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This Is Why We Hate Them...New video of pro-family riots across Paris. Police tear gas violent anti-gay thugs in multiple locale

Family values thugs rioted in Paris yesterday, throwing objects at police, storming police lines, and intentionally putting their children in danger, enraged that their government is in the process of giving full civil rights to their gay and lesbian citizens via the right to marry.

A second video we just obtained shows that violence was not the exception at the “pro family” march, it was the rule. There was violence in at least three different locations in Paris yesterday.

by Anonymousreply 4704/06/2013

In the video we posted yesterday, you can see throngs of religious right protesters pushing against police lines and ignoring the police’s admonitions to back up. The police are finally forced to tear gas the mob, and use their batons, and what happens next? A family values thug yells to the mob, repeatedly, to “put the children up front!” He then went right up to the police barricade, where he was ordered not to go, and challenged the police using his two-year-old child as a human shield against the police.

by Anonymousreply 103/25/2013

So much for France being a bastion of liberality and worldly sophistication...

by Anonymousreply 203/25/2013

video

by Anonymousreply 303/25/2013

[quote] He then went right up to the police barricade, where he was ordered not to go, and challenged the police using his two-year-old child as a human shield against the police.

And the police should have maced and beaten the two-year old.

Mess with the bull, you get the horns.

FUCK THEM.

by Anonymousreply 403/25/2013

Such passion.

It's a shame that gay people can't generate that much passion and unity in their own community.

by Anonymousreply 503/25/2013

Have them form a barricade and then get them all shot down like every other revolution in French history.

by Anonymousreply 603/25/2013

Are many of these protestors North African?

by Anonymousreply 703/25/2013

R7 not so from the pics and videos accompanying the story at the link posted

by Anonymousreply 803/25/2013

[quote]So much for France being a bastion of liberality and worldly sophistication...

Yet, their anti-gay hysteria doesn't surprise me in the least. Look at their president. Look at their own particular brand of machismo.

In fact Look at their leaders in most any field. - Always white men. Men who can be as sexist as they want. Their main cultural staple that they love to brag about is their FOOD and yet every celebrated contest is dominated by white MEN— all the lead restauranteurs, All the chefs, All are white men. There is NO discussion of having women as equal in these fields.

Before you brand me as a femi0nazi just think about it. They like for their men to be men and women to be women. Anything that blurs the lines is ignored. You can see it across the board in their culture.

Sexism is rampant- and homophobia is a closed cousin with sexism.

This shit is no surprise.

by Anonymousreply 903/25/2013

They have religious nuts over there too?

I thought the French were more liberal and worldly.

by Anonymousreply 1003/25/2013

r9 hits the nail on the head.

by Anonymousreply 1103/25/2013

So much for Western Europe being laid back and "live and let live", huh?

by Anonymousreply 1203/25/2013

Every country has their wing-nuts!

by Anonymousreply 1303/25/2013

After this horror, I'm moving to Uganda, perhaps Iran or Yemen. Fuck these intolerant Europeans.

by Anonymousreply 1403/25/2013

300k plus (I was there) in January, in Paris, and trust me, there were A LOT of dark faces in that crowd. Very, very large number of Muslims. I was speaking with a really attractive gay couple at the restaurant later that night (I believe they were French but were perhaps Belgian,) "What the fuck is all this about? How is it these groups (what appeared to be old Catholic folks, Hajib-covered women, men in Kippahs) are unified?" They looked at me like a naive little wench and told me some of their fellow gay acquaintances and friends were protesting gay marriage earlier that day at the rally AS WELL. Nonplussed as can be, they went back to their shitty Consomme.

Euro liberal leanings are true for nudity, social programs, and marijuana, perhaps, but most of these supposed European progressive bastions (mostly in countries dominated by Catholic doctrine) are about as comfortable with two men fucking as the state of Kentucky is.

by Anonymousreply 1503/25/2013

[quote]300k plus (I was there) in January, in Paris, and trust me, there were A LOT of dark faces in that crowd. Very, very large number of Muslims.

