that the dizzy NY queens on this thread are the types who are zipping over to the Met when they're not attending an opening at PS1 or dashing to a poetry reading at the Y, if you get my drift.

Ramen and netflix with their 6 roommates seems more like it.

by Anonymousreply 16008/15/2013

I go to the Met quite frequently, thank you very much. Sure I might be buying standing room in the Family Circle, but I'll be there.

New York, and specifically Manhattan, is not just for the rich. You can see things on the cheap if you know how to work the system, as any New Yorker would.

I already have my tickets for the Mark Rylance Twelfth Night and Richard III as well as the Stewart/McKellan No Man's Land and Godot.

I have one roommate, haven't eaten Ramen since college, and live comfortably in Hell's Kitchen. It can be done, and quite frequently is.

by Anonymousreply 16108/15/2013

Well, good for you, r161.

Maybe if you go to enough cultural events you'll finally absorb an important and very simple lesson: culture is not meant to be used as a bludgeon to denigrate other people who live in other places. That's a ditzy, queeny, superficial use of it.

I don't think you'll ever really get any of it, but do keep trying, dear.

by Anonymousreply 16208/15/2013

[quote]You can see things on the cheap

I never said culture was for the rich. It is for people who are smart and intellectually curious. The toxic gay-ghetto NY queens on this thread seem severely lacking in both departments, no matter how much they protest to the contrary. They seem more the type to, I don't know, pat themselves on the back because they saw Patti LuPone at a restaurant.

by Anonymousreply 16308/15/2013

"Maybe if you go to enough cultural events you'll finally absorb an important and very simple lesson: culture is not meant to be used as a bludgeon to denigrate other people who live in other places. "

Is that what r161 was doing? bludgeoning other people who live in other places?

I thought his/her response was a reasonable rebuttal to someone else's inane generalization of the ny experience.

by Anonymousreply 16408/15/2013

Troll-dar the thread, r164.

"we've got it all. These reasons alone make it stupid to live anywhere else." --r161 et al

"the ny experience."

eyeroll.

If NYers are using this thread to try to prove that they're not all insufferable cunts, they're doing a miserable job.

by Anonymousreply 16508/15/2013

You implied it was for the rich when you said they would more likely be sitting at home eating Ramen with 6 roommates.

I get more out of going to shows than squealing about a Rebecca Luker sighting in a restaurant, but I do think it's a shame and pity that someone, especially a gay someone, doesn't know who Rebecca Luker is.

Of course other cities have theater, opera and the ballet, but not the quantity that New York has. I'm not trying to say everything that plays in New York is good, but lord knows that's far from the truth, but we do end up with the best of the best and the highest volume of it too.

by Anonymousreply 16608/15/2013

Sorry, R166. London puts NY theatre to shame...

Get off your highhorse. NY is a great city but it's not the end all be all of existence...and it was a lot better before Rudy Giulliani gutted it and turned it into Disneyland. There's a whole world out there.

by Anonymousreply 16708/15/2013

London puts great plays, but their musical theater hardly puts New York to shame. Far from it; it's a total embarrassment most of the time.

by Anonymousreply 16808/15/2013

[quote]Rebecca Luker

You're not digging yourself out of your hole here, r166.

[quote]best

I beg to differ. Ny theater has turned to shit. London, though also not what it was, is still miles above NY, and in the US, the best theater is now actually regional. It's where the interesting new plays come from before they head to NY, if they even make it to NY, the stages there are now so crowded with Lion King, Shrek, Book of Mormon and the like. Ny, even small theaters, can no longer take risks on new playwrights or, well, anything that doesn't have a celebrity or brand or franchise name attached to it.

You are clinging to a dying vision, dear.

by Anonymousreply 16908/15/2013

Musical theater is a total embarrassment most of the time.

by Anonymousreply 17008/15/2013

I'll concede that a lot of what is good transfer to New York from elsewhere, but there was never a time (post 1940s) that shows didn't have out of town tryouts.

