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Kim Novak: Live from the TCM Film Festival (on TCM, Wed., March 6

Granted she wasn't the greatest actress Hollywood's ever produced, but she was a **STAR**. She played opposite some of the most fascinating leading men of the era (Tyrone Power, Sinatra, Jimmy Stewart, Bill Holden, etc.), and starred in a some enduring classics (PICNIC, VERTIGO), and quite a few box-office duds (THE LEGEND OF LYLAH CLARE, THE AMOROUS ADVENTURES OF MOLL FLANDERS). I'm curious to hear what she has to say about them, and I hope she dishes.

by Anonymousreply 16309/06/2013

She was absolute perfection in "The Eddy Duchin Story." The one time on the screen that you forgot she was Kim Novak.

by Anonymousreply 103/02/2013

I hope she talks about Falcon Crest; I bet Susan Sullivan entertained a piece of Hollwyood legend when Novak was on FC.

by Anonymousreply 203/02/2013

Love her

by Anonymousreply 303/02/2013

What has she been doing with her days for the last 25 years? I can't imagine.

It's actually fascinating that someone who was once such a superstar and sex symbol could have retired so quietly and (apparently) happily. No scandal, no trauma, no bankruptcy.

I can't wait to see the interview! I hope it's dishy....all of her costars and directors are dead now.

by Anonymousreply 403/02/2013

I get her mixed up with Zsa Zsa.

by Anonymousreply 503/03/2013

I thought that she was perfection in "Vertigo."

by Anonymousreply 603/03/2013


God I love that cheesy cornball piece of movie trash. More fun than any of those Davis/Crawford/Stanwyck/deHavilland old lady horror films

And Coral Browne as.... a lesbian! (again - big surprise - well this one has a leg in a brace - talk about your phallic symbols!)

by Anonymousreply 703/03/2013

I thought she epitomized sex appeal. Loved Bell, Book and Candle and Strangers When We Meet.

by Anonymousreply 803/03/2013

Strangers When We Meet is one of my favorite movies, she was great with Kirk Douglas and to me she never looked better than she did in that movie.

by Anonymousreply 903/03/2013

I didn't like her very much in Vertigo until recently I saw the film on blu-ray and thought she was great ...

by Anonymousreply 1003/03/2013

In " Strangers When We Meet" , there is so much sexual tension between her & Kirk. I was surprised to find out later, they couldn't stand each other during the making of that film. Maybe that's what I sensing - just tension, but whatever it is, works perfectly for the film. Barbara Rush is great in it as Kirk's prim & proper wife. When Walter Matthau tries to seduce her, he's so slimy - she plays the scene perfectly.

by Anonymousreply 1103/03/2013

Though perhaps this could be said about most actors whose stars rose in the 1950s but careers lasted into the 1970s, Kim gave far better performances during her first decade when she was under the thumb of big studio (Columbia/Harry Cohn) pressure.

Throughout the 1950s she was brilliantly and carefully cast in roles that suited her limited talents, directed by some of the heavy-weights of the decade and paired with all of the best leading men in important literate scripts, everything from Picnic to Vertigo to Pal Joey to Bell, Book and Candle to The Man with Golden enormous range of work.

But she was always always rebelling against that servitude; once she was free to leave her iron-clad contract and star in (and even produce) some of her own pet projects, she failed miserably at almost every turn.

I do hope Robert Osborne gets her to talk about the differences between her studio years and her subsequent free-lance work.

by Anonymousreply 1203/03/2013

Kim bump!

by Anonymousreply 1303/03/2013

It's true that Kim and Kirk didn't get along in Strangers When We Meet--I heard something about Kim demanding certain changes to her role and Kirk balked or something like that, but it doesn't really matter because they play off each other really well and Kirk's not as obnoxious or as over the top and irritating as he can be in some films, he's kind of subdued or quietly intense--the ending always gets to me.

R11, you're right about Barbara Rush, she was great and Matthau was a real sleaze.

by Anonymousreply 1403/04/2013

I rather enjoyed it. She was never my favorite actress but she indeed, was a STAR and it's nice to hear her speak about her public and private lives. She's bi-polar and she kind of seemed out of sorts at times as if she were struggling to get the right words out.

Nice person. A good sense of who she is. New respect.

by Anonymousreply 1503/06/2013

she really didnt dish

by Anonymousreply 1603/06/2013

What was refreshing was seeing a performer who hasn't been under the surgeons knife. She still has functioning tear ducts.

by Anonymousreply 1703/06/2013

[quote]What was refreshing was seeing a performer who hasn't been under the surgeons knife.


by Anonymousreply 1803/06/2013

Her face work was great but she did have face work. You could see it when she smiled.

by Anonymousreply 1903/06/2013

Yeah, you can see the work on her face but I figure she did it because she wanted to feel better about herself and not because she's trying to be 30 again. No lights and cameras around her 24/7. I am pleased that she is living a normal life and was probably always normal (bi polar not withstanding).

by Anonymousreply 2103/06/2013

I can't help but think she may have been more lucid some ten to fifteen years ago. She's exhibiting the mental fragility of old age. I was surprised none of her '60s work received any attention. She should at least have been proud of her work on 'Of Human Bondage'. I thought it was cute that her Falcon Crest character was named Kit Marlowe.

by Anonymousreply 2203/06/2013

Catch Kim in 5Against the House. A real hoot. A Film Noir Campfest.

