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Mormons and Scams

Is it true that it's okay for Mormons to tell lies, as long as it benefits the church?

Is that why they're so prevalent in the "wealthbuilding" and "personal coaching" industries?

by Joey Smithreply 2705/05/2013

Yes.

by Joey Smithreply 104/30/2013

Isn't "Mormons and Scams" a redundancy?

by Joey Smithreply 204/30/2013

Mormons are cut throat at every level. Avoid them if you can.

by Joey Smithreply 304/30/2013

Their entire cult is a Ponzi scheme with a choir.

by Joey Smithreply 404/30/2013

They call it "lying for the Lord."

by Joey Smithreply 504/30/2013

The Mormons are one of the most vile and dangerous cults on the planet today.

by Joey Smithreply 604/30/2013

Securities fraud is so bad in Utah that the SEC has an office in Salt Lake City, the only SEC office devoted to just one state.

by Joey Smithreply 704/30/2013

When Miss Ann secretly referred to Mormonism as a Trojan Horse I mistakenly thought she was talking about protected sex with Mitt. Yeah, I know, horse?

by Joey Smithreply 805/01/2013

"As early as 1969 the Wall Street Journal called Salt Lake City `a locus for shell operations.'

"Then in 1974 the infamous `stock fraud capital' moniker was awarded Salt Lake City in a page one Wall Street Journal article on February 25, 1974. The headline: `Dubious Distinction; Salt Lake City Gains Reputation for Being a Stock Fraud Center,'" (Utah Holiday, October 1990, p. 26).

This downward trend continued to be noticed and ten years later in 1984, Newsweek magazine wrote, "Utah, the land of the Mormons, has earned itself another name: the Stock-Fraud Capital of the Nation," (Ibid, p. 27).

by Joey Smithreply 905/01/2013

The only reason Mormons are slightly more socially accepted than Clams is because they've been around a bit longer, but both so-called religions are scams.

by Joey Smithreply 1005/01/2013

[quote]Is it true that it's okay for Mormons to tell lies, as long as it benefits the church?

Isn't this in pretty much all religions?

by Joey Smithreply 1105/01/2013

Lots of MLM (multi-level marketing) scams start in Utah. Also the main source of scammy nutritional supplements. And Orrin Hatch is the reason the FDA can't regulate them and therefore why you see so many ridiculous claims being made on infomercials.

by Joey Smithreply 1205/01/2013

Mormons in general are also extremely gullible; because they see "gentiles" as less moral than church members, they are vulnerable to all kinds of scams pushed by other Mormons, especially the wealthier-looking ones (wealth is viewed as a blessing from God, thus money == righteousness.) They have a hard time believing that Brother Jones in the big house with the fancy car could be lying to them - after all, he's in priesthood meeting every Sunday too! They view self-employment as preferable to working for someone else and are always looking for jobs that will let them spend time at home with their families, thus the MLM/work from home scams. And they believe that a priesthood blessing can heal things that doctors can't, so it stands to reason that supplements might do the same...in short, their beliefs make them sitting ducks for scams.

by Joey Smithreply 1305/01/2013

Literally none of them believe in Joseph Smith and the Golden Plates. What they believe in is that their gang will get them ahead in life. At your expense.

by Joey Smithreply 1405/01/2013

OP, it's okay for any church to tell lies as long as it benefits their church. They all do it.

by Joey Smithreply 1505/01/2013

Anyway, so the result of perfect cynicism is perfect gullibility. If you believe everybody is lying about everything, then you choose a course of action that you think will be approved by the rich members of your gang, and therefore are easy prey. The setup is corruption in its pure form, since there is no trained priesthood and leaders choose everbody's role, so the way to get ahead it to be able to offer something to the leader, either money or connections or power or absolute obedience. Look at those pathetic people they trotted out at the GOP convention to praise Romney. They were so caught up in the HIERARCHY of the thing that it never occurred to them the country would be repulsed by the minimal evidences of charity and the attribution of noblesse oblige to simple courtesy.

by Joey Smithreply 1605/01/2013

When the Mormies come a-knockin', offer them a gift!

I've heard that they cannot refuse anything offered as a gift - used Kleenex, an empty tuna can, not-so-fresh cat litter...

by Joey Smithreply 1705/01/2013

I'd be wary of eating in a Mormon run restaurant. We had a Mormon kitchen manager at a place I worked and he cut food costs by getting the grossest cuts of meat and "breading" them. He also ran gross, overly seasoned fish specials and made croutons out of dinner rolls that came off of other's plates.

by Joey Smithreply 1805/01/2013

The Mormon Church is a hate group and should be classified as such.

by Joey Smithreply 2005/01/2013

Yes, "Lying for the Lord." Here's an article on it.

[quote]Lying for the Lord refers to the practice of lying to protect the image of and belief in the Mormon religion, a practice which Mormonism itself fosters in various ways. From Joseph Smith's denial of having more than one wife, to polygamous Mormon missionaries telling European investigators that reports about polygamy in Utah were lies put out by "anti-Mormons" and disgruntled ex-members, to Gordon B. Hinckley's dishonest equivocation on national television over Mormon doctrine, Mormonism's history seems replete with examples of lying. Common members see such examples as situations where lying is justified. For the Mormon, loyalty and the welfare of the church are more important than the principle of honesty, and plausible denials and deception by omission are warranted by an opportunity to have the Mormon organization seen in the best possible light.

More at link.

by Joey Smithreply 2105/01/2013

R14 hit the nail on the head.

by Joey Smithreply 2205/01/2013

I found the best description of them in an article on professional wrestling in this month's Harper's

"Putting over a pro-wrestling persona is not easy. The task requires a thorough mastery of 'kayfabe,' a carny-derived term for the extreme strain of method acting peculiar to the sport. American pro wrestlers treat kayfabe with a devotion that requires denying the obvious. It's a head game. When you know you're faking and the audience knows you're faking and you know the audience knows you know you're faking because the fact that pro-wrestling is a fake has been documented, verified, and repeated to the point of cliche, and yet you stay in character on the walk from the locker room to your Mazda just in case someone is pointing his phone's camera at you from a window above the alley - that's kayfaybe."

And that's Mormonism. A spectacle of fakery where keeping an obvious act of believing makes people reward you for being a tremendous liar and gangster.

by Joey Smithreply 2305/01/2013

To be Mormon is to be a scam artist.

Understand the thriving Mormon business community now?

by Joey Smithreply 2405/02/2013

[quote] OP, it's okay for any church to tell lies as long as it benefits their church. They all do it.

Yeah, but some of them focus more on lying to and scamming their own members. Like the Catholic church

by Joey Smithreply 2505/02/2013

Hide your wallet and bank cards if there's a Mormon nearby.

by Joey Smithreply 2605/05/2013

Shut this anti-gay cult down. Scientology too.

by Joey Smithreply 2705/05/2013
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