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The New Xbox is being revealed Today!

10am Pacific, 1pm Eastern, Tuesday May 21st!

Anyone else in here interested in hearing what it's going to be like?

by Anonymousreply 26707/01/2013

give us the details, OP when its announced

by Anonymousreply 105/21/2013

I am!

by Anonymousreply 205/21/2013

Last generation: PS3 was custom "Cell" processor, and Xbox was PowerCell processor.

This generation: Both PS4 and Xbox will be based on Intel chips, and be pretty much "specialized PCs" underneath.

I'm not yet sure if that makes things MORE interesting, or LESS.

by Anonymousreply 305/21/2013

OMG it's HUGE!

by Anonymousreply 405/21/2013

It's called "The Xbox One", and integrates with television and cable to control everything.

It's a DVD/BlueRay player, TV/Cable box, and Gaming system all in one. And you can instantly switch between games and TV and apps like Netflix and Skype and a Browser, all with simple voice commands and gestures.

It's actually really impressive... providing it works as demo'd.

by Anonymousreply 505/21/2013

I missed the event, but I'm really underwhelmed by the stuff they revealed, particularly the required use of the Kinect 2.0, which, unless they've vastly improved it, doesn't work well if you don't have a lot of space. I am completely offended by the way they're going to lock out used games unless you pay a fee.

Also, were any of the games they demo'd exclusive?

Also, I assume most of the online features will require an Xbox Live Gold account, so...

by Anonymousreply 605/21/2013

Apparently you can't pay XBox 360 games on it, either. WTF? And having o pay a fee for used games? Why?

I also hate this Always On shit. You ean if my Internet goes out, I can't play the ame I paid $60 for? Fuck you.

by Anonymousreply 705/21/2013

[quote]Apparently you can't pay XBox 360 games on it, either. WTF? And having o pay a fee for used games? Why?

The lack of backwards compatibility doesn't really surprise me, because I'm sure they're using entirely different architecture for the One, plus this gives them additional incentive to force people to repurchase digital copies of games they already own.

Apparently the Always On thing will be at the behest of the individual publisher, so expect any title from EA or Activision to require it.

The PS4 isn't going to be backwards compatible either, but I don't think they've said anything about requiring an Always On connection. Also, unlike Xbox Live Gold, Playstation Plus has started offering free games to subscribers every month, like the Kindle Lending Library. And most of them are actually good games; they're currently offering Sleeping Dogs.

by Anonymousreply 805/21/2013

[quote]I also hate this Always On shit. You ean if my Internet goes out, I can't play the ame I paid $60 for?

Not only can't spell but he stole his games and now is crying and making excuses.

by Anonymousreply 905/21/2013

R6. Yes they did fix Kinect. Here is an article that has good information.

by Anonymousreply 1005/21/2013

I have a 360 but decided I'm going to stick with PCs for future gaming - more powerful, less annoying backwards compatibility issues, access to indie games, etc.

by Anonymousreply 1105/21/2013

[quote]Not only can't spell but he stole his games and now is crying and making excuses.

Sorry, I'm on my ipad and for some reason lately it's been dropping letters.

I don't get the stolen games comment, though. That doesn't even make sense. If I pay for a game, I should be able to play it whether I have an Internet connection or not. It has nothing to do with stealing games. How the fuck do you even steal games???

by Anonymousreply 1205/21/2013

[quote][R6]. Yes they did fix Kinect. Here is an article that has good information.

That didn't address the depth issue, though. In the brief period when I had Kinect 1.0, it would constantly tell me I needed to step back, which isn't easy in a small apartment without moving furniture.

by Anonymousreply 1305/21/2013

[quote]Todd Holmdahl, demonstrates for me by walking his 6' 4" frame toward the sensor. Even 3 feet away, the Kinect's onscreen display clearly registers his entire body, and he still has room to lift his hands above his head.

by Anonymousreply 1405/21/2013

What about the price point? Did they announce what they want to charge for this version?

And I wonder if new games will bump up to $70?

by Anonymousreply 1505/21/2013

[quote]Todd Holmdahl, demonstrates for me by walking his 6' 4" frame toward the sensor. Even 3 feet away, the Kinect's onscreen display clearly registers his entire body, and he still has room to lift his hands above his head.

Ack! I got as far as the demonstration video and missed the paragraph directly under it.

And no, they've confirmed neither a release date nor a price. I imagine they're holding off until Sony breaks out the specifics about the PS4. It will probably be sometime before the PS4 hits, but still before Christmas, since all of the big releases in the fall (Watch Dogs, Assassin's Creed IV, Battlefield 4, and Call of Duty: Ghosts) are all going to be on both systems.

by Anonymousreply 1605/21/2013

Wired.com has a great scoop on the Xbox One. I think it looks amazing, and can't wait! The kinect video is well worth checking out for the its new capabilities.

by Anonymousreply 1705/21/2013

Currently with the 360, can you play a single game on more than one machine? What I mean is, if I have Call of Duty (or whatever), can I lend it to my buddy and let him play it on his machine?

I ask that because of the info about 'used' games likely requiring an additional fee with the next XBox console.

As a Nintendo guy, sharing games or taking mine to another guy's house has never been an issue. That's why my question might sound ignorant.

by Anonymousreply 1805/21/2013

XBOX One design is directly from 1989. For over a decade now we've been told we live in the "Information Age." Yes, Collecting Information on YOU Age! Having to get games from the internet is a way for Microsoft, Sony, Nintendo etc. to gather information on what you do with these game consoles. I don't care if it's harmless. We are being pushed into giving more information about ourselves every year. Where's the privacy? Usually there are countertrends or backlashes to things becoming popular. There has yet to be any pushback to the increasing lack of privacy.

by Anonymousreply 1905/21/2013

I think a lot of you misunderstand the 'fee' for used games:

Say you have bought a brand new game. You install it to your hard drive. No more dgetting up off the couch to change from game to game, no more changing discs. You activate it one time and you're done.

Now let's say you give the game disc to a friend. They can install it and pay for the game electronically right there, without having to go to the store to get their own disc. Obviously, as the game gets older, the price goes down, just like at the store.

Now say you're DONE with a game. You can uninstall it, and get a credit to use towards another game (basically "selling" it). They haven't talked much about this part yet, but that'll be coming later, at E3 or just after.

The thing is, this basically cuts out GameStop from the equation, as you can trade games and such right from your living room.

We'll learn more soon enough... don't make too many assumptions just yet. It's only 20 days until E3.

by Anonymousreply 2005/22/2013

The hardcore gamer reaction seems pretty underwhelming / antagonistic to the press conference - mainly towards:

1) restrictions on used games. If you're a hardcore gamer and buy lots of games, the used games market saves you hundreds, even thousands, per year (and lets you recoup costs by reselling and trading in your own games). It's not just cutting out Gamestop out of the equation, it's cutting out individual gamers themselves. Even if you can "resell" it, it's in a process completely controlled and orchestrated by Microsoft - oh joy, let's give more power to them instead of to an open market (like eBay or the Amazon marketplace) and the consumer...

2) always online requirement. Yeah, sure, the probability of being without internet for an extended period grow slimmer everyday in most parts of the country (though, even in major cities internet outages aren't that uncommon), but I think it's the principle of being left with a useless expensive piece of metal because of an artificial design restriction. Just like the outcry over Sim City Online's server failures - I think people are forgiving if they can understand the reason for an always online requirement (e.g. MMORPG's and multi-player), but if it just seems like an arbitrary way for the manufacturer to implement DRM and control / inconvenience you, then there's a backlash.

3) honestly, design-wise it looks like a big VCR / DVR. Just unimaginative, boxy, vents everywhere, and not particularly sexy. And seeing as they said they weren't going for top of the line graphics capabilities, I'm not sure why it needs to be so bulky.

I'm sure by E3 there'll be better reveals that might improve the response, but so far none of the big three console manufacturers have put out anything impressive with this new generation, and they're already in a tight spot with the splitting of the mainstream market with tablets / phones.

by Anonymousreply 2105/22/2013

The negative responses are premature and generally based on misunderstandings or half-truths. Or just knee-jerk reactions to things they think they might hate, but have no idea if they really will once they try it.

I have very little respect for the whiners.

by Anonymousreply 2205/22/2013

...though I will say I agree the box design is uninspired and boring-looking at best (chunky and dated at worst), and the name is weird. I would have though "Xbox Infinity" or "Xbox Infinite" would have been better on any number of levels.

by Anonymousreply 2305/22/2013

R22, how do you know their reactions are premature? Have you already played the XBox One yourself?

And I think most people are basing their reactions off the press conference and the subsequent interviews given by senior executives like Phil Harrison - i.e., factual statements given about the XBox One's design and features by Microsoft itself - so, it's kind of hard to fault them on reacting to "misunderstandings and half-truths".

I mean, the hardcore gamer crowd is probably the most well-informed out there (though admittedly also one of the most likely to engage in hyperbole and flame wars).

You know, one of the things I dislike about the upcoming generation is the open play manufacturers are making to control your living room and be your one-stop box. Like, I love the convenience of an HTPC / all-in-one solution, but I DON'T want everything on it to be controlled by one company. But that's exactly the play Sony and Microsoft (Nintendo not so much) are making - "use OUR marketplace", "buy movies from US", "give US your personal data", "use OUR networks", "post to social feeds on OUR platform".

What about focusing on how they can benefit consumers (by giving them more choices about how to access content, because so many new platforms and technologies pop up each year - a gaming console generation is a lifetime in tech), rather than focusing on how they can try to control and restrict media channels to benefit themselves? That's a better value proposition in the long run.

by Anonymousreply 2405/22/2013

[quote]R22, how do you know their reactions are premature?

I would think that would be obvious. They don't have all the information. They have mostly rumors and knee-jerk reactions.

And hard-core gamers are the worst at being pre-mature, since this was mostly the device reveal... all the detailed info about games is coming at E3.

by Anonymousreply 2505/22/2013

Xbox=WebTV too. If it gets too big, everyone will suffer, including gamers.

by Anonymousreply 2605/22/2013

R25, my point was that you can't know if they're being premature because you haven't played the XBox one either. Your "knee-jerk" reaction is to call its critics whiners and defend it, going off the same information... it might end up being great. It might not. The only info we have to go off now is from the press conference and interviews given.

On the "XBox One" name - someone pointed out it might put them in a difficult marketing spot in identifying it as a new system, the same way "Wii U" is apparently giving Nintendo some problems. After all, many people use the term "PS One" to refer to the original Playstation released in the 90's, so some consumers might not realize "XBox One" is supposed to be a new system (rather than another name for the original XBox).

by Anonymousreply 2705/22/2013

[quote]my point was that you can't know if they're being premature because you haven't played the XBox one either.

Yes I can. I don't think you know what the meaning of 'premature' means. It doesn't mean they're absolutely wrong. It means they can't possibly be sure because they don't have all the information.

It's not an opinion that they're premature. It's a fact. You can't argue that they're not being premature.

Contrarywise, I'm not "defending" it by saying it's great. I'm not saying anything about whether it's good or bad. It's just as premature to say it rocks and is super.

by Anonymousreply 2805/22/2013

Well, R28 - Microsoft just hosted a big press conference announcing and showing off the console's design and features. Its senior executives have given extensive interviews about the same. Photos and videos have been released; magazines have taken the machine apart and shown what its insides look like.

The reactions aren't based on rumors or innuendo; it's based on public information direct from the source.

How much more information needs to get out there before people are entitled to have a reaction that you don't consider "premature"?

by Anonymousreply 2905/22/2013

[quote]The reactions aren't based on rumors or innuendo

You really need to stop talking.

The reactions I'm talking about are on topics like "always on" or "used games" or "lack of games", all of which weren't part of today's reveal.

Details on THOSE topics are coming at E3 and later.

I really wish you knew what you were talking about. It would make this conversation easier and more productive.

by Anonymousreply 3005/22/2013

R30, thanks for the condescension!

The reactions to "always on", for example, are based on a follow-up interview provided today by Phil Harrison to Eurogamer, where he attempted to "clarify" the nature of the always-on requirement and used game sales (interview at link). That's plenty of information direct from the source about the system's intended design and operation, not a knee-jerk reaction to the terms "always on" or "no used games". People can decide whether they like / don't like the system Harrison describes, but I wouldn't describe reactions to the interview as being "premature".

I don't know if you're a Microsoft PR shill trying to defend the brand, a fanboy with an agenda, or just another internet know-it-all, but why don't you point to some concrete information of your own before accusing others of not knowing what they're talking about - it leads to more constructive discussions.

by Anonymousreply 3105/22/2013

[bold]Steve Jobs’ Dream Device Has Arrived And it’s made by Microsoft. Meet the Xbox One.[/bold]

Just before he died, Steve Jobs told his biographer Walter Isaacson about his dream for revolutionizing television. His fantasy device would control all the many doodads that crowd your living room—DVRs, game consoles, Blu-ray players—and would connect to the vast world of entertainment available online. Best of all, it would be drop-dead simple to control—no more futzing with the Input button to switch between different kinds of content, no more fiddling with different remotes to control your devices. “It will have the simplest user interface you could imagine,” Jobs said. “I finally cracked it.”

Today, I saw something very close to Steve Jobs’ dream device. Just like he envisioned, this machine turns itself into the hub of your living room. It plays video games, Blu-ray discs, TV shows, and everything you could possibly want from the Internet. It switches between this stuff seamlessly—you can forget about the Input button. And it does indeed have the simplest user interface imaginable, an eerily accurate voice-recognition system that is far more intuitive than a remote control. Want to watch MTV? Want to see what’s on HBO? Want to switch between TV and a Blu-ray? Just tell it what to do, and it will respond instantly.

Before you say anything, though, you’ve got to say its name: Xbox.

That’s right: In a new device it’s calling the Xbox One, Microsoft has done what Apple has long been rumored to do. It has created a near-perfect living room machine, one that has the potential to finally make it simple for you to watch or play anything you want, from anywhere, very quickly. Here’s how it works: Go to your TV and say, “Xbox on.” Your TV and Xbox turn on immediately, with no pause for booting up or logging in. You’re presented with a menu—it looks very much like the Windows 8 home screen—featuring apps, games, and other stuff you’ve recently interacted with. Now go to town. Say, “Watch CNN.” Your TV goes to the channel instantly. Say, “Xbox game,” and the device switches to the game you were playing. Say “Snap Skype” and the One brings up Skype in a panel to the side of your screen. Now tell it to call your mom. The One can also add its own elements on top of a TV broadcast—for instance, it can show your fantasy football stats as you’re watching an NFL game.

What’s remarkable about this is how quickly the device switches from input to input—going from TV to a Netflix show is as quick as changing the channel on your TV, and it happens with natural language commands.

