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Film Noir - I'm Loving it !

Catching up with all the classics on TCM. Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, Sunset Blvd. , Murder My Sweet, Dark Passage. I'm 25, but find these films so great. They had plots, and intrigue, and great lighting. Makes all this new shit seem so lame.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 10507/05/2013

Good for you!

When you're feeling like you want to see something great and crazy, try "Kiss Me Deadly," "The Naked Kiss" or "Shock Corridor." Lurid late noirs with wild plots and lots of intrigue.

The opening scene before the credits in "The Naked Kiss" still packs a punch 50 years later. Don't read about it before you watch it!

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 106/29/2013

I'm with you OP.

Costco had a 10 movie, DVD compilation set for $19 last week and again, another 10 film collection I picked up this morning.

If you have a Costco in your hood, might want to check it out.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 206/29/2013

Don't forget "Detour"

Or anything directed by Fritz Lang

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 306/29/2013

Film noir is my favourite genre too OP, I'm 39. I like watching them when I'm home alone. Those no good dames and those tough as nails detectives draw me in every time.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 406/29/2013

I love them!! One of my favorite lines from a film noir whose title I can't recall, was spoken by Lisabeth Scott. .. "A girl like me doesn't need much to get by. Just stockings and cigarets."

:-))

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 506/29/2013

Didn't she also say, "I don't go to church. Kneeling bags my nylons."

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 606/29/2013

Bwahahahaha!! .. Love it!!

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 706/29/2013

Gloria Grahame in THE BIG HEAT.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 806/29/2013

I do agree they're fun. Double Indemnity has a clever plot - since updated for Body Heat - but some of the dialogue in DI is laughable ...not to mention that no one IRL has ever talked in the clipped, rapid-fire way that Fred MacMurray does.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 906/29/2013

If you need to always have real life, stay out of the theaters.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 1006/29/2013

So many great movies to watch. The plot for the movie of [italic]the Big Sleep[/italic] doesn't make much sense, but it has some great scenes, particularly with Dorothy Malone and Martha Vickers.

James Cagney is very intense in [italic]White Heat[/italic] and it has that classic ending.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 1106/29/2013

"Born To Be Bad" , Starring the still alive, Joan Fontaine. Causing havoc in everyone's lives, when she hits town ( San Francisco ). Loving the bad boy, but wanting the rich guy, for his money. Don't we all ? Robert Ryan's great line to her 'I love you so much. Too bad I don't like you'

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 1206/29/2013

[RE8] So disturbing when Lee Marvin throws the hot coffee in Grahame's face. So freaky that secondary character actors like Marvin , & Charles Bronson , would go on to become huge A - list stars in the 60's & 70's.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 1306/30/2013

The term, Film Noir is entirely racist and a produce of white domination. As a result, I'm not going to pay my taxes.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 1406/30/2013

I love that bit in [italic]the Big Heat[/italic] when Gloria Grahame imitates a prancing dog to make fun of the men kissing up to the top dog. I can't remember what he says, but it's something like "she's a nice girl, but you shouldn't let her drink."

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 1506/30/2013

really incredible

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 1606/30/2013

The Sunset Boulevard qualify as film noir?

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 1706/30/2013

We had FACES then! And lots of drink.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 1806/30/2013

Yes, R17. It bled into so many other genres. R6, that was Jan Sterling in ACE IN THE HOLE aka THE BIG CARNIVALm another Billy Wilder film.

A recent favorite for me is BORN TO KILL with Claire Trevor and Lawrence Tierney. Trevor is magnificent and Tierney is a piece of wood but can at least do menace well enough. And they do have great chemistry. And lots of fun people in the small roles. It's a nasty little film.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 1906/30/2013

Now, dear OP, if you can just quit equating your age with the capacity to enjoy popular art and entertainment from the not-so-distant past, you'll feel so much better about being a normal person. And unlike most of your cohort, you'll be fun company!

BUT in the meantime - they are great, aren't they? Try ASPHALT JUNGLE for some Huston, and of course THE MALTESE FALCON for a little more. Do the early Bogart/Bacall stuff, at least with THE BIG SLEEP. And see if you like THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE. Also, IN A LONELY PLACE is great, and if you've never done the nouveau noir in-color CHINATOWN (surely you already have), it's a wonderful update. And, last, watch TOUCH OF EVIL for the Welles' insane brilliance. Great fun.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 2006/30/2013

OUT OF THE PAST with one of my favorite femme fatales, Kathie Moffat, played by Jane Greer.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 2106/30/2013

Besides those mentioned, I'd also recommend Pickup on South Street.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 2206/30/2013

Just rewatched The Big Heat and LOVED Gloria all over again! She made that quip as she was Lee Marvin's girl friend. [Oh, baby, deep in side of me.] And Jeanette Nolan, so perfectly hateable, killed in a mink coat by a woman in a mink coat. Loved the ex-army buddies and all their hunkability brought in for backup.