The Glass Menagerie that's coming in, and is brilliant btw, may be a "regional" production, but don't kid yourself. They always had their sights set on Broadway- Brantley even went up to review it for them just to give the official green light- and lo and behold it's coming in a few weeks.

It's not all on Broadway either. Natasha, Pierre and The Great Comet and Here Lies Love were superb.

We get a lot from Steppenwolf, but they are the only regional theater producing works without the sole purpose of hoping they come to Broadway.

by Anonymousreply 17108/15/2013

This thread pretty much confirms that there are some NY'ers and Non-NY'ers who are just fucking idiots.

I like you, R70.

by Anonymousreply 17208/15/2013

The Glass Menagerie is a warhorse play that's more than 60 years old, dear. What a strange example to try to defend the viability, freshness, and vitality of NY theater.

[quote] the only regional theater producing works without the sole purpose of hoping they come to Broadway.

You need to get out more. As in: get your head out of your ass more. Regional theaters that produce shows with the sole intention of sending the production on to Broadway are quite rare. wtf?

by Anonymousreply 17308/15/2013

Obviously you haven't seen this production Menagerie R173. It's a stunning, revelatory production with impeccable performances by Zachery Quinto and Cherry Jones.

John Tiffany's direction will make you see the play like you've never seen it before.

This example was perfect actually because it shows how a non-New Yorker views this stuff. To you The Glass Menagerie is just something your local community theater puts on and you think, "Wasn't that nice!"

Bringing fresh life to an older work can be just as fulfilling as creating a new one. Ask Diane Paulus.

You are the one who needs to get out more.

by Anonymousreply 17408/15/2013

It's a question of supposed superiority and chauvinism. Couple that with the person's inability to see his own jingoistic narrow-mindedness.

How could someone possibly consider several alternatives and prefer anything but this one of his own, the only one he's ever known? How unsophisticated! (which is ironic)

'Still rather have a flyover $800/mo mortgage, save for my future, and splurge on travel. Like, say, New York... or London. Last time, I stood in line, sipping coffee and people-watching for about an hour, then picked up a day ticket for Stewart/McKellen's Godot. Didn't wait but 10 minutes for the return ticket to Dench's Madame de Sade, and went about my day. And theater tickets in London, even with the exchange rate, are so much cheaper than in NYC.

by Anonymousreply 17508/15/2013

[quote]Bringing fresh life to an older work

Yeah. Because that only happens in NY.

And not to mention: the play under discussion was revived in CAMBRIDGE, dimwit. Holy shit, you're a ditz.

And again, a play that's half a century old, revived by non-NYers and then brought in to Ny from the ART where it originally opened, like, a year ago is a dumb example to reach for if you're trying to show the vitality and originality of NY theater.

Back to the OP's point. DL-NYers are insufferable and you've done a good job of illustrating exactly how and to what depth. Thx,

by Anonymousreply 17608/15/2013

R166 London's theatrical output is immense, as is the case for just about every large city in Europe, even Edinburgh with a population of about 450,000 has the biggest arts festival in the world, also the oldest. The arts side of Edinburgh is one of the most vibrant anywhere, brings in tourists year-round and can make a career if you do well in Edinburgh.

Try travelling a bit, find out something about the rest of the US, maybe even the world, before you start spouting absolute nonsense about how great New York theatre is. It's not that great, it's not that big, it's not unique. And it certainly isn't avant garde.

by Anonymousreply 17708/15/2013

LA has more youthful creative energy these days. Many people are feel that LA is the American city of the 21st century. NYC was the queen of the 20th. Even old transplanted NYCers agree that she ain't what she used to be. New York feels like an aging starlet, and LA is her younger, fresher understudy.

by Anonymousreply 17808/15/2013

LA is the last major American city where you don't need a fortune to live there, so there's been a big migration over the past decade or so.

NYC really fucked itself by becoming the city of the 1%.

by Anonymousreply 17908/15/2013

THIS deserves its own thread.

