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America! has finally arrived in my local supermarket in London

This is a very new thing to have an American products section in a regular Tesco supermarket. You used to have to go to expensive sort of delis, in a few very American populated areas.

Should I be excited about any of this stuff?

All I bought was Bazooka, which was OK...I think it's not what it was (what is?) and Willy Wonka gobstoppers and I thought I'd faint from the chemicals inside them.

I took a pic.

If you were an American in London would you be pleased to see any of this stuff?

What do you recommend?

by Anonymousreply 23602/03/2013

If you click on the pic and then click again, it blows up so you can actually see what's going on.

by Anonymousreply 101/13/2013

Where in London is this Tesco?

by Anonymousreply 201/13/2013

I don't like any of that stuff. Maybe the mustard, hot sauce and beef jerky.

by Anonymousreply 301/13/2013

I love loads of that stuff, OP! Which Tesco is it?

by Anonymousreply 401/13/2013

Why is Tesco bringing you the worst of American food?

by Anonymousreply 501/13/2013

The A-1 Steak Sauce is a definite must, plus the grits. Sadly, though, I see no Kraft Mac and Cheese dinner, which I have to have friends either ship to me or mail to me.

by Anonymousreply 601/13/2013

Oh yes. Sweet-Tarts.

by Anonymousreply 701/13/2013

Are they selling AK47s, by any chance? Because nothing says American selection like a semi automatic weapon next to the Cool Whip.

by Anonymousreply 801/13/2013

Jif & A1 is all you need to concern yourself with. The rest as you say is shite.

by Anonymousreply 901/13/2013

Jif is shit and contains hydrogenated fat and HFCS. A1 is shit too.

by Anonymousreply 1001/13/2013

The Snyders pretzels maybe. The Louisiana Gold. Candy is candy. I like Jr Mints and butterfingers. Canned pumpkin shaves off some time, but canned anything has problems.

by Anonymousreply 1201/13/2013

If you are looking at these sort of products I am guessing you are not much into cooking from scratch.

So with that said, I'll second the A-1 steak sauce. Also the stove top stuffing is ok and also the hamburger helper can be ok.

by Anonymousreply 1301/13/2013

Stove Top has hydrogenated fat AND HFCS.

The WORST of America.

by Anonymousreply 1401/13/2013

By the way, OP, oh my God, these Chocodiles, these Chocodiles, OP, oh my God, these Chocodiles!

by Anonymousreply 1501/13/2013

What, no assault rifles?

by Anonymousreply 1601/13/2013

It's the 24 hr one in Kensington (West Cromwell Road).

They've also introduced all sorts of new things, including a bakery/cafe called Euphorium which is so rip-off expensive, it's absurd.

No one buys anything and who wants to sit in a fucking supermarket drinking coffee at top 'boutique' coffee shop prices...with, of course, the horrid noise that passes for pop music these days, blaring away, to attract 'the young' who wouldn't dream of paying so much.

by Anonymousreply 1701/13/2013

I don't buy any of that stuff except maybe Crisco for frying chicken but only if I can't find real lard. Stove Top can be made better by adding onion, sage and celery to it but if you do that you might a well make it all from scratch.

by Anonymousreply 1801/13/2013

When I live in London during the summer I have no problem finding food that is tastier than anything we have on this side of the Atlantic. I swear only in the UK can one find truly good tasting white bread. Same for deli foods. The quality in the UK is a little better than we have in the US.

With the exception of Snyder's Pretzels (from my beloved Baltimore area) I don't believe there is anything in that picture I have purchased here in the US.

Tesco's stores in the US (which are sadly closing) have a UK section and I buy several of their products, but they are really overpriced. Salad Cream, Mango Chutney, Curry powder and mustard are just a few of the items I buy at F&E.

by Anonymousreply 1901/13/2013

LMAO...that's hilarious, OP. I recommend getting some peanut butter, Nerds, and Fruit Rollups.

by Anonymousreply 2001/13/2013

As a Southerner, I certainly enjoy hominy grits, but those Quaker instant grits are not likely to be very good. I do eat the plain ol' French's yellow mustard, and of course the Tabasco sause. Hershey's Milk Chocolate, Butterfinger, Payday, are all good candy bars, but that Jolly Rancher stuff is just chemicals like you say about the Bazooka. The cornbread type of Stovetop Stuffing is ok if you don't have time or energy to make Chicken and Dressing or Pork and Dressing for real.

by Anonymousreply 2101/13/2013

It's all gas station food.

by Anonymousreply 2201/13/2013

The funny thing is, I've never even seen Jolly Rancher soda before!

by Anonymousreply 2301/13/2013

R14 None of the food in that picture is even remotely healthy. Even the Quaker Oats have HFCS.

by Anonymousreply 2401/13/2013

[quote] The A-1 Steak Sauce is a definite must,

Forget the A-1 and just use HP sauce. It's far superior.

by Anonymousreply 2501/13/2013

Wow, US exports obesity now.

