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Study Shows That Bee Venom Can Kill HIV & Hepatitis B, C & Cancer Cells

A recent study published in the current issue of Antiviral Therapy reports that nanoparticles loaded with a toxin, melittin, found in bee venom, can destroy HIV while leaving nearby normal cells unharmed. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, have shown that this toxin can can poke holes through the outer protective shell of HIV and other viruses like hepatitis B, C, and has also been shown to be effective against tumor cells.

Joshua L. Hood, MD, PhD, a research instructor in medicine said “Our hope is that in places where HIV is running rampant, people could use this gel as a preventive measure to stop the initial infection.” Scientists say it could be used to develop a vaginal/anal gel that prevents the spread of HIV during intercourse. The Melittin therapy could also be applied to treat existing HIV infections, especially ones that have become drug-resistant. The nanoparticles could be injected intravenously and, in theory, would be able to clear HIV from the blood stream according to the study.

Read more at the link

by Anonymousreply 5904/04/2013

I always thought that the cure to illnesses like this would be something super simple and accessible to everyone.

by Anonymousreply 103/09/2013

I'm leaving right now for Steamworks with a bee in my bathhouse bonnet.

by Anonymousreply 203/09/2013

I have always loved Bees, I am pleased to love them even more. It's amazing that a brain collective specie may be the solution to one of our most frightening diseases.

by Anonymousreply 403/09/2013

Aren't bees mysteriously disappearing and everyone is freaking because they do a huge majority of pollinating?

by Anonymousreply 603/09/2013

Our bees must be scared to death!

by Anonymousreply 803/09/2013

Why isn't this big news?

by Anonymousreply 903/09/2013

Call me crazy, but I think this is old news for certain high profile people.

by Anonymousreply 1003/09/2013

r9, How many other great discoveries have fizzled out in clinical trials. HIV has been cured many times in petri dish.

by Anonymousreply 1103/09/2013

Irony of ironies, just when the venom vaccine will be(e) developed, we will have destroyed all the bees with our toxic destruction of the environment.

by Anonymousreply 1203/09/2013

That's what I used. Yeah, that's the ticket. bees.yeah.

by Anonymousreply 1303/09/2013

I welcome the Bees as our new insect overlords.

by Anonymousreply 1403/09/2013

Would be great if true.

Can it do the same for herpes and HPV?

by Anonymousreply 1503/09/2013

Told ya I was hardcore!

by Anonymousreply 1603/09/2013

"Just let me stick this up in there and I can also cure your cervical cancer."

by Anonymousreply 1703/09/2013

I'm allergic to bees.

The world is my oyster and I'm allergic to shellfish.

by Anonymousreply 1803/09/2013

"It'll signal a return to the 70s, with increased partners and barebacking, which will make us all susceptible to the next plague, which could be even more lethal."

Thank you, Larry Kramer.

by Anonymousreply 1903/09/2013

Expect Pat Robertson to denounce Bees as tools of the devil on his next show.

by Anonymousreply 2003/09/2013

They're BEE-vil!

by Anonymousreply 2103/09/2013

[quote] It'll signal a return to the 70s, with increased partners and barebacking, which will make us all susceptible to the next plague, which could be even more lethal.

For fuck's sake, another DL nervous nelly filled with worries and doubts -- and not an iota of knowledge of historical patterns of infectious disease.

by Anonymousreply 2203/09/2013

I'd be surprised because cancer research has been going on for more than 50 years and I'm relatively sure they've tried out all manner of venoms.

by Anonymousreply 2303/09/2013

Why are bees in decline? Modern pesticides and other environmental pollutants, which interfere with bees being able to find the flowers, and harm bees physically as well, as they uptake harmful substances into their bodies.

The more technology advances and fucks with nature (and the more we run far away from all that is natural), the more we get fucked in return.

Here's one thing. The chemicals we pump into the air coats flowers. Bees close to factories or highly polluted areas can no longer smell their way to a flower needing pollination (or at least not as well - depends on level of pollution). They then have to use sight, which is not their first language, so to speak.

by Anonymousreply 2403/09/2013

If Big Pharm finds out bees are worth money, they'll find a way to cultivate them in large numbers.

by Anonymousreply 2503/09/2013

Im gonna start using burts bees wax

by Anonymousreply 2603/09/2013

U think they will combine lube with this bee venom gel?

by Anonymousreply 2703/10/2013

Bees are dying though

by Anonymousreply 2803/10/2013

[quote]Aren't bees mysteriously disappearing and everyone is freaking because they do a huge majority of pollinating?

