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Aleksey Vayner, former Yale student whose douchey resume video went viral, dead at 29

A Yale student who catapulted to Internet fame for a video resume he sent to a prospective employer has died at his home in Queens, New York, according to reports.

Aleksey Vayner died at the age of 29, according to the New York City Medical Examiner.

A spokesman for the medical examiner told Ivygate that a man matching Vayner's description under the name of Alex Stone died on the morning of Jan. 19. She said the cause of death was still unknown.

Vayner had changed his name to Alex Stone after the video resume he sent to UBS for an investment banking job in 2006 went viral online.

In the video, titled 'Impossible is Nothing,' a gravely serious Vayner attempts to prove his mental and physical fitness by talking about the meaning of success while lifting 495-pound weights, smacking tennis balls faster than 140 miles per hour, ball-dancing with a scantily-clad woman and breaking seven bricks with his hand.

'Ignore the losers, bring your A-game, your determination and your drive to the field, and the success will follow you,' he says in the video.

The video was forwarded around Wall Street and quickly went viral.

The New York Times called it 'The Resume Mocked 'Round the World,' and Vayner told the newspaper that he thought he might never get a job in the financial industry as a result of the video's popularity.

While the video became the laughing stock of Wall Street, Vayner said he was not amused.

'He said he feels like a victim,' the Times reported in October 2006, three months after the video was recorded. 'The job materials that were leaked and posted for public view included detailed information about him that allowed strangers to scrutinize and harass him, he said.'

Vayner is listed online as the manager of a company called Ultimate Success Systems, LLC, and a nonprofit called 'Empower a Child,' and he has maintained a YouTube channel where he posts videos of himself performing athletic feats, such as punching through a block of wood and cracking bricks with his palm.

Former Yale student seeking finance job with infamous 'Impossible Is Nothing' video resume is reported dead at age 29

By Daily Mail Reporter

PUBLISHED: 00:00 EST, 24 January 2013 | UPDATED: 17:51 EST, 24 January 2013

* Comments (20) * Share * o o o

Aleksey Vayner, the very determined Yale student with the infamous video resume, died this weekend, according to reports

Aleksey Vayner, the very determined Yale student with the infamous video resume, died this weekend, according to reports

A Yale student who catapulted to Internet fame for a video resume he sent to a prospective employer has died at his home in Queens, New York, according to reports.

Aleksey Vayner died at the age of 29, according to the New York City Medical Examiner.

A spokesman for the medical examiner told Ivygate that a man matching Vayner's description under the name of Alex Stone died on the morning of Jan. 19. She said the cause of death was still unknown.

Vayner had changed his name to Alex Stone after the video resume he sent to UBS for an investment banking job in 2006 went viral online.

In the video, titled 'Impossible is Nothing,' a gravely serious Vayner attempts to prove his mental and physical fitness by talking about the meaning of success while lifting 495-pound weights, smacking tennis balls faster than 140 miles per hour, ball-dancing with a scantily-clad woman and breaking seven bricks with his hand.

'Ignore the losers, bring your A-game, your determination and your drive to the field, and the success will follow you,' he says in the video.

The video was forwarded around Wall Street and quickly went viral.

The New York Times called it 'The Resume Mocked 'Round the World,' and Vayner told the newspaper that he thought he might never get a job in the financial industry as a result of the video's popularity.

While the video became the laughing stock of Wall Street, Vayner said he was not amused.

(cont.)

by Anonymousreply 3901/26/2013

Sorry about the fucked-up cut-and-paste posting--the link has the article in clearer shape.

by Anonymousreply 101/24/2013

Sad. Reminds me of my partner's college best friend who similarly self-aggrandized with fake resume details and over the top personality traits, though not to the extent of this guy. He OD'd at 34.

by Anonymousreply 201/24/2013

It's not sad. If it happened more often, the world would be a better place.

by Anonymousreply 301/24/2013

He was hot with his clothes off, as the pictures at the link show (though certainly not with them on). He clearly was a man of at least some genuine achievement, given his great body. It's weird that wasn't enough for him and that he clearly lied so much and had to create other faked accomplishments.

by Anonymousreply 401/24/2013

Here's the original video that went viral and got him in so much trouble.

Even considering he's Eastern European, he comes across as so sociopathic--his affect is so flat and creepy.

by Anonymousreply 501/24/2013

Was he Jewish? He claimed on a resume that he wrote a book about the Holocaust.

by Anonymousreply 601/24/2013

I agree his face wasn't attractive, but he was hot with his clothes off.

by Anonymousreply 701/24/2013

That's sad - he had good intentions. People make video resumes for college all the time.