You can see her so moist it leaves a stain on every chair she sits in. The dirty little whore(and I say that in the best way) also did Playboy. A knockout slut of the 60s.

Love me some Novack. Didn't Sammy fuck her? Or is that some other actress.

by Anonymousreply 2303/06/2013

R23, Kim supposedly was the great love of Sammy's life and wanted to marry her, but Harry Cohn wouldn't dream of it and threatened to put out his other eye. Sammy, I think, talked candidly about their affair in his autobiography, but Kim never copped to it and would only say that they were just friends.

by Anonymousreply 2403/06/2013

She did seem like she was getting a little senile, R22 says it better. Sometimes Robert Osborne seems a little out of it on TCM but compared to Kim Novak, he was really in control and clear-headed.

by Anonymousreply 2503/07/2013

The interview was taped last spring at the TCM Film Festival. Since then Osborne has started to show signs of slippage - anyone who saw him at the CABARET screening in NYC recently was very aware of it.

He's slowly starting to cut down on his TCM responsibilities - Ben Mankiewicz is getting more on-air time and doing more of the TCM DVD releases, and Leonard Maltin will be doing several of the other screenings with guests around the country this spring. Both will also be doing the majority of the work at this spring's Film Festival in Hollywood - Osborne will be there, but more as an eminence gris rather than an active participant.

by Anonymousreply 2603/07/2013

[quote]The interview was taped last spring

I didn't realize that.

by Anonymousreply 2703/07/2013

Missed it ! When is it on again? The tcm guide made it seem it was today only.

by Anonymousreply 2803/07/2013

Is it online yet? Even a clip?

by Anonymousreply 2903/07/2013

I enjoyed the interview, although there were moments where Kim rambled on and got repetitive, and I was waiting for Robert Osborne to step in and steer her back into focus, but he just let her talk.

She was absolutely beautiful back in the day and the camera did love her. What I noticed in the movie clips they showed was that her leading men were a good deal older than she. Looking it up on imdb, Fred MacMurray was 46 when he was paired with 21-year old Kim in PUSHOVER; Sinatra was 40, she 22 for MAN WITH A GOLDEN ARM; Ty Power was 42 to her 23 for EDDY DUCHIN; Stewart was 50, Kim 25 during VERTIGO and BELL, BOOK, AND CANDLE; and Fredric March was 62 to Kim's 26 for MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT. Typical Hollywood male fantasy. Nothing's changed.

by Anonymousreply 3003/07/2013

Surprisingly, she didn't look so hot in her "Playboy" spread. She almost has Phyllis Diller hair.

by Anonymousreply 3103/07/2013

Thanks for posting the layout r31, she looks much more "hot mess" than "hot". It was an ill-advised photoshoot.

The interview was good but not great however it is very much worth seeing.

What I would like to hear more about was her Mike Figgis issues.

Also, her reference to Lee Remnick was intriguing; there is more to the story.

Still she seems to be in a much "better" place today.

She deserves credit for being astute enough to realize - and avoid - suicide, which she acknowledged as the outcome for too many of her contemporaries, along with those who followed her. Leaving the business and LA itself was very wise.

by Anonymousreply 3203/07/2013

Bell Book and Candle is one of my favorite movies. I wanted to be her character (not necessarily a witch) and go to little nightclubs and wear a fur coat in the snow.

by Anonymousreply 3303/07/2013

Audrey Hepburn and Grace Kelly starred opposite all those same much older leading men in the 1950s.

And you can add Gary Cooper, Cary Grant and Humphrey Bogart to Audrey's list and Gary, Cary, Bing Crosby and Clark Gable to Grace's.

Young women were infanitized in 1950s cinema. Somehow Liz Taylor and Shirley MacLaine , of all people, escaped that trap.

by Anonymousreply 3403/07/2013

I wished she was asked about Falcon Crest and working with Jane Wyman

by Anonymousreply 3503/07/2013

R33, I enjoyed "Bell, Book, and Candle" and Kim was at the height of her beauty then, which is why I didn't understand why her character even bothered using magic to ensnare Jimmy Stewart. She was a pretty young thing and should've been able to land any man she wanted. Why she chose old Jimmy Stewart, who wasn't exceedingly handsome nor dashing nor rich is beyond me. LOL. Now, had it been Cary Grant, then I would've understood the attraction. Interestingly enough, Grant supposedly actively sought that role.

by Anonymousreply 3603/07/2013

It's clear that she has struggles with emotional issues and needs medication to keep them under control. Her crazy father was a real piece of work.

I get the impression from the interview that Kim thought Lee Remick took her place in Hollywood and got the roles that would've normally gone to her.

by Anonymousreply 3703/07/2013

What did Kim specifically say about Lee Remick, of all people? Which of Lee's roles could Kim have coveted? Days of Wine and Roses? I can't imagine.

by Anonymousreply 3803/07/2013

Very moving interview, I wanted to give Kim Novak a hug.

by Anonymousreply 3903/07/2013

[quote]What has she been doing with her days for the last 25 years? I can't imagine.