A Manhattanite in all of her cunty glory:

by Anonymousreply 18008/15/2013

She is representative of the new New Yorker. Claims to be liberal, but just a big old Republican at heart when it comes to living next to " those people."

by Anonymousreply 18108/15/2013

NYC theater rules!

by Anonymousreply 18208/16/2013

Hahaha, that is hilarious, R80.

by Anonymousreply 18308/16/2013

Re: R180 clip...

UWS Joan will be found dead -when the stench gets too bad in her rent-controlled apt- and covered in cat feces.

by Anonymousreply 18408/16/2013

Hey, OP here.

Yesterday this guy was convinced Idaho was a "southwestern" state.

by Anonymousreply 18508/16/2013

OP, It sounds like your New Yorker is geographically challenged, but that doesn't have anything to do with him being a New Yorker.

Why won't you tell us what city you live in?

Some of these comments are pretty funny about "the collapse" of New York being complete and how New York has been "dismantled." As if!

by Anonymousreply 18608/16/2013

"As if!"

Powerful, New York-style retort, R186! The desperation is wafting off of you.

by Anonymousreply 18708/16/2013

Read the thread, R186.

by Anonymousreply 18808/16/2013

London theater so much cheaper than NYC?

When were you last there?

Excepting the wonderful institution that is the National Theatre (which the USA sadly lacks), West End prices are now far more comparable to NYC. When "Book of Mormon" opened this spring, the box office caused great controversy by offering those special exclusive seats that cost three times as much as regular seats, and yet those seats were selling very well.

A horrible practice has crossed the pond!

I did get day-of-performance seats to see "Old Times" with Rufus Sewell, Lia Williams and Kristin Scott Thomas, and those were only 20 pounds a piece, but many NYC institutions have day-of-performance deals as well, including "Pippin" and the recently closed "I'll Eat You Last".

Yes, the subsidized theaters and their attendant companies still have decent prices, but do note that they are subsidized in a way that would make any American theater company insanely green with envy, but that too is not for the ages, as the subsidies are being challenged every which way.

As for the for-profit theaters, they are now mostly charging just as Broadway does. I have my receipt for "The Audience", so I do know of what I speak.

All that said, the musicals in the West End mostly have nothing on their NYC counterparts, though the overall theater scene is very healthy, more so than NYC.

In the USA, outside of NYC, there is Chicago. And some regions have one or two strong theaters, but besides NYC and Chicago, all else pales. Just ask Patti or Victor.

by Anonymousreply 18908/17/2013

This New Yorker (a transplant) is amused by all the silly vitriol being flung about. The city is not for everyone, but it does have an energy and excitement that I've not found anywhere else.

The USA only needs one NYC. I just wish there were more great cities for Americans to choose from. Chicago, SF, Boston, LA and even DC all have merit, and I've heard Austin is cool, but others suffer from all the big-city trappings and none of the cultural advantages. New Orleans would be included in this list if its problems weren't so massive.

Atlanta, for example, is ghastly. Hideous and horrible, all endless traffic to get from one suburb to the next.

by Anonymousreply 19008/17/2013

"...it does have an energy and excitement that I've not found anywhere else."

Your subjective opinion, and nothing more. Many of us feel differently, and our voices are now being heard as well.

by Anonymousreply 19108/17/2013

Is OP taking about this guy?

by Anonymousreply 19208/17/2013

I do see a lot of New Yorkers making frequent references to where they live and how amazing it is or how special the people are there. Sometimes it's a bit too much.

by Anonymousreply 19308/17/2013

Sometimes?

by Anonymousreply 19408/17/2013

[quote]W&W for R5

Why? There wasn't anything remotely funny or original about it, r7.

by Anonymousreply 19508/17/2013

In my travels around the world and the US, I have found that only New Yorkers and Texans constantly remind people where they are from and compare everything to NY or Texas, but only if it is bad. Rarely will you hear that something is better than it is in those two places.

by Anonymousreply 19608/17/2013

To sum up: New York rules because there's a chance you might one day catch a glimpse of Patti LuPone and Victor Garber eating lunch.