In addition to letting you watch and play, the One also connects to social networks and lets you browse the Web (which you’d never want to do on your TV, but I suppose it looks cool in a demo). While it’s not very attractive—it’s got a boxy, early-VCR aesthetic—it does solve some of the persistent problems with using a video game system as a set-top box. Unlike its predecessor, the Xbox 360, Microsoft says the One is silent, and it turns itself and your TV on instantly, with a single voice command.

...

Americans watch TV more often than they do nearly anything else, and when they’re not watching TV, they’re often playing games. The Xbox One is the first device I’ve seen to bridge these two activities in a way that isn’t clunky. If Microsoft can own that overall experience, the giant of the American tech scene could reawaken.

by Anonymousreply 3205/22/2013

A somewhat sarcastic reaction... that actually hits on a lot of good points about the strategy here.

by Anonymousreply 3305/22/2013

That guy in R33 MUST be a DL poster...

by Anonymousreply 3405/22/2013

To be fair, the guy in the video at R33 also has a "real" video (out of character, in a normal voice) where he presents a very intelligent, reasoned analysis on the pros / cons of the announced XBox One features.

by Anonymousreply 3505/22/2013

[quote]Now let's say you give the game disc to a friend. They can install it and pay for the game electronically right there, without having to go to the store to get their own disc. Obviously, as the game gets older, the price goes down, just like at the store.

Whereas now you can just give or lend the disc to your friend and he can play it for free. Cuz,you know, it's your game, you bought it and should be able to do whatever the fuck you want with it.

[quote]Currently with the 360, can you play a single game on more than one machine? What I mean is, if I have Call of Duty (or whatever), can I lend it to my buddy and let him play it on his machine?

Yup.

Imagine if you bought a DVD and could only play it on one DVD player? There would be outrage.

by Anonymousreply 3605/22/2013

[quote]Whereas now you can just give or lend the disc to your friend and he can play it for free. Cuz,you know, it's your game, you bought it and should be able to do whatever the fuck you want with it.

If you keep on playing it after giving it to your friend, that's piracy.

If you're uninstalling it to give to your friend, well, in the new world, you'll get a credit for the game (just like trading it in), so it works like most used-games/trade-game systems.

You're a fool if you think you "own" anything any more. You own a LICENSE. The game is not yours to give away. Same goes for movies, music, eBooks, etc.

Oh, and all the members of your family can play your game on your one box, even if they have their own gamertags and accounts. Just like normal.

The fact is, if they let you install the game (so you no longer had to switch DVDs every time you want to play a different game) and then let you do whatever you wanted with the DVD, it'd just be rampant piracy all over the place. One person would buy it and pass it around to all his friends, and they'd all get it for free without paying. How do you think that should be avoided?

Currently, it's by requiring the DVD to be in the machine in order to play. Which is a pain in the ass. In the future, it'll be about being able to transfer the license to a friend, or being able to trade in games for credits towards other games... and all your friends CAN install the game from the one DVD you went out and bought, by just paying for it directly through their console (no need for everyone to go stand in line at midnight to get a new game... one person can do it, then everyone can install it).

I think most people reacting negatively are over-reacting. I don't think it's going to be this huge burden, and I look forward to being able to switch games "on the fly" without having to rummage around for DVDs and swap them all the time.

by Anonymousreply 3705/22/2013

[quote]If you keep on playing it after giving it to your friend, that's piracy.

You CAN'T play it after you give it to a friend. Even if you install a game on your Xbox, you still must have the disc inserted to play. So no, it's not piracy. Why Xbox One doesn't just employ this strategy is absurd, and clearly just about screwing over their customers.

If I'm done with a game, I should be able to give it to whoever I want. Just like I can a DVD.

by Anonymousreply 3805/22/2013

[quote]You're a fool if you think you "own" anything any more. You own a LICENSE. The game is not yours to give away. Same goes for movies, music, eBooks, etc.

Bullshit. If I'm done with my Bluray copy of Weekend At Bernie's, I can most certainly lend it to a friend who can watch it just fine.

by Anonymousreply 3905/22/2013

[quote]Why Xbox One doesn't just employ this strategy is absurd, and clearly just about screwing over their customers.

No it isn't "clearly" any such thing. Calm down, Blanche.

The Xbox One doesn't employ that strategy for reasons already stated... not having to swap DVDs for each game you play, and being able to do fast switching (DVDs are too slow even if the correct one is already loaded).

[quote]If I'm done with a game, I should be able to give it to whoever I want. Just like I can a DVD.

Why? When you're done with a movie ticket, can you just give it to someone else?

But let's assume you think this is a "right" (even though it isn't)... who's to say you can't? Didn't you read where I mentioned they were talking about the ability to transfer licenses? Yes, it'll be an extra step, but there's no reason it wouldn't be possible.

You don't know the details, you don't have the details, but you're acting as if you know everything. Stop it.

by Anonymousreply 4005/22/2013

Not a gamer, but I always find myself intrigued by new consoles and game releases for some reason. What are the thoughts on the PS4? Does it look to be better than this new Xbox?

by Anonymousreply 4105/22/2013

R39, the physical ability to do something, and the legality of doing the same thing (depending on the licensing of the "sale") are two entirely different things.

If, for example, you buy an MP3 track from iTunes and listen to it, and don't like it... you CAN copy the MP3 file to a USB drive and give it to a friend to listen to, and delete it from your own hard drive. But that still doesn't make it LEGAL.

Whether you like it or not, that's where digital distribution is going.

by Anonymousreply 4205/22/2013

[quote]Why? When you're done with a movie ticket, can you just give it to someone else?

The fuck? A movie ticket is not a comparison. When you pay $60 for a game you are BUYING it. A REAL comparison is when you BUY a DVD of a move --- which you CAN give to a friend to watch.

If XBOX will only be charging $15 and plan on calling it "renting" games, then okay. Your example would fit.

And:

[quote]You don't know the details, you don't have the details, but you're acting as if you know everything. Stop it.

Ditto. Except your reasonings make no fucking sense.

by Anonymousreply 4305/22/2013

R41, it's interesting... this generation, the differences between the two consoles aren't that great.

They both use pretty much the same CPU, have the same amount of memory, and roughly equivalent graphics processing power.

We haven't seen what the PS4 looks like, but I can't imagine it looks worse than the Xbox One. But they're still both going to be black boxes that sit near your TV.

PS4 doesn't have the built in Kinect (visual login, ability to pick out your voice commands even in a loud room, because it can pin-point where you are, and where the sound is coming from, and match them up, ignoring anything anyone else says). PS4 also doesn't have the live TV ability, that we know of (and certainly not the fast switching by voice command or gesture).

That said, the PS4 is clearly more focused on gaming, while the Xbox One tries to be a lot more than that (your entire entertainment experience).

In reality, we don't know enough just yet to really say which will be better. Neither has backwards compatibility, both can take and edit "movies" of game-play and share on social media sites. There's a lot of parity between the two in what we know.

We'll learn more at E3 next month... and your question will be easier to answer then.

by Anonymousreply 4405/22/2013

[quote]When you pay $60 for a game you are BUYING it.

No, you're actually buying a license for it. It's much like software... if you buy Office, you can't just hand it over to someone else either. Well, you physically could try, but it's violating the licensing terms.

[quote]Ditto. Except your reasonings make no fucking sense.

Mine do. And my position is basically "stop over-reacting Mary, and wait and see". I'm pointing out the reality of life to you, you just don't want to hear it. I'm not saying it's better (I want to OWN my stuff too, but having a friend who is a copyright lawyer has disabused me of a lot of naïve notions I used to have... similar to the ones you're expressing here right now).

The point is... once again... that you don't know for sure this is going to be bad or horrible. You're letting your imagination run away with you on the bad side, while utterly failing to use it to imagine how things might ACTUALLY end up working... ways that are different to be sure, but might just not suck, and might just have advantages.

Maybe you're right. Maybe it WILL suck. I'm thinking it won't, and there are lots of hints that it won't.

We'll know more after E3 next month.

by Anonymousreply 4505/22/2013

It's strange to me how people are so eager to see the "next new thing", and then inevitably rip it to shreds because it's not exactly the same as the old thing it replaces.

Seriously, listen to yourselves.

New does not always mean 'bad' and different does not always mean 'it sucks'.

by Anonymousreply 4605/22/2013

I'm just really disappointed in the Xbox One. So I can say "Xbox Netflix" and Netflix pops up ... who gives a fuck, really? Those are the big features that you spend 30 minutes talking about, vvoice control for a bunch of apps we already have? And you can now watch Cable TV on your TV thru your Xbox ... if you have cable? Um, I can already watch cable on my TV, but I guess thanks for saving me at most 2 seconds from hitting a button on my remote???

by Anonymousreply 4705/22/2013

If Microsoft REALLY wanted to be innovative they would have allowed users to purchase channels a la carte, INSTEAD of needing to have cable, instead of being an unecessary portal to a cable subscription you already have.

by Anonymousreply 4805/22/2013

Who's to say this isn't the first step in that direction, R48?

They're already doing their own programming... a Spielberg-helmed "Halo" live action series, that they're promising will be "Game of Thrones" quality. And of course you can control Hulu too. Or if you don't have cable, over-the-air TV as well.

This isn't the end-game. This is just the beginning of the next thing.

Look how much the XBox360 changed over it's life time... all the new capabilities and features that were added. You really think the Xbox One is going to just stand there static, never offering anything more than it initially ships with?

This is about getting new frameworks and foundations out there. You can bet updates and enhancements will be coming even more aggressively to the Xbox one over time, than it did to the Xbox 360.

by Anonymousreply 4905/22/2013

R49, just saying, for a product announcement, the main focus being on voice command ... Well, it's pretty underwhelming.

Especially considering the tech specs are weaker than the PS4, and I'm not sure that focusing less on the gaming aspect of the console is smart when most Xbox users are hardcore gamers.

by Anonymousreply 5005/22/2013

A few thoughts:

First off, I actually thought the new design looks cool! I thought previous Xbox's were ugly as fuck. They're so awkward looking.

Second, what are the chances that the voice and motion commands are really going to work as well as they demonstrated? There's no way.

Lastly, do you REALLY want the Kinect to be on you at all times--even while just watching TV--waiting for you to motion? Call me crazy, but this doesn't look particularly healthy or safe...

by Anonymousreply 5105/22/2013

I hated Kinect. It just kept falling off the top of my TV (the only place it would actually work), freaking my cats out every time.

by Anonymousreply 5205/22/2013

And of course smart ass VON shows up to ruin the thread.

by Anonymousreply 5305/23/2013

Who's VON and how'd he ruin this thread?

by Anonymousreply 5405/23/2013

[quote]Especially considering the tech specs are weaker than the PS4

How so? Everything that has been detailed makes the both look pretty on par with each other... if anything, the Xbox One looks to be more advanced, given the Kinect motion sensing and sound processing for voice commands and gesture support.

by Anonymousreply 5505/23/2013

R55, various tech. websites have already reported that the XBox One's GPU is weaker than the PS4's GPU (e.g., one estimate is that the PS4's GPU will be around 50% more powerful than the XBox One's GPU), and Microsoft has explicitly stated they weren't going for high end specs this time around, choosing to target the specs of a mass-market entertainment device rather than a high-end PC. The below article from Eurogamer has a good summary of the leaked / confirmed specs so far for both systems.

Though honestly, neither system's specs are anything to write home about - most PC gamers already have systems that match or far surpass the rumored specs for both the PS4 and XBox One. I mean, doesn't XBox One have 8 GB DDR3 RAM? That's pretty much the same as a mid-range or budget PC running Windows 7 nowadays.

Consoles have never really pushed the graphical envelope - the ultra-high resolution, highly-detailed graphics always come from PC games.

by Anonymousreply 5605/23/2013

Thanks for that link, R56... though the differences between DDR3 and DDR5 memory are more a series of trade-offs than "DDR5 is always super-better than DDR3". DDR3 is plenty fast, and the static SRAM cache on the Xbox One will help make up most of the difference in large memory moves (where DDR5 excels).

But anyway, I'll share this article from Tech Radar:

[bold]Xbox One: 10 reasons you're going to love it[/bold]

Side Note: Yes, the PS4 seems more focused on games right now (before E3), but the Xbox One seems more focused on the way most people actually use their Xboxes (Xboxen?) ... over the years, it's used more and more for Netflix, Hulu, and other features, in addition to games. Xbox One expands and optimizes all these additional uses, while still focusing on gaming and making gaming pretty damn cool. We'll find out tons more in less than 3 weeks.

Anyway, the article:

by Anonymousreply 5705/23/2013

From the article:

[bold]1. It's adaptive in the best way possible[/bold]

Before the big reveal, we were worried that the new Xbox would be too focused on multimedia and not focused enough on the games.

While the reveal show was mainly about hardware and features, there was enough game talk to keep us happy for the time being.

Microsoft Studios announced that it has 15 exclusive titles coming to Xbox One over the next year, eight of which will be brand new franchises.

We also got a look at the range of new EA Sports titles coming out way, including Fifa 14 and Madden 14. Call of Duty: Ghosts also got its world premiere trailer, showcasing the brand new engine.

The One is certainly changing with the times, but it doesn't feel like the gamers are losing out as a result. And guess what? It doesn't require an 'always on' internet connection to play. Phew.

[bold]2. TV and film just got better[/bold]

TV integration is one of the killer apps of Xbox One, and we were suitably impressed with what Microsoft had to show off at the Redmond event.

The Instant Switching feature lets you change between programmes and live TV with ease, while Snap Mode lets users run more than one service at any time. You can check your emails while watching a movie, for example.

All in all, Microsoft's new console is perfect for a generation of 'second screen' users and offers itself as the ultimate multimedia device for our living rooms.

[bold]3. Voice control[/bold]

Xbox chief Don Mattrick had our attention from the moment he said "Xbox on" to power up the console, but it didn't stop there.

Voice commands can be used to navigate between TV viewing and gameplay on the console. For example, you can say "watch TV" to, yup, you guessed it.

Overall recognition has been greatly improved, while hand gestures can also be used as a form of control.

[bold]4. New Kinect[/bold]

Xbox One Kinect is "rocket science-level stuff" according to Microsoft. We knew Kinect would be baked into the new console and we're impressed with how far it's evolved.

The new sensor is vastly improved with an extra wide field of vision meaning more people can get involved. The new Kinect can better analyse your body movements, picking up motion in just 13 billionths of a second, and can even detect your heartbeat.

It also has a 1080p camera to make that picture sparkle on your HD TV. Can't argue with that.

[bold]5. Exclusive content[/bold]

One thing that kept coming up during game discussions was exclusive content that would be coming to Xbox One users firtst.

EA Sports announced that exclusive content for Fifa 14 will be coming to Xbox One, adding that it had formed a "special relationship" with Microsoft.

