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Food Porn

When did food become the center of everything? When I was growing up, you just ate whatever and stepped away from the table. Now it's food, food, food 24/7.

by Anonymousreply 6602/24/2013

Because food's the new 'Rock & Roll'

Over-used term, but it's true.

by Anonymousreply 102/22/2013

Because food is delicious, food is sensuous, food is pleasure, food is experience.

To treat it like 'fuel' and nothing more is a crime, a sin against the senses.

by Anonymousreply 202/22/2013

I tend to agree. Though I am picky, I am very no frills about food. I like the social activity of going out to dinner or lunch with someone and having good conversation. I live in LA and there are tons and tons of food snobs here.

by Anonymousreply 302/22/2013

Food porn is not about being a snob. Sheesh.

by Anonymousreply 402/23/2013

My grandmother used to use a phrase: "You don't live to eat. You eat to live."

I thought that was an interesting way of saying it.

by Anonymousreply 502/23/2013

OP, perhaps you should look into AARP's website.

by Anonymousreply 602/23/2013

R5, your grandmother could not have been more wrong.

by Anonymousreply 702/23/2013

Maybe you should check AARP's website, R6. Lots of food there too.

by Anonymousreply 802/23/2013

I hate people who take pictures of their food in restaurants. Good for Komi. Bad for Rogue 24.

And Dawn Brower can't even write a sentence. Food reviewer, my ass.

Some people just need killin'.

by Anonymousreply 902/23/2013

You're right. I was at Staples today and the entire checkout area is completely flooded with snack items. Why are they selling food at on office supply store?

by Anonymousreply 1002/23/2013

Cooking used to be a basic survival skill, it wasn't a big freakin' deal because *everyone* did it. Then, around the 70's or so, it became unfashionable because women going to work became the norm and they didn't want to come home and have to cook, too. So now the pendulum has swung again and it's been re-branded as a sort of arsty hobby and suddenly it's hip again. Not to mention a marketing goldmine for all the fancy accoutrement and free-range artisanal organic such and such that one just *has* to have for their weekend dabbles in chefery.

by Anonymousreply 1202/23/2013

Is gluttony still one of the seven deadly sins?

by Anonymousreply 1302/23/2013

R13 Haven't you been paying attention? It's one of the seven sacraments.

by Anonymousreply 1402/23/2013

Oh yeah, baby! You know you want it!

by Anonymousreply 1502/23/2013

If I'm paying for a fine, expensive meal, I have the right to record it like any other memorable experience, as long as I'm not being rude to other customers. Welcome to the modern world.

by Anonymousreply 1602/23/2013

Indeed, R16. You have every right to be as shallow as you please.

by Anonymousreply 1702/23/2013

And how is it that snapping a picture of an artistic creation on a special occasion "shallow," r17?

Some of us are capable of appreciating and being grateful for a few positive experiences in life.

I risk my health for assholes like you and work hard to enjoy a few good times. Your bitchy, judgmental attitude reeks of self-entitled spoiled, brat.

by Anonymousreply 1802/24/2013

OP, not sure which planet you are from. Here on earth, food has been the center of everything even before our species walked on two legs.

by Anonymousreply 1902/24/2013

[quote]as long as I'm not being rude to other customers

And therein likes the distinction. Most people are incapable of taking pictures of their food without calling a great deal of attention to themselves, thereby being rude to other customers.

by Anonymousreply 2002/24/2013

I'm sick of food porn and food madness, too.

TV likes it because it is cheap and not intellectual. Snobs like it because it gives them something to feel superior about.

This is kind of interesting, though - a guy taking photos of people's fridges.

by Anonymousreply 2102/24/2013

I don't know why The Travel Channel is all about FOOD now! It's preposterous!

by Anonymousreply 2202/24/2013

Calm down R16/R18 and take your pictures. It's not like they're trying to take away your guns.

by Anonymousreply 2302/24/2013

R18's breasts have grown waxy with righteous rage.

by Anonymousreply 2402/24/2013

taking pictures of food is so stupid. Did that start in Asia?

by Anonymousreply 2502/24/2013

It used to be just "steak and potatoes" for dinner, but now these people have to bend everyone's ear about their "sea-salt rubbed, pan-seared, grass-fed Argentenian beef and new white potatoes drizzed with hand-churned butter and fresh homegrown chives. Why does everyone have to talk like a server reciting the daily specials?

by Anonymousreply 2602/24/2013

[quote]Because food is delicious, food is sensuous, food is pleasure, food is experience.