And r189 is an aging musical- and celebrity-fan-boy with shitty taste in theater.

by Anonymousreply 19708/17/2013

I don't think anyone was saying NY doesn't have ANY nice points, r190. It's NYers who are thoroughly insufferable and pretentious, and you've just added more evidence. Thx.

And you're obviously too tone-deaf to hear the death rattle of a once great city in a statement like "At least we're better than Atlanta."

by Anonymousreply 19808/17/2013

Depends on where "here" is - if you're some satellite office in Bumblefuck, Iowa, hell yeah I'd be bringing it up every ten seconds as well that I was from a better place. Maybe he's just reminding himself of the escape he has to go to in order to make it through one more day in fucking Mayberry.

by Anonymousreply 19908/17/2013

Where is "Portsmith," ME, r5?

by Anonymousreply 20008/17/2013

If he's really so fucking fabulous, r199, his business would be sending him to Paris, Milan and London.

If checking up on middle-management in Bumblefuck is where life has led you, don't take it out by insulting the people around you. Own it. Don't be a pretentious twat. How many times do we have to repeat this to the NYers on this thread?

by Anonymousreply 20108/17/2013

^^And whatever, r199... I bet OP's town, no matter where or what, is interesting enough that an interesting, curious and open person could amuse themselves there during a visit. There's truth to the old expression: only boring people are bored.

The dude sounds like a pretentious, condescending twit. The fact that DL-NYers rush to defend someone whose behavior as described here is so plainly obnoxious and annoying reveals more about them than anything else.

by Anonymousreply 20208/17/2013

"New Yorkers are so sophisticated they'll wait in line for hours for a hybrid of a croissant and a donut." Made me laugh, [r32], thanks!

by Anonymousreply 20308/17/2013

I don't think r203 really got the joke.

by Anonymousreply 20408/20/2013

Tell him New York is a fucking cesspool of filth and scum and that you hope he gets mugged soon so he'll stop tossing around the New York reference around trying to make himself look sophisticated. It's shitsville. Greedy landlords charging high rents, criminals left and right on subway trains, the stench of the city alone, of human waste from the millions who live there slowly meandering through the underground of that scummy place, rivers of human shit and piss below their feet and heaven help the public tap water where that comes from. Everyone's ass all up in each other's face in crummy buildings unless you're degenerate rich and privileged, where they live in their glass houses far up in the clouds looking down on the ant-like peons. There's filthy fucking going on there every second, with shit eaters, piss drinkers, ass beaters, blood-letters, cum swallowers, extreme acts of forbidden sodomy by straights (it should be exclusively for gays since they don't have cunts) -- and other very, very VILE and depraved acts of unspeakable filth and depravity -- homosexual in particular -- going on there that is being filmed by seedy porn producers. New York is an dirty, over-populated stinkhole of humanity pandering to the very lowest form of human life. Immorality, corruption (police), injustices, lack of cleanliness in food handling there, and other ugly abominations that would make you sick and depressed just thinking about it long enough.

Don't go there. Don't ever go there.

by Anonymousreply 20508/20/2013

[quote]The posters bashing NYC have either never lived here or ran back to their little flyover thingy after not being able to make it here. It takes a lot to survive here, both in terms of money and strength of character, so I understand those who were unable to live here on a long-term basis. We experience the highest of highs but also the lowest of lows. Because we've endured some much suffering and adversity, we take very little in life for granted. We know how precious every minute is, and live life to the fullest. Every day is a party, a new adventure. I truly believe that this is what sets us apart from others...the ability to live life as if every second counts. It's quite thrilling in a way.

What a fucking cliche!!!

If this was written better, it would read like a monologue cut from a Woody Allen movie from the 70's.

I really hope New York is not full of 8 million people like you.

by Anonymousreply 20608/20/2013

I agree that it's a cliche R206, but it has only become that because of the truth behind those words.

