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Do you think Obama is doing a good job as president?

Read the title. Discuss.

by Anonymousreply 6903/10/2013

For gays he's doing spectacular!!!

by Anonymousreply 603/05/2013

I didn't read the title. I just couldn't.

by Anonymousreply 703/05/2013

I disagree R5. Heartily.

by Anonymousreply 803/05/2013

Yes, Obama is doing an excellent job in his second term.

by Anonymousreply 903/06/2013

No but he's doing better than the country deserves, frankly.

by Anonymousreply 1003/06/2013

Of course he is, but that's not why you're asking.

Just know we know.

by Anonymousreply 1103/06/2013

That Business Insider link conveniently leaves out the fact that Congress went on a 16 vacation right before the sequester went into effect.

Democrats put forth a plan in the Senate. Filibustered by the Republicans even though it would have passed. The Republican plan failed but they were allowed to vote on it.

No, it's not both sides.

by Anonymousreply 1203/06/2013

Considering he's damn near rightwing, sure.

by Anonymousreply 1303/06/2013

I don't get the republican hatred...race is the only logical reason...

...And there was a suspicious lack of golf-related legislation from Gohmert when his own party took the opportunity to laud their own victory in the taxpayer-funded Congressional Challenge Cup...

by Anonymousreply 1403/06/2013

I work for the federal government, and since he's been president out pay has been frozen (despite inflation) and we're now facing a 22-day furlough. Times have been rough under Obama and I no longer feel he gives a fuck about anyone but his 1% cronies. Still, I don't believe things wouldve been better under McCain or Romney.

I guess I just feel Obama is in way over his head and his biggest sin is trying to pretend to be this guy who genuinely cares about others. He and Michelle have theirs so duck everyone else, right?

by Anonymousreply 1503/06/2013


by Anonymousreply 1603/06/2013

Not so much, r15, you probably wouldn't even have a job with a rethuglican prez. Your part of the problem in rethuglican logic, you're the bloated government that they want to eliminate. Yet, they forget, you are an employed,human being. Doesn't matter, your elimination is the means to their end. Scorched earth for the 99.9 % .Then the rich and their bought politicians will inherit all of the scorched earth.

Democratic politicians are not all guileless, however, rethuglicans are overwhelmingly so.

by Anonymousreply 1703/06/2013

Remember how Clinton made Newt look bad for shutting down the government? The GOP is starting to make Obama look foolish for the Sequester

by Anonymousreply 2103/06/2013

However, this isn't attributable.

by Anonymousreply 2203/06/2013

I don't think he knows how to handle the GOP attacks and stonewalling. That has been his weakest point. The American people do not seem to know the extent of his accomplishments because he has allowed the GOP to control the narrative. Even thought he economy is improving the national debt has been going down, I seriously doubt most American know this. As it stands, his approval rating is 43% and the people are blaming Obama/Democrats and GOP in equal measure.

I wish he governed the way he campaigns.

by Anonymousreply 2303/06/2013

The Repubs are not afraid of him. That means he's not doing the kind of job he should be doing.

by Anonymousreply 2403/06/2013

Yes, the MSM would like the public to believe that all the crap the GOP causes is Obama's fault. He is doing a good job in spite of everything.

by Anonymousreply 2503/06/2013

Meh . . .

by Anonymousreply 2603/06/2013

Fucking republiturds will let our rating slide again, just for political posturing. Sick shits.

by Anonymousreply 2703/06/2013

Obama is not much of a leader on so many issues, but he's better than any Repug. He has squandered so much time trying to form a consensus with the Repugs. It took Obama a long time to get it through his thick head that they are not going to compromise with him.

by Anonymousreply 2803/07/2013

He was trying to reach out to Republicans and he gets criticized for that and when he isn't kissing their asses, the media says he's too aloof and he needs to bow down to their wishes. He can't win. R27 is right, nothing Obama has done merits the kind of criticism he gets. The Republicans are damn near TREASONOUS and Obama takes most of the blame for them not coming around. They will never come around because they don't give a fuck.

by Anonymousreply 2903/07/2013

This Isn't Hard, Mr. President: Do You Think You Can Kill Us on American Soil or Not

by Anonymousreply 3003/07/2013

he better keep doing a good job to pave way for another democrat in 2016. Shit like Bush left behind need some years of fixing.