She works as an artist, a very talented painter. That was her original career, before becoming an actress.

by Anonymousreply 4003/07/2013

My favourite movies with Kim Novak are:

The Man with the Golden Arm

The Eddy Duchin Story


Strangers When We Meet

You can find beautiful photos of Miss Novak in the link below

by Anonymousreply 4103/07/2013


by Anonymousreply 4203/07/2013

Sexy vintage photo of Kim

by Anonymousreply 4303/07/2013

With a rose...

by Anonymousreply 4403/07/2013

With Angela Lansbury in ' The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders'


by Anonymousreply 4503/07/2013

With Cary Grant...dancing

by Anonymousreply 4603/07/2013

One of her Vertigo-like poses

by Anonymousreply 4703/07/2013

With...Agnes Moorehead!

by Anonymousreply 4803/07/2013

Wish I had seen the interview. Kim Novak is one of the last of the major female stars of the 1950s still around. With Hitchcock and the Columbia films, she usuaally has an very appealing vumnerable side.

by Anonymousreply 4903/07/2013

r49, you might even say Va-va-va-vum!

by Anonymousreply 5003/07/2013

R38, Kim didn't give any specifics, just that she had wished she had played some of Lee's roles. She didn't elaborate, and Robert Osborne should've followed this up with, "Oh really? Which ones?" but it probably was past his bedtime.

It was sad how after trying to be upbeat and positive throughout the interview and saying only nice things about people, Kim toward the end revealed that she wished she had been appreciated by her peers. Then quickly, as if her inner voice was saying, "Oh, stop you're whining," she added how her life was good and had a wonderful husband who loved her, etc. I wonder if that were true, that her peers didn't appreciate her. After all, she was an overnight success -- just two years from being discovered and signing with Columbia, she starred in several high profile, top quality films and became the #1 box office star. Meanwhile, people like Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor and other leading ladies before them had to toil in lousy pictures for years and had to fight long and hard with their studio bosses for better scripts, better pay, respect and esteem. There must've been professional jealousy and resentment towards her.

by Anonymousreply 5103/07/2013

You are absolutely right R49.

by Anonymousreply 5203/07/2013

Love her.

Watched some movie where she played a witch and she totally pinged to me.

by Anonymousreply 5303/07/2013

The Lee Remick reference was made in the middle of a point that Kim Novak was trying to make where she wished that she was driven enough to pursue some parts but she didn't have it in her.

One Lee Remick role she could have done was "Anatomy of a Murder."

by Anonymousreply 5403/07/2013

She had an undefinable quality that was nevertheless unique.

A true sex symbol who rarely played cheesecake type sex kitten roles yet also without the class of Grace Kelly or Audrey Hepburn or the brashness of Elizabeth Taylor or exoticism of Sophia Loren or the girl-next-door quality of Doris Day.

I remember reading in an old book about movie stars, Richard Schickel described her as a "somnambulist".....a beautiful creature who seemed to sleepwalk rather passively through our fantasies, just waiting to be woken and aroused by her much stronger leading men. Very apt, I think.

Her career faltered with the changing times in the 1960s but also because, though a bigger star, she could never really carry a film, she was always more successful when subservient to the male co-star.

by Anonymousreply 5503/07/2013

She always seemed like a beautiful cow to me -- big-boned, big-eyed, but a little sluggish in her movements and delivery.

by Anonymousreply 5603/07/2013

"Fredric March was 62 to Kim's 26 for MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT."

To be fair, that film was about the romance between a young woman and a much older man, so the age difference is appropriate. When NIGHT was done on Broadway as a play, it was Edward G. Robinson and the young Gena Rowlands.

IMO, Novak was effective in two films: VERTIGO and BELL, BOOK, and CANDLE. The rest of the time she struggles mightily to give a performance but she's not remotely up to the task. I'll admit I haven't seen STRANGERS WHEN WE MEET, so perhaps she's better in that one.

Her work in England (OF HUMAN BONDAGE, MOLL FLANDERS) is embarrassing. After those and the howler LYLAH CLARE, she was pretty much finished.

by Anonymousreply 5703/07/2013

I wish he asked her about her best film from the post-Cohn years, the superb (and still under-rated) KISS ME STUPID, co-starring Dean Martin and directed by Billy Wilder.

I saw the uncensored version at the Film Forum and it was superb.

By the way, Lee Remnick got the ANATOMY OF A MURDER role after Lana Turner either quit or was fired from the production.

by Anonymousreply 5803/07/2013

"Moonglow" with the lovely main theme from PICNIC coming in midway. A classic!

by Anonymousreply 5903/07/2013

Picnic was nominated for six Oscars, including Best Scoring and Best Picture. It won two -- Art Direction and Film Editing.

by Anonymousreply 6003/07/2013

Kim would have been perfect for "Experiment in Terror". Lee Remick was good in the role, but Kim would have have made the film much sexier.

by Anonymousreply 6103/07/2013

RE - You're so right. Love that film, and when I see it again, I'm going to be thinking of Kim in that role. Remick was a good actress, but not really sexy ( except in her earliest films). Do love Remick in " Days Of Wine And Roses".

by Anonymousreply 6203/07/2013

I love that scene R59, Holden may have been too old for the role but he played THAT particular scene perfectly. So sexy.

by Anonymousreply 6303/07/2013

Kim gave a lovely interview. She revealed some simple truths that we can all benefit from:

- Be true to yourself.

- Life happens; go with it.

- Never compromise on your values.

- Beauty is internal as well as external.