It was also announced that DLC for the upcoming Call of Duty: Ghosts will also be exclusive for Xbox One at first. These exclusive deals will be a huge pull for the hardcore gamers.

[bold]6. The controller rocks[/bold]

With no console to show, the PS4 announcement was very focused on the controller, which it had a lot to say about as it turned out.

The first thing that struck us about the Xbox One controller was that it's keeping with a winning formula. Not a lot has been changed: the D-pad has been tweaked and the Xbox home button has been pushed up.

But all in all, the design holds onto all the best features of the 360 controller with just a few small changes that should make it feel even more amazing in our hands.

(continued)

by Anonymousreply 5805/23/2013

[bold]7. It has enough power to stand up to the PS4 [/bold]

8 Core CPU, 8GB RAM, 500GB HD – these specs put it in good footing for the next-gen race. Blu-ray support is another big feature we're happy to see on board too.

However, both consoles do use different types of RAM. Xbox One uses DDR3 while the PS4 uses GDDR5. This means the PS4 will have higher bandwidth when dealing with large-scale stuff, while Xbox One will be better at performing lots of smaller tasks at once.

Whether this will put Xbox One at a disadvantage remains to be seen, but we're confident right now that it's more than ready for what the next generation of gaming has in store.

[bold]8) Better Xbox Live [/bold]

Microsoft say the new Xbox Live service will react dynamically to gamers as well as bringing DVR functionality that lets you record and upload in-game footage to the internet.

We also know that it will be jumping from 15,000 to 300,000 servers, which is pretty impressive if you ask us.

Another cool feature we're keen on is Trending, which will show you what's currently popular among friends and within the Xbox Live community, a little like the Wii U does.

[bold]9. Spielberg's producing a Halo show for Xbox-ers[/bold]

'Nuff said really. One of the biggest surprises of the Xbox event was the announcement that a live action Halo TV series is being made, and Steven Spielberg will be producing it.

We've been waiting for a Halo movie for ages, but we'll be just as happy with a TV show. No mention of a new Halo game though, but we expect we'll hear about that at E3.

[bold]10. This is just the start[/bold]

Microsoft's reveal might have been more comprehensive than Sony's, but there are still plenty of things we're yet to see.

TechRadar was promised at a special event that this is just the first part, with E3 being the second. We can't wait to see what else Microsoft has to share, especially with regards to the live TV features and Xbox Live.

Of course, we'll be at E3 to see the rest of the reveal play out, when we'll also finally see the PS4 shown in all its glory. It'll be at that moment that the next-gen console war will really kick off.

(end)

by Anonymousreply 5905/23/2013

Call me crazy, but I don't want to have to talk to my TV. It's easier to press a fuckin' button.

by Anonymousreply 6005/23/2013

It looks like an 80's VHS player.

by Anonymousreply 6105/23/2013

Friendly reminder: video games are for degenerates.

by Anonymousreply 6205/23/2013

Yeah, I don't get why the TV integration is a big deal when I can just hit the Source button on my remote (and the Xbox continues to run).

Plus:

[quote]The Instant Switching feature lets you change between programmes and live TV with ease, while Snap Mode lets users run more than one service at any time. You can check your emails while watching a movie, for example.

Most people will just use their phones or iPads for this. Or just pause the movie.

Does the new controller have a keyboard in unaware of?

by Anonymousreply 6305/23/2013

R60, in many cases yes.

But for example, on my box, if I want to search for a show, it's really laborious to go to the 'search' screen and manually 'type' in, say, 'Big Bang Theory' in order to figure out which of 400 channels it's on...

Just saying "Switch to Big Bang Theory" is so much faster and easier in that case.

And saying "Switch to HBO" is a lot faster than finding the remote, and remembering to type in channel 1670 (which is what I do now).

So... yes, many times the remote is faster and easier. But sometimes it's not. In this case, you're welcome to use either method, whichever is faster and more convenient for you at the time.

(like when I leave my remote on the recharging stand over by the TV and it's not near me, voice control will be convenient)

by Anonymousreply 6405/23/2013

[quote]Yeah, I don't get why the TV integration is a big deal when I can just hit the Source button on my remote (and the Xbox continues to run).

I have a more complicated set up than you obviously. I have a DVD player, a Cable/DVR box, the Xbox, and a home theater sound system.

Instead of fumbling with FOUR remotes to do anything... I have a Logitech Harmony remote. It "knows" what all my components are and how to talk to them.

If I'm watching TV (the TV is on, the cable/DVR is on, the amp is on), and want to switch to Xbox, I can just push the "Play Xbox" button, and the remote will auto switch the Xbox on, turn the cable/dvr box off, and switch the sources on both the TV and the amp.

It "optimizes" things by turning on only what needs to be turned on, and turning off anything that isn't necessary. And switching all the sources for me.

So it's never just as easy as switching sources on the TV (and I never leave my cable box and xbox running all the time). Besides, I can never remember which of the four sources each "thing" (or in Harmony nomenclature, "activity") is on. DVD player is on one, Cable is on another, Xbox on a third... and I have a fourth set up for when I want to use wireless display from my laptop. I've never bothered to memorize which is which. Ditto the source settings on my home theater amp.

I'm not sure how the Xbox One will fit into my setup... other than replacing the DVD player completely and thus simplifying that one aspect. It has an IR blaster to control the cable box... but I have no idea how it would work with the home theater system I have. It has the potential to simplify things for me a lot. It also has the potential to simply not work at all in my situation.

I remain guardedly optimistic and interested, but have no intention of rushing out to buy this the moment it's available.

by Anonymousreply 6505/23/2013

I can't even imagine how many times this thing is going to inadvertently do things it's not supposed to. It might work fine in a controlled setting like at the launch, but in "real life" I bet that thing is gonna go haywire when there are conversations going on in the room (it'll think it hears a command when one is not intended) and/or it'll falsely sense someone's body motions as commands. It reminds me of the "Smart Clapper" I bought one time that would constantly turn the light on and off because it thought it heard clapping, when it was just hearing something on the TV or me opening a DVD case or something. Fuckin' thing got unplugged real quick!

by Anonymousreply 6605/23/2013

So if the Xbox One has to be always on, even to simply watch TV, doesn't that mean it's likely to not last as long?

by Anonymousreply 6705/23/2013

[quote]I bet that thing is gonna go haywire when there are conversations going on in the room (it'll think it hears a command when one is not intended)

First, you have to preface commands with "Xbox". Second, you have to be looking at it... it can tell when you're focused elsewhere and will ignore things in those situations. Third, it ignores sound coming from it (or the TV) and can pin-point sound sources in the room, so it can ignore anything not coming from the person addressing it.

Even the current Xbox/Kinect can sorta do this... I was watching Netflix and commanding it with my voice, when my little cousin tried to shout out commands to make it do things I didn't want it to do. I could just say "Xbox Pause" and "Xbox Resume", and it would do it instantly. She couldn't get it to do anything. Because the Xbox was listening to ME, not her. Sorta the same deal only better with the new stuff.

by Anonymousreply 6805/23/2013

[quote]So if the Xbox One has to be always on, even to simply watch TV, doesn't that mean it's likely to not last as long?

It has a very low-power state when "off"... most of it is powered down, just enough to listen for "Xbox On" is running.

And the design is for maximum cooling and silence, so it's pretty clear they learned their lessons from the original Xbox issues.

by Anonymousreply 6905/23/2013

Voice command is just not that impressive. I don't get the huge focus. I think for the most part people feel silly talking to their electronics, especially with other people around.

by Anonymousreply 7005/23/2013

Only Microsoft is retarded enough to name their 3rd generation product, "One".

XBox -> XBox 360 -> XBox One

WTF?

by Anonymousreply 7105/23/2013

Really R71? And what came after the iPad 2?

Yup, just the 'iPad'. There is no "iPad 3".

And it's not "Xbox 1", it's "One"... the one console for everything you do, TV, movies, video conferencing, games, apps, etc.

by Anonymousreply 7205/23/2013

R72, which is a lie. You still need a cable box, etc.

by Anonymousreply 7305/23/2013

Uh oh, rabid Apple fancunt @ R71.

Has anyone heard anything on which this will be able to be ordered?!?

by Anonymousreply 7405/23/2013

[quote]Has anyone heard anything on which this will be able to be ordered?!?

Pricing and availability have not been announced.

Rumored price is $499 (which strikes me as $100 too high).

Rumored availability is Sept/Oct time frame, most likely October sometime. In time for the holidays. No idea when pre-orders will start.

I have no intention of pre-ordering or buying this calendar year. If there is a compelling game or two, and if I'm convinced it'll work with my cable-box and home theater system, I may get one early next year. We'll see. I still feel there's a lot of life left in my XBox360.

Note that Microsoft is claiming they'll have a "Huge" announcement for 360 users at E3... new stuff being announced. So they're still pushing new games and new updates for the existing console even though they're also bringing out the next generation console.

by Anonymousreply 7505/23/2013

A different take:

[bold]You Don’t Hate the Xbox One, You’re Just Jealous[/bold]

Gamers seem to hate the Xbox One. If you wade into a comments section or ask a man-on-the-street at your local Mountain Dew distributer, you’ll hear a variety of reasons why the Xbox One is not for gamers—why it’s a horrible misstep, presumed dead on arrival. Some of these criticisms will ring a little truer than others, but none really tap into what’s really eating at the gaming elite. They’re mad that they’re not the center of attention.

See, for as long as they have existed, brand new consoles have been the provenance of the hardcore gamer. They are the only ones dedicated enough, enthused enough, to drop (or convince their parents to drop) a wad of cash on a new gaming system for the privilege of buying new and more expensive games. Gamers loved consoles, and consoles loved them right back. Except now, Microsoft’s eye is wandering, and gamers do not like it one bit.

(lots more at the link)

by Anonymousreply 7605/24/2013

[bold]The Xbox One Uncertainty Principle[/bold]

At the start of a cocktail party that was to end an exciting, bewildering and altogether odd day at Microsoft's Redmond campus, I approached Microsoft v.p. Aaron Greenberg. Hell of a debut day for the Xbox One, I told him. Some impressive stuff, some confusing stuff. Some fierce reaction online.

Greenberg nodded and told me about some stats. They were tracking reaction on social media. They had four times the buzz as Sony's PlayStation 4 event, from what he could tell. Reaction was split, but good: 40% positive, 40% neutral, 20% negative.

I'd mostly heard about the negative, I told him, mostly from the Kotaku team back home.

I suggested that it would be useful if Microsoft could clear some things up. And I granted that, if you weren't at the Redmond campus, you missed getting your hands on some of the best things about Xbox One. The new rumble in the controllers, for example. That feels next-level.

Was the anger really 20%? In my extended online world, it seemed broader than that. The mood away from Redmond was, at least among the gamers I saw online, the kind of stuttering, stammering frustration that comes with the dawning recognition that, in the Xbox One's version of gaming's future, you might not even be allowed to borrow a game from a friend without paying a fee. To console gamers of the last two decades, that seems mad.

There were several dozen reporters on Microsoft's campus. We weren't as angry. More bewildered, I think. Maybe bemused by Microsoft's stumbling confusion. We went to the system's big briefing, which was held in a tent pitched on a soccer field. We were shuffled off to interviews, to demonstrations of the new Kinect and controller as well as to tours of Xbox testing labs. Interviews were solo. Tours were in groups.

Home base was the campus' Spitfire Lounge, where we'd come and go and, soon enough, begin comparing notes. What we found is that we were getting different answers. He told you what about used games? Oh, I heard this. Your guy said that about always-online? The situation was fluid.

Heisenberg's uncertainty principle tells us that the more we try to observe a particle's position, the less precise we can be about its momentum. Heisenberg, have we got a game console for you. The more we try to know things about the Xbox One, the less it seems that we know.

(much more at the link)

by Anonymousreply 7705/24/2013

Here's a nasty feature to beware:

by Anonymousreply 7805/27/2013

OMG! This is almost as exciting as when Microsoft revealed the Zune!

by Anonymousreply 7905/28/2013

R79 = retard

And R78, the Kinect and Xbox One can be turned off.

Seriously, what the hell is wrong with people? Why are they so intent on bashing Microsoft and anything it does, that they'll literally MAKE SHIT UP in order to bash it?

by Anonymousreply 8005/28/2013

I'd be very exited about this if I didn't have a life

by Anonymousreply 8105/28/2013

[quote]Seriously, what the hell is wrong with people? Why are they so intent on bashing Microsoft and anything it does.

The only problem with Microsoft is they just have no taste. They have absolutely no taste. And I don’t mean that in a small way, I mean that in a big way, in the sense that they don’t think of original ideas, and they don’t bring much culture into their products. I am saddened, not by Microsoft’s success — I have no problem with their success. They’ve earned their success, for the most part. I have a problem with the fact that they just make really third-rate products.

by Anonymousreply 8205/28/2013

For me, the problem with Microsoft is the nickel and diming (he said, posting from his iMac). In order to get all the goodies, you have to pay for an Xbox Live Gold account, and then pay for the services like Netflix and Hulu on top of that. Unless they end up radically changing their model, Sony doesn't do that with Playstation Network.

I may change my mind if there's some must-have exclusive game they announce at E3, but as it stands, but everything that's been announced thus far I could get on a PS4. Plus, unless something changes, the three game companies that I gravitate the most towards, Quantic Dream (makers of Heavy Rain and the forthcoming Beyond: Two Souls), Naughty Dog (Uncharted and the forthcoming The Last of Us), and thatgamecompany (Flower and Journey) are more in the Sony barn.

Of course, my favorite game of the past year was The Walking Dead, and I played that on my iPad, so I'm wondering if this might really be the last generation where we see dedicated consoles. Clearly, Microsoft is trying to move beyond that.

by Anonymousreply 8305/28/2013

Microsoft E3 Press Conference right now. Maybe we'll get more answers about some of the stuff that they wouldn't really talk about.

by Anonymousreply 8406/10/2013

I'm watching!!

by Anonymousreply 8506/10/2013

World of Tanks? The hell?

by Anonymousreply 8606/10/2013

So the future is...Xbox 360....

by Anonymousreply 8706/10/2013

By the way, for the OP and prolific poster who spent this entire thread defending Microsoft and claiming others were "prematurely judging" and "bashing" the XBox without enough information... sorry, but you were full of shit. Microsoft revealed its used games / DRM policy by official press release a few days ago, and it's even worse than people thought.

A summary: No renting or loaning games. No private sales to other people (unless it's to someone who's been on your friends list for at least 30 days).

Console checks in with Microsoft every 24 hours and is disabled with failed checks.

Trade-ins are up to the publisher and only at participating retailers (smaller independent shops are excluded).

If you want to sell a game to a friend, it must be to a friend who's been on your friends list for at least 30 days, and they can't resell the game after.