And sex has the possibility of being too punitive, now

by Anonymousreply 2702/24/2013

Or sometimes sex just isn't an option.

I pity people who cannot or will not appreciate fine food. It can be an amazing experience. I've had meals that were almost orgasmicly good.

by Anonymousreply 2802/24/2013

[quote] It used to be just "steak and potatoes" for dinner, but now these people have to ..." R26

Perhaps it was only steak and potatoes for dinner in your house, R26, but I wouldn't make such a broad generalization based on that limited sample.

by Anonymousreply 2902/24/2013

food fetishing replaces sports/TV violence as our new american sexual expression.

by Anonymousreply 3002/24/2013

I'd say that was a step up.

by Anonymousreply 3102/24/2013

It's like when the hipsters acted as if they just discovered coffee. It used to be sneered at as an "old people's drink" until someone figured out that they could charge $3-4 a cup if they gave it some precious sounding name, preferably with a bunch of green-washed buzzwords attached.

by Anonymousreply 3202/24/2013

People are fixated on food because they have nothing else going on in their boring realities they have created. They're not busy, so they focus on feeding themselves for comfort.

TV doesn't help. Just count how many food commercials are shown. It's SICK.

Turn off the electronic stimuli -- TV, Internet, cell phone, iPod, iPad and get some exercise, sunlight and fresh air.

by Anonymousreply 3302/24/2013

The whole celebrity chef nonsense, with hordes of "foodies" following these glorified cooks every move is bullshit is well.

by Anonymousreply 3402/24/2013

I enjoy dining but it's more about the social aspects. The food is secondary. I hate cooking shows though and have never seen any of those cooking competition shows.

by Anonymousreply 3502/24/2013

If you think food is boring, or don't (or can't) get excited over a really great meal... I really do feel pity for you.

It's like someone who looks at an amazing sunset and just shrugs and doesn't see what the big deal is.

You're missing a huge part of life.

by Anonymousreply 3602/24/2013

And why is fashion such a big thing because it used to be about having just one set of clothes?

And why are cars such a big deal when it used to be about just having a set of wheels and driving them until the car was dead?

Obviously, these statements are not true of everyone's experience--it's an observation rooted in working class roots. (Nothing wrong with that, by the way. So were my grandparents.) The internet and cable TV have democratized hobbies and connoisseurship. If the subject matter doesn't interest you, it can seem stupid and if you don't like learning about new things, you might view it as pretentious or effete.

In fact, artisan foods and restaurants are a boon to the economy in that they're a purely local small business. That's obviously not the same as Office Max or whoever carrying a snack section. That relates to the obesity epidemic.

There are people who genuinely have no interest in food and more power to them. I was that way until I was about ten and life would have been infinitely easier had I stayed that way. But a lot of people take comfort as well as pleasure from foods, and as long as they don't do it to excess, who cares?

I have an interest in "foodie" shows, products and techiques but rarely make elaborate stuff at home because I like to clean as few pots as possible.

by Anonymousreply 3702/24/2013

Don't get me started on all the food pictures and postings on Facebook. Chronicling a spectacular restaurant meal is one thing, but I don't need to know every time you go out to eat or what new recipe you tired. If it's that important, you can tell me about it the next time we're together. If you think you're eating habits are so amazing, check your comments and likes. I've seen people with 500+ "friends" post a picture of food and get about 2 comments and 7 likes. Doesn't that tell you people don't really care?

by Anonymousreply 3802/24/2013

When we were young adults, it was all about music and sex and clubs and (for some) pot or coke and parties and liquor.

Food was what you ate afterward, and it wasn't that big a thing unless it was pizza -- where to order pizza was a big thing and the cause of many arguments, or what passed for arguments amongst the stoned.

by Anonymousreply 3902/24/2013

People like to look at beautiful things with their eyes... listen to things with their ears... smell beautiful things with their nose... why wouldn't people want to taste amazing things with their tongues? (admittedly, most of tastes is also smell)

by Anonymousreply 4002/24/2013

R39 makes an excellent point and has really hit on something: the whole "foodie culture": network shows, blogs, people posting pictures of their meals out on Facebook:

What age range are we talking about here? Is it pretty much 25, 28, 30+?

i.e., aren't kids in high school and college still more interested in booze, cigarettes; getting laid?