- Fame doesn't mean happiness.

by Anonymousreply 6403/07/2013

I didn't understand something - for years, read that Kim , & Tyrone Power, hated each other while making "Eddie Duchin Story". Yet when his name was brought up, she said she adored him. Same for Harry Cohn - but now, it was all about how everything fell apart for her when Cohn died. All I've ever read is how she wanted to do different roles, and that bastard wouldn't let her, he was a tyrant. And how she had problems with Rita Hayworth - now talking about what a beautiful person she was. Could it be that now that Kim is on bi- polar meds, she's able to put her erratic behavior in perspective, and sees things in a better light ? Otherwise, she seems like such a hypocrite.

by Anonymousreply 6503/07/2013

She was a big girl, but she wasn't fat. She was just... big.

by Anonymousreply 6603/07/2013

She tried to be diplomatic, but you could tell that she and Rita Hayworth couldn't stand Sinatra while filming Pal Joey.

by Anonymousreply 6703/07/2013

He really was a pig. I think he was bi- polar too, the more I read about his life. The ' it's Frank's world - we just live in it' line they always use , basically translates to ' Im a selfish pig , who want's everything 'my way' (no pun intended) - and if you don't like it , FU scum'. He was a thug, a bully, a misogynist, YET , he donated lots of $$$ , anonymously, to people & charities, fought racism, and was an incredibly loyal friend. The 2 sides are so perplexing.

by Anonymousreply 6803/07/2013

r68 and Patty would know she slept with Frank.

by Anonymousreply 6903/07/2013

Where does she live now? I wonder how much she's worth today?

by Anonymousreply 7003/07/2013

R70 with her second husband in Oregon. They showed a picture of the place,looked beautiful. Her husband is a vet. They own horses. Kim said she was an animal lover and she has two dogs.. her house has a studio where she paints her pictures.

by Anonymousreply 7103/07/2013

How cool would it be to live next door to Kim? We could sit and talk about Old Hollywood while she painted. She seems lonely and would probably love the company.

by Anonymousreply 7203/07/2013

Kim has had decades away from the spotlight to reflect on her past stardom and all the relationships that built her career.

If she's as smart and sensitive as she seems, I'm sure she sees events and people who were a part of her early career with hindsight now.

For example, she's probably far more sympathetic to Rita Hayworth and other female costars now that she's older herself. And she is better able to judge her own performances in films and what it took to achieve them than she was when she was making them.

by Anonymousreply 7303/07/2013

I was surprised to hear her talk so positively about Hitchcock. I thought Hitch didn't like her?

by Anonymousreply 7403/07/2013

I hope now Ms. Novak can finally let that feeling about her career she had been holding onto go. She did the right thing. It also makes me realize if other biggies from old Hollywood were able to reflect on the past like she did. She mentioned the instability of so many. Garbo, Shearer, Crawford and many others obviously never found that peace. She should be proud that she found peace.

by Anonymousreply 7503/07/2013

I'm not sure she ever found that peace, not entirely. She seemed emotionally fragile during the interview. Is it possible for someone who's bipolar and manic depressive to ever be truly happy? I think she does the best she can, though.

by Anonymousreply 7603/07/2013

I haven't seen the interview so I'm assuming Kim talked about being bi-polar? Was it diagnosed after she stopped acting?

Was her last film role in that awful version of Agatha Christie's The Mirror Crack'd in the early 1980s? No one came out of that looking good...Liz, Rock, Tony, Kim or even Angela Lansbury.

by Anonymousreply 7703/07/2013

She also slept with Wilt Chamberlin. No reason not to admit after all this time. I don't like what she did to Sammy.

by Anonymousreply 7803/07/2013

It was Doris Day that slept with Wilt.

by Anonymousreply 7903/07/2013

Well r76, she was talking about her career to her fans and more for, basically the first time. It is emotional. She should be damn happy that she got out sooner and she understands how her brain functions. That is peace, when you can admit that.

by Anonymousreply 8003/07/2013

"What has she been doing with her days for the last 25 years? I can't imagine."

Judging from her interview, here's what she's been doing: not a hell of a lot. She paints. She takes care of her animals. She lives with her husband. She appears to have been leading a very ordinary, simple kind of life, and seems satisfied with it. She's probably had enough glamor and excitement to last a lifetime.

Her face looked strange, kind of lumpy and uneven. I guess that comes from bad plastic surgery. The woman is EIGHTY years old.

The interview was pretty dull. She's not that articulate or funny or interesting. I had hoped she would talk about "Kiss Me, Stupid" and working with Billy Wilder, but she didn't. I hoped she would talk more about "Vertigo" and Alfred Hitchcock, but she didn't. Pretty much all she said about Hitchcock and that film was that he pretty much let her do what she wanted and she didn't like the grey suit. I wish Osbourne had guided her more during the interview, but he just let her talk.

I don't believe she was "just friends" with Sammy Davis Jr.