This is the biggest heap of anti-consumer BS I've ever come across. Add to that the "always-on Kinect" and the idea floated of monitoring how many people are in front of the TV (and shutting down movies if there are more people watching than are "licensed" to watch), and people should steer clear of this pile of crap.

Shouldn't be too much of a loss, seeing as the technology is just mid-range PC, and none of the games shown even approach the graphics quality of PC games released a few years ago. Although I guess you're shit out of luck if you're devoted to Halo and can't play any of the other 100 shooters that come out every month.

by Anonymousreply 8806/10/2013

This Ryse game has something of a troubled history, so I'm surprised they're highlighting it.

by Anonymousreply 8906/10/2013

As long as PS4 doesn't pull this used game bullshit, they win by default. If they collude with MS to screw the consumer, it's over.

by Anonymousreply 9006/10/2013

Well, we'll find out tonight.

None of these games are really that exciting to me.

by Anonymousreply 9106/10/2013

For the over-reacting asshat at R88:

[bold]Xbox One Game Licensing Explained[/bold]

[italic]A reasonable approach to game licensing won't silence all critics[/italic]

by Anonymousreply 9206/10/2013

So far, the E3 show is pretty cool... the games look awesome.

And yeah, XBox360 isn't dead... new version released and available today, and hundreds of new games coming in the next year.

So if the Xbox One bothers you for whatever reason, you can stick with the 360 for now.

I still think it's hilarious you think the PS4 is going to be significantly different though.

Or that any of this is overtly anti-consumer.

by Anonymousreply 9306/10/2013

The question foremost in my mind while watching this E3 reveal is: "Wow, can't they have anyone on stage where English is a first language? Or even second? Or third?"

by Anonymousreply 9406/10/2013

You're basically buying a multi-hundred dollar rental box. One that watches and listens to you.

by Anonymousreply 9506/10/2013

And yes, Xbox One requires an internet connection. Not a huge deal... my Xbox 360 has always had one.

by Anonymousreply 9606/10/2013

What's in it for me if I want to play a game in order to relax and get away from the world, not share it with the entire world?

by Anonymousreply 9706/10/2013

Where do we watch the PS4 unveiling? That's what really matters here.

by Anonymousreply 9806/10/2013

You can watch it here, but it won't be until about 5:30 Pacific.

by Anonymousreply 9906/10/2013

R92, that link does nothing to counter what was written in R88. They just tried to put positive PR-spin on how all the new restrictions being put in place are really great for the consumer (and yeah, really unbiased take there). "Well, of course you can still sell your used games... at participating retailers." "Isn't it exciting how you'll be able to share your games with friends... (who have to be on your friends list, and who can't resell games afterwards)." "Wow, other people in your family can still play your games." Wow, Microsoft, you're telling me that if I spend a couple of hundred dollars on your console then you'll deign to give me permission to have people who live in the same house to play it as well, without charging me extra? Stop being so generous!

by Anonymousreply 10006/10/2013

[quote]What's in it for me if I want to play a game in order to relax and get away from the world, not share it with the entire world?

Better controller, better graphics, better game-play, no having to swap-discs to swap games, voice-control...

by Anonymousreply 10106/10/2013

Yeah, but most of what they've highlighted has been the multiplayer stuff, the social integration. Not really my cup of tea.

by Anonymousreply 10206/10/2013

And, R100, all R88 did was put the most negative spin possible on those facts. So?

by Anonymousreply 10306/10/2013

Big hiccup with Battlefield 4.

by Anonymousreply 10406/10/2013

But Battlefield 4 does look pretty damn amazing, you have to admit.

by Anonymousreply 10506/10/2013

I really wish I was into video games. I played them as a kid in the 90s, but it was rare. It always seemed like a chore. I do somewhat find the change in technology interesting, so news such as this is interesting to me. I really do hate how games look so realistic now though.

by Anonymousreply 10606/10/2013

Some of these guys are really bad public speakers.

by Anonymousreply 10706/10/2013

Wow, I'd never heard of Twitch before...checking it out now. I think I've found my new addiction lol

I don't know why, but I love watching other people play video games on YouTube.

by Anonymousreply 10806/10/2013

Yes, I agree, but it's not really my type of game.

Quantum Break is really the only one that's to my taste.

by Anonymousreply 10906/10/2013

$499? No thank you.

by Anonymousreply 11006/10/2013

I can't wait to see the next Elder Scrolls or Fallout on this box... damn.

by Anonymousreply 11106/10/2013

TitanFall looks pretty awesome.

BTW, it's also a better "apple tv" on top of the gaming.

And a blue ray player.

While it would have been a no-brainer at $399, the $499 price isn't shocking or out of line.

by Anonymousreply 11206/10/2013

$499 + $60/year for Xbox Live Gold.

by Anonymousreply 11306/10/2013

Whoa, PS4 might even win on price? K.O.!!!

by Anonymousreply 11406/10/2013

Well, let's not assume a Sony victory until we get the specifics this evening.

I really just want a game to wow me. So far, it's just Watch Dogs, and that was announced last year.

by Anonymousreply 11506/10/2013

Witcher and a couple of the others really looked pretty good to me. Of course, only time (and reviews) will tell.

by Anonymousreply 11606/10/2013

Some of these games will also be available on Xbox 360, just FYI.

It looks like those bitching the most about the Xbox One not being for them (because they only do off-line play, cart their console around a lot, and live in a world of used/shared games) can just continue using the 360, knowing it's got a few good years left in it.

There's not enough there for me to buy on release day, or even this year, but maybe by the time they ship Halo 5 and a few other games, I'll pick one up. I'd like to replace my current DVD player with the integrated BlueRay player in this, and the TV watching/Kinect-voice-commands thing just looks cool... especially for searching for shows.

Hopefully it'll support my cable provider.

Though it floors me that they didn't integrate any DVR functionality in this. How cool would it be to be able to just voice-command record TV shows on a whim, without having to look up when they were, what channel they were on, or scrolling through endless slow DVR grids and screens to do so...

by Anonymousreply 11706/10/2013

One aspect not mentioned much is the new features of Xbox Live, including two FREE GAMES PER MONTH. Tell me it's not worth the price now...

by Anonymousreply 11806/10/2013

Playstation Plus already does that.

I don't know, I don't want to declare an early victory barring any kind of DRM announcement and without the pricepoint, but Sony has been killing it.

Kingdom Hearts III. You had me at hello, You had me at hello.

by Anonymousreply 11906/10/2013

Really? I've found the PS4 E3 thing to be rather dull, not much compelling.

The console itself is just an italicized Xbox One. Everything else seems comparable, except the PS4 can't do voice commands or add anything to the TV watching experience. Is there even a blue ray player in the thing?

And when it comes to DRM... I think it's pretty funny people are assuming it'll be noticeably better than on Xbox... Sony LOVES DRM, and has pushed the boundaries of DRM at every opportunity... from protected HDMI, to blueray encryption & DRM, to installing rootkits on CDs back in the day.

by Anonymousreply 12006/10/2013

[quote] Is there even a blue ray player in the thing?

There was one in the PS3. Would seem odd to go backwards.

And no restrictions on the sale of used games.

by Anonymousreply 12106/10/2013

No connection required.

by Anonymousreply 12206/10/2013

"Sony also highlighted a new Elder Scrolls entry, which will include an exclusive PS4 beta. Which speaks to the problem a lot of Sony's PS4 exclusives have: They're not really all that exclusive. A little downloadable content here, some beta action there. Overall, though, there aren't that many titles that you're going to want to buy the PS4 for.

The graphics all look, for the most part, stellar; but if I told you they were on the PS3, you'd believe me. That doesn't mean much; it takes developers a while to take full advantage of a new console's hardware horsepower. But if you're looking fora leap forward in graphics right away, you'll be... well, not disappointed. But you'll slow nod instead of slow clap.

There are over 140 games in development currently for the PS4, including 40 that include "experiences" that are exclusive to PlayStation. Note, again, that "experiences" don't mean the full game."

by Anonymousreply 12306/10/2013

R121, yeah, but look at the pic of the box. If there's a BlueRay player in there... where is it?

by Anonymousreply 12406/10/2013

If that's the case, then I presume that you need to have the disc in the machine in order to play. No way Sony would let you install the game to the HD and then pass the disc on for someone else to install... either way, you get DRM. And frankly, the "not having to swap discs to play a different game" is a HUGE bonus to me.

by Anonymousreply 12506/10/2013

[quote]Overall, though, there aren't that many titles that you're going to want to buy the PS4 for.

Unless you want to actually OWN the titles, and not just use them with Microsoft's permission.

[quote][R121], yeah, but look at the pic of the box. If there's a BlueRay player in there... where is it?

I'm guessing it's somewhere in between the two "halves." The specs they released says it uses Blu-Ray as its format. Jeez.

by Anonymousreply 12606/10/2013

[quote]No way Sony would let you install the game to the HD and then pass the disc on for someone else to install... either way, you get DRM

And that's more draconian than what Microsoft is doing...how?

You'll also be able to sell your used game on eBay, which Microsoft won't allow because you haven't been friends with the buyer for a month.

by Anonymousreply 12706/10/2013

[quote]Unless you want to actually OWN the titles, and not just use them with Microsoft's permission.

Please stop with this ridiculous nonsense. Please. You're being stupidly ridiculous.

The net effect to you is insignificant. You own the DISC not the digital media on it. That's the same as with BlueRay discs, eBooks, and virtually all other media. You "own" the disc either way. But you don't own the media. You license the media. Like all software has always been.

Stop persisting in your delusion about the way things work.

Clearly the only way PS4 can do this is to require swapping discs in order to play different games. Games you buy digitally and install over the internet are NOT transferrable or tradable or anything else.

Just like Steam games on the PC.

by Anonymousreply 12806/10/2013

[quote]And that's more draconian than what Microsoft is doing...how?

The point is, it's no LESS draconian. Jesus.

[quote]You'll also be able to sell your used game on eBay, which Microsoft won't allow because you haven't been friends with the buyer for a month.

Your confusing reselling and donating. But you don't care about being accurate, obviously, you just want to bash Microsoft. Because if you actually cared about accuracy you wouldn't be saying crap like this.

by Anonymousreply 12906/10/2013

[quote]Your confusing reselling and donating. But you don't care about being accurate, obviously, you just want to bash Microsoft. Because if you actually cared about accuracy you wouldn't be saying crap like this.

They've already said they're giving publishers the option to kill used game sales, and if you don't think EA is going to be first in line to do that, you're missing the forest for the trees.

by Anonymousreply 13006/10/2013

And it's $100 cheaper.

Game, set, match, Sony.

by Anonymousreply 13106/10/2013

R131? No voice commands, no motion gestures, no multi-tasking, no TV/Media incorporation, manual swapping of physical discs to switch games... and you're shocked its $100 cheaper?

by Anonymousreply 13206/10/2013

I think Microsoft had their PS3 moment today - in that they let their pride and hubris in doing relatively well last gen (though they never did surpass the Wii) let them push for more than consumers were willing to accept, and indications are it's going to bite them in the ass this holiday season. Last gen, Sony thought it could get away with a $599 price point with the PS3 because they dominated with the PS2, and ended up seeing their fortunes fall to 3rd place. And now Microsoft believes the relative success of the 360 (at least in the US) will allow it to shove whatever it wants down gamers' throats... and Sony just showed them up with the PS4.

Sorry, I see no value proposition in spending $500 on Microsoft's DRM box (along with the subscription / access charges, etc.) I get more power on a PC for cheaper with fewer restrictions on reselling my games when I'm done with them. Heck, I get more power on a PS4 with pretty much the same features... for $100 less. There's no reason to buy an XBox One unless you're a committed Halo fanboy / fangirl, because pretty much every other game is going to be multiplatform with PC or with the PS4.

by Anonymousreply 13306/10/2013

K.O. !!!! See y'all on PSN! (And eBay where we'll swap games)

by Anonymousreply 13406/10/2013

[quote]Heck, I get more power on a PS4 with pretty much the same features... for $100 less.

Hardly the 'same features'. See R132 for just a partial list.

The Xbox One is more forward looking. The PS4 is same-old-same-old. The Xbox One also has a wider potential audience (more casual gamers, more media consumption features).

See, Microsoft is basically offering a new Xbox 360 for those that don't want the on-line requirement or other features. And it's cheaper than the PS4.

by Anonymousreply 13506/10/2013

I can't believe that "selling a game on eBay instead of at a retail store like GameStop" is THE killer feature for some of you. Seriously?

by Anonymousreply 13606/10/2013

R132, motion gestures don't mean much to me. Also, I am indifferent towards the voice commands. The disc swapping is not a big to me, especially compared to fewer (if any) DRM restrictions on PS4. For the price, I don't mind the lack of TV/Media incorporation, which I can't imagine is all that important to most people.

I'd say hands down the PS4 whips the Xbox One. Of course, launch titles and price will make or break these systems.

by Anonymousreply 13706/10/2013

R135 / R136, you don't make any sense - in what way is a $499 XBox One "cheaper than the" $399 PS4? If you try to argue it's actually cheaper because it's got more features... oy. Stop. That's loser talk. That is literally what PS3 fanboys argued last gen ("It's a better value than the XBox 360 because you're getting more for your money!"). Nobody gave a shit back then. Nobody gives a shit now.

Who cares what extra features there are if you don't use them? Most gamers do not car about Kinect, or voice commands, or TV integration. They make nice party tricks, but people I've talked to don't find voice commands particularly convenient or life-changing - they overcomplicate a process that is much simpler with a remote or touch screen.

And R136, please don't dumb down the used game issue. It's not just where you're able to sell, it's who you're able to sell it to and for how much. Right now, control of used game sales is with consumers - I've sold games I've completed on places like Amazon and eBay for close to 90% of retail price because they were in great condition or were rare / out of print. And now Microsoft wants to force me to trade my games in at GameStop (which is an AWFUL AWFUL chain), and most trade-ins I've seen there get 20% of their MSRP (and then get flipped and sold for 80% MSRP - great, I can contribute to GameStop's shitty profits).

There is no benefit to me from above. And now Microsoft wants to charge me $500 for the "privilege" of playing games on their system, when there are cheaper, more powerful, and less restrictive alternatives out there with the same game selection? Sorry, they overplayed their hand this time around.

by Anonymousreply 13806/10/2013

Xbox Done

And I never lose money on used games. If you buy them for cheap enough (I have my tricks), you can play them through and then off them again for what you paid + enough to cover eBay fees & shipping. Hell, I've profited off many.

by Anonymousreply 13906/10/2013

[quote]you don't make any sense - in what way is a $499 XBox One "cheaper than the" $399 PS4?

Um... I don't know where the hell you got the notion that I said the Xbox One was cheaper than the PS4. I said it makes sense the PS4 costs less because you GET a lot less.