by Anonymousreply 3103/07/2013

How can he get things done with a Congress that would rather see him fail than see the country collectively succeed? That's treasonous. It's terrible that we have lawmakers who want to stifle progress because the President doesn't share their same political party or skin complexion. Oh yeah, that has lots to do with the obstructionism. The formation of the Tea Party is about the preservation of white privilege and you're a fool to think otherwise. I thought the GOP couldnt get any more obstructionist in the Clinton years but the past 4 years have proven me wrong. It's egregiously disgusting and pathetic.

by Anonymousreply 3203/07/2013

Actually, what probably is more egregiously disgusting and pathetic is the fact that Obama is STILL willing to bend over backwards for those GOP bastards. That just makes it even worse. It sickens me to my stomach. American politics is such bullshit. It's all theater and gang mentality politics. The citizenry is dumb as fuck, the media and what counts as journalism these days is tragic, the politicians are despicable, & the corporations are insanely sinister per usual. We are in the age of information but are more ignorant than ever. Rant over I guess.

by Anonymousreply 3303/07/2013

We needed a kick ass LBJ to get the US back on track after Bush. Obama is too wussy, and would have made a better VP than President.

by Anonymousreply 3403/07/2013

Obama is not the problem, it's the destructive obstructionist GOP. They need to be voted out.

by Anonymousreply 3503/07/2013

[quote]This Isn't Hard, Mr. President: Do You Think You Can Kill Us on American Soil or Not

And I would like an answer to the question--and would appreciate another grandstanding teaparty filibuster--to the question: Mr. President, do you think you're entitled to rape our grandmothers while wearing a Donald Duck mask and eating Girl Scout cookies?

by Anonymousreply 3603/07/2013

[quote]We needed a kick ass LBJ to get the US back on track after Bush. Obama is too wussy, and would have made a better VP than President.

Secretary of Education -- he could have been the black guy who wagged his finger and told kids to stay in school.

by Anonymousreply 3803/08/2013

Yes, pretty awesome, considering the situation.

by Anonymousreply 3903/08/2013

Fuck NO

by Anonymousreply 4003/08/2013

[quote]he's doing spectacular!!!

Oh, dear.

by Anonymousreply 4103/08/2013

Now he's actually meeting with the Republican leaders. Perhaps he's also calling members of his own party and establishing relationships with them too?

CONGRATULATIONS. Obama is finally doing the other half of his job -- what he should have been doing four years ago at the start of his admin. He hates it, but it's part of the job.

by Anonymousreply 4203/08/2013


he has a lot of room for improvement but yes.

by Anonymousreply 4303/08/2013

The Society for the Preservation of the Adverb would point out that you must have meant to say 'spectacularly' rather than 'spectacular'.

by Anonymousreply 4403/08/2013

The Sequester hit Obama's number in the polls.

by Anonymousreply 4503/08/2013

[italic]Society for the preservation of the adverb.

Oh dear.[/italic]

"My German's not real good."

-Barack Obama

by Anonymousreply 4603/08/2013

[quote]He was trying to reach out to Republicans and he gets criticized for that and when he isn't kissing their asses, the media says he's too aloof and he needs to bow down to their wishes. He can't win.

Yes, he can. He needs to tell the Right to go fuck themselves, and do the right thing. The end result will be better.

by Anonymousreply 4703/08/2013

The drones fiasco is really a problem for him, and it should be. Even liberals are outraged. It's very frightening. Obama is the biggest hawk around, which is ironic since that was the excuse liberals use for not voting for Hillary: she's too hawkish. Obama has given the Pentagon everything they've wanted, escalated wars, didn't shut Gito, etc. The drones are the last straw. I am glad he's not starting a war with North Korea or Iran like the Neocons want though -- at least not yet.

by Anonymousreply 4803/08/2013

R48. Give him time

by Anonymousreply 4903/08/2013

Here is how a pro does it --

Obama is not a pro, just a prole that makes too many feel all gushy inside:

It was on this day in 1933 that newly inaugurated President Franklin D. Roosevelt called a special session of Congress and began the first hundred days of enacting his New Deal legislation. For the next several months, bills were passed almost daily, beginning with the Emergency Banking Act, followed by federal programs such as the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps, the Public Works Administration, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.