It's not a mystery why they're disappearing. BAYER is responsible for their demise. When Bayer's insecticide "Gaucho" was banned in France, their bee population bounced right back. Of course it's still legal here in the US. You can learn more by watching the documentary Vanishing of the Bees. OH--and boycott all things Bayer! Bayer is a horrific, Nazi company.

by Anonymousreply 2903/10/2013

[quote] It'll signal a return to the 70s, with increased partners and barebacking, which will make us all susceptible to the next plague, which could be even more lethal.

I am too young to have been around during the 70s but everyone I know (despite their sensitivity to gay rights vis-a-vis marriage equality) has many different partners and many do this openly despite the fact that they are in long term relationships. And I've found that those who abhor it are usually full of it.

So I don't think it will signal a return to the 70s, I don't think men enjoying random fucking ever went away.

And I hate to say it but barebacking is on the rise too.

Most people under 30 think this will be cured in their lifetime.

by Anonymousreply 3003/10/2013

I am so glad that at 51, I just made the cut of your judgemental bullshit, r31.

In any case, I'll believe this miracle cure as soon as my HIV is cured. Till then, it might as well be snake oil.

by Anonymousreply 3203/10/2013

"Bee" is such a cute name for such a scary little insect.

by Anonymousreply 3303/10/2013

There should be a separate "Deserved It" AIDS Quilt to keep this guttersluts away from all the innocent victims on the original one, right r31. Like the poor folks who got it in the '90s, back when we didn't know how it was transmitted.

by Anonymousreply 3403/10/2013


thats a new one!

by Anonymousreply 3503/10/2013


by Anonymousreply 3603/10/2013

I hope you're joking, R35.

by Anonymousreply 3703/10/2013

If my lawn becomes invaded with clover one summer, will there be less clover the next summer? I keep hearing that clover is good for the soil, but I get so much clover by the end of the summer....

by Anonymousreply 3803/10/2013

It would be super good if the venom that worked was killer bee venom and not honey bee venom. There is no good use for killer bees and there is for honey bees. And I'm sure the venom could be used in small doses so it's not a threat.

by Anonymousreply 3903/10/2013

R3 has a point that shouldn't be dismissed. A point that should in no way diminish the optimism which this news brings. Safe sex has great value beyond the risk of hiv. There are other dangers, known, and, more to OP"s point, possibly unknown.

by Anonymousreply 4003/10/2013

I'm sorry, back in the *90s* you didn't know how it was transmitted? Oh, you have GOT to be fucking kidding me. I was a second-grader in 1993 and I knew what AIDS was and how not to contract it.

Willful ignorance on your part.

by Anonymousreply 4103/10/2013

Bea venom is even more lethal.

by Anonymousreply 4203/10/2013

Killer bees and ordinary honeybees are no different in their venom. The only difference is in their behavior. The so-called "killer bees" are more aggressive, but their sting is the same.

by Anonymousreply 4303/10/2013

If this seems so easy to do why didn't they test it on humans before making the announcement?

At least the announcement itself seems so positive that a lot of other researchers will probably rush to duplicate it and hopefully some major progress will be made soon.

by Anonymousreply 4403/10/2013

If you hit a killer bee hive with a stick and let them sting you, would you get the same benefits? It seems like you would.

by Anonymousreply 4503/10/2013

I think the sting would be too localized on the body and not travel in the blood stream in such large amounts where it could interact with the HIV cells.

It's kind of confusing reading some of the articles saying they're mostly using it as a gel as a preventative measure and not to inject into someone's bloodstream to cure.

by Anonymousreply 4603/10/2013

It would be amazing if indeed it was so simple. Not totally surprising though. Life can be like this.

I know it's a ridiculously obvious thing to say, but I would love to see a cure before I died. It's been around since I was 19 years old and now I'm almost fifty and I lost so many people from my life.

by Anonymousreply 4703/10/2013

In the article, it says an infected person would be treated with IV infusions, but I don't see why it wouldn't work orally, too. Just mix that shit up with some orange juice and drink it.

by Anonymousreply 4803/10/2013

I'm going to run around my yard naked, covered in clover and dandelions .... come and get me, you busy little bees.

by Anonymousreply 4903/10/2013

This is absolutely incredible, but i wonder if it will turn out to be a cure?

by Anonymousreply 5003/13/2013

R50 Seems like more of a prevention tool or treatment

by Anonymousreply 5103/13/2013

Fuck the bees!