Aren't they all Karo, really?

Goodbye, food...

by Anonymousreply 2601/13/2013

What? No Rice-a-Roni?

by Anonymousreply 2701/13/2013

Could someone explain "salad cream" to me. I heard an English friend mention it once and it looks like a cross between Ranch dressing and tartar sauce. Do you eat it on a salad and do they not appreciate a nice vinaigrette?

by Anonymousreply 2801/13/2013

Almost afraid to ask: what is that round thing on the candy shelf with the Tabsaco logo?

by Anonymousreply 2901/13/2013

Jesus Christ! £4.50 for grits? A silo of corn is cheaper!

by Anonymousreply 3001/13/2013

Libby canned pumpkin is excellent to have on hand if your dog gets the runs... That's about the only practical product on those shelves.

by Anonymousreply 3101/13/2013

That's a tabasco-infused chocolate thing, r29. I got one a couple of months ago; haven't eaten it yet. It says "Tabasco brand spicy chocolate." Sort of in the Mexican tradition, I guess. It comes in a nifty flat round tin.

by Anonymousreply 3201/13/2013

Why would they bother selling American candy in the UK? Confectionary in the UK is light years better than the swill made in the US.

by Anonymousreply 3301/13/2013

Is it something like Abuelita chocolate tablets R32?

by Anonymousreply 3401/13/2013

Top left milk chocolate-covered "Flipz"pretzels. Straight down strawberry "Twizzlers". Three shelves down left of Bazooka "Jolly Rancher"hard candy. One shelf down to the right "Jiff"peanut butter(creamy)the best! One shelf down "A1"steak sauce.one shelf down "Hamburger Helper",and "Stove-Top"stuffing,salty comfort food. The food snobs here have already started. Ignore them! They think we don't know the difference between good home-cooked food,fancy(ridiculous) restaurant food and fun easy guilty pleasure comfort food.Beware the "make your own mayonnaise"nazis! To really upset them I'll mention that adding a cup of cut-up "velveeta"(Armageddon-proof) melt able cheese-adjacent cheese,to "Hamburger Helper" at the end of prep.(OMG)!

by Anonymousreply 3501/13/2013

Nothing says American Wild West like beef jerky.

by Anonymousreply 3601/13/2013

Probably, r34. The tin says "8 pieces" and the picture illustrates a triangular wedge. I haven't had them yet though, and I haven't had the Abuelita ones either.

by Anonymousreply 3701/13/2013

We'uns git it! Everthang in the US is bad, and everthang in other places is good.

by Anonymousreply 3801/13/2013

No, R38, but the choices there aren't the best we can offer.

by Anonymousreply 3901/13/2013

Bacon-flavored popcorn? That could go either way, horrible or fabulous. Might be worth a try.

Aside from that: A-1 steak sauce, Flipz milk chocolate covered petzels (skip the peanut butter chocolate ones), and Tootsie Rolls. Canned pumpkin is good for making excellent 2-ingredient brownie muffins (Weight Watchers recipe at link).

by Anonymousreply 4001/13/2013

r19, for truly delish white bread, try Italian markets. By this I mean the samll, family owned grocerias which offer top-quality foods and breads. The bread will be very crusty, dense and flavorful. There is NO comparison to what is called Italian bread and the genuine thing. Sometimes it is available sliced, most often not.

by Anonymousreply 4101/13/2013

[quote] Libby canned pumpkin is excellent to have on hand if your dog gets the runs... That's about the only practical product on those shelves.

What do you do with canned pumpkin? Bake your dog a pie?

Most of these products are off brands (things that are really only sold in small convenience stores)

by Anonymousreply 4201/13/2013

If you've never tasted them, I suggest trying out Pop Tarts, both the fruit flavored kind (strawberry, blueberry, etc.) and the non-fruit flavored kind (s'mores, cinnamon, etc.). Make sure to pop them into the toaster but don't burn them. Very yummy but not nutritious or good for you at all.

Goober Grape is awesome but you probably have to like PBnJ and you have to not care what those chemicals do to your body. I haven't had it in years but I remember it fondly.

by Anonymousreply 4301/13/2013

R32, did you get the Tabasco chocolate product in America? I've never seen it here in Calif, not even in a mercado (maybe because I never thought to look for such a thing).

by Anonymousreply 4401/13/2013

3.50 for hamburger helper??? that's 7$

by Anonymousreply 4501/13/2013

Boylan's soda is delish, esp. the birch beer. It is not like mainstream sodas at all.