As part of the New Deal's cultural programs, grouped together as Federal One, the Roosevelt administration created the Federal Writers' Project, which employed more than 6,600 out-of-work writers, editors, and researchers — among them Zora Neale Hurston, John Cheever, Saul Bellow, Richard Wright, Studs Terkel, and Ralph Ellison — and paid them subsistence wages of around $20 a week. The main occupation of the Federal Writers' Project was the American Guides Series. There was an American Guide for each of the existing states of the time, as well as Alaska, Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, and several major cities and highways. Not mere travel guidebooks, they were also collections of essays on various subjects from geography and history to architecture and commerce.

In addition to the American Guides Series, the FWP collected the life histories of more than 10,000 Americans. Under the direction of folklore editor Benjamin A. Botkin, the FWP writers interviewed people of all socioeconomic, racial, and cultural backgrounds. Botkin, like many intellectuals of the period, was deeply disturbed by the growing Fascist movement in Europe, and wanted to promote tolerance and pluralism at home. He saw the collection and publication of these life histories as a way to do that.

Perhaps the FWP's most valuable contribution to American history and culture was the collection of the first-person accounts of more than 2,300 former slaves, which were assembled and microfilmed in 1941 as the 17-volume "Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews with Former Slaves."

by Anonymousreply 5003/09/2013

He's doing a fantastic job.

More jobs.

Stock market at record high.

Terrorists are being killed or brought to justice.

Out of Iraq.

Getting out of Afghanistan.

Gay rights.

Women's rights strengthened.

Good Supreme Court choices.

And the hits just keep on coming.

by Anonymousreply 5103/09/2013

Indeed, R51!

by Anonymousreply 5203/09/2013

[quote]He's doing a fantastic job.

Deluded fan gurl

[quote]More jobs.

The sort of jobs that are keeping illegals from returning to Mexico

[quote]Stock market at record high.

With printed money

[quote]Terrorists are being killed or brought to justice.

Along with all those wedding parties

[quote]Out of Iraq.

We were thrown out

[quote]Getting out of Afghanistan.

Except for the ten divisions that will be left behind for "security."

[quote]Gay rights.

Better late than 2009.

[quote]Women's rights strengthened.

Better late than 2009.

[quote]Good Supreme Court choices.

Pro-business Centrists in minority skin -- just like O

[quote]And the hits just keep on coming.

And they break the already rotting infrastructure.

by Anonymousreply 5303/09/2013

You mad, R53?

by Anonymousreply 5403/09/2013

r53, from where you sit the glass is clearly a quarter empty, not three-quarters full. I didn't say he'd done a perfect job. For some of you, perfection is the standard against which this President is held. You expect nothing less and anything less is complete failure. Alas, dear girls, President Obama has indeed fallen short of perfection, and, sadly, he will continue to do so. I trust you judge your accomplishments at your job and in your life as you do the President.

How are you doing?

by Anonymousreply 5503/09/2013

Nope, but I think he is doing a better job than what Romney would have done.

My chief complaints are (a) executive power abuses (b) immoral illogical and counter productive budget policies and (c) utter failure to address global warming.

I feel like he and the other Democrats are pink, black, brown and yellow washing their lousy unpopular pro-Wall Street policies. They mastered the PR challenge for Wall Street: getting gays, women, blacks, latins, and asians to support economic and other public policies that will crush us.

by Anonymousreply 5603/09/2013

We just bailed out Wall Street again. Obama does make extremely stupid choices when it comes to choosing those to surround himself with. He's repeating the Bush administration's fuck ups in that department.

by Anonymousreply 5703/09/2013

"Defense chief Chuck Hagel in Afghanistan: 'We're still at war'"

Chuck Hagel arrived in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Friday for his first trip there as the secretary of defense, saying, "We're still at war."

On the flight over, Hagel gave a short press briefing to set up the visit, saying that he was traveling to Afghanistan to thank the troops serving there and to better understand "where we are in Afghanistan."

Hagel would not talk specifics about the pace of U.S. troop drawdown through the end of 2014, saying that the president has not made his decision yet.

Asked whether he's concerned that the U.S. has forgotten about the war in Afghanistan, Hagel said, "I can't speak for the American people, or where we are on attention spans, but I would tell you now as the secretary of defense who has some responsibility for assuring that this transition be conducted responsibly, that we're still at war."

