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When someone get Political Asylum...how do they live?

Who supports them?

I remember a while back when I was a little kid Russians would 'defect' and we took them in.

Did they come with fat bank accounts?

Did we give them assistance?

Anyone know how this works, here and elsewhere?

by Anonymousreply 1403/08/2013

Someone on DL must know...you guys know everything.

by Anonymousreply 103/08/2013

In the US I believe that it makes them available for public assistance, once they officially start the asylum process. It's probably the same in other Western countries as well.

by Anonymousreply 203/08/2013

Well, in The Psychopath Test, the author mentioned on Haitian death squad leader, Toto Constant, who was living in the use. I assumed it was political Asylum. But, he was working in the mortgage industry while in the US (and was convicted of mortgage fraud.) So, based upon that, I believe that they may receive a stipend, but largely support themselves. ... that is all I have.

by Anonymousreply 303/08/2013

In the US, while you are in the process, you get some kind of ID/temporary working permit that allows you to work legally.

by Anonymousreply 403/08/2013

In addition to public assistance, as R2 said, there are many charities which provide assistance to political refugees.

by Anonymousreply 503/08/2013

I have known a few people who have political asylum. How do they support themselves? They get jobs like anyone else. Political asylum is just another way to get resident alien status (aka a green card).

It is pretty tough to have asylum. You are not allowed to contact family or anyone in your homeland ever for the rest of your life.

So many who qualify for asylum don't seek it and try to get their green card other ways. Working in restaurants with their native cuisine or working in businesses that do business in their native language are the most common ways.

by Anonymousreply 603/08/2013

[quote] It is pretty tough to have asylum. You are not allowed to contact family or anyone in your homeland ever for the rest of your life.

That's bullshit. You're talking about what happens when the government puts someone in the witness protection program. That has nothing to do with political asylum.

by Anonymousreply 703/08/2013

[quote]It is pretty tough to have asylum. You are not allowed to contact family or anyone in your homeland ever for the rest of your life.

Bullshit.

by Anonymousreply 803/08/2013

R8 is confusing asylum with witness protection.

by Anonymousreply 903/08/2013

It is similar to receiving a Green Card. They can start the application process for citizenship, but it does make them eligible for public assistance. No fat bank account at all.

I am a teacher, and I taught a student from Eritrea recently. He lived with his aunt and her family in southern Virginia.

by Anonymousreply 1003/08/2013

I was told by two people that the reason they chose not to seek asylum was that they would not be able to be in touch with family back home.

It is not like witness protection at all, in that one does not change ones name or identity. In fact, many of these people who had asylum were public about their status and the reasons they left their native countries.

The one who was the best known however turned down offers to write about his work back home and the cultural conditions there since he was afraid that any connection to him could endanger people in his native land.

So maybe the ban on being in touch was not a government imposition but rather a choice to keep those back home safe.

by Anonymousreply 1103/08/2013

If they are Cuban they get taken care of; otherwise, they are on their own.

by Anonymousreply 1203/08/2013

One of my friends got here from Iran in the 1980s and was hired to teach at a college. However, it took six months to get the paperwork done so he could get a green card--which meant he could not be paid for his first half year. Administrative assistants gave him food and other people helped him. But it was tough.

But there is no government program for political exiles.

by Anonymousreply 1303/08/2013

They do what 'mos do, get AIDS then leech of the government teat.

by Anonymousreply 1403/08/2013
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