I thought she was very beautiful in her youth, and starred in some good films, but I've always considered her a minor actress.

by Anonymousreply 8103/07/2013

R77, after the Mirror Crack'd Kim did a couple of cameos in Made for TV movies and then a season as "Kit Marlowe" (which was the name Harry Cohn wanted her to have when she signed to Columbia). IN 1990 she made a little seen film called The Children based on the Edith Wharton story which co starred Ben Kingsley. I saw it on VHS 22 years ago and while slow, is pretty decent and she's good and attractive as a middle aged widow. Then she made Liebestraum with director Mike Figgis which she disussed in the TCM interview. She played a dying woman and as she mentioned in the Osborne interview the experience of working on that movie made her decide to stop making movies. Since 1991, she's pretty much lived her life on her ranch in Oregon with her animals and painting. Every few years or so she'll do the Kim Novak thing and go to a film festival or do an interview or as in 1997, go out to promote something Vertigo related such as the restoration. I saw her on stage at the Castro Theater in 1997 for the Vertigo restoration SF premiere and she was fabulous, a real star of the old school. And that came through last night as well..even when she bordered on saying something negative about someone like Sinatra, Figgis, or Harry Cohn, she would backtrack and either blame herself or find an explanation for their conduct.

by Anonymousreply 8203/07/2013

r81, who are you to judge? She could have talked about her horses the whole time, it was her choice on what to discuss and what not. You needn't be so demanding.

by Anonymousreply 8303/07/2013

As I recall from a Larry King interview maybe 10 years ago, she and her husband are very good friends with Tippi Hendren and her husband, which oddly makes a lot of sense when you think about it - Kim was of course the bigger star, but both were directed by Hitchcock, both left Hollywood, both survived to be happily married and both live on ranches with animals.

by Anonymousreply 8403/07/2013

R81: How can you call Kim Novak 'a minor actress.' She made over a dozen films at the height of her fame including "Picnic," "Middle of the Night," "Bell, Book amd Candle." Most important, "Vertigo" will still be one of the greatest films ever made 50 years from now. No, she was not a great actress, but she connected with movie audiences in ways that those with more talent could not.

by Anonymousreply 8503/08/2013

she came off as a class act and a normal person, with good memories and regrets of a interesting life.

I love Kim - she is amazing in Vertigo. Her vulnerability is what made her so interesting on screen.

by Anonymousreply 8603/08/2013

Bob Osborne is slipping.

His interviews years ago with actresses like Betty Hutton were phenomenal. He was thoroughly knowledgeable about Betty's life and career and personal demons and asked her hard questions which she answered with honest emotion.

It's a shame Kim doesn't do an in depth interview with someone more probing, even if just in print. She is a rare survivor of Golden Age Hollywood who connected with so many of the greats.

I feel the same way about Tab Hunter, who even in his autobiography, gave away so little about that time in film history.

It's their choice, obviously. But what a waste!

by Anonymousreply 8703/08/2013

With Elizabeth

by Anonymousreply 8803/08/2013

With Tippi Hedren

by Anonymousreply 8903/08/2013

One more shot with Tippi

by Anonymousreply 9003/08/2013

Any pictures of her current day feet? Thanks.

by Anonymousreply 9103/08/2013

Her eyes show a person with a tender heart. She is certainly fragile and she has a dreaming and fragile quality in her stare. She tries not to escape...

She is so lovely.

by Anonymousreply 9203/08/2013

It's not supposed to be an interrogation, R87. She was invited to muse on her life and career - which is exactly what she did.

I thought Robert Osborne handled the interview very respectfully.

by Anonymousreply 9303/08/2013

Robert and Kim are friends. She did this interview as a favor to him.

Robert probably knows a lot more about Kim, than was revealed on stage. She could have asked him NOT to ask about certain things she doesn't want to talk about.

Though she was very candid about mental illness, which was discussed.

by Anonymousreply 9403/08/2013

I know it was not Osborn's intention, but Betty Hutton came off as a sad, lonely woman, almost at wits end. Perhaps Robert Osborn decided to not let that happen in subsequent interviews. Kim Novak seems th being doing well now, and for the last twenty-twenty-five years, but I doubt that was always true.

by Anonymousreply 9503/08/2013

She was and still is far more beautiful than Sophia Loren.

by Anonymousreply 9603/08/2013

A classy woman with an honest face

by Anonymousreply 9703/08/2013

UNFORGETTABLE. She was the full of tints heart of 'Vertigo'

by Anonymousreply 9803/08/2013

A 1958 photo of beautiful Kim

by Anonymousreply 9903/08/2013

I love that moment of 'Vertigo'

by Anonymousreply 10003/08/2013

With a lion in 1961

by Anonymousreply 10103/08/2013

[quote]even when she bordered on saying something negative about someone like Sinatra, Figgis, or Harry Cohn, she would backtrack and either blame herself or find an explanation for their conduct.

That comes from growing up with a mentally ill father. Kim learned from an early age how to handle difficult people and how to "make things better."

by Anonymousreply 10203/08/2013

I didn't like her much, the first time I saw "Vertigo". I thought she failed at being the tragic, beautiful, and ethereal character. I changed my mind after seeing the film again, the tragic/ethereal character is a sham, and she was absolutely perfect as the *real* person underneath. I love that film, it's about one of the most twisted relationships ever portrayed during the studio era, and it's gorgeous!

Like a lot of classic movie stars, she had a very small range, but could be very good within it.

by Anonymousreply 10303/08/2013

When will the interview be shown again?

by Anonymousreply 10403/08/2013

One film of hers which I don't think has been mentioned is Jeanne Eagels, in which Kim portrayed the tragic drug-addicted stage and silent film star of the 1920s. I think it was her only film of the 1950s in which she was top-billed, not playing the girl friend or love object of a bigger male lead.

She's gorgeous in it, as is the very hot Jeff Chandler. IIRC Agnes Moorehead plays Jeanne's mentor/drama coach.

I saw it decades ago on TV and loved it. Not seen it since and it probably doesn't hold up well, I think it was a commercial and critical flop. It never seems to be shown on TV these days.