A delicious movie.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 2306/30/2013

Scarlett Street and Nightmare Alley are up there, too.

And, that boys and girls, is what a GEEK actually GEEKS.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 2406/30/2013

"Quicksand" with Micky Rooney & Barbara Bates ( Phoebe, the wanna be Eve, at the end of " All About Eve"). Set in Santa Monica, at the old Ocean Park amusement pier, and ending on the famous Santa Monica Pier ( where Route 66 ends). Sad fact - Bates was suicidal for years, once attempting to slash her wrists, lost her career, and finally succeeded by locking herself in her garage , with the engine running. She was only 43.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 2506/30/2013

"Union Station" - William Holden's 1st film after " Sunset Blvd.", again with Nancy Olsen. Not a great film, but good, with lots of 1950 L.A., including Pasadena, and Griffith Park.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 2606/30/2013

That freaky wrestler, Mike Mazurki, is very funny in " Murder My Sweet". 6' 5" tall, he had that gravelly voice from being punched in the Adams apple, when he was wrestling. I love how he just tosses everyone around in the film.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 2707/01/2013

I'm with you R9. The dialogue in DI at times is so ripe it's laughable.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 2807/01/2013

Check out the films of Henri-Georges Clouzot, starting with "Quai des Orfèvres".

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 2907/01/2013

R30, what an ignorant, unhelpful, jingoistic post ...begone, you phony patriot.

And R29, thanks for the Clouzot recommendation!

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 3107/01/2013

R30, you had yet to contribute at all, other than to insult r29 who made an excellent contribution to this thread, so why don't you go back to your basement dwelling and let the grown ups talk.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 3207/01/2013

Don't forget Joan Crawford in Possessed. Very good movie.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 3307/01/2013

The opening sequence to Mildred Pierce is one of the greatest uses of film noir with the lighting, shadows and off kilter shots. It's an interesting movie that starts out as Noir then switches to a typical woman's melodrama. But basically so much of film noir is just the woman's melodrama tilted to men.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 3407/01/2013

[quote]Try ASPHALT JUNGLE

Great movie - I watched it the other night on TCM - the ending always chokes me up.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 3507/01/2013

I love Film Noir - even when it's bad, it's still worth watching (usually)...

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 3607/01/2013

[quote]t's an interesting movie that starts out as Noir then switches to a typical woman's melodrama.

Agree. I'd add that this seems typical of a lot of Warners product. Noir -- or the style of Noir --was the studio trademark through much of the 1940s.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 3707/01/2013

Marnie - it's my favourite Hitchcock. Sean Connery is a twisted control freak, Tippi Hedren is a white collar criminal. The whole thing is beautifully lit and styled, the backstory is suitably grotesque, love it.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 3807/01/2013

The strange case of Martha Ivers. Barbara Stanwick, Lizabeth Scott and Kirk Douglas

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 3907/01/2013

You Tube is an absolute treasure trove when it comes to old movies. I'm talking movies from the 30's & 40's. Incredible finds.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 4007/01/2013

I don't know if purists consider "Niagara" a film noir though the plot and its twists probably qualify. Anyway it's amusing to see Marilyn playing a villain for once.

Just to rile up r30 who probably think Americans first coined the expression "film noir", I'll add my voice to the Clouzot vote. And to stretch it further I'd add that "Diabolique" extends the film noir premise to the horror genre.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 4107/01/2013

Shoot the Piano Player--so what if it's French? It's the best!

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 4207/01/2013

Two words: Steve Hayes (a/k/a Tired Old Queen At The Movies)

He features many noir films among the dozens of TOQ videos at You Tube.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 4307/01/2013

I recommend Laura. It's film noir with a candy coating: glamorous, witty, romantic, beautiful, entertaining, but still down and dirty.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 4407/01/2013

TCM is a gold mine of noir. I saw one a few weeks back with Joan Bennett and James Mason that was an A+ for atmosphere. When movies today are clearly made for children and/or retards, it's a pleasure to see films made for adults (even in an era of heavy censorship).