And as for the used game market... it's killing developers and publishers. They see ZERO money from it, which means that a ton of people play their games without ever paying for them. There's no revenue stream. Which means the base price is driven up to help compensate.

Steam on the PC has many of the same so-called "restrictions", and as a result, more money goes to the devs, and Steam is able to have massive sales and specials. Game prices are a lot cheaper there. But hey, if you love "$60/game no matter how much game play" for consoles, keep pushing the current paradigm.

I can't understand how you can't get this. Movies and TV shows and books have other revenue streams... computer games generally don't.

I don't see any significant limitations that actually matter. It's different. But it's not gone.

by Anonymousreply 14006/10/2013

[quote]And I never lose money on used games. If you buy them for cheap enough (I have my tricks), you can play them through and then off them again for what you paid + enough to cover eBay fees & shipping. Hell, I've profited off many.

I love how you brag about making money off the hard work of others, who see no compensation for providing you with the games you play and take for granted. Nice sense of entitlement there.

by Anonymousreply 14106/10/2013

R140, please re-read your post at R135:

"See, Microsoft is basically offering a new Xbox 360 for those that don't want the on-line requirement or other features. And it's cheaper than the PS4."

That's where you said the XBox One is "cheaper than" the PS4, when actually it's $100 more expensive.

by Anonymousreply 14206/11/2013

R142, I'm not sure how you read it twice AND copied/pasted it without actually reading it correctly, but let me spell it out for you.

THE XBOX 360 COSTS LESS THAN THE PS4. They came out with a new update for the Xbox 360. Its' just like the Xbox 360 today, but even smaller, cooler, and quieter.

THE XBOX ONE COSTS MORE THAN THE PS4. See that? The Xbox 360 is a different thing than the Xbox One. Is that clear enough to you now?

So you see, I never once said that Xbox One is "cheaper than" the PS4. And you're a fucking blind idiot.

by Anonymousreply 14306/11/2013

R143, you've revealed yourself throughout this thread to have such a pleasant, attractive personality. And to be really, really committed to the XBox One, a console you've never played but seem really emotionally invested in. I have to assume you're a fanboy, because even a Microsoft employee / viral shill wouldn't bother going to such lengths.

Apologies for not being able to decipher your post, and that I assumed that in a thread about the XBox One you were actually talking about the XBox One, and not making some random point about its eight-year old predecessor.

You're right, the XBox 360 is cheaper than the PS4. So... who cares? Like, a Wii is cheaper than the PS4. A PS2 is cheaper than the PS4 (and has a bigger games library!) I doubt many people are facing a decision about whether to buy a 360 or a PS4 - they're more interested about the value comparison between the XBox One and the PS4. And (getting back to the point of the thread) - from today's press conferences, so far Sony's done a better job of presenting a reasonable value proposition of games vs. features vs. price (though I'll still hold off some months after release before deciding whether to buy one).

by Anonymousreply 14406/11/2013

[quote]And to be really, really committed to the XBox One, a console you've never played but seem really emotionally invested in.

I'm actually not committed to it. I currently have no plans to buy one. Perhaps next year, if there are some compelling games I want, AND it's proven to work with my cable box and home theater system.

What I'm committed to is a sense of reality and sanity, facts, and that sort of thing. And there's so much bullshit being spewed about the Xbox One and Microsoft that it's annoying.

[quote]Apologies for not being able to decipher your post, and that I assumed that in a thread about the XBox One you were actually talking about the XBox One, and not making some random point about its eight-year old predecessor.

Okay, I'm going to try again and talk REALLY SLOWLY so you can grasp this.

TODAY, Microsoft announced a NEW update of the Xbox 360. It was the fist 10-15 minutes of the presentation at E3. It *IS* a new Xbox being revealed today... one of TWO new boxes. And I *CLEARLY* labeled it "Xbox 360" as opposed to "Xbox One".

I don't know how I could have been more clear.

And what I'm saying is that what you think is a "clear value proposition" isn't so clear.

On the low end, you have the new Xbox 360. Does all the same things today's Xbox 360 does in a smaller, quieter form factor. If selling used games on eBay is a priority and low cost is a priority, this is your machine. It has a lot of life left to it. It has HUNDREDS of new games coming out for it.

PS4 has carved out a middle ground. Cheaper than Xbox One (the High end), more expensive than Xbox One (the Low end), with features basically matching the Low End, only with better graphics, and a blue ray player instead of DVD player.

Xbox One is the high end. A complete living room entertainment center, combining TV, Sports, Media consumption, and high end gaming. It has motion and gesture controls and voice commands that will be developed to because developers know every single Xbox One has them. Multi-tasking, Skype, SmartGlass, and instant switching between games.

by Anonymousreply 14506/11/2013

[quote]I love how you brag about making money off the hard work of others, who see no compensation for providing you with the games you play and take for granted. Nice sense of entitlement there.

I'm sure you make money off of others at your job, no? It's a dog-eat-dog world, my friend. Woof!

by Anonymousreply 14606/11/2013

[quote] I think Microsoft had their PS3 moment today - in that they let their pride and hubris in doing relatively well last gen (though they never did surpass the Wii) let them push for more than consumers were willing to accept, and indications are it's going to bite them in the ass this holiday season.

I absolutely agree. It was like a carbon copy of the PS3 announcement, and you see where that got them. The autocratic declarations, the high price, etc. Sony learned a seven year long, very painful lesson which nearly drove the PS division to bankruptcy. They weren't about to repeat that mistake.

The reduced price and ability to trade, sell, and rent games willbe the nail in the Xbox's coffin.

And whoever keeps wondering about a BluRay player being in the PS4? Sony created and backed the BluRay. They purposely defeated the HD DVD. OF COURSE it has a BR player in it. That's something the system has had for nearly a decade and something Xbox always lacked.

by Anonymousreply 14706/11/2013

Sony was so catty today on the used games issue... and the audience loved it (more than 100,000 thumbs up on its "used game instructional video", and it's only been up a few hours).

by Anonymousreply 14806/11/2013

I love watching the comments flood in on that video ^^^^

by Anonymousreply 14906/11/2013

I'm actually surprised Sony didn't spur-of-the-moment change their price to $449 after hearing MS's price announcement of $499. They'd increase their revenue 12.5% right off the bat and their system would still be by far the crowd favorite. No one was anticipating the PS4 to cost less than the XboxDone. In fact all the forecasts I read were expecting the XboxDone to cost $399, so that makes me think that is the reason why Sony went with that number.

by Anonymousreply 15006/11/2013

[quote][R131]? No voice commands, no motion gestures, no multi-tasking, no TV/Media incorporation, manual swapping of physical discs to switch games... and you're shocked its $100 cheaper?

But what if I don't want any of those things? What if my primary focus is games? And I hardly think having to change discs to switch games (which isn't even a problem if you buy them digitally) is a huge selling point.

And it's more than $100 cheaper. Since at least some of those features will require Xbox Live Gold, assuming a seven year life cycle, that's at least $400 additional.

by Anonymousreply 15106/11/2013

Anyway, Nintendo's having their non-press conference today (early, 7AM on the West Coast), so I think we'll see the Wii U going further down the spiral.

Unless they surprise with a true proper Mario or Zelda game.

by Anonymousreply 15206/11/2013

"No voice commands, no motion gestures, no multi-tasking, no TV/Media incorporation, manual swapping of physical discs to switch games"

Oh how terribly disappointing...NOT.

I buy a console to play games - not to be spied upon.

by Anonymousreply 15306/11/2013

Wii U: Delay, delay, delay. delay.

So far, their only interesting announcement is Mario Kart 8. This is just embarrassing.

by Anonymousreply 15406/11/2013

[quote]I buy a console to play games - not to be spied upon.

(rolling eyes)

Paranoid delusional much?

by Anonymousreply 15506/11/2013

[quote]And I hardly think having to change discs to switch games (which isn't even a problem if you buy them digitally) is a huge selling point.

If you buy them digitally, then the used game/selling/loaning stuff isn't an issue either, right? Doesn't that nullify THE major slam people are putting on the Xbox One?

And no, none of those features require Xbox Live. And now PS4 requires a monthly fee for multiplayer. That area is "evening out".

I think not having to swap discs, voice-commands, multi-tasking, and SmartGlass are more than worth the extra money, and the easy searching of TV shows is a definite bonus.

Are "gamers" truly so single-minded that anything additional that is outside a very narrow band of "hardcore gaming" is actually a drawback?!? Really?!?

by Anonymousreply 15606/11/2013

Good catch, r155.

We have now have an open contractor job open, if you're interested.

by Anonymousreply 15706/11/2013

[quote]In fact all the forecasts I read were expecting the XboxDone to cost $399

Really? All the actual predictions I saw said $499. But then I pay attention to people with actual sources who have been shown to have been right in the past, not just wishful thinking columnists with no clue.

by Anonymousreply 15806/11/2013

[quote]Microsoft announced the price of the Xbox One: $499. It was a shock for the wrong reasons. Many had expected the system to be no more than $399 at launch, or possibly even lower.

by Anonymousreply 15906/11/2013

"You may recall that I previously and exclusively revealed that Microsoft would launch the Xbox One in November at a price point of $499. Microsoft today confirmed both of these facts."

by Anonymousreply 16006/11/2013

[quote]exclusively revealed

Okay, so ONE person predicted $499. Great. Everyone else was thinking otherwise.

by Anonymousreply 16106/11/2013

He didn't predict. He knew. And reported it. If everyone else wanted to ignore it, fine, but there is a world of facts and a world of fantasy, and to be pissed off because facts don't match fantasy is kind of weird.

by Anonymousreply 16206/11/2013

[quote]And now PS4 requires a monthly fee for multiplayer

But not for the media features.

by Anonymousreply 16306/11/2013

Hmmm... A well known and established journalism based site or some largely unknown blog/personal website. Which one has the more credible and publicized information.

by Anonymousreply 16406/11/2013

Clearly not the one you think, R164.

by Anonymousreply 16506/11/2013

Paul Thurott who runs WinSuperSite is a long-established Microsoft cheerleader. He's not the New York Times, but his not just a random blogger either.

I do think his piece about the Xbox One's features was PR spin, but he's still pretty respected in the tech journalism community.

by Anonymousreply 16606/11/2013

Well if Sony had known ahead of time that Xbox1 was going to be $499, it boggles the mind why they'd come in a full $100 cheaper (unless they just wanted to completely fucking annihilate their competition, which they did). Considering they're taking a hit on each console they sell though, you'd think they'd want to limit that loss as much as possible. The fact they chose $399 tells me they thought $399 was going to be the Xbox1 price as well. But now all they've done is set the scene for Microsoft to do a little price switch-a-roo before launch. Sony should have quickly upped their launch price to $449. That's the only thing they did wrong in my opinion (from a strictly business/profit standpoint).

by Anonymousreply 16706/11/2013

Consoles are often sold at a loss early in their life cycles. They make money on game sales, XBL and Playstation Plus subscriptions, and the like.

by Anonymousreply 16806/11/2013

I know that, R168...but Sony could have taken a lesser loss and still come out lightyears ahead.

by Anonymousreply 16906/11/2013

Well, back in the halcyon days of mid-90s, Sega released the Saturn at $399, and Sony released the original Playstation for $299. I honestly see this as the second round of that.

by Anonymousreply 17006/11/2013

I thought the PS1 was $329? I swear I paid $329 for it on launch day. Maybe I got ripped lol

by Anonymousreply 17106/11/2013

Nevermind, guess it was $299...maybe I bought an extra controller with it.

by Anonymousreply 17206/11/2013

Is there a way to hack the Xbox to avoid having your personal life raped by a corporation? I believe hackers are freedom fighters in this respect.

by Anonymousreply 17306/11/2013

Here's Sony's own history. It launched in North America in September 1995 for $299, and they cut the price to $199 less than a year later.

by Anonymousreply 17406/11/2013

[quote]Is there a way to hack the Xbox to avoid having your personal life raped by a corporation? I believe hackers are freedom fighters in this respect.

I'm sure someone will crack it at some point, and then Microsoft will sue them for a million, billion dollars. They've done it before.

by Anonymousreply 17506/11/2013

I've gots to get me one!!

by Anonymousreply 17606/11/2013

Yea, see I think Sony should have launched at a higher price to capture the hardcore $$$ for the first year and THEN drop the price to $399 in a year or so--like what they did with the PS1. Now all that's gonna happen is a bunch of flippers are gonna pocket that excess money over and above the list price.

by Anonymousreply 17706/11/2013

The Wii being cheaper didn't hurt its sales (in fact, I'd argue that that might have given sales, and as I recall, they didn't have the strongest line-up of games, except maybe Zelda: Twilight Princess).

Meanwhile, the Wii U needs a system seller, which, sorry fanboys, Super Smash Brothers is not.

by Anonymousreply 17806/11/2013

BTW no one has mentioned what they think about the PS4 hardware design? The minute they unveiled it I was SHOCKED how similar it was to the XboxOne's design! What a funny coinkydink!

by Anonymousreply 17906/11/2013

r155 - bitch cunt from hell much?

I can understand the requirement to connect to the internet every so often (though not condone it) but why the always-on camera?

by Anonymousreply 18006/11/2013

r180, don't forget the always-on microphone.

MS swears it will only listen for certain phrases and not record conversations, but there's no mention of what in particular it's listening for.

Don't talk about explosives in your living room.

by Anonymousreply 18106/11/2013

The Xbox One is an ALWAYS ON microphone and camera in your living room. It WILL NOT work unless the Kinect is attached and functioning. Considering what the hell has been going on in this country recently, it is not paranoid to not want this device in your living room. Microsoft is absolutely part of PRISM.

The XBox One is an absolute no go. They have hugely fucked up with this machine.

by Anonymousreply 18206/11/2013

[quote](rolling eyes) Paranoid delusional much?

Are you high or just retarded? Have you not heard the news in the past five days? Everyone is being spied on.

Fucking moron.

by Anonymousreply 18306/11/2013

R183, the images and sounds never leave the local box. I'm not the fucking moron in this conversation.

by Anonymousreply 18406/11/2013

[quote]MS swears it will only listen for certain phrases and not record conversations, but there's no mention of what in particular it's listening for.

Uh, yes, there is. Quite explicitly. It's listening for "Xbox On". Period.

It doesn't RECORD anything.

It simply listens. It doesn't keep a history of all sounds and words.

And the camera is not "always on". When the box is off, it's off.

The paranoid delusion and ignorance in this thread is really sad.

by Anonymousreply 18506/11/2013

An audio/video monitor system such as Xbox One is only truly off when it is unplugged. Most consumers won't realize that.

by Anonymousreply 18606/11/2013

[quote]It doesn't RECORD anything.

It doesn't have to record. The government agency that Microsoft is allowing acess to the cameras thanks to their FISA warrant are certainly recording, though.

