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Internship Advice

I'm in grad school and my program requires a 425 hour internship (worth 6 credit hours) as one of the core requirements. So far I'm having zero luck and I'm actually a little surprised at how hard it has been to secure a non-paid position at a nonprofit. I have a great full time job and I'm not looking to turn an internship into anything longterm, yet I already got turned down by HRC and I fear more rejection is in my future.

I'm new to the internship thing and any practical advice on selling myself would be greatly appreciated.

by Pass This Onreply 1705/15/2013

Most non-profits are a complete joke. Look elsewhere.

by Pass This Onreply 105/09/2013

$ell your$elf

by Pass This Onreply 205/09/2013

D'oh. I guess since I'm in HR I figured I'd be idealistic and go with a nonprofit, but thanks for pulling the wool from my eyes, R1.

by Pass This Onreply 305/09/2013

Most nonprofits don't need internships in HR. We need people to do real work. Try a big hospital or a large company.

by Pass This Onreply 405/09/2013

Meh

by Pass This Onreply 505/09/2013

For the record, R4, I'm more than willing and capable of doing *real* work, but your little snide comment only reinforces what R1 said about nonprofits.

by Pass This Onreply 605/09/2013

It's not about being willing/capable to do it. It's about not having a need for it. A lot of nonprofits don't even have HR departments. But I'm talking about real nonprofits, not the ones raising money to throw bigger parties, like HRC. My office is always looking for writers, researchers and IT interns. "HR" is done by whoever has the time that week.

by Pass This Onreply 705/09/2013

Well, R4, I've been applying for research internships since research is one of my strong suits; however, I'm also a strong writer and proficient with computers. Sure, HR-type work would be most in line with my degree program, but I would hope an organization would consider an applicant's skill set in addition to their degree program.

by Pass This Onreply 805/09/2013

Interns do it for free

by Pass This Onreply 905/09/2013

R6 - I want to help you. Have you talked to your professors? Have you tried government, local, state or federal? How about an internship in a congressional office, either in DC or their district/state offices?

by Pass This Onreply 1005/11/2013

Ross the Intern left the Tonight show. Have you contacted Leno?

by Pass This Onreply 1105/14/2013

[quote] Aren't hospitals non-profits?

Some are NP. But many are owned by the large for-profit hospital chains. They and the health insurance companies are taking billions of dollars out of the health care pie. Money that could deliver better care to more people. The CEO's are getting rich off the suffering of others.

Take the blood money out of health care. Support single-payer national health insurance.

by Pass This Onreply 1305/14/2013

"So far I'm having zero luck..."

OP, do you own a lucky blue dress?

by Pass This Onreply 1405/15/2013

Many non-profits operate internally rather along the lines of a mean girls' private club: they all hate their coworkers, intensely, but the are united only in keeping out the wrong sort of people, which is to say everyone.

Non-profits are famously ditherers, stretching out the application and interview process over many weeks and months and then still not being able to make a decision in hiring, usually from amongst a group of highly overqualified applicants for a rock bottom position. They may do the same even amongst pools of competent applicants who are personally and professionally known --and liked-- by key staff and those in hiring positions.

A non-profit is the worst place to take anything personally, and yet it seems that that is all that they do; certainly internecine office squabbles occupy way more time than actual work. Grudges, petty battles over whose responsibility something is, envy, class warfare between those who blow their salaries on work shoes (and pout about spending $120,000/year on private school for the kids and fret over which Tuscan villa they are going to two-months this year and whether they should rent out the beach house while they are away) and the beaten-down idealists who once wanted "to make a difference" and now just live to get the fuck out.

Of course they are not all like that, but getting rejected (or more likely just not told No) from an internship or position at a non-profit is best taken lightly. Don't dwell on the rejection, don't count on being hired based on positive feedback, just keep looking.

by Pass This Onreply 1505/15/2013

Very insightful R15.

by Pass This Onreply 1605/15/2013

...

by Pass This Onreply 1705/15/2013
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