This is why Muslims should stay in their shitty backwards countries.

by Anonymousreply 1603/25/2013

R9, their president is a left wing Socialist who has fought to get gay marriage legalized in France. He also appointed many ethnic minority and female members of his government including Christiane Taubira, the Minister of Justice who gave a very powerful speech to the National Assembly in favour of gay marriage.

I'm not saying that sexism and racism don't exist in France, they certainly do, but France is not quite the racist, sexist hellhole you think it is.

by Anonymousreply 1703/25/2013

I remember watching Colbert a few months ago and he had a bit about "pro-family" protestors in France. He showed a clip of one of their demonstrations in which they waved large pink signs around while "Mamma Mia" blared on in the background. His comment was "Just so you know, in France, the people holding pink signs and dancing to Abba are the anti-gay protestors."

by Anonymousreply 1803/25/2013

The majority is still in favor of gay marriage. These people were bused in from small towns.

by Anonymousreply 1903/25/2013

[quote]about as comfortable with two men fucking as the state of Kentucky is.

Trying to believe yourself as liberal, yet you forget that women want the right to marry other women. As for the whining about Europe by other posters, note that police tear gassed the anti gay protesters.

by Anonymousreply 2003/25/2013

Funny, R15, Spain and Portugal are doing fine with equal marriage.

by Anonymousreply 2103/25/2013

R21, mighty in comparison to the 30 that either give no recognition or outright BAN it. But yes, those two and six others allow marriage.

I am merely saying that for as large as the US is, we are evolving on these issues incredibly fast, comparatively. And I believe our pockets of extremism are proportionally smaller. I cannot imagine 300k people showing up anywhere in any city to form the same protest in the US. Thoughts?

by Anonymousreply 2203/25/2013

Trust DL to try and blame a riot by a 99% white mob on their muslim population. The muslims don't have much power in France.

Having spent 2 years of grad school in Paris, I always laugh when I hear Americans spew that "liberal bastion" shit about France. R9 has the right idea, it's a country dominated by Catholic doctrine and machismo. That boor DSK has a lot of supporters and could have become president if the American case hadn't made it impossible.

Spain and Portugal were much more welcoming of gay marriage.

by Anonymousreply 2303/25/2013

I'm surprised that the Religious Reich is so well organized in France. No doubt, the morbidly obese Maggie Gallagher is jealous of their organizing abilities.

What's interesting is that no church in France would ever have to marry two same-sex people because their churches can't perform marriages. France has separation of church and state. Marriage contracts are the job of the government. The churches have frou-frou wedding ceremonies but if the couple wants to be legally married that has to be done by the local authorities, not a church.

by Anonymousreply 2403/25/2013

r22, why try to blame the muslims? Have you even looked at the video and TV footage? Do you have French TV in your cable package? This is one thing you can't blame on immigrants from the colonies.

by Anonymousreply 2503/25/2013

This is the country that came very close to electing Le Pen... the David Duke of the French. Europeans talk about racism in the US, but their nationalist movements are extreme. No one ever tells someone born and raised in the U.S. that they aren't American, yet most 'ethnically' French people will never accept a North African born in their nation as French. While I was in studying in France in the 90's, Le Pen and his group would dig up the graves of Jews and Africans because they didn't want their bodies in French soil.

by Anonymousreply 2703/25/2013

R25, are you on fucking drugs or just not that bright? It was a purely observational statement; I was fucking there in January and witnessed an equally large protest that was full of White Europeans, Jews, Muslims, etc. The POINT was that it takes something like an unjust shared HATRED to bring these groups to agreement about something. FFS, let the larger themes and bigger questions wash over you instead of jumping on the "let's see who is being victimized!" bandwagon.

by Anonymousreply 2803/25/2013

Oh, and R24, interesting you should ask but France 24 is part of my Sky Italia package so what kind of bullshit are you seeing that I am not?

