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How Much Longer Before Music CDs Go Extinct?

By the end of the 2010s? What will be next? iTunes? iTunes doesn't have CD quality yet. What about album booklets? Just PDFs?

by Anonymousreply 901/24/2013

CDs, MP3 Players, Cable Boxes Are Doomed, Says 'Gadget Graveyard'

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has tallied of the results of its 2013 'Gadget Graveyard' survey, and it would appear that most members of the technical professional organization do not have faith in the lasting power of entertainment gadgets.

The survey was held online earlier this month and at CES last week. More than 1,700 IEEE members, engineers, engineering students, and CES attendees cast more than 25,000 votes in total, determining which gadgets they believe to live on through 2013, and which ones they expect to go the way of the dodo by year's end.

The IEEE, by the way, touts itself as being "the world's largest technical professional organization," and produces publications, holds conferences, and organizes educational programs all aimed at "advancing technology for the benefit of humanity."

As for which gizmos the IEEE thinks will be hitting the Gadget Graveyard in 2013, electronics for entertainment media took the "top" spots. CDs were deemed most likely to go extinct, with over 75 percent of respondents saying that digital and cloud music files will put the old media format to bed this year.

Streaming media services had a good amount of clout with respondents in general, as 58 percent think radios will die out, 55 percent say MP3 players will, 53 percent agreed for DVDs, and 51 percent believed the same for cable boxes. This certainly isn't been the first time people have called for the death of these formats, so it remains to be seen whether or not these old stalwarts will hang on for one more year.

Not every poll result correlated with common assumptions, though. Despite modern society's increasing insistence on turning to smartphones and tablets for all their technological needs, the IEEE says that many traditional single-function devices will stay strong over the next 12 months. 62 percent of respondents believe that desktop PCs will continue to withstand the rise of smart devices, while a whopping 75 percent think that phones won't be able to replace cameras just yet. Similar results were found for car keys (60 percent) and GPS systems (58 percent).

Finally, the IEEE claimed that paper-based products will stay alive too, even if laptops and tablets keep many of today's students from ever taking notes the old-fashioned way. 81 percent think printers are in no danger, 74 percent believe printed money will be fine, and 64 percent say that spiral-bound notebooks will hang on as well.

by Anonymousreply 101/24/2013

[quote] 55 percent say MP3 players will

Why would mp3 players die out, mp3s are the reason cds will go extinct. I know smart phones are now the primary mp3 players, but a lot of us still don't use them. I can't believe mp3 players will completely go extinct. What I like are cordless headphones with an mp3 player built-in, but that format never took off, or hasn't taken off yet. I use my $80 pair everyday.

As OP notes, iTunes still doesn't offer lossless audio, and the few places that do charge more for it than mp3s. That's outrageous, digital music should be far cheaper than cds, there's no manufacturing or distribution costs. As long as the greedy record companies keep gouging the consumer, I won't feel an once of guilt about downloading most of my music for free.

Artists should cut out the middle-man and go independent, they can upload their albums to iTunes without a record label jacking up the cost.

by Anonymousreply 201/24/2013

iPods plays mp3s.

Artists should just sign distribution deals, and have total control over the product. That's what a lot of people do today.

by Anonymousreply 301/24/2013

I use my iPod all the time but I guess most people now just keep music on their phones. True? I guess it makes more sense to be able to download music directly to your mp3 source but I prefer having them separate. Of course, I still buy CDs rather than download when possible so I don't consider myself representative.

by Anonymousreply 401/24/2013

I'm ok with high bitrate mp3s as a replacement for cds, because tests have shown very high bitrate mp3s are indistinguishable from cds. The only problem is you can't edit them without having to save them back to mp3s, which is called transcoding and degrades the quality. It's easy to edit songs on your computer, I can often improve a song by doing a re-edit, and I also think it's fairly necessary with dance music because the 12" versions usually have mostly boring beats during the intro and outro. If they do away with cds, they better start offering lossless everywhere for the same price. I don't know what the resistance is to it now, I guess they don't like perfect copies floating around on the internet, but that's happening anyway. Flac is becoming nearly as popular as mp3s for pirated music.

by Anonymousreply 501/24/2013

[quote]Why would mp3 players die out, mp3s are the reason cds will go extinct.

They mean single-purpose mp3 players such as Creative Zens will die out, because now everyone listens to music on his smartphone or iPod. (iPods now do so much more than just play music; they're like little iPads.)

by Anonymousreply 601/24/2013

[quote] digital music should be far cheaper than cds

And e-books should be far cheaper than real books. But they're not.

by Anonymousreply 701/24/2013

Hopefully they never go extinct. They sound a fuck of a lot better than Mp3's.

by Anonymousreply 801/24/2013

Now, when you buy a CD from Amazon, the songs are ripped and placed in your cloud on their website.

by Anonymousreply 901/24/2013
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