In hindsight, it's astounding the range of films and roles a limited actress like Kim was given by autocrat studio boss Harry Cohn, whether at her home studio of Columbia or on loan out. A young actress today would kill to play all those parts.

by Anonymousreply 10503/08/2013

R105- Turner Classic Movies has shown JEANNE ENGELS. That's where I first saw it.

by Anonymousreply 10603/08/2013

Jeanne EAGELS is great. Agnes Moorehead is indeed in it and goes waaaaay over the top as does Virginia Grey as the fading actress who gets in Kim's way.

by Anonymousreply 10703/08/2013

Jeanne Eagels is on dvd, it is part of a Kim Novak dvd box set released not too long ago.

by Anonymousreply 10803/08/2013

I saw part of this last night. What is interesting is that many directors like Richard Quine counseled her to "be herself - don't try to be anyone else". Many of her characters are lovely young women who are troubled or insecure inside - like her. She is heartbreakingly truthful as Madge in "Picnic", in "The Man with the Golden Arm", in "Strangers When We Meet" and "In the Middle of the Night". All playing simple, working class or middle class girls struggling with life. She is also excellent and very real as Judy in "Vertigo".

When she plays sophisticated, wealthy or urbane women - she is in trouble. Hitchcock brilliantly exploits this problem in "Vertigo" - her Madeleine is totally stilted, artificial and disconnected and yet transfixing. You never get anything real coming from her - and it is pure genius when the we get the final "reveal". I find her embarassing in "The Eddie Duchin Story" as his society debutante wife. Kim is actually very good in the first quarter of "Jeanne Eagels" where Jeanne is a struggling carnival dancer from the wrong side of the tracks trying to break into theater. When she has to do the "great lady of the stage" drama queen routine she becomes hopelessly amateurish. Lylah Claire is another drama queen role and she overacts wildly, flailing about. She actually is painfully stilted and awkward in "Pal Joey" though the role should have suited her well. Oddly, despite a terrible cockney accent, I find her self-destructive Mildred Rogers in the 1964 "Of Human Bondage" way better than Bette Davis or Eleanor Parker. You see the seductiveness, vulnerability and neediness underneath the vituperative shrew - how she draws him in and then hurts him because she is hurting herself - damaged and can't give or receive love. Her death scene in the hospital from syphilis is great dramatic acting - better than Davis.

I think she had a streak of real deep talent but couldn't tap into it without a great director, script and careful casting. She was basically untrained and working on deep instinct. Hence, the problems when Harry Cohn left Columbia.

by Anonymousreply 10903/08/2013

Postscript: She recently has been treated for breast cancer. Hence the frailty and perhaps also the more measured and philosophical attitude towards her life and career.

by Anonymousreply 11003/08/2013

R109: Kim Novak is very good in "Bell, Book and Candle" even if the role seems a little outside her range. You could say she plays a grown up, even more beautiful Madge...but Madge as a no-so-willing witch.

Despite the small age difference with Jane Fonda, Kim Novak come from the studio era. Both actresses made mistakes in the lives and careers. But, it's easier for me to have more compassion for Novak. She does not have Fonda huge talent or show business background. But, she may have had a happier life. And she has that one iconic movie, Vertigo, that will be remember...something that some of Hollywood's biggest stars do not have.

by Anonymousreply 11103/08/2013

I don't think of Kim in the same generation as Jane Fonda at all. Jane's film debut was in Tall Story in 1960. Kim's best-loved and most memorable films were all behind her by then.

Kim's contemporaries were Marilyn, Liz, Audrey, Grace and Sophia.

Oh, and Shirley and Debbie, too.

by Anonymousreply 11203/08/2013

Regarding Kim and Ty Power's uneasy relationship on the set of "The Eddy Duchin Story"... here's an excerpt from a piece posted at

'Novak and Power may have projected onscreen chemistry, but their working styles and personalities clashed. Power was the classy professional, a veteran of the studio system; Novak was a young bohemian, whose inexperience and shyness made her volatile. Power told the press exactly how he felt about his co-star. "Confusion between temperament and bad manners is unfortunate... She made my life hell. She was often late, inevitably rude and incredibly cold." Novak responded in kind: "When things are going wrong, it is a waste of time to be calm."'

by Anonymousreply 11303/08/2013

The same piece relays Peter Duchin's own memorable encounter with Kim during the making of his father's biopic, which he described in his later memoir.

'As one of the era's reigning sex symbols, Novak was the object of the lustful fantasies of many young men, including Peter Duchin, then a Yale student. While the film was on location in New York, young Duchin and some of his Yale buddies went down to New York and met Novak. Later, he took her to meet his mother's best friend Marie Harriman, who along with her husband, New York Governor Averell Harriman, had raised Peter. Novak avidly quizzed Harriman about Marjorie's mannerisms and personality. Then the young man and the movie star went out on the town. Duchin discreetly draws a veil over what transpired between them that night, noting only that "I got as close to Oedipal ecstasy as I'll ever know."'

by Anonymousreply 11403/08/2013

R79, Doris Day is rumored to have had an affair with L.A. Dodgers shortstop Maury Wills, who's black -- he says it's true, she's denied it. I never heard anything about her with Wilt Chamberlain, but he did claim to have slept with more than 2,000 women.

by Anonymousreply 11503/08/2013

Here's Kim performing a nightclub torch song number in one of her early films, 5 Against the House.

by Anonymousreply 11603/08/2013

I would love for Kim to get one final role so that she can make peace with career and talent.

by Anonymousreply 11703/08/2013

A clip of Kim in her first role, Pushover, saying a quintessential line of film noir: Money isn't dirty, just people.

by Anonymousreply 11803/08/2013

Who dated who lists Wilt Chamberlin as one of the people Kim "dated'. Don't know how accurate it is but he's listed.

by Anonymousreply 11903/08/2013

R112: Of the actress you mentioned Shirley and Sophia are only three years older than Jane Fonda(75). The others were/are the same age or older than Kim Novak (80) by as many as seven years older. Grace Kelly was four years older than Kim.

