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France bans Twitter term 'hashtag'

The French government has included the Twitter term 'hashtag' in a list of words to be avoided in order to protect the national language.

The Académie Française is responsible for maintaining standards of French and has identified the English social networking term as a word that undermines linguistic purity, The Mirror reports.

Public figures, teachers and the French media have been urged to adopt the new term 'mot-diese' when referring to the micro-blogging site's tagging system.

The Official Journal said: "The English term hashtag should wherever possible be replaced with the French term mot-diese."

'Hashtag' now joins other English terms including 'email', 'blog', 'supermodel', 'take-away', 'parking', 'weekend' and 'low-cost airline' that are blacklisted, as authorities fear they will become commonly used in everyday French.

Sports commentators are also being asked to avoid using 'coach' and 'corner' during football matches, in favor of their French counterparts 'entraineur' and 'coup de pied de coin'.

by Anonymousreply 4801/29/2013

"France" hasn't "banned" the word hashtag. The Académie has merely made a recommendation of a native word to use instead.

by Anonymousreply 101/28/2013

[R1]: this is an American board. Expect zero reading comprehension or reason.

by Anonymousreply 201/28/2013

Digital Spy = Britain

It's their article, their title, thus they are the idiots, not Americans.

by Anonymousreply 301/28/2013

le (h)ashtag. l'ashtag. l'hashtag.

by Anonymousreply 401/28/2013

Of course, the Quebecois will now consider using "hashtag" a sacrilege and will avoid it like plague. The European French speakers will continue to use it even more frequently.

by Anonymousreply 501/28/2013

Oh my Dieu!

by Anonymousreply 601/28/2013

[all posts by right wing shit-stain # a removed.]

by Anonymousreply 701/28/2013

That's just ridiculous, R7. If any language out of those three is farrago, it's indubitably English.

by Anonymousreply 801/28/2013

Wow, they're very uptight over there. There are a lot of French words that we use all the time without getting bent out of shape over it.

by Anonymousreply 901/28/2013

The English language could do with a few prissy schoolmarms policing it.

by Anonymousreply 1001/28/2013

I agree, R10.

by Anonymousreply 1101/28/2013

Franglais terms like le weekend and le parking are not going away regardless of what the Alliance Français may wish.

As self-conscious as the french are about this subject if you want to discuss a country that is [italic]really[/italic] paranoid about linguistic pollution then you just can't beat Iceland. They have been forced to invent increasingly bizarre icelandic word combinations to encompass modern (foreign} technology and cultural influences.

They even have a list of "approved" names for Icelandic babies which MUST be adhered to if the child is to qualify for an Icelandic passport. Most names common in english are not sanctioned though, amusingly, "Elvis" has been approved.

Elvis conquers all!

by Anonymousreply 1201/28/2013

HAGELSLAG?

by Anonymousreply 1301/28/2013

Freedom fries, freedom fries, freedom fries!

by Anonymousreply 1401/28/2013

French people are learning English and use Franglais so the AF can shove it up their derriere!Derriere is my favorite French word BTW.....

by Anonymousreply 1501/28/2013

[quote]Latin-on-a-mushroom-trip language

by Anonymousreply 1601/28/2013

R16, I was just going to post that and ask R7 to marry me.

by Anonymousreply 1701/28/2013

The "French" word bistro is actually from Russia. "Bistroi" is the Russian word or "fast" or "hurry up." When the Russians occupied Paris in Napoleonic times, they would demand food. The French have made food a sacrament and built a Mass around it. The Russians were having none of that. No preparing food for hours before serving it. The Russians would pound the table, "Bistroi! Bistroi!" Hurry it up already! Move it!

So the French opened up restaurants that offered less formal meals which could be easily cooked. They were called Bistroi, and eventually bistros.

by Anonymousreply 1801/28/2013

I can understand why Quebers are insecure but why are the french concerned about using a few english words?

by Anonymousreply 1901/28/2013

[quote] why are the french concerned about using a few english words?

A few rotten apples can spoil the bunch. Much like the vocal fry and uptalk epidemic.

by Anonymousreply 2001/28/2013

Didn't Tony Blair tell a story about Bush complaining that the French didn't know the meaning of the word "entrepreneur"?

by Anonymousreply 2101/28/2013

Interesting, R18, I never knew that.

by Anonymousreply 2201/28/2013

Mot-diesse sounds like a brand of tampons -

Ladies! Use "Mot-Diesse" for that extra fresh feeling!

by Anonymousreply 2301/28/2013

That's mot-dièse, s'il vous plaît.

by Anonymousreply 2401/28/2013

R7 It's not quantity,it's quality! The French are assholes BUT for good reason.It's a beautiful language that hasn't been changed that much for centuries. As nice as English is, they want to keep their culture and their language intact. Though to be honest once again,the young people are speaking English and will use English words.That can't be stopped.

Spanish you say? Yuck!;)There are so many countries speaking it already compared to French that it doesn't merit a comparison to begin with.

