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Comfort food

Does the phrase "Comfort food" annoy the shit out of everyone? Why does everyone need macaroni and cheese to feel secure? Do other countries have this obsession with comfort food?

by Anonymousreply 6604/17/2013

Fraus love their comfort food.

by Anonymousreply 102/15/2013

The only comfort food you'll ever need is Metamucil. 12 hours later you'll be as comfortable as ever...trust me.

by Anonymousreply 202/15/2013

Shouldn't any food comfort you. I mean eating should be pleasurable.

I think the term comes from the US where a lot of people are overweight. In places like Italy or France people are completely confused about American eating habits and why eating good is bad for you. Strangely enough obesity in those places is only marginal.

by Anonymousreply 302/15/2013

It's a cheap, legal "fix.""

by Anonymousreply 402/15/2013

[quote]I think the term comes from the US where a lot of people are overweight

Yes, that's the premise of this thread, that "comfort food" is an American concept. It refers to the simple, salty, fatty foods that remind us of childhood, such as macaroni and cheese.

by Anonymousreply 502/15/2013

You just know OP is Canadian.

by Anonymousreply 602/15/2013

No, a Canadian would have called mac and cheese "Kraft Dinner."

by Anonymousreply 802/15/2013

The British resort to their "nice cuppa" when feeling distraught. Same idea (but not fattening).

by Anonymousreply 902/15/2013

Meant to say "anyone", not "everyone" in my first sentence.

R3, exactly, I enjoy eating good food. Why in the world does something have to be covered in cheese and butter to be "comforting"? And we wonder why the obesity epidemics are sky high, we're basically encouraging people to binge eat when they're say by perpetuating this "comfort food" bs.

I watched "The Taste", that new show with Nigella Lawson and Anthony Bourdain, and one of the challenges was preparing comfort food. One person cooked something like sea urchin cooked in coconut milk, and one of the judges questioned whether or not that really counted as comfort food. Bourdain said "where she's from that might be considered comfort food". Turns out her mother used to make that all the time when she was a kid, so it's all subjective really.

But really, it's just an excuse for people to eat fattening shit (quelle surprise...)

by Anonymousreply 1002/15/2013

Americans, overweight, fraus, blahs blahs blah . . .

by Anonymousreply 1102/15/2013

I have a friend who is tragically morbidly obese. She refers to her overeating as "self-medicating." We go out to dinner and she orders two entrees, says she's "self-medicating. Very sad to see. She keeps saying that she knows she needs to lose weight but with all she has going on in her life (which is life itself), she says she needs to "self-medicate."

by Anonymousreply 1202/15/2013

I effing HATE that phrase "comfort food"..... Also hate the word "veggies"

by Anonymousreply 1302/15/2013

When I was sick in Sicily I was given a bowl of pastini with an egg poached in it in a bath of chicken broth. It was presented as 'cibo per Comfor voi' Literally food to comfort you.

Patina is the pasta for the babies so while the words used and the food may vary I think many cultures have a version of this.

by Anonymousreply 1402/15/2013

Every culture has their own version of comfort food. It's not an American thing.

by Anonymousreply 1502/15/2013

r12, you friend needs to go once around the garden.

r14, pastina, or those little micro stars, are truly comfort foods. Thanks for the memory.

Personally, my favorite guilty comfort food is Cream of Wheat made with milk and sprinkled with sugar. There is something wonderful about feeling liken a loved and happy six year old:)

by Anonymousreply 1602/15/2013

R7 I am not Canadian - but you sure have some issues!

by Anonymousreply 1702/15/2013

r17 whatever country you're from, doesn't matter. Comfort food is an American term but you're too stupid to realize that every culture has its own comfort food. Maybe you should get out once in a while and travel.

by Anonymousreply 1802/15/2013

[quote]No, a Canadian would have called mac and cheese "Kraft Dinner."