Your iPhone doesn't record your calls, either. That doesn't mean shit to the NSA.

by Anonymousreply 18706/11/2013

Great article:

[bold]Think of Kinect on the Xbox One As Just a Part of the Controller[/bold]

Gamers who consider their core hard have always thought of Kinect as just some gimmick Wii-successor that they'd never use because true gamers use analog sticks or fight pads or morse code or something. And maybe the first Kinect was like that. The Kinect 2 on Xbox One? Completely different. It's truly an extension of the controller without the constraints of a controller.

We already know the Kinect 2 is ridiculously powerful enough to see your heart beat just by looking at you and that its innards are stupendously smart. But the point of bundling Kinect with every single Xbox One ever isn't to force you to host Dance Central parties or make you teach Skype to Grandma, it's so that Microsoft can make a better controller without changing its controller (without changing it too much, I should say. The new Xbox One controller is tickle me sweet).

Microsoft demoed a FPS game that took advantage of Kinect in a completely natural game-playing way. Your hands are on the controller. Your thumbs are on the analog sticks. Your fingers are on the triggers. Oh crap, a giant rocket is coming right at you on your screen. You move your thumbs accordingly, you subconsciously lean to the side with it, the rocket passes by. Phew. You're okay. You didn't even realize it but you just controlled a game with Kinect and you didn't die. Hmm?

Because every console will have Kinect, every game can be developed with it in mind. Just leaning to a side can make your character move, like it did in the Xbox One FPS demo. And because Kinect 2 is so advanced, it can read your movements almost as quickly as you can press the B button. Microsoft showed how if you touch your temple in the FPS demo, it'll immediately turn on x-ray vision in the video game. If you raise your controller, your character will raise a shield. Maybe those aren't natural movements to you but how is pressing a random button any more natural? What if you could map out certain game actions to buttons and natural motion gestures?

With Kinect, controlling the Xbox One is no longer limited by the number of static buttons on the controller. Imagine pointing at which enemy your AI partner should focus on. Or cycling immediately to your pistol or grenade with a quick hand gesture. Or motioning your troop to stop with a halt. Or cornering a turn in a driving game by leaning. Or calling for timeout in Madden like you would call for timeout in real life (okay, maybe that's a gimmick). And that's just what I thought of in 30 seconds. If you gave real game developers time? They'd blow away all the useless tricks we made fun of on the 360. We can't judge Kinect today without wondering it will do for us tomorrow.

So don't think of Kinect on the Xbox One as a Kinect you'd never use. And don't think of the Xbox One controller as the only way of controlling things. That's just needlessly limiting your view. They could stay different. They could become interchangeable. But they won't exist without each other anymore. A Kinect is now a part of every Xbox controller. Is that really worse than slapping a trackpad onto every controller?

by Anonymousreply 18806/11/2013

r188, we've noticed that you raise your caftan, your heartbeat increases and your right hand moves toward your crotch when the Xbox One plays Sex and The City re-runs.

Would you like us to play more horse racing videos?

by Anonymousreply 18906/12/2013

[bold]Why I'm Getting the Xbox One, Not the PS4 (Ugh)[/bold]

If you're anything like me, your penchant for gaming has probably dwindled over the years. And, as I stand on the precipice of unloading an ungodly amount of money on either Microsoft or Sony's next generation console, I ask myself if I should upgrade to either, or just opt for a media streaming box? The answer: I'm getting an Xbox One. Here's why.

[bold]Thinking Inside the Box[/bold]

If gaming's not your main obsession, there's really no contest between PS4 and the Xbox One. Over the years Microsoft has wheeled and dealed its way into a treasure trove of non-gaming content that Sony simply hasn't been able to match. The Xbox has transformed itself from being just a gaming console to a family-friendly do-it-all media hub. It's something Bill Gates has envisioned since before the Xbox 360 launched nearly eight years ago.

In a 2005 interview with Time Magazine, Gates had this to say about the Xbox and its place in the home:

[quote][italic]"You can't just sell it as a convergence device," Gates says. "You gotta get in there because certain members of the family [i.e., teenage boys] think it's a must-have type thing. But the way to cement it is as a family experience. And the way that it really makes sense for Microsoft, and we justify this sort of circuitous route that we went down, is because of how it fits in the living room."[/italic]

Xbox One now offers Netflix, HBO GO, ESPN, Vevo and a heck of a lot more than just the ability to play DVDs and CDs then when the 360 first launched. You can even watch live TV on it if you're a Comcast customer.

Sony's offerings aren't nearly as far-reaching, and now that the Xbox One will be Blu-ray compatible, the PlayStation has lost its primary media advantage. Sony doesn't offer HBO GO, among other Xbox-friendly content options. In terms of breadth of services, it's not even close.

In fact, if you navigate to either Xbox.com or PlayStation.com, it's interesting to see how each of the two companies is marketing their respective black boxes. Gaming is the last value proposition in a laundry list of things that Microsoft boasts about the One. Sony, meanwhile, wants you to know that it's all about games and gamers and gameplay. Sadly, I'm not that interested in just games anymore. Why can't I have the best of both worlds?

One could opt for a media streaming box like the Apple TV or Roku, but what about those of us still using optical media? My apartment is cluttered enough with electronics. I really just want one box to rule them all. And while I don't game as much as I used to, I'm still up for the occasional round of Gears of War.

[italic](continued)[/italic]

by Anonymousreply 19006/12/2013

[italic](continued)[/italic]

[bold]Necessary Evil[/bold]

The only shitty thing is that Microsoft has the best content deals around but maintains that every additive feature requires an Xbox Live Gold membership at $60 bucks a year. Somewhere along the way the multiplayer service turned into more than just that, and now includes anything fun and/or cool. Without Gold, the Xbox is actually pretty lame. With Gold, you have to pay a subscription fee just to access the Netflix subscription you're already paying for. It's sad but true.

But what other option do I have? I'm willing to pay for the redundancy to have the convenience of just one box. To me, it's worth it. If it were just about gaming, then there's no doubt that the PlayStation 4 would have won me over. This isn't a war about which console is best anymore, at least not for me. It's about which one has better content, and Microsoft is winning.

[bold]Master Plan[/bold]

While Gates might not ever be remembered as a visionary the way Jobs was, you can't argue that he hasn't delivered on his vision for the Xbox. In that same interview with Time, Gates succinctly predicted the Xbox's place in the home: "Think of it as not taking over the digital ecosystem but being a prime player in that digital ecosystem."

Mission accomplished, Bill. Now take my money.

[italic](end)[/italic]

by Anonymousreply 19106/12/2013

[bold]Don't flinch: the new Kinect could be the end of motion gimmicks[/bold]

The first version of Kinect promised to completely change how we play games. Instead of sitting on our couch with a controller, we'd be running, dancing, throwing, and shouting our way through level after level. The new version of Kinect, the one that will ship with every Xbox One console in November, initially seemed like more of the same: more data, more accuracy, to the same end. But as we talk to game developers at E3 2013, it's quickly becoming clear that the next generation of motion gaming isn't about making us stand in front of our TVs and play. It's about watching us play, as we've always played, and reacting in kind.

Take Ryse: Son of Rome, for instance. The game is played with your controller — you don't use your arm to swing your sword, or pull an arrow out of your eye. Instead, you shout "archers!" to summon some medieval aerial support, and beckon your men forward with your arm. You do all this from your couch: every part of Ryse works with your controller, parts of it are just better with Kinect.

The game's producers called it "mash to mastery," allowing people to play however they want. You want to pound buttons, hoping to survive the onslaught of barbarians? Great. But if you learn to use Kinect, to direct your men with your arms and your voice, and then to pair that with smarter and faster button presses, you'll be a much better (and more brutal) executioner.

I asked the Ryse producers and directors why the game is coming out now, fully two years after it was first announced at E3 2011. Their answer related to the Kinect's development. "It was announced as a Kinect game, where you would just stand in front of the TV and play like that. But as the Crytek team started developing the game and story further, they realized that the setting, the story, the things you want to do just better fit a third-person combat game." The new Kinect, they said, allowed them to create that kind of game and still have the fun, interactive features Kinect offers.

In Dead Rising 3, an open-world zombie game that seems to be part Grand Theft Auto and part Kingdom Rush, your controller is once again your friend. Your Kinect might be your enemy. Zombies can hear you talking, even rustling on your couch, and they'll come after you. (Prepare to play Dead Rising 3 in the quietest room you can find.) Once they find you, if you wriggle on your couch as you presumably would if a zombie were attempting to eat your entire face all at once, you'll wriggle the zombie off you. The controller stays in your hands, but as you react to the game, the game reacts to you.

These are two of Microsoft's key Xbox One titles, and they're using Kinect in a way that might finally make it palatable to gamers hardcore and casual alike. You don't need to use the Kinect, but the games are more fun and more immersive when you use it — and you'll be better at the game, too.

In a more futuristic demo called "Reflex," Xbox reps took the idea even further. As we walked through a Tron-like level, we could raise the controller over our face to activate our shield, touch our temple to activate our X-ray vision, and duck out of the way to, well, duck out of the way. These are activities that make sense, that we might even reflexively do anyway while we game — I know I lean a little every time I try to dodge a bullet in Halo. With an always-on, always-watching, always-listening Kinect, our surroundings and our actions become part of the game.

"We've exposed these reflexes to developers in a way that thinks of your spine as a thumbstick," I was told during the Xbox hardware demonstration. "We're able to bring natural, intuitive, instinctive Kinect input in a way that's thrilling even to the most hardcore gamers." Kinect may have more capabilities than ever, and more features than any developer seems to be currently using, but as we see developers continue to roll out their games in the coming months, Xbox One Kinect games will win big by thinking small.

by Anonymousreply 19206/12/2013

[bold]A Strong Argument Against Used Games[/bold]

YouTube gaming commentator Total Biscuit does not like used games. He's no suit defending The Man. He's a hardcore PC gamer and man of the people.

Now, he's not right about everything (to wit: he thinks we're "terrible"... yeah, ok). But he makes some great points about used games being no-good.

Got half an hour? Give his argument a listen. He's considering many points of view.

Used games might be a convenient industry scapegoat, but that doesn't mean they're not problematic. The man makes a compelling case. Feel free to disagree. There are strong arguments for and against.

(video at link... well worth watching even though it's longish)

by Anonymousreply 19306/12/2013

No.

The DRM bs.

The always-on.

No longer region-free bs.

NO.

by Anonymousreply 19406/12/2013

Sorry, no matter how many PR flack articles and booster opinion pieces that get posted, at this point people have made up their minds. They know what the policies and the prices are and what the rough launch lineups are, and many have already put in their pre-orders (or not).

And regardless of whether you think Microsoft's design decisions were reasonable or not, it's hard to argue that they didn't do an AWFUL PR job this E3. They were not prepared at all for the backlash and for how Sony would seize the opportunity to undercut them on price and portray itself as the gamers' champion (while Nintendo kind of stayed out of it and just focused on its franchises).

The ability to share games freely with one another is something that gamers, young people especially, feel passionately about. I can't tell you how many tumblr blogs I've come across that have shared posts about how horrible the XBox One's DRM is, or re-posted Sony's "used games" video (9 million+ views in a day), with hundreds of thousands of notes on each post. These blogs are usually devoted to other subjects (like comics, or TV shows), but on this one issue they have been broadcasting to other teens and young people to stay away from the new XBox.

And Microsoft's response has been ham-fisted at best, or off-putting and arrogant at worst. The other day Don Mattrick gave an interview where he said if someone didn't have reliable connectivity (e.g. soldiers fighting overseas), they could always buy a 360. Really? That's their prepared PR response?

If Sony ends up winning this gen, it'll have as much to do with Microsoft's incompetence and awful messaging as it will with any features of the PS4. Combine this with the Windows 8 debacle, and I think Microsoft should do a serious evaluation about whether it knows how to listen to its customers anymore, rather than spending its time trying to convince consumers they want something that they really don't.

by Anonymousreply 19506/13/2013

[quote]You can even watch live TV on it if you're a Comcast customer.

Ummmmmm, and what about the people who DON'T have Comcast!?

by Anonymousreply 19606/13/2013

Isn't wrong that the game that I'm most excited about (other than Watch Dogs) is Ducktales Remastered? That was one of my favorite NES games, and it looks like they did an amazing job with it.

by Anonymousreply 19706/13/2013

Will most people buying the latest console right away even be big hardcore gamers who would notice the difference in graphics? I'm probs gonna hold onto my console for the next year or two, given that I play games maybe twice a month.

by Anonymousreply 19806/13/2013

I'm not buying a PS4 until I can get games for $20 or less. So see y'all in 2016!

by Anonymousreply 19906/13/2013

[quote]Will most people buying the latest console right away even be big hardcore gamers who would notice the difference in graphics? I'm probs gonna hold onto my console for the next year or two, given that I play games maybe twice a month.

I think it will depend on what kinds of games we get within the first six months or so. The three games I'm most excited about right now are The Last of Us, Beyond: Two Souls, and Watch Dogs, and all three are for current gen, except that Watch Dogs is also available for next gen. Infamous: Second Son is also one I'm looking forward to, but it's not out until January.

by Anonymousreply 20006/13/2013

Has GTA V been previewed at E3? I am looking forward to it as much as anything I have seen previewed so far this week.

Destiny is the best thing I have seen in the E3 coverage this week. ESO also looks pretty impressive. Watch Dogs and The District may also end up on my list of games to purchase.

by Anonymousreply 20106/13/2013

No, Rockstar announced a few weeks ago they weren't previewing GTV. Take2 doesn't even have a booth.

by Anonymousreply 20206/13/2013

[quote]I'm probs gonna hold onto my console for the next year or two, given that I play games maybe twice a month.

This honestly sounds like the best idea. I won't be buying anything until 2014 for sure... rather than prejudging, I'm going to wait and see what ACTUALLY ships. The promises of E3 are notoriously sketchy. Things that sound good turn out to be bad, and things that sound bad turn out to be non-issues, etc.

I'm going to wait for the games that draw me in, and for the reviews that come out a few months in, after the knee-jerk reactions are over, and people have actually experienced it for a while.

by Anonymousreply 20306/13/2013

[quote]at this point people have made up their minds

...of course. Closed minded, snap-judgments are the rule these days. Don't bother keeping an open mind until things actually ship, real honest-to-god reviews come in, and the actual situation is known.

Because we ALL know that EVERYTHING ever said at E3 always comes completely true, exactly as everyone interpreted that truth. Right? (/sarcasm)

by Anonymousreply 20406/13/2013

R204, are you new to gaming? Do you know what pre-orders are? It's when people decide to purchase a system or a game before it's officially on the market and reviews are out.