Bayer removed Di-Syston from the US market due to the motherfucking bees. It was about the only thing that will kill spider mites on gardenias. (Most insecticides don't work on mites.)

I'm using another Bayer product on the gardenias but it's a messy spray and less effective. Di-Syston granules went directly into the soil and worked systemically.

by Anonymousreply 5203/13/2013

That's it... from now on I prelube with honey!

by Anonymousreply 5303/13/2013

I think the bee dna will be bad for people's bodies and they will start shitting honey.

by Anonymousreply 5403/13/2013

R54 That just cracked me up

by Anonymousreply 5503/18/2013

The headlines should read, "Honey Pot Saves Honey Pot"

by Anonymousreply 5603/18/2013

Gay date nights will now require bee venom suppositories for when the sexy time starts!

by Anonymousreply 5703/18/2013

Honey badger don't give a shit!

by Anonymousreply 5803/18/2013

More promising news

Possible Path to Vaccine for AIDS Is Suggested By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Published: April 3, 2013

In what may be an important step toward a long-elusive AIDS vaccine, American researchers have minutely tracked one person’s powerful immune response to the virus to see how a series of mutations led to an antibody that can defeat many H.I.V. strains.

A vaccine still remains far off, but the research lighted up one complex path that may someday be followed to that distant goal.

Thirty-four million people in the world are H.I.V.-positive, and 2.5 million are newly infected each year, 50,000 of them in this country.

“The beauty of this is that it’s a big clue as to the sequential steps the virus and the antibody take as they evolve,” said Dr.Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which financed the research.

The study was led by scientists at Duke University and also drew in researchers from Columbia, Stanford, the University of Pennsylvania and elsewhere. It was published online Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Scientists have so far failed to produce an AIDS vaccine because H.I.V. mutates so rapidly. Influenza viruses mutate so often that flu shots must be reformulated every year; H.I.V. mutates in one day as much as flu viruses do in a year.

The study analyzed many sequential samples of the blood of one African man from shortly after he was infected until about two years later, when he started to produce “broadly neutralizing antibodies.” Antibodies are Y-shaped proteins that neutralize virus particles by grabbing onto all the surface receptors they use to attach to cells. The antibodies the patient eventually evolved were called “broadly neutralizing” because they were able to jam up about 55 percent of all known H.I.V. strains.

Scientists have been isolating broadly neutralizing antibodies for several years now, and more than a dozen have been found.

About 20 percent of all H.I.V. carriers eventually produce broadly neutralizing antibodies, Dr. Fauci said. But that usually happens only after they have been infected for between two and four years, and by that time the powerful antibodies cannot save them because they are overwhelmed with so much mutating virus.

In theory, if such antibodies could be cloned in bulk, a cocktail of enough variants to match all known H.I.V. strains could be given to newly infected patients. That is the equivalent of an immune globulin shot, which was once the only treatment for some diseases, like hepatitis.

But it would be very expensive, and the treatment would have to be given for life. And antiretroviral drugs, which cost pennies to make, do the same thing: prevent the virus from replicating.

However, if a healthy patient could be given a vaccine that would induce his own white blood cells to produce the same cocktail of antibodies, they might knock out any infection that patient got later.

Because the cells that produce antibodies have to go through up to 100 mutations before they make broadly neutralizing ones, Dr. Fauci said, a vaccine to induce that would require many shots, given month after month, to “push” the cells through those mutations. Whether that is possible, let along financially practical, remains to be seen.

Other H.I.V. vaccine experts reacted cautiously to the research, saying it was first-rate work but hedging on its practical implications.

Dr. Louis J. Picker, an H.I.V. vaccine specialist at Oregon Health & Science University, described the work as “a road map to vaccine development, yes — but it’s like one of those maps of the world from the year 1400. We still don’t know how to turn this into a vaccine.”

Dr. Mike McCune III, head of experimental medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, called it “clarifying science, with a lot of data I hadn’t seen before.”

But he said it was not clear if one patient’s immune process could be applied to others.

“Eighty percent of all patients don’t create broadly neutralizing antibodies,” he said. “What do we do for them? Do we know how protective this strategy is against new infections? And would we have to tailor-make batches of vaccine for people with different backgrounds?”

by Anonymousreply 5904/04/2013
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