When friends brought a guest from England to Thanksgiving, he got his first taste of pumpkin pie, and liked it. As for A1 steak sauce, I'd rather have HP sauce.

by Anonymousreply 4601/13/2013

Tabasco chocolate:

by Anonymousreply 4701/13/2013

Oh, I just noticed the Snyder pretzel bits in the lower left corner. SO FING GOOD especially the jalapeno and cheddar flavors but you really can't go wrong with any flavor.

by Anonymousreply 4801/13/2013

Why no M&Ms there?

by Anonymousreply 4901/13/2013

Nerds .. yum.

by Anonymousreply 5001/13/2013

Goober, Marshmellow fluff, syndders, junior mints, and baby ruth.

by Anonymousreply 5101/13/2013

WTF is bacon pop? Bacon-flavored popcorn?

I've never even seen some of these things sold in this country, so how in the hell did they determine what they'd sell over there?

by Anonymousreply 5201/13/2013

[quote]Nothing says American Wild West like beef jerky.

Absolutely. Too bad that Jack Link crap isn't beef jerky.

by Anonymousreply 5301/13/2013

Also, they need far less Lucky Charms and more Cap'n Crunch.

by Anonymousreply 5401/13/2013

"Why no M&Ms there?"

There were bags of peanut M&Ms.

by Anonymousreply 5501/13/2013

You can have a quintessentially American childhood favorite: a fluffernutter! I loved them when I was younger, very sweet but good.

Get the Jif and the marshmallow fluff (same shelf as Jif, to the right). Use soft white bread, spread one slice with Jif, the other with Fluff, put together and slice on the diagonal. Serve with milk. You'll be pronouncing your "r"'s and applying for NRA membership in no time.

by Anonymousreply 5601/13/2013

I've seen the Tabasco chocolate at World Market, I think.

by Anonymousreply 5701/13/2013

Why no cracker jacks? You can't get much more American nostaligia than CJs.

by Anonymousreply 5801/13/2013

There's been a run on Three Musketeer bars. There's only one left on the shelf.

by Anonymousreply 5901/13/2013

Oops, I didn't see the M&Ms in the yellow bags hanging right out there in mid-air. I'd get those.

by Anonymousreply 6001/13/2013

Sadly, you've gotten a wide sampling of our crap foods. The things I like:

Any of the Snyder's pretzels should be good (look for honey mustard).

Beef jerky (an acquired taste, IMO)

Stove Top stuffing -- I love stuffing. I prefer homemade with lots of veggies, but this is quick. Tends to bee too salty, though.

The candy seems to be mainly Hershey's crap (it will taste salty to European palates). I do like Junior Mints and the Payday candy bars (no fake chocolate)

Pop Tarts if you're stoned.

by Anonymousreply 6101/13/2013

I remember when I lived in Italy in 1980 you could not find peanut butter ANYWHERE.

For the opposite of OP's post-- the Tesco-owned Fresh & Easy chain here in the western US (which, alas, is up for sale) has a British foods section, with Marmite, HP sauce, Heinz stuff, etc. They had even more for the holidays- Tesco brand shortbread in holiday shapes, Christmas pudding, etc.

by Anonymousreply 6201/13/2013

Most of that stuff is junk. The good junk would be the Hanover pretzels and Jack Links jerky, especially if they start carrying the teriyaki beef chunks.

by Anonymousreply 6301/13/2013

I hate myself for eating them, but I love Pop Tarts. If I were an expat in London, I'd need to see some Nestle's chocolate chips so I could make some fucking COOKIES. "Biscuits" are weak and have no balls.

by Anonymousreply 6401/13/2013

Is that the Tesco near the Opera House?

What horrifies me is most of that stuff is CRAP!

by Anonymousreply 6501/13/2013

Go for the Nerds and the Snyder's pretzels. All the rest is crap.

by Anonymousreply 6601/13/2013

OP, what's on your shelves aren't the best choices of American food. I'm wondering who thought this was worth importing?

Why would Tesco import cartons of Eggnog?

I think the chocolate "shell" and Hershey's cocoa products are a waste. Fox's U-Bet, Nestle Quik or Bosco would be a better choice if you are looking to make chocolate milk or use as ice cream topping.

I think the candy is OK, but as somebody else pointed out, why would you buy American chocolate when you can get better European chocolate.

Boylan soda is ok, but I think better selections could be made. Cheer Wine (cherry soda) would be great. I didn't know there was a Jolly Rancher soda.

I would buy the Pop-Tarts because I like them. And also the grits just because I like grits with lots of butter.

The cereals are ok, but I'd rather have Cap'n Crunch or Chocolate Cheerios.

Two types of Karo syrup are not needed. How much is a person going to use that?

I would buy the Fluff. Jif maybe, although I prefer Skippy. Doesn't seem to be any jelly. You need Smuckers Grape for a peanut butter & jelly sandwich.

A1 steak sauce is ok, but I wouldn't buy it in London because I think HP Brown sauce would fit the bill just as well. I'm not sure what that is to the left of the A1, but if it's barbecue sauce, you'd do better with Sweet Baby Ray's.