"We're still at war in Afghanistan," he later reiterated.

Then Hagel gave a somewhat convoluted reason for why the U.S. is at war there, saying the U.S. sought "to give the Afghan people an opportunity for their country, their people, to be free of terrorists and a government that was very hostile to what was going on in the neighborhood, and certainly as an effect of what happened September 11, 2001." He added that "I think we need to follow through the reasons we first went there, what we have tried to do."

Hagel said that it "was never the intention of the United States to stay in Afghanistan indefinitely," but then added that the U.S. still has "troops in a different capacity in South Korea, troops in Europe, Okinawa." Asked whether the war is reminiscent of Vietnam, Hagel said, "The only thing I would say is the world we live in today is so complicated. And we have to factor that into our policies and everything that we do. And I think that, that speaks for itself, that complicated world that we live in."

Finally, asked about the recent North Korean threats, Hagel said that "the United States of America and our allies are prepared to deal with any threat, and any reality that occurs in the world."

He added, "We are aware of what's going on. We have partnerships in that part of the world that are important, and I think that -- that that reality is --- is clear, and that's what we will -- will continue to do."

by Anonymousreply 5803/09/2013

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — On a morning the stock market was sailing to a record high and a chilly storm was blowing into Silicon Valley, Wendy Carle stuck her head out of the tent she calls home to find city workers duct taping an eviction notice to her flimsy, flapping shelter walls.

"I have no idea where I'm going to go," she said, tugging on her black sweatshirt over her brown curls and scooping up Hero, an albino dog.

She glanced at the glimmering windows on a cluster of high-tech office buildings just blocks away and shook her head.

"Did you know Google shares hit $840 each this morning?" she asked. "I just heard that on the radio."

Carle, who did not want to give her age, used to manage apartments. Today she lives on a Supplemental Security Income disability payment of $826 a month due to back and joint problems.

The Silicon Valley is adding jobs faster than it has in more than a decade as the tech industry roars back. Stocks are soaring and fortunes are once again on the rise.

But a bleaker record is also being set this year: Food stamp participation just hit a 10-year high, homelessness rose 20 percent in two years, and the average income for Hispanics, who make up one in four Silicon Valley residents, fell to a new low of about $19,000 a year— capping a steady 14 percent drop over the past five years, according to the annual Silicon Valley Index released by Joint Venture Silicon Valley, representing businesses, and the philanthropic Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

Simply put, while the ultra-rich are getting even richer, record numbers of Silicon Valley residents are slipping into poverty.

"In the midst of a national economic recovery led by Silicon Valley's resurgence, as measured by corporate profits and record stock prices, something strange is going on in the Valley itself. Most people are getting poorer," said Cindy Chavez, executive director of San Jose-based Working Partnerships USA, a nonprofit advocating for affordable housing, higher minimum wages and access to health care.

Nowhere is this growing disparity more obvious than this sprawling and trash-strewn 28-acre tent city that authorities are trying to clean out. Beneath the sweeping shadow and roar of jets soaring in and out of nearby San Jose's international airport, residents here say times are so tight they have nowhere else to turn.

"This is the most ridiculous place ever," said Kristina Erbenich, 38, clambering onto her bike, a heavy pack on her back. The former chef said she spent $14,000 on hotel rooms before her savings ran out. "If everyone around here is so rich, why can't they do something to help?"

United Way Silicon Valley CEO Carole Leigh Hutton wonders the same thing.

"How is it that in an area so very rich, we have so many people so very poor? Why can't we break that cycle? With all the brain power in the Silicon Valley, we should be able to solve these problems. But what we need is the collective will."

The causes for the growing disparity are complex, but largely come down to one thing: a very high cost of living. The median home price is $550,000, and rents average just under $2,000 a month for a two-bedroom apartment in this region that is home to many of the nation's wealthiest companies including Facebook, Apple Inc., Hewlett-Packard Co. and Google. For a family of four, just covering basic needs like rent, food, childcare and transportation comes to almost $90,000 a year, according to the nonprofit Insight Center for Community Economic Development.