I am not trying to make an earth-shaking point. I do understand that a five year age difference can be significant depending on the circumstances. Despite the fact that you do not think of Novak and Fonda as being of the same generations, Kim is only five years older than Jane.

by Anonymousreply 12003/09/2013

Was that Guy Madison and Brian Keith in the clip of Kim singing in 5 Against the House?

Does anyone know that film? Is it worth checking out?

by Anonymousreply 12103/09/2013

Yes. Guy Madison is definitely worth checking out no matter what he's in!!

by Anonymousreply 12203/09/2013

During the interview,a clip was shown of Kim & Fred Macmurray in "Pushover", I believe her 1st or 2nd film. She's just sitting in a car, while Fred is standing, talking to her, through her open window. She has a big close up - her face is amazing , and she already knew to let the camera do all the work. She's almost expressionless, yet there is a lot going on behind those eyes. It really impressed me that , unlike so many actors who start out doing 'too much' , she knew ( or the director who was becoming her boyfriend did, Dick Quine) to be perfectly still - all good film actors eventually learn that. It just surprised me that Novak knew to do it so early on, with no experience.

by Anonymousreply 12303/09/2013

I thought she was perfect as Judy AND Madelin (I can't spell it) in Vertigo - she had the elegance, sophistication, mystery, distance of Madelin just right and was sad, vulnerable, lost and empty as Judy.

by Anonymousreply 12403/09/2013

R121, yes that's Guy Madison and Brian Keith sitting at the table watching Kim perform. The other two guys are Alvy Moore, who would go on to play Mr. Kimball in Green Acres and Kerwin Matthews who played Sinbad. Kerwin really pings, gorgeous gay man. Later he would live as an out man in San Francisco.

R123, yes, she nailed the importance of being still for the camera. She never acted before she was signed to Columbia so she was groomed right from the get go to learn how to perform for a camera, not an audience. And she had a natural rapport with the camera and that undefinable "it" quality which is why she was signed up in the first place and thanks to hard work and the right roles, rocketed her to stardom.

by Anonymousreply 12503/09/2013

R109, good assessment of Kim's abilities. I'm a fan, and I like her in just about everything I've seen her in, even when she does go over the top as in Jeanne Eagles or Lylah Clare. The only Novak performance I don't like is Pal Joey. She is often clunky and stiff in that movie. Over the years she's admitted to not being good in Pal Joey--she admits to not liking her character or having patience for women like that character, in fact she couldn't stand the name "Linda". And Kim was repelled by Sinatra's arrogant behavior while making Pal Joey as he was very kind to her on Man with Golden Arm, yet was so obnoxious on the set of Pal Joey and you can sense she's repelled by Joey Evans/Frank Sinatra. Kim's only good moment in Pal Joey is when she performs "My Funny Valentine". True her singing voice is dubbed by Trudy Erwin, but she does perform and play out the wistful melancholy of the song's lyrics. Kim could always do melancholy.

by Anonymousreply 12603/09/2013

I thought the same thing, R123. That close up in "Pushover" completely convinced me of Novak's talent. She converys so much with just her eyes and a slight movement of the lips.

by Anonymousreply 12703/09/2013

The Linda of the Pal Joey film has nothing to do with the Linda of Pal Joey as originally written on Broadway.

I wonder why FRank was so different to her from one film to the next. Had she become a much bigger star in the interim?

by Anonymousreply 12803/09/2013

I believe Kim was discovered by Harry Cohn after winning a beauty contest sponsored by Fridgidaire in which she was named Miss Deep Freeze. Very apt!

Her real name was Marilyn Novak (or Nowicki?) but there could only be one Marilyn.

by Anonymousreply 12903/09/2013

This is my favorite scene in Vertigo. Kim perfectly conveys the shame and feelings of fraud that Judy feels. Hermann's score only adds to the power of the scene. Love Kim Novak.

by Anonymousreply 13003/09/2013

R128, in her recent interviews, Kim said she thinks Sinatra was so different on the sets of Golden Arm and Pal Joey due to the characters he was playing. In Golden Arm he was playing a vulnerable man trying to re-start his life and turns to Novak's character for help. In Pal Joey, he's playing a cad who wants to own a nightclub and will do anything for his dream. Kim had become a much bigger star by the time of Pal Joey, but I don't think Sinatra's attitude had anything to do with that.