by Anonymousreply 2903/25/2013

My point is, r26, muslims are not driving this movement in France. Look at poor r7 hopelessly reaching for explanations as his idea of liberal France goes up in smoke. It just can't be the sophisticated and worldly Jean-Pierre or Marie. There has to be a Mohamed ochestrating that mess.

by Anonymousreply 3003/25/2013

r29, Do you have Canal +, TF1, France 2 etc?

by Anonymousreply 3103/25/2013

No, I have Euro news, Sky Intl, BBC Intl, etc, and then for French or French/ Arabic programming only France 24, TV5MONDE, 2 M Monde, Media 1 SAT. Pretty decent and covers intensely.

by Anonymousreply 3203/25/2013

THE MUSLIMS ARE NOT HAPPY!

They're not happy in Gaza .. They're not happy in Egypt .. They're not happy in Libya .. They're not happy in Morocco .. They're not happy in Iran .. They're not happy in Iraq .. They're not happy in Yemen .. They're not happy in Afghanistan .. They're not happy in Pakistan .. They're not happy in Syria .. They're not happy in Lebanon ..

SO, WHERE ARE THEY HAPPY?

They're happy in Australia . They're happy in Canada .... They're happy in England ... They're happy in France ..... They're happy in Italy .. They're happy in Germany ..... They're happy in Sweden .. They're happy in the USA ..... They're happy in Norway .. They're happy in Holland .... They're happy in Denmark .

Basically, they're happy in every country that is not Muslim and unhappy in every

country that is!

AND WHO DO THEY BLAME?

Not Islam. Not their leadership. Not themselves.

THEY BLAME THE COUNTRIES THEY ARE HAPPY IN!

AND THEN; They want to change those countries to be like.... THE COUNTRY THEY CAME FROM WHERE THEY WERE UNHAPPY!

Excuse me, but I can't help wondering... How damn dumb can you get?

by Anonymousreply 3303/25/2013

Just because a country is secular and atheist, doesn't mean they are gay friendly or non-sexist. I don't know why people don't understand this.

That said almost 60% of French people support gay marriage- this is higher than the US support. Just because 300k people protest marriage equality doesn't mean they represent the public opinion on this. France has like 60 million people. Of course a fraction of the population might be bigots. I do think that maybe the opposition to gay marriage seems more in your face than say the UK. I didn't see mass protest when the UK proposed gay marriage.

by Anonymousreply 3403/25/2013

France is nice for a visit.

by Anonymousreply 3703/26/2013

I think Cuba is the last liberal hold-out.

by Anonymousreply 3803/27/2013

[quote]No one ever tells someone born and raised in the U.S. that they aren't American, yet most 'ethnically' French people will never accept a North African born in their nation as French.

Thanks, R27. Good to know.

by Anonymousreply 3903/27/2013

Barack Hussein Obama IS president of America.

by Anonymousreply 4003/29/2013

They're still demonstrating in Paris over this, btw.

by Anonymousreply 4103/29/2013

THE French Senate needs to hurry up and vote next month on this. These protests have eroded marriage equality support to the low 50s, whereas it was near 2/3 support a year ago. Why hasn't there been another marriage equality march to respond to this mess?

by Anonymousreply 4203/29/2013

B...bbbbut France is so liberal and sophisticated.

by Anonymousreply 4303/29/2013

Gay-marriage opponents claim revolutionary mantle

© AFP Opponents of a law legalising same-sex marriage have staged some of France's largest-ever rallies. Confronted with an obstinate government, some have adopted a more combative strategy and a new highly charged moniker: the "French Spring". By Joseph BAMAT (text

This week French news channels widely broadcast scenes of anti-riot police repelling protesters from barricades and dispersing rebellious teens along Paris’s iconic Champs-Elysées. Sunday’s clashes might have been written off as mundane in France, a country used to union strikes and left-wing activism, but this time it was religious conservatives receiving mouthfuls of pepper spray.

Confronted by a Socialist Party-led government unwilling to backtrack on its efforts to legalise marriage and adoption for same-sex couples, and polls showing the law's growing acceptance among the French, certain opponents of gay marriage are opting for a more combative tone and strategy. Some have started calling their movement the “French Spring”, referring to the regime-toppling Arab uprisings of recent years.