People make pre-orders because they want to secure a copy or unit, or because they're so excited they want to guarantee they have it upon release. Especially when new consoles launch in the holiday season, there is competition for a limited supply available (remember the perpetual Wii shortages back in the day?), so people who pre-order generally have the best chances of securing a purchase.

E3 is when Microsoft and Sony had their chance to sell and advertise their systems. They showed their rough launch lineups, explained their features, their policies and their pricing. That's more than enough info for most people to make a "closed-minded snap judgment" about what they want to purchase and pre-order this year. And it seems a lot of people have already placed their orders (with the PS4 outpacing the XBox One from anecdotal reports from retailers, to the point that Sony may have to adjust their supply chain).

by Anonymousreply 20506/13/2013

I know what pre-orders are, R205. I've never done that. I always wait for the reviews. I don't pre-judge. Even games I'm *certain* I'll like. Every once in a while, I'm glad I didn't jump the gun.

I've only 'stood in line' on opening day once, for Borderlands 2. Because the reviews were already out and were fantastic, and I loved the first one.

One cool thing about Xbox One is that I won't ever have to stand in line again, even if I want it "day one"... I'll just download it.

And don't act like E3 is over. There have been events every day, expanding on many things. Mostly ignored by closed minded people of course, who've already made-up their mind on half-baked info and no real experience by anyone. Even the games that had significant demos are still just demos, and hardly indicative of final game quality or even game-play.

I have little doubt the PS4 will cream the Xbox One right out of the gate. But I have very little doubt that the Xbox One will sell fine, to a broader market, and has more future potential. It's truly something different and interesting, compared to PS4's "same song, second verse".

Besides, the Xbox One wins on the controller alone, given none of the other so-called "limitations" affect me in any way (I do multi-player gaming with friends, so I pay for Xbox Live Gold anyway, and I never buy used games or sell back games, and I always have a reliable internet connection). I'm not alone in being essentially unaffected by these "limitations", and interested in what else the console has to offer. And the controller, which is most of the experience you have, is just vastly superior to the PS dualshock design.

by Anonymousreply 20606/13/2013

[bold]Xbox One has power of 10 Xbox 360 consoles, says Microsoft[/bold]

[italic]And the company says the power becomes "infinite" with cloud technology, which game developers have been "incredibly positive" about[/italic]

Microsoft may still be reeling from the PR nightmare about Xbox One's used game policies and always online nature, but that hasn't stopped the company from espousing the next-gen platform's big potential. In a closed-door meeting called "Xbox 101" attended by GamesIndustry International, the company stressed that Xbox One has "the computational power of more than 10 Xbox 360 consoles," and that "the cloud brings infinite additional processing power."

Those are the words of Xbox One engineering manager Jeff Henshaw, who led a demonstration about how Xbox One's power has enabled Microsoft to create a demo using real data from NASA to track the orbital velocity of 40,000 asteroids in space. While Henshaw and his team are very proud of the power of Xbox One when it's offline, the real advantage, he stressed, comes from Microsoft's special cloud services.

"Microsoft has hundreds of thousands of servers and dozens of data centers geographically distributed all around the planet, and Xbox One has the ability to instantly tap in to that limitless computational horsepower," Henshaw explained. With that extra cloud power, Microsoft is able "to take the number of asteroids from 40,000 to 330,000, and any device doing the computational math to realistically in real-time chart the orbital velocity of 330,000 asteroids would melt a hole in the ground, but Xbox One is able to do it without even breaking a sweat because it's pulling in virtualized cloud computing resources."

Henshaw added that even with all the power being used, Xbox One remains incredibly silent (no doubt an important aspect to note given how loud Xbox 360 hardware has been). "We have about 500,000 updates per second coming from our global computing cloud down to this Xbox One so it can all be managed completely seamlessly. The beautiful thing that's happening here is we are seamlessly blending Xbox One's incredible processing power with the limitless processing power of the cloud," he continued.

So why is Microsoft going out of its way to show us a screen full of thousands of asteroids? Well, the implication is that if Xbox One can track all these asteroids, then it can certainly create massive, highly detailed game worlds for gamers to enjoy.

"Game developers are building games that have bigger levels than ever before. In fact, game developers can now create persistent worlds that encompass tens or hundreds of thousands of players without taxing any individual console, and those worlds that they built can be lusher and more vibrant than ever before because the cloud persists and is always there, always computing," Henshaw said.

"Those worlds can live on in between game sessions. If one player drops out, that world will continue on and can experience the effects of time, like wear from weather damage, so that when a player comes back into the universe it's actually a slightly evolved place in the same way that our real world evolves a little bit from the time we go to sleep to the time we wake up. Game developers have given us incredibly positive feedback on the crazy different ways that they can use this incredible new cloud power resource."

It all seems a bit theoretical, but if the cloud can be as valuable a resource for developers as Microsoft says, perhaps consumers won't mind the Xbox One being always online when they play.

by Anonymousreply 20706/13/2013

From one of the developers on the Xbox One team, about the reaction:

"The thing is we suck at telling the story. The whole point of the DRM switch from disc based to cloud based is to kill disc swapping, scratched discs, bringing discs to friends house, trade-ins for shit value with nothing going back to developers, and high game costs. If you want games cheaper then 59.99, you have to limit used games somehow. Steam's model requires a limited used game model.

The thing is, the DRM is really really similar to steam... You can login anywhere and play your games, anyone in your house can play with the family xbox. The only diff is steam you have to sign in before playing, and Xbox does it automatically at night for you (once per 24 hours)

It's a long tail strategy, just like steam. Steam had it's growing pains at the beginning with all it's drm shit as well. [...] For digital downloads steam had no real competition at the time, they were competing against boxed sales. At the time people were pretty irate about steam, (on 4chan too...) It was only once they had a digital marketplace with DRM that was locked down to prevent sharing that they could do super discounted shit.

Think about it, on steam you get a game for the true cost of the game, 5$-30$. On a console you have to pay for that PLUS any additional licenses for when you sell / trade / borrow / etc. If the developer / publisher can't get it on additional licenses (like steam), then they charge the first person more. [...] If we say "Hey publishers, you limit game to 39.99, we ensure every license transfer you get 10$, gamestop gets 20$" that is a decent model... Microsoft gets a license fee on first and subsequent game purchases, compared to just first now? That's a revenue increase.

Competition is the best man, it helps drive both to new heights. See technology from the Cold War. If we had no USSR, we'd be way worse off today. TLDR: Bring it on Steam :)"

by Anonymousreply 20806/14/2013

R208 makes a lot of sense (the link has a lot more than was pasted into the post, just FYI)

by Anonymousreply 20906/14/2013

But it's all bullshit. I GUARANTEE you Vbox games will not be cheaper.

by Anonymousreply 21006/14/2013

But it's all bullshit. I GUARANTEE you Xbox One games will not be cheaper

by Anonymousreply 21106/14/2013

Not at first, R211. But it's a disruptive change, and just like with Steam (whose games weren't cheaper or "on sale" so much to begin with), prices will drop. IF they're successful.

But you know, if you really love super-expensive games so much, keep pushing the same-old, same-old model and buy a PS4.

by Anonymousreply 21206/14/2013

The New York Times had a pretty critical article on this whole fiasco where it made a lot of good points:

1 - "Microsoft’s problem is that it is heralding a fully digital, downloadable experience, but offering a game system that is powered only partly by the Web . . . Microsoft looks as if it were trying to place restrictions that are commonplace on the virtual Internet onto physical discs. People don’t complain about their inability to lend or resell their iPhone games, so Microsoft argues that its position has a precedent. But many gamers are responding as if Amazon tried to apply the rules for the Kindle to new hardcover books."

2 - "The Xbox One, on the other hand, demands a daily check-in with Microsoft’s servers. And it is a near certainty that one day Microsoft will turn off those servers. That means that most of the Xbox One’s games will be enjoyed only by the current generation of players."

And the kicker: "When it comes to novels, songs and movies, you can choose to rent, paying less for a service like Netflix, or to own, paying more for, say, Blu-ray discs.

When it comes to video games, the Xbox One will no longer offer that choice. That’s why players are responding as if they were being treated not like renters, but serfs."

To me, this highlights the problem with the XBox one - if you're going to digital distribution and enforce online DRM, it better be a fully digital system with all the benefits. If you're going to have a disc-based system, it better not have the DRM restrictions of a digital distribution system. It's like Microsoft combined the two and ended up incorporating the worst features of both.

by Anonymousreply 21306/15/2013

I keep seeing that "reason 2" you posted above, R213, and it's just so full of shit.

There is AMPLE precedent for this. If MS is going to turn off those servers (VERY unlikely any time in the lifetime of this console that you care about), they'll simply push an update to all boxes to remove the daily check.

This isn't rocket science.

And this is a TRANSITION to digital distribution. Already, any title will be available for download (no disc required, no standing in line required) on day one. This will not be the case for the PS4. If you don't ever want to deal with discs again, you won't have to.

Most of the criticisms I see seem so short-sighted and so clueless. Not all of them of course, but certainly most.

Obviously if you're stationed on a sub, you're not going to want this console. It's not made for you. So either go PS4 or Xbox 360 for those cases. They haven't discontinued the 360, you know... they've in fact released a new updated (smaller, lighter, quieter) version, and will be releasing hundreds of new games on it over the next couple of years. It's not like it's dead.

by Anonymousreply 21406/15/2013

The problem with pushing "you don't have to deal with discs!" as a benefit is that you need sufficient storage to have a digital-only system.

A Blu-Ray (which both the PS4 and the XBox One will use) holds around 25GB of data for one game (also, since the XBox One will switch to Blu-Rays instead of DVD's like the 360, I'd expect a lot less disc-swapping issues in any case). How big are the hard drives that are being offered with these systems? I think they said the XBO would have a 500GB drive which is non-removable and non-serviceable - so once you hit around 20 retail games (which isn't that much, over a system that's supposed to last 5+ years - e.g. 4 games a year), you start having to swap games in and out to avoid hitting the internal storage limit. You've replaced disc-swapping with HDD-swapping.

And stop acting like digital-only game files are some revolutionary disruptive idea. Games have always been digital files; the reason physical media is necessary for consoles (and is indeed still necessary) is that their file sizes are generally too large to conveniently store on a console's stock hard drive. PC's don't run into this issue because they're open systems and users can always choose to upgrade their storage, get SSD's, etc., but consoles are closed, locked environments.

And honestly, R214, "get a 360"? Maybe someone wants to play the latest and greatest and not games that came out years ago - in which case, yeah, get a PS4 or a PC. And ironically, much of the 360's library is discontinued at retail and new copies are hard to come by, so if someone really wants to play games for the XBox 360, chances are they'll have to buy more than a few of those games used...

by Anonymousreply 21506/15/2013

[quote]A Blu-Ray (which both the PS4 and the XBox One will use) holds around 25GB of data for one game

It *can* hold that much. Most games will likely not be anywhere near that.

Additionally, save-games go in the cloud, not on the disc.

And it has two USB 3.0 ports for attaching additional drives any time you like.

And since the games are all available in the cloud as well, removing a game is a non-issue... the system still "knows" you own it, and it can be restored at any time.

In fact, you can roam your games... go over to a friend's house who has an XB1, and you can play any of your games (at the point you left off, losing no progress) on their console.

See, the problem is you're still thinking inside the "box" of the old way. But this is a game changer that changes the way things are done.

[quote]Maybe someone wants to play the latest and greatest and not games that came out years ago

Most of the "latest and greatest" games will still be coming out for Xbox 360. For years yet. There are tens of millions of these consoles out there, do you really think game developers are going to completely ignore them? Most of the games demo'd at E3 will actually be coming out on both current gen and next gen boxes.

So yeah, you're still not getting it.

by Anonymousreply 21606/15/2013

So if you get kicked of Xbox Live for some reason, you essentially brick your system?

by Anonymousreply 21706/15/2013

If the Xbox One didn't suck, there wouldn't be all this need for excuse making.

by Anonymousreply 21806/15/2013

R217, yes - if your account gets banned on XBox Live (for inappropriate behavior, game cheats, whatever) you will no longer have access to any of your games, including disc-based ones, since those game licenses and the console's activation check are all tied to your account.

Welcome to "innovation"!

by Anonymousreply 21906/15/2013

Sometimes my Internet goes down and I like to play video games to kill the boredom. It is ABSURD that the $500 Xbox One "does not support" this.

by Anonymousreply 22006/15/2013

R220... you can play games. As long as your internet isn't down for more than a day.

If your internet is THAT flakey, then one has to wonder why you're spending $500 on a game machine instead of getting better internet.

by Anonymousreply 22106/15/2013

If your electricity goes out, you can't watch TV. Hell, if your cable goes out, you can't record your favorite show on your DVR. Internet is becoming like a utility.

by Anonymousreply 22206/15/2013

Who wants to jump through all those ridiculous hoops? K.I.S.S.

by Anonymousreply 22306/15/2013

R223, what hoops would that be?

You plug it in and play.

99% of the time you wouldn't know any different.

Well, except the PS4 does make you get up off the couch and laboriously swap discs in order to change from game to game, and god forbid you should lose the disc or scratch it.

With Xbox One, you just play. Instantly. Switch games. Instantly. Play your games on any Xbox One anywhere (don't need to lug your box around).

Seems pretty convenient to me.

by Anonymousreply 22406/15/2013

R221, but what exactly is the point of having to connect to the internet every 24 hours? Like, what's the benefit to me of there being a check? How does it help the system function? It's an arbitrary restriction that only inconveniences people.

I mean, they could also have a restriction saying you have to pat your head and rub your tummy in front of the Kinect camera in order to not be deactivated, and you'd probably argue, "Well, if you don't have hands and can't manage simple motor actions, you shouldn't be playing games." The point isn't whether people are capable of passing the checks, the question is why they have to even bother in the first place. Here's a general rule for successful product design: don't inconvenience your customers without giving them a benefit in return. Here, Microsoft is "all stick, no carrot".

And by the way, if you're a customer of Comcast, Time Warner or any of the major cable providers, no that no matter where you live, no matter how developed (San Francisco, New York, whatever), the internet goes out occasionally. I've definitely had my broadband go out for hours at a time in places - it's just a fact that internet providers are not 100% reliable.

by Anonymousreply 22506/15/2013

[quote][R221], but what exactly is the point of having to connect to the internet every 24 hours? Like, what's the benefit to me of there being a check? How does it help the system function? It's an arbitrary restriction that only inconveniences people

It's been explained many times, but I'll try again: YOU don't have to do anything. It just needs a functioning connection at some point during 24 hours. Why? To eliminate the bother and burden of discs. Games bought on a disc get installed one time, and then you never need the disc again. Just like on PC. You don't need to worry about losing the disc, or scratching it, or anything like that. It allows you to instantly switch from game to game without having to load and unload discs and wait for loading times. It also uses the internet connection to update games in the background so you never have to sit through a game update again. You just play.