"The fact is that we have an economy now that's working well only for those at the very top," said Lawrence Mishel at the Economic Policy Institute in Washington D.C. "Unless we adopt a new approach to economic policy, we're going to continue going down this path, which means growth that does not really benefit the great majority of people in this country."

by Anonymousreply 5903/10/2013

Nationally, Mishel says the declining value of the federal minimum wage is a major factor driving inequality. On Monday, in an effort to address this, minimum hourly wages will rise from $8 per hour to a new minimum of $10 per hour, the nation's largest minimum wage increase approved by voters last fall. While it's a dramatic shift for tens of thousands of workers, it's a minuscule fraction of the increases top earners in the region enjoyed last year.

Silicon Valley's top tech magnates inched up the Forbes annual list of the richest people on the planet released this week: Oracle Corp. CEO Larry Ellison had a reported net worth of $43 billion, Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin had about $23 billion each, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, was worth an estimated $13.3 billion, and Laurene Powell Jobs, widow of Apple Inc. co-founder Steve Jobs, had an estimated worth of $10.7 billion.

"The wealth numbers are staggering, they are absolutely staggering," said Alf Nucifora, who chairs the Luxury Marketing Council of San Francisco

One in five ultra-wealthy Americans, defined by having a net worth above $30 million, lives in California, stoked by the "wealth-generating cluster" of the Silicon Valley, according to WealthX, a company that tracks the super-rich. Stanford University, in Palo Alto, boasts 1,173 alumni with a net worth of more than $30 million — only Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania have more.

"The Silicon Valley is an ecosystem of human capital, venture capital, risk, an educational infrastructure," says WealthX president David Friedman. "All of those things combine into this glorious cocktail of prosperity."

But many residents, even those with college educations, are finding it tougher than ever to make it in the Silicon Valley.

Before the Great Recession, about 10 percent of people seeking food had at least some college education. Today, one in four who line up at food pantries for bags of free food have been to college. Last year the share of households in Silicon Valley earning less than $35,000 rose two percentage points to 20 percent, according to the 2013 Silicon Valley Index.

"There are millionaires, even billionaires, who sit in their sunrooms watching me work in their gardens and they have no clue what's going on," said Sherri Bohan, a credentialed horticulturist who ran a landscape gardening firm for 30 years and raised two sons as a single mom. Today, retired and disabled, she picks up a free bag of groceries every week at her local food bank. Without the food she says she would go hungry.

Silicon Valley's rich do give, and often significantly, but the money mostly leaves the area. Facebook's Zuckerberg gave $100 million to Newark N.J., public schools in 2010; his $500 million gift to the Silicon Valley Community Foundation last year has yet to be designated. The Google Foundation donated about $11 million in 2011, according to its tax forms, largely to global environmental and health projects.

"Many people come here to work, but they have no idea what's really going on," said Lisa Sobrato Sonsini, whose Sobrato Family Foundation — funded by profits gained as a leading real estate and development firm in the region — is the single largest contributor to local charities in the region. "The companies are generous, but they don't see the need directly in front of them, they want to send their money away."

Phyllis Kizer, a long time high-tech business analyst, is disturbed by the challenges people in her community face.

"Looking at myself, I'm very well paid for what I do, I have no complaints," she said.

Once a week, Kizer heads to a low income school where she sits with children, including recent immigrants, helping them learn to read.

"I love books, and I love teaching," she said. "I wanted to pass that on. Some of these children, they can really go far, but we need to help."

by Anonymousreply 6003/10/2013

I think he's doing superlatively, especially given the circumstances he was handed.

by Anonymousreply 6103/10/2013

52% of the people that voted for him think so. That's all that matters. To be honest I don't think he gives a flying fuck what anyone thins about him anymore.

by Anonymousreply 6303/10/2013

Except for the drone shit, I'm entirely satisfied with his job so far.

by Anonymousreply 6403/10/2013


by Anonymousreply 6503/10/2013

The Republicans are psychos, but it must be said that Barack is ineffectual and doesn't appear to give a shit about anything but winning elections. Never vote for a cool guy.

by Anonymousreply 6603/10/2013


by Anonymousreply 6803/10/2013

We elected a black man prez and it hasn't been a total disaster. If it was a white repub with this economy it would be very ugly. Hillary should be interesting. She might show us all. She's smart, learned a lot and might try to do the right things. I think the gay rights stuff has worked out well in obamas 2nd term.

by Anonymousreply 6903/10/2013
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