Inquiring minds wonder...

by Anonymousreply 4102/24/2013

Don't forget that part of foodie-ism is being able to afford all those artismal cheeses and 200-word restaurant dinners.

I'm afraid it's an element that creates hard feelings: People can be smug that they can afford it all, or other people percieve smugness where it doesn't exist. That's why really good food should be something to enjoy, father than something to boast about.

by Anonymousreply 4202/24/2013

Because our culture is bankrupt.

Music = gangsta rap

Movies = drunken frat boys, drunken bridesmaids, cartoons, CGI, live action cartoons

Literature = 50 Shades of Gray

This is Ameria

by Anonymousreply 4302/24/2013

I'm not sure that I see a heightened awareness of food and cooking as the dumbing down of "Ameria".

Of course, some of it is silly. I think documenting meals on Facebook is silly. But American cuisine is so much better now than it was 25, 30 years ago. There's a new interest in how food is grown and prepared, and some people are actually learning to cook again.

Not such a terrible thing if people focus some of their attention on food vs pop culture.

by Anonymousreply 4402/24/2013

Me wants my Num Num!

by Anonymousreply 4502/24/2013

[quote] But American cuisine is so much better now than it was 25, 30 years ago.

Totally disagree. Food doesn't taste as good as it did 30 years ago. Vegetables, beef, chicken, pork, sausage, eggs -- all of it tastes worse. And "organic" eggs sold in stores are just as flavorless as regular eggs. .

by Anonymousreply 4602/24/2013

R37, I love you for saying that.

by Anonymousreply 4702/24/2013

The thing about food is that anyone can convince themselves they're an expert.

by Anonymousreply 4802/24/2013

Appreciation of delicious food doesn't have to be pretentious. Stop lumping everyone into the hipster-pretentious nouvelle cuisine bullshit.

by Anonymousreply 4902/24/2013

So far as I know, R37, there isn't an entire cable network devoted to cars or to fashion. There is, however, an entire network devoted to food, plus there are food shows on many other networks as well.

by Anonymousreply 5002/24/2013

We don't need cars or fashion to survive. We do need food, so why not do our best to see that it's good food?

by Anonymousreply 5102/24/2013

[quote] The thing about food is that anyone can convince themselves they're an expert.

This is true. Many people who go on and on about cooking aren't very good cooks. My partner's sister comes to mind. Constantly talks about food (she's anorexic) and how bad her mother's cooking was, how good a cook she is, how she can make a gourmet meal out of anything. The first time we were invited over for dinner she served spaghetti.

Yeah, spaghetti with your basic red spaghetti sauce. And basic Italian bread from some bakery that tasted exactly like the Italian bread in a white paper bag you can buy in the supermarket bread section. And she served so little of it we were still hungry. When my partner asked for more pasta she said she didn't have anymore. I'm not kidding, there was maybe 2 oz of pasta on our plates. (She dished it out to us; we weren't allowed to take our own). When he asked if there was more bread and sauce, she said no, she was saving the rest of the bread and sauce for her and her bf to eat later in the week.

The second meal we were invited to (and last I accepted) was chicken parmigiana. Bland, boring chicken parmigiana. She ranted on and on about the wine she used for the sauce and how one or another kind of wine wouldn't have been good enough for whatever reason , andInor all of her long-winded food talk, it tasted just like school cafeteria food.

And I ask you -- who can't boil pasta, make a basic red sauce or put some cheese and sauce over chicken breasts? She made herself out to be some kind of culinary genius.

BTW -- Both times we brought dessert for four people and both times she served half of the dessert we brought. She kept the other half for her and her bf "for later in the week."

I thought iof inviting her over for a couple of ounces of boiled potatoes and cabbage but decided not to waste the ironic effort on her.

by Anonymousreply 5202/24/2013

Food can fill an awful lot of empty cable hours. You can have Mexican food, Finnish food, Filipino food, Hawaiian food (just add spam and pineapple), French food, Thai food, Vietnamese food, Mongolian food, Ukrainian food, Greek food, Yemeni food, Indian food, etc. Just raid every culture for recipes and fill as much empty cable time as you like.