Maybe all the haters on this thread should have to reveal where they live and I think things will quickly come into focus.

by Anonymousreply 20708/20/2013

[quote] The USA only needs one NYC. I just wish there were more great cities for Americans to choose from. Chicago, SF, Boston, LA and even DC all have merit, and I've heard Austin is cool, but others suffer from all the big-city trappings and none of the cultural advantages. New Orleans would be included in this list if its problems weren't so massive.

More great American cities? There are great American cities. Have you been to many cities?

The problem with New Yorkers is that they can't go anywhere, from Paris to Bali, without making comparisons to New York City. That's really sad and makes New Yorkers look very mundane.

I've worked in arts and culture in a big and small American cities for years, and I can tell you that there are many people who work just as hard as New Yorkers for their craft because their cities need them too. New York is not a cultural vacuum, places like Buffalo and Philadelphia and Minneapolis really work hard to build an effective and inspiring arts scene. They work hard and fight against the odds and get very little in return. These cities may not make billions in tourists dollars like NYC does, but they do enrich the lives of the local populations. And these organizations are non-profits where even the higher ups make no money.

It's a labor of love to be an artist outside New York City. But in my opinion, it's more important to be an artist outside NYC than in NYC.

Seeing a play or a piece of art or hearing new music in "flyover" land may change a person's life for the better.

I don't understand why so many people from New York City feel the need to bully people from the rest of America as if we don't work hard like you do. That's a desperately sick lie and a very unfortunate one.

by Anonymousreply 20808/20/2013

R206 has it right. These New Yorkers have been exposed for the shallow, intellectually vacant thugs that they are. People with "strength of character" don't write elitist screeds like the ones we've seen from New Yorkers.

by Anonymousreply 20908/20/2013

Buffalo a cultural mecca? Oh my sides! Haha, thanks for the good laugh R208

No one said that people, whether in the arts or otherwise, don't work hard in flyover land. They can work as hard as they like at the Rose County Playhouse, and there's certainly value to putting on good community theater in the hinterlands, but let's not pretend for a moment that any place in the country equals what New York has to offer for the arts.

Also, are you implying that the arts aren't a labor of love in New York? Why is it more important to be an artist outside of New York?

by Anonymousreply 21008/20/2013

R207, it takes a lot to survive anywhere nowadays, both in terms of money and strength of character. But the insufferable New Yorkers bashing the rest of America are not shining beacons exemplifying "strength of character."

Anyone anywhere can experience the highest of highs or lowest of lows anywhere. I had a friend who owned a white water rafting company on the Niagara river. I've never experienced anything so death defying in my life. That's not an experience or a job that can be had in NYC. Nothing comes close.

[quote] Because we've endured some much suffering and adversity, we take very little in life for granted.

This could have come out of the mouth of a flyover frau. How generic. You don't know what everyone else has been through.

[quote] We know how precious every minute is, and live life to the fullest. Every day is a party, a new adventure. I truly believe that this is what sets us apart from others...the ability to live life as if every second counts. It's quite thrilling in a way.

Still generic and cliche. This is something that could be experienced in Paris or Berlin.

You do NOT deserve special treatment for being a New Yorker. Respect is earned, not given, simply because you think life is an adventure every time you climb up five flights of stairs to your 500 sq foot Hell's Kitchen walkup you're paying $2,000 a month for.

by Anonymousreply 21108/20/2013

[quote] Buffalo a cultural mecca? Oh my sides! Haha, thanks for the good laugh [R208]

Did I say "cultural mecca"?

No. I said "work hard to build an effective and inspiring arts scene." And if you really looked at what this small, rust belt city has done to artistically satiate the citizens of the city, you'd take back that statement.

You and your NYC hyperbole mindset are overreaching in your strive to criticize and condemn. That's pathetic.

[quote] No one said that people, whether in the arts or otherwise, don't work hard in flyover land. They can work as hard as they like at the Rose County Playhouse, and there's certainly value to putting on good community theater in the hinterlands, but let's not pretend for a moment that any place in the country equals what New York has to offer for the arts.