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 4507/01/2013

How about Elevator to the Gallows, or Ascenseur Pour l'Echafaud as the original French title goes? If only for the Miles Davis classic soundtrack.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 4607/01/2013

That's THE RECKLESS MOMENT, R45. Remade as THE DEEP END with Tilda Swinton.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 4707/01/2013

Phantom Lady from 1944 directed by Robert Siodmak is one of my favorites.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 4807/01/2013

The original "D.O.A." is one of the greatest film noirs ever.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 4907/01/2013

I have mixed feelings about film noir. I have liked some of them, and have watched most in this thread. But something about them is depressing, too.

On a related note, I find melodramas completely depressing and am unable to watch them.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 5007/01/2013

[RE50] You sound like a real party !!!

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 5107/01/2013

Well, R51, narcissists have trouble with things that don't reaffirm their self-esteem and make them feel brilliant and happy and like they're the center of the universe.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 5207/01/2013

I don't need happy, R52 and I am definitely not a narcissist. I like serious drama, but there is something depressing about some of Film Noir, and definitely old melodramas.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 5307/01/2013

Even though it probably doesn't count as classic noir, I still love L.A. Confidential

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 5407/01/2013

OMG - YES, film noir is depressing. There's a reason. A lot of the films were reactions , post WW 2, to the cynicism, and yes, depression, of the war, it's killing, lives shattered. Don't watch them then. "Mary Poppins" is a good alternative.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 5507/01/2013

Not a reaction to WWII & the cynicism, killing, but spouting out more of it in rigid little stories for a popular audience, without mentioning the real drama and truth and cynicism in society and the world, and in fact avoiding that reality. Hitler isn't the evil one, just some tough dames in tight sweaters. Full of corny music and dialogue.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 5607/01/2013

That's odd, R53. I love good melodrama (like James M. Cain) the same way I love good comedy (like Oscar Wilde) -- they both intrigue my mind & keep me fascinated. Depressing is something like "Old Yeller", where the dog dies, & I can't bear to think about it, much less see it again.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 5707/01/2013

[RE56] OK professor , we got it . I think your wrong, but being verbose is what you do I guess.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 5807/01/2013

[quote]I think your wrong, but being verbose is what you do I guess.

R56 also does apostrophes correctly. I don't share his sentiments, but do appreciate his punctuation.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 5907/01/2013

Has anybody mentioned the great "Out of the Past" starring Robert Mitchum with Kirk Douglas as the bad guy? I call it the battle of the cleft chins...(with Jane Greer, fabulous as the exotic love interest.) It was directed by French born Jacques Tourneur, although I guess he mainly worked in American films.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 6007/01/2013

What's the movie where Richard Widmark pushes the old lady in a wheelchair down a flight of stairs?

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 6107/01/2013

"Old Mother Riley Meets the Vampire"

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 6207/01/2013

Not to be missed is "To Have and Have Not"

Lauren Bacall's first film and it made her a star.

The chemistry between Bogart (45) and Bacall (19) is off the fucking charts.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 6307/01/2013

"Kiss of Death" r61

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 6407/01/2013

R61, that's "Kiss Of Death" (1947) -- starring Victor Mature, but Widmark steals the show.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 6507/01/2013

Most Popular Film-Noir Feature Films (464 titles)

sort them any way you like.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 6607/01/2013

"Dark Passage" - Bogart's great, as usual, it's got Bacall, set in San Fran, and Agnes Moorehead fantastic as a bitchy old maid ( of course). I won't give away what she does at the end.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 6707/01/2013

One of my faves - "I Walk Alone" . You get prime Burt Lancaster & Kirk Douglas, plus divine Lizabeth Scott. Story's good. Liz should have been a huge star.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 6807/01/2013

If your talking Burt Lancaster, his first film, " The Killers" is a noir classic. With Ava Gardner. 2 beautiful faces, in b&w, suspense, it's got it all !

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 6907/01/2013

I enjoy a lot of Film Noir, but (even more than Westerns) it is the Classic Movie genre that is safe for straight guys.

I WAKE UP SCREAMING is an excellent early noir (1941) that hasn't been mentioned...ditto FALLEN ANGEL (1945).

Once thought to be lost, and only recent re-discovered is the poverty-row BLONDE ICE (1948) with Leslie Brooks as a cold blooded society columnist on a killing spree is a tantalizing noir that has a cop-out ending, but until then is lots of dark, juicy fun. Worth searching out.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 7007/01/2013

I wonder why Bette Davis didn't do any film noir. Her home studio Warner Brothers was the king of noir and she would have been a natural in the genre, yet for whatever reasons didn't do it.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 7107/01/2013

R71, I know what you mean, but Davis' appearances in THE LETTER, PETRIFIED FOREST, DECEPTION and BEYOND THE FOREST all qualify as film noir outings.