Pretty easy. Not much thought required and virtually no creativity involved on the part of producers. Just use other people's recipes ad infinitum.

by Anonymousreply 5302/24/2013

[quote] There is, however, an entire network devoted to food

There are at least two networks. The Food Channel and Food Planet.

by Anonymousreply 5402/24/2013

I miss the music channels that my cable provider used to have. I can't be bothered with Internet radio.

by Anonymousreply 5502/24/2013

By Jonathan Gold

Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic

February 23, 2013

The first thing anybody is going to tell you about the Hart & the Hunter, the restaurant in the new Fairfax District Palihotel, is that you should get the biscuits, which come four to an order and are served on a board. And you should get the biscuits, which are really pretty extraordinary, as light and delicate as the angel biscuits you sometimes find in the best Southern households, but also flaky at the extremities, and layered — they naturally separate into two or three finger-burning strata, which you are going to need if you want to butter them properly.

I have been making biscuits since I learned how at my mother's knee, and I get my biscuit flour flown in from the last water mill in Kentucky. I can talk to you for hours, if you like, on the differences between biscuits made with supermarket butter or European butter, home-rendered organic lard or globs of Crisco. I once talked about the finer points of biscuits on stage at Caltech with Shirley Corriher, who is to biscuits what Edison was to light bulbs, until visions of protein molecules danced in my head.

What I'm trying to say is that I've never made biscuits like these. My mother never made biscuits like these. I've never tasted biscuits like these, which combine the best of what I've previously thought to be incompatible schools of the art. And when they come this scorchingly hot on a plank that also holds a spoonful of pimento cheese, a smear of good butter and a few blackberries that taste as if they have just been plucked from a preserver's pot, there is really nothing else you could want.

(Fine Jonathan -- but what is it that is good about the biscuits besides the heat and what is in them? Since you know all about it...)

by Anonymousreply 5602/24/2013

Jonathan Gold is everything I don't like about a food writer. He should have the words "pretentious twat" tattooed on his forehead.

by Anonymousreply 5702/24/2013

The French are really really really into food, but they aren't offensive about it. They have a name for everything but not the need to use it over and over again when people are trying to eat...

by Anonymousreply 5802/24/2013

"You get biscuits on a piece of wood with a bit of cheese and butter. They are very tasty."

by Anonymousreply 5902/24/2013

[quote] once talked about the finer points of biscuits on stage at Caltech with Shirley Corriher, who is to biscuits what Edison was to light bulbs

Didn't Edison invent the light bulb?

Were there no biscuits before Shirley Corriher?

by Anonymousreply 6002/24/2013

As music writer Jessica Hopper recently noted, it is a Mumford Mumford Mumford world we live in now. Looked at a certain way, the Hart & the Hunter could be the restaurant equivalent of a drummerless band in vests, the South filtered through the not-South, especially when you are handed a plate of fried chicken skin served with a little bottle of handmade Tabasco, especially when you realize that the thin curls of La Quercia ham from Iowa, the smoked trout with avocado and capers, and the raclette cheese melted onto new potatoes are all served with great piles of white toast.

It's not as if the place exists completely outside the Los Angeles restaurant mainstream. You will find a kale salad, after all, with bits of apple, cheese and nuts, and there is the requisite hand-chopped steak tartare, a version of which seems to be at two-thirds of the new restaurants in town. The only hart you will come across is in the form of a plate of venison carpaccio with pickled garlic and horseradish cream.

by Anonymousreply 6102/24/2013

R60, that stupidity did not come from Shirley Corriher. I've met her on a few occasions and she is not pretentious in the least.

by Anonymousreply 6202/24/2013

It won't be long before we are in famine.

Ever since Reagan knocked the world off its axis, any time people start obsessing about something -- pensions, education, health -- it soon withers away and dies.

Too much food talk bodes only ill.

by Anonymousreply 6302/24/2013

A local mill flour is essential for good biscuits and baked goods. Never buy Pillsbury or such.

by Anonymousreply 6402/24/2013

[quote]your grandmother could not have been more wrong.

Nice try but you're wrong. Most folks eat because they have to. How else do you explain the popularity of McDonalds or even more vile Taco Hell?

I like fine food, but 99% of the time I'm cooking something to fill me up. Just cooked an omelet for dinner, nothing special but it hit the spot.

by Anonymousreply 6502/24/2013

Gee, I'm planning on having leftover (homemade!) massaman chicken curry over couscous with fresh asparagus.

by Anonymousreply 6602/24/2013
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