It wasn't an awful video - boring and a bit too much of braggart, yes. But he didn't deserve to be ridiculed so much.

by Anonymousreply 801/24/2013

taught tennis to Jerry Seinfeld and Harrison Ford

was a specialist in Chinese orthopedic massage

college recommendation from the Dalai Lama

frequented the C.I.A. firing range

competed in a martial-arts competition that took place in a secret system of tunnels underneath Woodstock, New York

forged passports for the Russian Mafia

won two games in a tennis match against Pete Sampras

one of four people licensed to handle nuclear waste in the state of Connecticut

must register his hands as lethal weapons at airports

has killed two dozen men in Tibetan gladiatorial contests

by Anonymousreply 901/24/2013

Four and a half years ago, Jordan Bass, a freshman at Yale, met a tall blond Uzbek immigrant named Aleksey Garber—a prospective student who, in this era of increased specialization, stood out for his almost cartoonish well-roundedness: a twenty-first-century Renaissance man. Last week, Garber achieved notoriety when a job application that he’d submitted to investment banks was forwarded, with sarcastic glee (“Certainly one way to get your foot in the door . . .”), around the young-professionals circuit, but back in 2002 he was still a student at Manhattan’s Dwight School. He told Bass that he’d taught tennis to Jerry Seinfeld and Harrison Ford. He was a specialist in “Chinese orthopedic massage,” and had the business card to prove it. The Dalai Lama had apparently written his college recommendation.

The occasion for the Bass-Garber meeting was Bulldog Days, an annual event where high-school seniors who have been admitted to Yale descend on New Haven for a sample of collegiate life: beer-drinking, pizza, relentless a capella. Garber preferred to remain in the dorm and tell Yalies all about himself. “He talked for, like, six hours straight the first night,” Bass, who is now an editor at McSweeney’s, recalled the other day. “He had a lot of affiliations with élite institutions. He was an action star, an espionage expert, and a professional athlete. He would be on the C.I.A. firing range one day and, the next, at a martial-arts competition that took place in this secret system of tunnels underneath Woodstock, New York. Then he was at a skiing competition in Switzerland. He told us the Russian Mafia had him forging passports.”

One of Bass’s roommates began surreptitiously transcribing Garber’s James Bond-like stories. “He became kind of a circus attraction,” Bass said. “By the end of the weekend, we were bringing people over just to sit by him and listen.” Bass tried calling the number on Garber’s card, and reached an older-sounding woman. “It seemed like it might have been his mom, or something,” he said. Bass wrote an article for the campus tabloid, Rumpus, entitled “CRAAAZY PREFROSH LIES, IS JUST WEIRD.”

Garber decided to attend Yale anyway. (Upon arriving, he sent Bass an e-mail complaining that the Rumpus story belittled his Buddhism.) Since then, he has changed his last name to Vayner, and, at least by his own account, started modelling (he charges two hundred dollars an hour), written a book (“Women’s Silent Tears: A Unique Gendered Perspective on the Holocaust”), founded a charity for troubled kids, served as an adviser at an investment firm called Vayner Capital Management, taken up ballroom dancing (the international rumba is his specialty), won two games in a tennis match against Pete Sampras, retired from professional martial arts, and mastered the art of “bone-setting.” He is now a senior. He chose to include much of this information in his résumé, which referred potential employers to a short video depicting him at the gym (evidently, he bench-presses nearly five hundred pounds), serving a tennis ball (a hundred and forty miles an hour, or so it appears), skiing, ballroom-dancing, and splitting a stack of bricks with his bare hand. (cont.)

by Anonymousreply 1101/24/2013

(cont.) On its face, Vayner’s C.V. may be the world’s greatest, which raises the question of why he’s looking for an entry-level finance position—the fallback for so many unremarkable Ivy Leaguers who lack dual backgrounds in espionage and Eastern medicine. When the e-mails started circulating, one blog, IvyGate, said it had uncovered a number of dubious coincidences: “Women’s Silent Tears” contains material that was lifted from an online Holocaust encyclopedia; Vayner’s charity (Youth Empowerment Strategies) shares its name with a New Jersey consultancy; and his investment firm borrows much of its mission statement from a company in Denver. (Vayner sent a cease-and-desist letter to IvyGate.) Meanwhile, Vayner’s legend grows, like that of a latter-day Paul Bunyan. Acquaintances report hearing that he is one of four people licensed to handle nuclear waste in the state of Connecticut, that he must register his hands as lethal weapons at airports, and even that he has killed two dozen men in Tibetan gladiatorial contests.

Never mind what’s apocryphal and what’s real in all this. Will the résumé get results? The advertising executive Donny Deutsch said on MSNBC that he was impressed. (“I would hire this guy sight unseen.”) Yale alumni seem a little less so. On the listserv for the Class of 1970, for instance, a message with the subject “Sad and bizarre Yale story” linked to a blog where a man had attempted to diagnose Vayner’s condition. “On the basis of the DSM IV, my point of view is that he is possibly a victim of histrionic personality disorder,” the post read.

An alumnus replied to the message, suggesting mere borderline personality disorder, and adding, “It goes back almost to Freud, and it fits this guy like a counterfeit Armani suit.”

Jordan Bass’s father, as it happens, was in the Class of 1970. “It was my son who wrote the Rumpus piece,” he wrote to everyone. “I recall, at the time, thinking that a guy with this level of grandiose and delusional thinking would either be homeless or president in twenty-five years.”