R129, Kim toured the country in 1953 as Miss Deepfreeze demonstrating refrigerators at trade shows. When the tour was over, she and one of the other models decided to go down to LA to visit before heading back to Chicago and resume college. As a lark they got extra jobs as chorus girls on the Jane Russell movie The French Line. Kim was discovered by Max Arnow on the set and he arranged a test for her at Columbia. Her test was directed by Richard Quine. Cohn was hesitant to sign her as she had not acting experience, but the other execs in the room convinced him she could be a huge star and the replacement for Rita Hayworth he'd been looking for. Her original name was Marilyn Novak. Cohn wanted to change it to Kit Marlowe. Novak and Cohn eventually settled on Kim Novak (Though Cohn tried at the last minute to call her Kit Novak). But Kim won that battle in the end.

by Anonymousreply 13103/09/2013

I wonder where they came up with the name Kim? It was not a common name or nickname until the advent of Kim Novak. Unless it was short for Kimberley, but I don't remember that name being very popular in America in the early 1950s.

Of course, there's the Rudyard Kipling character Kim, but it hardly seems like it would have been inspiration for America's newest sex symbol.

In any case, it worked!

by Anonymousreply 13203/09/2013

R132, Edna Ferber's "Showboat" (1926) had a character named 'Magnolia,' who named her baby girl 'KIM' after the point on the Mississippi where she was born, at the convergence of Kentucky, Illinois, and Missouri. The book, as you know, was adapted into a successful Broadway musical, followed by three film adaptations, the recent being the 1951 MGM musical. Also, the actresses Kim Hunter and Kim Stanley had already had stage and film successes by the time Marilyn Novak arrived in Hollywood.

by Anonymousreply 13303/09/2013

Of course, you are totally right r133. I knew all of that and should have remembered those 3 Kims,

Thanks for the reminder!

by Anonymousreply 13403/10/2013

Did someone unnail her coffin?

by Anonymousreply 13503/10/2013

Gary Griffin Gypsy, starring... Caroline O'Connor?

by Anonymousreply 13603/11/2013

Is Kim up for Mazeppa?

by Anonymousreply 13703/11/2013

Pretty woman, natural woman.

by Anonymousreply 13803/13/2013

Kim Novak and Jimmy Stewart take a break on-set of Vertigo (1958)

by Anonymousreply 13903/13/2013

With Sophia Loren in 1958

I prefer Kim all the way!

by Anonymousreply 14003/13/2013

Kim Novak, James Stewart and Alfred Hitchcock on the set of Vertigo,1958

by Anonymousreply 14103/13/2013

Mesmerizing gaze

by Anonymousreply 14203/13/2013

Stunning and stunned in Vertigo

by Anonymousreply 14303/13/2013

Freckles are so subtle on her. Sexy.

by Anonymousreply 14403/13/2013

Vertigo is her movie. No one should make a remake of Vertigo ffs.

by Anonymousreply 14503/13/2013

Kim Novak in 'Five Against The House' (1955). Tres jolie!

by Anonymousreply 14603/13/2013

Tony Curtis worked with her in the delicious 'The Mirror Crack'd'.

In his autobiography he writes:

'Kim Novak was sweet and very perceptive. She lived in northern California, outside San Francisco. Rumor had it that she was a lesbian, but we never talked about it, and i found her professiional and easy to work with.'

by Anonymousreply 14705/06/2013


by Anonymousreply 14805/06/2013

Kim Novak at the 'High Society' premiere, 1956.

by Anonymousreply 14905/15/2013

I would love to see Kim Novak and Grace Kelly talking to each other.

by Anonymousreply 15005/16/2013

Wasn't she diagnosed as is bi-polar fairly recently?

by Anonymousreply 15105/16/2013

Kim is star of the month this month on TCM--Thursday nights and they'll be showing her interview with Robert Osborne.

Here's a promotional clip TCM put together to promote this month's Kim salute--very well done.

by Anonymousreply 15209/03/2013


by Anonymousreply 15309/04/2013

I always thought she looked like a tranny.

by Anonymousreply 15409/04/2013

R154, no, no, no, no.

by Anonymousreply 15509/04/2013

Never liked her looks or her acting.

by Anonymousreply 15609/04/2013

Beautiful woman. She didn't resemble a tranny, ffs! Not at all.

by Anonymousreply 15709/04/2013


by Anonymousreply 15809/04/2013

It's sad that she connected so well with movie audiences - without having the experience of connecting to a live audience. She was so open, so raw, that she gave it all away without realizing the depth of intimacy felt by her adoring fans.

Also, I have the impression that something happened to KM's face shortly after the making of "Liebestraum" in 1991.

by Anonymousreply 15909/06/2013

Me, again. After watching the trailer for "Liebestraum," I have a better understanding of Kim Novak's abrupt departure...

by Anonymousreply 16009/06/2013

I also think that, not being well trained as an actress leaves a performer more openly susceptible to crises de coeur. Art is in the artifice: you are acting the part, so that the character can be read by the audience. It is not necessary for you to actually experience the emotions, The actor's job is to make us believe their emotions. Figgis was a new kind of director, and the experience really messed with her head.

by Anonymousreply 16109/06/2013

r59 Thanx for posting that link. It's a lovely tune, and well-suited to that scene. Both Holden and Novak made it very special.

by Anonymousreply 16209/06/2013

Finally saw the interview last night and thought that Kim was spectacular! So raw and human and sincere. She looked gorgeous and unbelievable for a woman close to 80 though the façade cracked when her emotions overtook her and you gradually saw the elderly woman underneath....yet still so beautiful and incredibly vulnerable.

Her wisdom has obviously bloomed with the power of hindsight.

by Anonymousreply 16309/06/2013
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