“We get the impression that marches gathering thousands of people were for nothing, that a petition that gathered 700,000 signatures was for nothing, and that the debate in parliament was extremely one-sided,” said Béatrice Bourges, a leader of the anti-gay marriage camp, who proudly brandishes the new label “French Spring”.

PORTRAIT

FRANCE In French gay marriage debate, a political star is born Known as the Taubira law in France, after Justice Minister Christiane Taubira, the marriage equality bill has been approved in the lower-house National Assembly and is expected to sail through the Senate next week. But opponents, a mix of traditional Catholics and far-right groups, promise to keep fighting a law they say will fundamentally weaken French society.

Sunday’s clashes broke out when some protesters attending the march against the law tried to flout a ban on demonstrating on the Champs-Elysées. They were hit with batons and doused with Mace as they tried to cross police lines. Others who succeeded in reaching the famous avenue were forcibly removed by security forces.

Somewhere amidst the disorder, the 69-year-old leader of France’s Christian Democratic Party Christine Boutin inadvertently wound up with a taste of police pepper spray, too. That event prompted a call from right-wing circles for the resignation of Interior Minister Manuel Valls, who is in charge of French police forces.

Béatrice Bourges told FRANCE 24 that a dozen lawsuits had been filed against the prefect by “victims” of the clashes, and more were likely to follow.

The making of a showdown

The invasion of the Champs-Elysées was not condoned by those who planned Sunday’s march. Participants, whom organisers claim numbered nearly one-and-a-half million (police estimates were closer to 300,000) were urged to avoid places designated as off-limits by police and to shun all violence.

“Making sure everyone is safe is an enormous responsibility, and our first priority,” Tugdual Derville, a spokesman for the anti-gay marriage camp, told FRANCE 24. He blamed the police for confining the massive rally to an inadequately small area, while admitting that “marginal” groups had allowed frustrations to get the best of them.

Gay-marriage opponents claim revolutionary mantle

© AFP Opponents of a law legalising same-sex marriage have staged some of France's largest-ever rallies. Confronted with an obstinate government, some have adopted a more combative strategy and a new highly charged moniker: the "French Spring". By Joseph BAMAT (text)

This week French news channels widely broadcast scenes of anti-riot police repelling protesters from barricades and dispersing rebellious teens along Paris’s iconic Champs-Elysées. Sunday’s clashes might have been written off as mundane in France, a country used to union strikes and left-wing activism, but this time it was religious conservatives receiving mouthfuls of pepper spray.

Confronted by a Socialist Party-led government unwilling to backtrack on its efforts to legalise marriage and adoption for same-sex couples, and polls showing the law's growing acceptance among the French, certain opponents of gay marriage are opting for a more combative tone and strategy. Some have started calling their movement the “French Spring”, referring to the regime-toppling Arab uprisings of recent years.

“We get the impression that marches gathering thousands of people were for nothing, that a petition that gathered 700,000 signatures was for nothing, and that the debate in parliament was extremely one-sided,” said Béatrice Bourges, a leader of the anti-gay marriage camp, who proudly brandishes the new label “French Spring”.

PORTRAIT

FRANCE In French gay marriage debate, a political star is born Known as the Taubira law in France, after Justice Minister Christiane Taubira, the marriage equality bill has been approved in the lower-house National Assembly and is expected to sail through the Senate next week. But opponents, a mix of traditional Catholics and far-right groups, promise to keep fighting a law they say will fundamentally weaken French society.

Sunday’s clashes broke out when some protesters attending the march against the law tried to flout a ban on demonstrating on the Champs-Elysées. They were hit with batons and doused with Mace as they tried to cross police lines. Others who succeeded in reaching the famous avenue were forcibly removed by security forces.

Somewhere amidst the disorder, the 69-year-old leader of France’s Christian Democratic Party Christine Boutin inadvertently wound up with a taste of police pepper spray, too. That event prompted a call from right-wing circles for the resignation of Interior Minister Manuel Valls, who is in charge of French police forces.