BEYOND THE FOREST especially is a tickler, though (the others being rather hot). It includes Bettes' peritonitis-death-from-self-abortion-by-falling-down-a-hill that she called the longest death scene in film history.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 7207/01/2013

The Third Man - from the moment Joseph Cotton arrives in postwar Vienna to the end when Alida Valli walks down the street.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 7307/01/2013

Bette Davis actually did a film noir for Warner, or rather a noir melodrama: DEAD RINGER directed by her 'Now Voyager' co-star Paul Henreid. As in 'A Stolen Life' she plays twins, and once more the jealous twin takes the place of the dead one... Only this time she will REALLY wish she hadn't!

At times the movie is more camp melodrama than film noir but is worth checking out, not just for two Bette Davis for the price of one, but also the terrific score by Andre Previn.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 7407/02/2013

"I enjoy a lot of Film Noir, but (even more than Westerns) it is the Classic Movie genre that is safe for straight guys."

What does that have to do with the price of tea in China? Some vague feeling that you can't like it because straight guys can "safely" do the same? I'm really missing the point here...

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 7507/02/2013

I disagree R74 with calling DEAD RINGER a noir. It's more accurately a 'gran dame guignol'.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 7607/02/2013

Poor old Lizabeth Scott, her career really dried up after she was busted by Confidential as a hooker-using lesbian.

She was, for me, the ultimate Noir Queen.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 7707/02/2013

No, r75 - I was just making an observation.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 7807/02/2013

Lizabeth Scott is still alive.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 7907/02/2013

You have a point, R70. An idiotic one, but a point.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 8007/02/2013

R80 attempts to slam someone who doesn't deserve it by quoting a non-noir character. How very dull.

And she's too short for the gesture, in any event. But she IS a cunt.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 8107/02/2013

Recent scary Lizabeth Scott, in March 2010.

She's 91 now, so actually it's rather amazing she's using this look and still nearly resembling herself. Those eyebrows appear like that in most recent photos, though. ( ! )

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 8207/02/2013

Love film noir too, most of the ones mentioned here. My favourite is the very odd and atmospheric "Angel Face" with Robert Mitchum and Jean Simmons.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 8307/02/2013

r83 I love ANGEL FACE.

A great noir melodrama is NO MAN OF HER OWN with Barbara Stanwyck. Based on a Cornell Woolrich story it could have been easily remade well and some idiot decided to turn it into a Ricki Lake comedy, MRS. WINTERBOURNE.

Another great Stanwyck is THE FILE ON THELMA JORDON, especially for the tense post-crime clean up scene.

An earlier poster mentioned Robert Siodmak's PHANTOM LADY. He also did THE FILE ON THELMA JORDON, THE KILLERS, CRISS CROSS and the non-noir classic suspense film, THE SPIRAL STAIRCASE. I'll always love him for COBRA WOMAN.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 8407/02/2013

I had no idea Barbara Stanwyck made so many Noir films. Crime of Passion, Witness to Murder, and on and on. Good stuff. I love You Tube.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 8507/02/2013

R84, "Phantom Lady" is also based on a book by Cornell Woolrich, published under his pseudonym William Irish.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 8607/02/2013

Lizabeth Scott back in the day.

Never married, no kids.

Any lesbians out there have any good stories?

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 8707/02/2013

When was Sunset Blvd. on? I've been waiting to see it.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 8807/02/2013

Another good little noir is Pushover from 1954. Fred MacMurray as a cop who's tempted to go to the other side of the law when he and his partner are assigned to surveil Kim Novak (in her debut), girlfriend of a wanted bank robber on the lam. He falls for Novak and the two of them plot to kill the boyfriend and run off with his loot. The movie has a quintessential film noir line when Novak tells MacMurray "Money isn't dirty, just people."

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 8907/02/2013

Not a pure noir, but the wonderful "Sudden Fear" (1952)with Joan Crawford, Gloria Graham, and Jack Palance is irresistible for repeated viewings. The score by Elmer Bernstein is brilliant too.

"I know a way. I know a way. I know a way. I know a way...."