It's fun to see the Kraft commercials in Canada, which feature a couple of hot 20-something roommates always trying to con each other out of their "K.D." Slightly homoerotic.

by Anonymousreply 1902/15/2013

I don't use this phrase often, OP. I take to it as another way of describing food that is convenient to prepare (even though that isn't the meaning).

by Anonymousreply 2002/15/2013

I am not aware that anyone is obsessed with comfort food or that it is an American phenomenon. I think the OP perhaps has some sort of an obsession however.

by Anonymousreply 2102/15/2013

We have comfort food in Europe too, but it is stuff that harks back to mother's milk and the nursery - custard, porridge, soup etc.

Stuff like macaroni cheese is binge food rather than comfort food - addictive tastes like cheese and highly processed, high glycemic, low fibre ingredients like white pasta (no doubt over-cooked to a pappy consistency).

by Anonymousreply 2202/15/2013

[quote]addictive tastes like cheese and highly processed, high glycemic, low fibre ingredients like white pasta (no doubt over-cooked to a pappy consistency).

This is what American children eat, so we consider it comfort food.

by Anonymousreply 2302/15/2013

I think the term implies food that is not healthy for you that you indulge in to comfort your miserable obese self. It is an excuse to fill up on crap, I need comfort because I am a miserable person.

by Anonymousreply 2402/15/2013

In other countries, adults don't have snacks, or eat "six small meals a day."

Adults eat 3 substantial meals a day. They don't eat chips in between meals or buy giant boxes of candy bars at the warehouse store. The don't drink soda.

When Americans go on diets, they have to have snacks built into their menu or they can't make it through the day.

It's food infantalization.

by Anonymousreply 2502/15/2013

My Portuguese friend considers bread soup to be comfort food.

by Anonymousreply 2602/15/2013

Cheesecake! The good kind!

PS: I am Canadian, but I do not hate Americans - only the bad ones!

by Anonymousreply 2702/15/2013

Comfort food, man caves, granite counter tops all part of the same media driven infantalization and heterosexualization of culture.

by Anonymousreply 2802/15/2013

Make that Phil's blue ribbon cheese cake, old Pillsbury recipe. I am an American, but I do not hate Canadians, just the bad ones and the French speakers.

by Anonymousreply 2902/15/2013

When I was younger and more naive I thought the British were the epitome of culture and refinement. I didn't know about chavs or bluntness of the British. I suppose back then we didn't have reality shows to expose the seedier/trashier side of any country.

Needless to say, I don't think very well of the English anymore. The refinement might be true of the upperclass, but the English can be as trashy as many Americans.

I suppose that's why Americans are not well-liked anymore. We have exported reality shows to the world and they think all Americans are like the Kardashians and Housewives.

by Anonymousreply 3002/15/2013

R25, I'm on the fence about the 6 meals a day suggestion myself. I stayed with a friend's family in France for 2 weeks and the entire time, I was never offered and never saw the family have snacks. We had three wonderful meals a day. That was it.

And personally I've tried to space out smaller meals for 5 or 6 times a day but I'm not sure it it's any better for me. I find that my world then tends to revolve around food or prepping/looking for it. And I wonder if I end up eating more anyway.

I do find that if I do not have some meat (and not beans don't cut it for me) with my food, I get hungry much faster. So even though I've contemplated vegetarianism, I do better with having at least a few bites of meat. Still, not snacking at all is difficult as I tend to get hungry after about 3-4 hours past a meal. I usually munch on almonds.

by Anonymousreply 3102/15/2013

My comfort food is chocolate fudge that is set, but still just a little bit warm.

by Anonymousreply 3202/15/2013

What's wrong with a comforting dish of say, meat loaf or spaghetti and meat balls like Mom once made? It makes people feel secure and comfy. Nothing wrong with that in my book!

by Anonymousreply 3302/15/2013

R17

You sure should avoid travelling around, you are not a good representation of your country.

by Anonymousreply 3402/15/2013

Americans select very different dishes as "comfort food." Supposedly it means creamy, easy to digest, and cheap, but not necessarily unhealthy to me.

by Anonymousreply 3502/15/2013

[quote]My Portuguese friend considers bread soup to be comfort food.

The great food writer M.F.K. Fisher once wrote an essay about the ultimate comfort food, milktoast. I didn't understand the concept of comfort food until then.