Béatrice Bourges told FRANCE 24 that a dozen lawsuits had been filed against the prefect by “victims” of the clashes, and more were likely to follow.

The making of a showdown

The invasion of the Champs-Elysées was not condoned by those who planned Sunday’s march. Participants, whom organisers claim numbered nearly one-and-a-half million (police estimates were closer to 300,000) were urged to avoid places designated as off-limits by police and to shun all violence.

“Making sure everyone is safe is an enormous responsibility, and our first priority,” Tugdual Derville, a spokesman for the anti-gay marriage camp, told FRANCE 24. He blamed the police for confining the massive rally to an inadequately small area, while admitting that “marginal” groups had allowed frustrations to get the best of them.

ANTI-GAY-MARRIAGE TEENS TRAIN FOR 'OCCUPATION'

However, the decision to defy police orders was hardly a spontaneous reaction to overcrowding. A vocal faction of the anti-gay marriage movement, including certain high-profile leaders like Bourges and Boutin, had encouraged the idea in the week leading up to the event -- and even while tempers were spilling over on Sunday.

Judging by emails circulated among Catholic parish groups (leaked to Le Monde daily), public messages on websites, and videos posted on the Internet, it is clear that the intent of the unauthorised invasion was to occupy the Champs-Elysées, a stone’s throw away from the Elysée Palace, President François Hollande’s official residence.

A video posted on YouTube ten days before the march urged participants to “occupy” the iconic avenue, showing teens training for the crucial moment with tents and camping supplies. The clip ends with a montage of pictures from key popular movements of the 20th century, including the Egyptian revolutionaries camped in Tahrir Square in 2011 and the “Indignados” occupying Madrid’s Plaza del Sol in 2012.

“The reference to the Arab Spring comes from the shared experiences of resistance,” said Bourges, who said President Hollande had been elected democratically but was choosing to “disregard all those who disagree with him.”

A diverse group, but also divided?

The comparison between France’s energetic anti-gay marriage movement and the Arab Spring and Occupy movements were promptly dismissed by voices on both sides of the fence.

“It is clearly a false comparison and usurpation of the term. The Arab Spring and the Indignados are emancipation movements by people who want access to civil rights and liberties, ” said Thomas Coutrot, spokesman for Attac, a left-leaning NGO that backs global social movements.

“These are people who want to bar homosexuals from attaining the same rights other members of society already enjoy,” he told FRANCE 24.

Even conservatives are at odds over the term “French Spring”, and the new push toward civil disobedience appeared to be creating a schism within France’s anti-gay-marriage movement in the wake of Sunday’s clashes. Tugdual Derville said the mainstream anti-gay-marriage movement did not own up to the name.

“We’ve grown to become a very large and diverse movement. The radicalisation among some is due to the frustration, the injustice people feel when they are not respected and their opinions are cast aside,” he offered as a reason for the new, hard-line approach espoused by some of his fellow activists.

Derville said that since Sunday, Bourges had been stripped of her role as a spokesperson for the movement because she had promoted the unsanctioned move to storm the Champs-Elysées, putting the security of protesters and others at risk.

Bourges tried to play down the decision to demote her. “It doesn’t bother me. I can’t be the spokesperson of everything,” she said in reference as her new, prominent role at the head of the "French Spring".

Despite their diverging views on how to move their campaign forward, both Derville and Bourges appear to be as determined as ever. As French gay and lesbian couples begin making wedding plans, the two activists must decide if theirs is a marriage worth saving.

by Anonymousreply 4403/29/2013

Check out this interview about how this French porn star came out as gay. Interesting reaction from friends and family, especially the father.

by Anonymousreply 4504/02/2013

[quote]Interesting reaction from friends and family, especially the father.

What's so interesting about it? Seems pretty ordinary to me.

by Anonymousreply 4604/02/2013

Ordinary for a father to say it would have been better to hear his son had been killed, r46? Where do you live?

by Anonymousreply 4704/06/2013
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