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 9007/02/2013

[RE90] "Sudden Fear" is excellent. Great scene when Palance & Grahame are talking, while Joan is hiding in the closet.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 9107/02/2013

I don't know what to say about #82's pic. It's like she has the same hair, from 1946, on a frightining 91 year old face . Why not change the hairstyle, so we're not thinking of the face, back then ? Love her though - no one can beat that sexy, sultry voice.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 9207/03/2013

[quote]Poor old Lizabeth Scott, her career really dried up after she was busted by Confidential as a hooker-using lesbian. She was, for me, the ultimate Noir Queen.

R77, I knew Scott was gay, I didn't know about "Confidential" and the hookers.

Any other interesting "Confidential" stories? t

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 9307/03/2013

R53, [italic]L.A. Confidential[/italic] counts as neo-noir, as does [italic]the Usual Suspects[/italic]. They both have complicated plots and lots of night scenes. There are more elements to consider than just those two, but those two will show up on any neo-noir list.

Do you guys think [italic]La4er Cake[/italic] counts as neo-noir? Despite the dark plot, it's mostly shot in daylight.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 9407/03/2013

Can a Noir be Technicolor?

I'm thinking of DESERT FURY.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 9507/03/2013

"Leave Her to Heaven" is a color noir. A classic.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 9607/03/2013

"Stranger on the Third Floor" with Peter Lorre is one I like. It was released in 1940 and Robert Osborne on TCM said something about it being one of the earliest film noirs, if not the first. I wouldn't know, but it's an interesting little movie. The dream sequence is pretty intense for such a low-budget film. YouTube only has the Spanish language version.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 9707/03/2013

[93] According to the Confidential article, Lizabeth was pretty open about her sexuality in Hwood (going to lesbian bars, refusing to beard, told a columnist she wore men's pyjamas and cologne, known to hang around with other lesbians including Marlene Dietrich's ex Frede) and the fact she was caught red-handed when the journo rang the phone number listed for her in the call girls 'little black book' was just the icing on the cake.

Sad and disappointing that she never came out publicly or speaks about her sexuality or the Confidential thing ever. It's such a pink elephant in every interview with her. I'm sure she has such a fascinating story to tell of being a lesbian in 40's Hollywood. Maybe she will speak out about it or write a bio before she passes on, I certainly hope that she does!

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 9807/03/2013

To anyone who has not seen 'Sudden Fear,' I recommend you watch it immediately if you are interested in film noir. It is a very suspenseful and great film. Even if you are not a Joan Crawford fan, you'll like it. Full movie at link.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 9907/03/2013

OMG, Night of the Hunter with Gish is superb.

Leaning on the everlasting arm...

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 10007/03/2013

An obscure & largely forgotten film, but one that is really entertaining in its own uniquely-weird way, is MIRAGE (1965) ...directed by Edward Dmytryk (THE CAINE MUTINY). In MIRAGE, Gregory Peck is an amnesiac whose life is in danger, but he doesn't know why ...stellar cast also includes Diane Baker, Walter Matthau, George Kennedy, Kevin McCarthy & Jack Weston. Wonderfully-atmospheric b&w cinematography, a veritable time capsule of '60s Manhattan. Screenplay by Peter Stone (CHARADE; ARABESQUE; the first writer to win a Tony, an Oscar & an Emmy). Outstanding jazzy score by Quincy Jones.

The film was recently re-released on a very nice-looking DVD, well worth searching out. I've watched it many times & still enjoy its deeply-strange vibe.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 10107/05/2013

I just watched Double Indemnity again. Movies of any genre, not just film noir, don't get better than that.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 10207/05/2013

Film noir is not called that because of scenes filmed at night. It is atmospheric, but there is a desperation about the film, someone falling against his/her better judgment, being betrayed and typically an unhappy ending even if Hollywood slapped a bit of hope on at the end of films. James M. Cain is the king of film noir. It's getting mixed up with someone bad and being pulled down by them to a nasty end. That's the noir.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 10307/05/2013

Postman Always Rings Twice, both the novel and the 1946 version, are quintessential noir. Even if the movie has a lot of MGM gloss, but Garfied, Lana Turner and Hume Cronyn all deliver strong performances. A shame MGM didn't make more of those type of films as Turner was perfect for Noir.

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 10407/05/2013

I like those old movies because they show a time when everyone at least tried to appear dignified in dress and make-up. Even if you lived on skid row, you tried to do something with your hair (like the Stevie Wonder song "... her clothes are worn, but never are they dirty"). Men wore hats.

Now everyone tries to look hip hop or slutty. Or sloppy-fat (people of WalMart).

by Young-in, loving the old classicsreply 10507/05/2013
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