There are times when a person has a bad day, is tired, perhaps coming down with a cold, the weather is cold and gloomy and rainy, and milktoast is the only cure. It has to be prepared the way one's mother made it or it doesn't work.

M.F.K. Fisher's version called for salt and pepper. My mother always sprinkled a little brown sugar or maple syrup on ours.

by Anonymousreply 3602/15/2013

My mother grudgingly cooked 3 meals a day on a very strict budget -- I have no memories of comforting food from childhood.

Now, my comfort food is raisin bread toast with a mug of hot buttered rum.

by Anonymousreply 3702/15/2013

Well, I just got home from a long week at work and have decided to start off my 3-day weekend by baking a batch of brownies with walnuts.

Ah, love the weekend.

by Anonymousreply 3802/15/2013

What is with the idiotic threads around here lately? You bored, bithcy eldergays are driving this place into the ground.

by Anonymousreply 3902/15/2013

Yes, DL must be set aside as sacred ground where only porn "actors" are discussed.

by Anonymousreply 4002/15/2013

That's quite a leap to make, R40.

by Anonymousreply 4102/15/2013

[quote]What is with the idiotic threads around here lately? You bored, bithcy eldergays are driving this place into the ground.

A leap from this? I don't think so.

by Anonymousreply 4202/15/2013

Don't you mean porn *stars*, R40?

Oh, and R35, there's nothing saying comfort food has to be cheap. My favorites include a couple dozen oysters or a pot of cioppino (to share, of course).

by Anonymousreply 4302/15/2013

Every country has its own version of "comfort food." Wouldn't it just be easy dishes to make that harken back to childhood??

And I am not sure the concept of "comfort food" is an obsession in the US.

by Anonymousreply 4402/15/2013

[quote] What is with the idiotic threads around here lately? You bored, bithcy eldergays are driving this place into the ground.

R39 - I don't get the impression that it's the eldergays (or the gaylings) who are the problem, but rather a handful of gay men who are worried about getting older and fatter and balder!

by Anonymousreply 4502/15/2013

R28, can you detail how granite counters are infantilizing the country? So curious to hear your particular brand of crazy.

by Anonymousreply 4602/15/2013

For entertainment you really MUST troll-dar R39/R41 and do a little tour of threads. This creature's faux outrage is very funny, considering what the cunt posts elsewhere.

But back to the point. OP, why do you have an issue with the term "comfort food"? It's just a descriptive phrase for "home cooking," which always has been famously associated with a mother's and family's familiar, fortifying, hearty fare.

And, yes, of course, Europeans across the continent have been heading back to old favorites. Plus, sweetums, a large portion of classical French cookery consists of country-style favorites from all regions that overtly echo the hearth and oven of Maman's kitchen.

Also, and perhaps you've missed it, a lot of attention has been given recently to the "comfort food" qualities of congee, so popular across Asia.

I'll take an invocation of "comfort food" any day over the stomach-turning squeals of a frau whimpering about how baaaaaaadddddd she was by eating that second caramel macadamia mocha fudge chocolate chocolate chocolate death cheesecake and that it was "soooooooo rich!"

by Anonymousreply 4702/15/2013

R47, don't forget how "decadent" it was.

by Anonymousreply 4802/17/2013

Someone needs to take me to Red Lobster.

by Anonymousreply 4902/17/2013

OP, it isn't security food, it is comfort food, to feel comforted. It raises serotonin levels.

by Anonymousreply 5002/17/2013

[quote] In other countries, adults don't have snacks, or eat "six small meals a day." Adults eat 3 substantial meals a day. They don't eat chips in between meals or buy giant boxes of candy bars at the warehouse store. The don't drink soda.

I guess you haven't been to England lately. They are fast catching up to America in obesity. They used to have good fresh food. It's definitely gone down hill with cheap crappy premade food. Just like America

And France is catching up with the Brits for obesity too

by Anonymousreply 5102/17/2013

Foods that are high in fat and/or sugar cause the release of more endorphins, so I think the term "comfort food" is appropriate.

