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How much does a tenure track assistant or associate professor make at a major university?

I ask because I figure these people must have massive loans coming out of school (in addition to some grants as well).

by Anonymousreply 1305/08/2013

OP? If you're smart, grad school is paid for by the school. I never needed to take out a loan after my undergrad. I got my out-of-state tuition, health insurance, and a stipend which was almost enough to live on, just for being a TA.

If no school gives you money (outside of a few majors, for example, an MBA), don't go -- you're too stupid.

by Anonymousreply 102/09/2013

R1 is correct about grad school. Do med schools often provide grants and stipends as well?

Somewhat related: aren't MBAs and law degrees useless nowadays?

by Anonymousreply 202/09/2013

Phd students dont pay tuition, they get paid while they are in school.

It is med school, law school and masters programs where you get debt.

And in general professor dont get paid a lot and fairly old by their first real salary after grad school and a postdoc. Most dont make 6 figures. You do it because you love the field, not for money

by Anonymousreply 302/09/2013

My master's program was fully paid for, R3... I think it depends on the field you get your masters in, as well as how badly the school wants you.

by Anonymousreply 402/09/2013

Nobody has answered the question - what's the salary range?

by Anonymousreply 502/09/2013

Wow, you're an asshole, r1.

It depends on the field, the school, your background, etc. For example, those in STEM fields will often have their costs paid for, while those in Arts & Letters often will not. You can go to a prestigious school and pay for some of your way, or go to a much less prestigious school and get a free ride.

Also, schools that offer you a free ride the first year may not be so generous the second, which often blindsides people.

R4 is the only person has any sense in this thread.

by Anonymousreply 602/09/2013

1. I'm an associate professor at a state school in the mid-Atlantic. I'm in the Humanities. I make $70,000/year. Scientists and business professors get paid more.

2. I got a full ride in grad school plus a stipend. My stipend, while generous in the Humanities at $9,000/year in 1988, was not enough for me to live on, especially since I was an older student. I took out some loans. I wasn't the only one. Back then, the science grad students were getting stipends of $12,500 plus research appointments with money.

by Anonymousreply 702/09/2013

OP/r5, what field are you talking about? And what tier of school?

At my mid-size/large state school in the East, a tenure-track prof in Arts & Letters would get around $60,000 a year. Someone in STEM would get more. Someone at a more prestigious school would get more; someone at a less prestigious school would get less.

by Anonymousreply 802/09/2013

A simple google search will give you your answer OP.

It can vary widely depending on the type of institution you are at, but here are averages based on fields.

by Anonymousreply 902/09/2013

"It depends on the field, the school, your background, etc. For example, those in STEM fields will often have their costs paid for, while those in Arts & Letters often will not. You can go to a prestigious school and pay for some of your way, or go to a much less prestigious school and get a free ride.".

Yes, but many of those in STEM fields will remain sociopathic assholea of the worst variety.

by Anonymousreply 1005/08/2013

The cost of grad school is sometimes picked up by the employer.

Tenure track at Rutgers in humanities is around $85,000.00 Same job at NYU or Columbia is around $125,000

by Anonymousreply 1105/08/2013

R11 conflates the divergent salaries in the categories asked about. Assistant profs do not make what associates do, tenure track or not. And of course there is a considerable range within the categories, depending on publications, reputation, well-placed friends, and grantmaking. Nothing succeeds like covering staff, building programs and pouring indirect costs into administration.

Also, R11, do not believe what you are reading about the lack of loans among academics. While many do take advantage of perquisites and opportunities, many also - at the high-end universities you're talking about as well as second- and third-tier institutions, carry enormous debt burdens. It is naive to think otherwise. R1 is largely correct about opportunities, but overstates availability in a competitive setting.

by Anonymousreply 1205/08/2013

I help companies manage their personnel, for affirmative action purposes and see salary data. Universities do not pay assistant or associate professors well, $45k - $65K would be my estimate. May a bit more on the coasts.

by Anonymousreply 1305/08/2013
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