Yale has declined to comment on the situation. (“That’s unfortunate,” a spokeswoman said, when she was told that this magazine was running a story about Vayner.) Vayner did not return messages, but in his video, between athletic stunts, one can see him dressed in a business suit, giving an interview. “Success is a mental phenomenon, not a physical one,” he says. “To achieve success, you must first conceive it, and believe in it.”

by Anonymousreply 1201/24/2013

Many of the stories are from high school days then? He was naive and foolish and a liar but he didn't deserve what he got. Poor guy.

by Anonymousreply 1301/24/2013

So that's where Dos Equis got the idea.

by Anonymousreply 1401/24/2013

It's unsurprising given the numbers of pathological on this forum that some of them would feel sympathy for him.

"Poor guy" indeed. He made his own problems.

by Anonymousreply 1501/24/2013

I wonder if he'll add:

Died 2013 - Present

To his resume.

by Anonymousreply 1601/24/2013

Someone smarter could have pulled this off.

by Anonymousreply 1701/24/2013

I'm lucky. I'm one of those slugs who never tries very hard at anything but always ends up doing all right. Mediocre college and a mediocre resume. Yet I have a huge office, great salary, an assistant, and honestly don't do very much. I part-time High School student could do my job. I always pity these people.

If I weren't good looking and easy to get along with I'd probably be living in a cardboard box somewhere. I probably wouldn't mind it to much cause I could sleep in everyday.

I just have zero ambition.

by Anonymousreply 1801/24/2013

[quote] That's sad - he had good intentions. People make video resumes for college all the time.

It wasn't for college. It was for a job at a Wall Street bank

by Anonymousreply 1901/24/2013

it seems fairly obvious that he was mentally ill--the grandiosity is a classic symptom. Just sad.

by Anonymousreply 2001/24/2013

Wow, this is shocking news.

by Anonymousreply 2101/24/2013

The link below is Aleksey at a Harvard/MIT conference in 2010 where he explains how the infamous video (which was actually a tribute to his martial arts teacher, who passed away) was hijacked and posted online as his "résumé".

He seemed like a down-to-earth guy with really impressive talents who was scraped over the coals because of a small group of petty (and possibly jealous) pranksters.

He was also a very handsome guy; it just didn't come across very well in the "résumé" video because of the preconceived notions that people had about this guy.

I wish I could've met him. He would've made excellent husband material.

by Anonymousreply 2201/24/2013

[quote]he didn't deserve what he got.

What exactly did he get? Mocking, derision? Join the club. He couldn't imagine that such a video would be passed around? That's just idiotic.

by Anonymousreply 2301/24/2013

He sounds like that 5 Hour Energy guy.

by Anonymousreply 2401/25/2013

I love that guy R24! Especially when he holds the book with his feets.

by Anonymousreply 2501/25/2013

R16 is the funniest DL post I have read in months.

by Anonymousreply 2601/25/2013

I'd'veFHH

by Anonymousreply 2701/25/2013

This is a sad story. Simply put, almost no one is emotionally capable of being plucked from obscurity and into the viral world, where they are sitting ducks for endless derision, mocking, and threats. It wholly defines them, and with the permanency of the internet, it is inescapable.

Any small mistake is magnified infinitely. Before the internet, this video would have resulted in nothing more than a few HR people rolling their eyes and chucking it in the garbage. Now it was viewed by millions, who had no trouble piling on a mountain of scorn. It is absolutely a form of mob bullying. He couldn't "move past it" because there was nowhere to move. He was going to be viewed through that lens forever. It's horrible, and these situations are going to continue, with more tragic results.

by Anonymousreply 2801/25/2013

R18 - if you're single contact me

you may be my doppelganger

by Anonymousreply 2901/25/2013

Haven't seen much coverage of this story.

by Anonymousreply 3001/26/2013

Manti Teo must be seething with envy right now. All he got was a fake girlfriend.

by Anonymousreply 3101/26/2013

He viewed life as a competition. That was just dumb.

by Anonymousreply 3201/26/2013

Most DLers do too, r32.

by Anonymousreply 3301/26/2013

He also bought the Kool-Aid of individual superhuman success. The obsessive hate of communism has led to a completely false notion that there are no underlying social forces manipulating our fates and that all achievement is individual.

by Anonymousreply 3401/26/2013

It may be harsh... but one less sociopathic douchebag in the world? I'm not too bothered by that.

by Anonymousreply 3501/26/2013

Alex Stone was a porno star. He was the first one Jeff Stryker ever did anything to.

by Anonymousreply 3601/26/2013

You know who is pissed off? ME!

Do you know WHY I'm pissed off? I'm pissed off because I was valedictorian of my class, National Honor Society, 1550 SATs, class best athlete, class president and much much more. I applied to Yale the same year this asshole did and he got in and I had to go Brown in Rhode Island.

Rot.

by Anonymousreply 3701/26/2013

The classic Saturn Return check out.

by Anonymousreply 3801/26/2013

[quote]scraped over the coals

The expression is "raked over the coals" r22.

by Anonymousreply 3901/26/2013
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