Again, that's NOT what I said. Reading comprehension is NOT your forte. Maybe that's because you're a hustle and bustle New Yorker who's always on the move and only has time to filter certain words through your tiny brain. It doesn't matter which art is better, it matters more what art does for people in NYC and in the rest of America.

[quote] Also, are you implying that the arts aren't a labor of love in New York? Why is it more important to be an artist outside of New York?

Because New York is a city full of transplants, and if artists weren't paying their dues in places like Austin or Omaha, they wouldn't be inspired to work in the arts in NYC. And your statement alone is why it's harder to be an artist outside NYC, because you obviously could care LESS about what people are doing to enrich their own communities.

I worked for outreach education at a major regional theater for 15 years and watched how building drama programs in inner city schools full of students who'd never been to NYC changed their lives. Eventually their classes did go to see Broadway shows and it was the highlight of their year, which was very exciting. But the seed was planted outside NYC in their own community by people who truly cared.

You are not a well-rounded, open-minded person. Frankly, you're rather bigoted because you think that any art outside NYC is not valuable, just a trifle that has no business being mentioned in the same breath as NYC. You don't know. You have no hands-on experience. I do.

by Anonymousreply 21208/20/2013

R191,

Your voice isn't being heard. You're just negating my comment and not even making the effort to provide an argument to the contrary. And "subjective opinion" is redundant, and obviously it's my opinion. I didn't say it was anyone else's, did I?

You're a dolt.

by Anonymousreply 21308/20/2013

R197,

R189 here.

Bad taste in theater because I liked a Harold Pinter play? Or because I think the National Theatre in London does amazing work? Or because "Book of Mormon" is too popular to be acceptable to your delectable taste level?

I'm none of the things you described, not even close. But if it makes you feel better to think that, go ahead. Ignorance remains your folly.

by Anonymousreply 21408/20/2013

R212, It actually does sound like you've done good in fostering a love of the arts in some youth. That is very admirable no doubt.

Still, you are only teaching them to love a product of New York, and by your admission the pinnacle of lesson was to attend some New York theater.

I didn't mean to imply that theater outside of New York had zero value- that's just not true. But it's all recreations, mimicry, revivals, etc. Of course of educational purposes this can be of some value, but New York is where most of the creation is taking place.

One trip to Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet will teach those youth more about theater than the millionth remounting of Arsenic and Old Lace.

Are you trying to implying that once people get to New York they stop caring about their craft and work ethic? Do you think Veanne Cox, Danny Burstein and Jan Maxwell don't work their asses off every year in the city?

by Anonymousreply 21508/20/2013

d

by Anonymousreply 21608/24/2013

R213 would have responded to R191 sooner, but he was waiting three days on line for a cronut. In the vast cosmic scheme of things, it was totally worth it!

by Anonymousreply 21708/24/2013

Fuck you, new New Yorkers. If you didn't live here then, you didn't really live here, so stop trying to impress people with your address in America's Largest Mall.

by Anonymousreply 21808/26/2013

OP here. Just chiming in to say this Friday is this guy's last day in our office.

A bunch of us are going out for happy hour tomorrow after work to celebrate.

by Anonymousreply 21909/11/2013

This blizzard has exposed how self absorbed NYC is.

by Anonymousreply 22001/27/2015

IM FRUM NU YAWK!! PISZA BETTA IN NU YAWK!! THE GURLS ARE WAY WIKID HOWTA IN NU YAWK! BROOKLIN IN DA HOWSE! IM FRUM SEVENDY FIF AN BRAWDWAY!

But seriously no they're not all that bad. Most people who live in nyc proper , really aren't even from new York.

by Anonymousreply 22101/27/2015
by Anonymousreply 22201/27/2015

2 things differentiate NYC from other world class cities: the amount of musicals playing and the amount of fabulous holiday window dressings. That's it!

by Anonymousreply 22301/27/2015
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