So it's not an inconvenience at all. It happens while you're asleep, unaware. It takes no action on your part at all, and enables a bunch of functionality.

Having the internet go out for "hours" at a time won't be an issue. Just as long as there is SOME connectivity during any given period of 24 hours or so.

The only time my internet has been down for longer was when a neighbor cut my cable line. In such cases, I could have just fired up my phone's hot-spot and gotten internet that way.

by Anonymousreply 22606/15/2013

R224, you think moving 10 feet to switch a Blu-Ray in your console is the greatest burden in the world, but at R216 you act like having to switch out an HDD and deal with the wait times for several GB-large game downloads (which can be several minutes and even a few hours) is no biggie. Let's be honest here - you're still going to deal with inconveniences with both systems. Digital distribution and downloads have their own headaches vs. physical media (many of which have been detailed in this thread - failed internet checks, slow download speeds, download interruptions and failures, game servers being down, etc.)

You think discs being scratched are a problem? What if your hard drive fails? (unless you're claiming that hard drives don't fail, and Microsoft's are going to be 100% reliable - just like their Red Ring of Death 360's, right?) Well, you'll just have to spend a few days re-downloading all your games, instead of dealing with those pesky discs which you could just pop in again to play.

But hey, I'm not against digital distribution. It's convenient when implemented correctly, and when the benefits are balanced against the tradeoffs. But as the New York Times article points out, people don't like having digital restrictions arbitrarily imposed on disc-based systems.

by Anonymousreply 22706/15/2013

But why do I need the Internet? I can still play my ipad games even when I don't have an Internet connection.

It's not necessary at all other than the fact that they are making it necessary.

by Anonymousreply 22806/15/2013

[quote]You think discs being scratched are a problem? What if your hard drive fails? (unless you're claiming that hard drives don't fail, and Microsoft's are going to be 100% reliable - just like their Red Ring of Death 360's, right?)

You're not going to lose your games, if that's what you're implying. Saves are in the cloud, and the knowledge of the game itself is too, so you won't have to buy the game again (or even find the disc again) to reinstall it.

The point is: This isn't a disc based system.

Discs are provided because it's transitioning to digital. People are used to discs and want discs. But over the life of the Xbox One, they'll likely disappear. Especially as the used game policy kicks in, and drives game prices down, enabling all sorts of digital game sales (like on Steam).

by Anonymousreply 22906/15/2013

R228, you're wrong. Your iPad games are installed from the digital store. There's no way to share or trade in or sell them.

Games purchased the same way on the Xbox One will have the same abilities.

The Check is for games you buy on disc... to ensure you aren't just installing and then sharing it around to a dozen friends so a dozen people play it without paying for it.

This isn't rocket-science. I'm not sure why this is so difficult for so many of you to grasp.

The "hardships" and "inconveniences" and "hoops" are mostly in your head. If you're okay with the gay games work on Steam or an iPad, you really don't have any room to bitch about the Xbox One.

by Anonymousreply 23006/15/2013

[quote][R228], you're wrong. Your iPad games are installed from the digital store. There's no way to share or trade in or sell them.

I said that I can play my ipad games without the Internet. Which is true. How does what you say negate this and me "wrong"???

by Anonymousreply 23106/15/2013

Nice evation there, R231. My point is you were comparing apples to oranges.

If you install a game on the Xbox One from the digital store, you don't need the internet either (unless it's a multiplayer game of course).

If you installed apps to your iPad using a disc, you'd either have to 1) have the disc in the machine the entire time, or 2) have an internet validation check.

Again, this isn't rocket science.

by Anonymousreply 23206/15/2013

R230, I think you're the one who's been having trouble grasping the issue. People understand how the system works. They just don't see a justification for its design. They also see an alternative which is cheaper and which has a different feature set, and many / most (millions, in fact) prefer the other system.

Perhaps you think you know better than everyone else and people just aren't "getting it". Well, that sort of tone-deafness will probably earn you a job at Microsoft, seeing as they've been doing a great job this past year in acting like they know better than their customers and everyone would love their products if they weren't so uninformed. The fact is, people are more informed than ever - they just don't like what they're hearing.

by Anonymousreply 23306/15/2013

[quote]People understand how the system works.

Clearly they don't. After the last several posts, it's hilariously laughable that you'd post such an assertion.

Microsoft is to blame here: They did a HORRIBLE job at communicating the vision, the reasoning, and the benefits.

And I don't see how facts and reality are 'tone deaf'. Seriously, bitching about things that aren't even going to affect 99% of the people 99% of the time? People just like to bitch. And bash Microsoft as well. It seems like a theme with some people.

No, people are not more informed than ever. They're more MISINFORMED than ever. And they react to the half-truths, misunderstandings, and negative spins rather than the reality. I see this time and time again.

This thread is another great example of that.

by Anonymousreply 23406/15/2013

All I need to know is that having to change a disc is a sacrifice I'm willing to make if it means I can play the games I paid for anytime and anywhere I want.

by Anonymousreply 23506/15/2013

R235, how can you not play your games any time and anywhere you want on an Xbox One? Especially if you buy the electronic digital download versions (which won't require a check because there's no disc involved).

Some of you are just trying to make up reason to hate on the Xbox One. Seriously.

In day-to-day use, you'd find very little difference, and probably LESS "inconvenience" with the Xbox One.

But whatever. Haters gonna hate.

by Anonymousreply 23606/15/2013

"and laboriously swap discs in order to change from game to game"

My chair to box - change disc - a few seconds.

Oh noes - I must let MS get into my life in ways I DON'T WANT just to play a game.

I'm going for a run (you know, physical thing - then will order my PS4)

And the day I get involved with "the cloud" is the day I eat "Chick-Filler" or whatever it's called...

by Anonymousreply 23706/15/2013

The thing is there's going to be an "always-on" camera on you at all times. The camera tracks you to see what you respond to, if you smile at an ad, if you laugh, if you frown. My TV is in my bedroom pointing straight at my bed. No way would I want a webcam broadcasting to Microsoft all my bedroom activities.

by Anonymousreply 23806/15/2013

[quote][R235], how can you not play your games any time and anywhere you want on an Xbox One?

Can I play them if I've just moved and Internet hasn't been connected? Can I play them in the hotel that doesn't have wifi? And on and on. So that's how I can't plant them ANYTIME and ANYWHERE.

by Anonymousreply 23906/15/2013

Yup, ps4 it is :)

by Anonymousreply 24006/15/2013

I couldn't decide between the two systems (already own a Wii U) but now I'm defiantly getting the PS4. Better price and better exclusives.

by Anonymousreply 24106/15/2013

Switching to PS4. Totally turned off by how money-grubby and intrusive the XBox One is.

by Anonymousreply 24206/15/2013

[quote]The Check is for games you buy on disc... to ensure you aren't just installing and then sharing it around to a dozen friends so a dozen people play it without paying for it.

So the purpose of the every 24-hour internet check is to spy on you to make sure you didn't share the game? I'm sorry but that is invasive and insulting. If Microsoft doesn't trust me, why should I trust them spying on me? And to spy every 24 hours is too much!

by Anonymousreply 24306/16/2013

[quote]The Xbox One is an ALWAYS ON microphone and camera in your living room. It WILL NOT work unless the Kinect is attached and functioning. Considering what the hell has been going on in this country recently, it is not paranoid to not want this device in your living room. Microsoft is absolutely part of PRISM.

That's fine if it's recording my living room. But considering how many people have the TV and game system in their bedrooms, then you could see how this is a problem. How many sex acts or jack off sessions are going to be broadcast out to Microsoft?

by Anonymousreply 24406/16/2013

"I'd love to be the Kinect in THAT room!" is the new "I'd love to be a fly on the wall."

by Anonymousreply 24506/16/2013

Click on the insane, hyperconservative, Republican, Microsoft shill at r216 et al, and you'll see this thread absolutely alight with piss yellow. Paragraphs upon paragraphs about how it's absolutely wonderful that your Xbox One will be staring at and listening to you 24/7.

Go to any of the privacy threads and watch this lunatic masquerade as a liberal who just loves that your privacy is being raped and that Microsoft is going right along with it.

Fucking asshole.

by Anonymousreply 24606/16/2013

It will be used to monitor how many people are in the room when watching Pay-per-view and charge you by the person.

"Consumers are presented with a content selection and a choice of licenses allowing consumption of the content. The users consuming the content on a display device are monitored so that if the user-views licensed is exceeded, remedial action may be taken."

Based on the description of the technology developed for the patent it seems likely Microsoft will use the Kinect sensor, which is mandatory with Xbox One, to monitor the number of people present while watching a TV show, movie or music on the device. Presumably, should the content be consumed by too many people Xbox One owners will need to pay again.

by Anonymousreply 24706/16/2013

r246, that poster seems to have been busy all over the interwebs.

Notice that none of the "XB1 is the new Steam!" jive explains just why it's okay that your Kinect monitors YOUR FUCKING HEART RATE.

Fuck you, Microsoft. Fuck you right in the ass on video.

by Anonymousreply 24806/17/2013

[quote]Can I play them if I've just moved and Internet hasn't been connected? Can I play them in the hotel that doesn't have wifi? And on and on. So that's how I can't plant them ANYTIME and ANYWHERE.

Are these actually serious considerations in your life? You move that often? You'd actually lug a console like Xbox One around with you to hotels? Seriously?

Military guys have a legitimate complaint (especially those that want to game on subs). For them, I can't see them buying this thing at all... why would they?

But then again, MS could easily make a change so that if you put the disc in, it doesn't need the internet check to play. Whether they will or not remains to be seen. But you don't need the internet check for games you've installed digitally from the store, so you can still play those. But keep in mind many games will likely use the "cloud" for extra processing and avoiding loading screens and such. Those benefits will disappear, and there might be games that require internet to play (like all online multiplayer games do now).... if they're persistent world games, even in single player.

by Anonymousreply 24906/17/2013

[quote]That's fine if it's recording my living room.

You're aware that it doesn't RECORD, right? It's just a sensor.

[quote]Notice that none of the "XB1 is the new Steam!" jive explains just why it's okay that your Kinect monitors YOUR FUCKING HEART RATE.

Your realize a game has to be loaded that actually is programmed to actually try and determine your heart rate, right?

[quote]So the purpose of the every 24-hour internet check is to spy on you to make sure you didn't share the game? I'm sorry but that is invasive and insulting.

Not to spy on you. Just to validate your license. Windows does it. Office does it. Lots of things do it. This isn't new or weird at all. I use a development environment that will shut down if it detects another copy running with the same license key on the network. I've been using this for nearly a decade. It's completely standard for making sure you're abiding by licensing terms and agreements. It may be new to gaming consoles (though really, it's no different than requiring you have the disc in the drive to ensure you aren't pirating... trying copying the disc and using the copy and see how far you get), but it's not new to software.

by Anonymousreply 25006/17/2013

[quote]You're aware that it doesn't RECORD, right? It's just a sensor.

You realize that your iPhone doesn't RECORD your calls either but that doesn't prevent an outside person or agency from tapping in and doing it, right???

by Anonymousreply 25106/17/2013

And they announced today that they're dropping the DRM. No more twenty-four hour check-ins, no restrictions on lending or trading games. You can even play a game you purchased online offline.

I still don't think that is enough to get me interested in the system, as they seem to be targeting multiplayer games and sports games, neither of which are in my wheelhouse.

But it's nice that after weeks of shouting and criticism from almost everyone, they listened.

by Anonymousreply 25206/19/2013

Too little, too late. They've already shown their true colors. Fuck 'em!

by Anonymousreply 25306/19/2013

Not to mention, didn't they initially say it was up to the software developers whether or not consumers would be able to sell/trade their used games?? So then how are they suddenly dropping it if it was never up to them in the first place? Liars.

by Anonymousreply 25406/19/2013

Actually, dropping those restrictions is enough for me.

by Anonymousreply 25506/19/2013

Besides the satisfaction of seeing all those corporate shills and PR apologists having to eat crow with this reversal, I'm most looking forward to not having to hear more BS about how the constant check-ins were required because of the "infinite power of the cloud" (the same "cloud" that was supposedly running complex calculations for SimCity Online but was really just a stupid DRM check).

by Anonymousreply 25606/19/2013

It still spies on you. That won't change.

by Anonymousreply 25706/19/2013

R257, if it's not connected to the Internet how can it spy on you?

by Anonymousreply 25806/19/2013

I don't know, the prices between the two systems may end up being the same when you factor in that the $399 price tag doesn't include the Playstation Eye.

I don't know, with the conversation off the hardware and back onto the games, there wasn't anything that's XB1-exclusive that seemed like it was in my niche. I think that's also true of the PS4, but given that two of my four favorite games of the previous generation were developed by Naughty Dog, which is a Sony-subsidiary, the odds of there being a gotta-have game for the PS4 just seem higher to me.

I know that's not everyone's experience, at it seemed like every gaming blog was creaming itself over Titanfall, but that's again not something that's my kind of game.

by Anonymousreply 25906/19/2013

No one buys the PS Eye, so that won't factor in.

Dropping the DRM does nothing. The PR is horrible, and the spying issue only worsens it. This ship has sailed.

by Anonymousreply 26006/20/2013

The internet has spoken, and they still hate MS.

by Anonymousreply 26106/20/2013

[quote]No one buys the PS Eye, so that won't factor in.

Well, since they've built the Move functionality directly into the controller, I can see this being adopted more readily than the previous Eye.

That's still only half the battle, as they have to make a game that uses Move that's worth playing.

Although I would argue that apart from Dance Central and some of the fitness games, there wasn't anything Kinect-related that was worth having the Kinect.

by Anonymousreply 26206/20/2013

Is it true that the PS4 will dedicate 7GB of RAM to games and 1GB to the operating system? If this is indeed fact, it seems like a major selling point considering the XBOX One is only allotting 5 GB for games with the rest being assigned to run the three operating systems on said machine.

by Anonymousreply 26306/20/2013

Okay, can I just say how amazing The Last of Us is? It's the action counterpart to The Walking Dead. You know, I don't like zombie games in general, but if they were all as thoughtful and well-realized as those two, I probably would.

And both of them do it in the same way, by focusing on the way the humanity of the characters is tested under extreme circumstances.

Also, TLOU integrates a gay supporting character about as well as I think I've seen a game that's not like The Sims or Mass Effect, where the player is determining orientations, do.

by Anonymousreply 26406/20/2013

Oh, and for everyone who's been claiming that the Kinect doesn't spy on you, it apparently only does so at the behest of advertisers. Not the government. So that's okay, then.

by Anonymousreply 26507/01/2013

Like they'd ever admit the gov't is watching us through it.

by Anonymousreply 26607/01/2013
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