And Kraft Dinner isn't available in the U.S!? That's wack!

by Anonymousreply 5202/17/2013

I grew up in Chicago in the 60s and we called it Kraft Dinner.

by Anonymousreply 5302/17/2013

Europeans certainly do have comfort food and of course it is subjective and only some food nazi would deny that they have things that they especially look forward to eating. Food is a pleasure, a sensual one at that, and sometimes if provides comfort.

The OCD anal classifiers are so hung up on word choice out here, so I guess some are saying that comfort food is a euphemism for favorite junk food? Sometimes yes, sometimes no.

Duh.

by Anonymousreply 5402/18/2013

What's with all the hate towards Canada?

Comfort to me is what my Italian grandmother would make: the previously mentioned pastini and chicken broth with an egg, but also BAKED rice pudding, meatballs and homemade tomato sauce (not the yucky out of a jar kind), homemade eggplant parm, chicken cooked on the stovetop with potatoes cooked in all that wonderful fat. No, I am not overweight, and neither was she.

by Anonymousreply 5502/18/2013

No, the phrase "comfort food" doesn't annoy the shit out of me.

Grow up.

by Anonymousreply 5602/18/2013

r55 here again. My European relatives would snack, but they would always snack on something such as almonds, peanuts, fruit in season, that kind of thing. They never snacked on cheese or crackers. Potato chips were something I NEVER got. Funny, I never developed a taste for them.Soda is something we never,and I do mean never, drank. Tea and coffee, we drank that. Homemade fruit juice we also drank. Soda was not to be found in our house. I still never drink it.

About the poster who had to have small meals or got hungry after 3 or 4 hours, everyone's biochemistry or blood sugar situation is differnt. A pal has blood sugar issues and has something similiar happen to him. He gets very hungry after about 3 to 4 hours even if we are not hungry.

by Anonymousreply 5702/18/2013

[quote]And Kraft Dinner isn't available in the U.S!? That's wack!

o, we certainly have it (did we invent it?), but in America, everybody calls it "Kraft Macaroni and Cheese." If you say "Kraft Dinner", generally you will get blank stares.

by Anonymousreply 5802/18/2013

In fairness, r45, some of the best threads on here have been food and/or restaurant related.

I'll always check out a thread like this in case it goes off in a sarcastic, wonky direction.

I do get your point though.

by Anonymousreply 5902/18/2013

[quote] We have comfort food in Europe too, but it is stuff that harks back to mother's milk and the nursery - custard, porridge, soup etc. Stuff like macaroni cheese is binge food rather than comfort food - addictive tastes like cheese

Yes, Europeans never eat cheese, especially as children.

by Anonymousreply 6002/18/2013

OP is annoying.

Comfort food is awesome.

by Anonymousreply 6104/17/2013

Comfort food rocks!!

I tend to go for starches.... seafood and a bunch of pasta in a garlic, white wine sauce, mashed potatoes, baked potato with butter and plenty of sour cream, pasta with veggies, couple bowls of clam chowder, white rice and any kind of bean, etc etc.

by Anonymousreply 6204/17/2013

OP, it all depends where you put the comfort food.

Demetri Martin made a similar point, noting that any toy can become an adult toy: location, location, location....

by Anonymousreply 6304/17/2013

I didn't truly understand what comfort food meant until I had some. I was devastated by an unexpected death in my family and had not been able to eat for about four or five days. I'd try to take a few bites and would literally start choking and gagging. I just couldn't eat.

A friend insisted I come to her house, and she fed me roast chicken with gravy, mashed potatoes and home made biscuits. Everything was piping hot, right out of the oven and it may have been the best meal I ever had. I ate every bit of it. She then put me to bed and I slept for 14 hours straight.

That was almost 20 years ago and I remember the smell and taste of that food like it was yesterday. It's still my favorite meal. I always serve it with vegetables too just because they're healthy, not because I especially enjoy them. I'm glad my friend didn't bother with them for this meal!

by Anonymousreply 6404/17/2013

Foods high in carbs, fat and sugar satisfy the palate. Most comfort foods contain lots of some or all of those ingredients. It's as simple as that, don't be stupid, OP.

by Anonymousreply 6504/17/2013

Is ass considered a comfort food?

by Anonymousreply 6604/17/2013
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