I saw Marion Cotillard on the Sag Awards on E and on Conan recently and she's still making little mistakes here and there. It's kind of obnoxious when she boasted about working with a language coach for months at a time.

by Anonymousreply 2501/28/2013

[all posts by right wing shit-stain # a removed.]

by Anonymousreply 2601/28/2013

Hashtag! Hastag! Hastag! And gay marriage, too!

by Anonymousreply 2701/28/2013

This doesn't surprise me at all. Most French people are racist and loathe anything that has to do with English. Just look at how the francophones are treating the anglophones in Canada. It's disgusting! French is a dying language anyway. The fact that they need to work so hard to "conserve" the language speaks volumes. The French language laws in Quebec are so strict because they believe the language will die out if the dreaded English people get to speak their own language. Talk about insecurities, yikes. It's a lost cause, English is so widely spoken and Spanish is gaining ground fast, same with Portuguese and the rise of Brazil. They might as well give up.

by Anonymousreply 2801/28/2013

Thanks, R18 -- that's fascinating (maybe even true?).

As much as I hate fascism, there may be a place for it in the preservation of language & I do appreciate the efforts of L'Académie Française. Now that William Safire is dead, the best Americans can do seems to be the occasional DL Grammar Nazi.

by Anonymousreply 2901/28/2013

R26, did you reply to the wrong post? R7 basically said the same thing as you.. I'm confused.

by Anonymousreply 3001/28/2013

First redtags and now THIS!

by Anonymousreply 3101/28/2013

Does anyone else agree with me on this?

The fact that the English language is flexible makes it perfect for technological innovation. When new industries arise, the English language accepts endless new jargon words without question. In my lifetime, I've seen the computer industry spring into existence and add I don't know how many words and new meanings to the OED: software, mainframe, cloud, hacker, kludge, download, javascript, etc.

Giving academics approval of which words are okay, slows down the techies who are inventing stuff.

by Anonymousreply 3201/28/2013

They're beginning to sound like the separatists in Quebec.

by Anonymousreply 3301/28/2013

But R32, for every good & useful piece of jargon (such as "software", "hacker", "kludge") that serves a purpose within a specific field, the English language's vaunted flexibility permits abominations to thrive: "they" as a singular pronoun; "I could care less" meaning the opposite; "irregardless"; "innovate"; "grow the economy"; "parenting"; etc., etc., etc.....

by Anonymousreply 3401/28/2013

It's a pound sign, not an hashtag.

French is one of the most beautiful languages in the world. Even though my ancestors are almost entirely German, mastering and using French in high school and college was much easier than German.

IMHO, Spanish is the ugliest and silliest European language. I'm of Generation X. Why was Spanish being taught to me in third grade? Preposterous! Looking back, more advanced math and science were far more important.

by Anonymousreply 3501/28/2013

I find German FAR more ugly than Spanish.

by Anonymousreply 3601/28/2013

Speaking of French pronunciation, would "Hercules" be "Ercules" in French?

And in Spanish "Jercules?"

by Anonymousreply 3701/28/2013

r32 Yeah, I agree. English has many advantages over French and other languages. Although English is not that simple a language, the spelling makes more sense, the grammar and pronunciation. The language is also inclusive and accepts foreign words.

It also helps that English is everywhere in popular culture and academics so almost everybody is exposed to it.

English is the international language and nothing can change that.

All that said, I do love French.

by Anonymousreply 3801/28/2013

In French, Hercules would be Hercule (Ercyule)

by Anonymousreply 3901/28/2013

R5 are you kidding? Quebecers love their anglicisms. Haven't you heard one of 'em talking about "le weekend"

by Anonymousreply 4101/28/2013

R40 must be even older than I am -- sounds like he actually lived through WWII (maybe even in France!).

by Anonymousreply 4201/28/2013

It's not as if Americans don't complain about the rise of Spanish in some areas. What was that hullabaloo about bilingual education?

by Anonymousreply 4301/29/2013

R40 You're sick take your meds. Not every Frenchman was a collaborator nor was he a partisan either. The truth was in between.Anti-Semitic asses eh? The biggest Jewish population in Europe by far resides in France today. The last two French presidents,Sarkozy and Hollande, have been half or part Jewish. How many American presidents have had a Jewish grandparent or father? Try none!

by Anonymousreply 4401/29/2013

I live in France and this type of thing is used strictly among a small group of academics things like email (or anything computer related) will always be in English..email= courrier électronique. pfft

by Anonymousreply 4501/29/2013

I agree with them about "takeaway." It's so overused and deductive. They might as well say "double plus good takeaway." Language is meant to be expressive not to reduce everybody to simple minded drones.

by Anonymousreply 4601/29/2013

I loves zee France...we make it with da OOOH la la...

by Anonymousreply 4701/29/2013

Mon dieu, you Americans just don't get it. You have such a utilitarian view of everything. According to you, a language is only important if a lot of people speak it. And if people in the past who spoke said language did bad things, then the language itself is worthless. Please! What on earth do they teach in American schools? I realize that foreign language instruction is woefully absent in your schools, but so must logical reasoning courses!

Every language has inherent value and beauty. Every language is part of le patrimoine de l'humanité. And some languages, such as French (or English, for that matter), possess incredibly rich literary traditions. Some languages such as French (or again English) have also been used to express humanity's great philosophical and scientific advances. Learn a language for its literature, for its history, for the culture it expresses, for its music. Don't learn a language simply because a lot of other people speak it. But please, you Americans, whatever you do, learn a foreign language. The rest of the world will thank you!

by Anonymousreply 4801/29/2013
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