If the store is going to stock Hamburger Helper then they need to stock Shake N Bake which is a coating for chicken or country fried steak.

What's missing are good potato chips. Where are the Ruffles, the Bugles, the Doritos, the Funyuns, the Pringles?

Also there could be better cookie choices. Oreos, Pepperide Farm or Little Debbie. And crackers: Club crackers, Triscuits or Chicken in a Biskit.

by Anonymousreply 6701/13/2013

About the only thing on those shelves that I'd buy is the canned pumpkin for breads and muffins.

You might want to pick up the Pop Tarts if you need to shingle a roof.

by Anonymousreply 6801/13/2013

Brown Sugar Cinnamon Pop Tarts are a guilty pleasure.

Jello is good too. Not really healthy either, but can satisfy a sweet tooth with relatively few calories.

by Anonymousreply 6901/13/2013

I was in London in May 2011 and I went into a convenience store on the Strand and saw Krispy Kreme donuts!

Also I was talking with an American family that were living in London and I asked the 12 year old boy what he missed and he said "Cheez Whiz!" I had to laugh at that. It reminded me of something I would have said at his age. You miss a can of squirt cheese.

by Anonymousreply 7001/13/2013

[quote]Beef jerky (an acquired taste, IMO)

I just found something called BACON jerky at Walgreen's. Now I can die happy.

by Anonymousreply 7101/13/2013

Looks like a selection of sweets and junk food more than anything. Certain cereals, Hersheys bars and Reeses Peanut Butter Cups have already established a footing in UK supermarkets and I can't see much else there that's worth getting excited about. I've seen bigger & better Polish food sections in supermarkets in the regions too.

I'd rather eat in an authentic American restaurant than buy US groceries (speaking as someone who has done both quite often in New York in recent years). I struggle to find reasonably-priced fresh items in NY supermarkets compared to the UK, Italy, France, Poland, Spain, Germany, Portugal etc. Maybe New York is a bad point of reference though?

by Anonymousreply 7201/13/2013

It's not a good selection.

They could at least have a decent Root Beer, something English people often love. They have that horrid sort of 'natural' Root Beer.

Also, I was hoping for more (exotic) Bubble Gums. Bazooka's a bore.

[quote]Jolly Rancher stuff is just chemicals like you say about the Bazooka.

I didn't say Bazooka was just chemicals, I said the Willy Wonka Gob Stoppers made me want to faint. Bazooka actually seems to be fine and I had no side effects eating it.

Also, Strawberry Fluff is pretty vile. Plain, I like, a lot.

Whowever made the selection doesn't know shit about American 'delicacies'...talking of which, they should have included at least a few more top notch high quality things, like Organic cookies etc...

I'm quite pleased to see Tootsie Rolls, but I was told a long time ago that they ruined the original recipe.

by Anonymousreply 7301/13/2013

R38, you are a defensive trog. But a good argument for being an expatriate.

Except the one thing all nations have in abundance: trogs like you. Can't escape 'em.

by Anonymousreply 7401/13/2013

I have a friend in the UK who buys Stove Top stuffing by the case-full and has it shipped over there. I wonder if she knows that she can buy it in Tesco now.

by Anonymousreply 7501/13/2013

Nerds and Butterfinger.

by Anonymousreply 7601/13/2013

[quote] I struggle to find reasonably-priced fresh items in NY supermarkets compared to the UK, Italy, France, Poland, Spain, Germany, Portugal etc. Maybe New York is a bad point of reference though?

What do you mean by fresh items? Produce? Meat, etc?

In NY, the outerboroughs are where you go for the good stuff these days because while the city now caters to tourists and wealthy transplants, the outerboroughs is where all of the various ethnic groups live and they require some quality products.

by Anonymousreply 7701/13/2013

Gads, that picture shows the trashiest foods!

by Anonymousreply 7801/13/2013

I'd try the peanut butter and jelly. You probably won't like it, but it's quintessentially American.

by Anonymousreply 7901/13/2013

[quote]They could at least have a decent Root Beer, something English people often love.

Barqs is the only good root beer. Everything else tastes watered down to me.

by Anonymousreply 8001/13/2013

I only buy all natural peanut butter that contains peanuts, peanut oil, and salt. I would never buy Jif, or anything else that contains hydrogenated fat. Mustard is good on meat sandwiches, canned pumpkin if great for baking, and Jr. Mints are fab IF they only use real sugar. Other than that I don't see anything worth eating. Much of it tastes absolutely terrible despite the pretty packaging.

by Anonymousreply 8101/13/2013

[quote]I've never even seen Jolly Rancher soda before!

LOL. The [italic]only[/italic] place I've seen it is at the 99 cent store!

It's odd that there's no Rice a Roni (the San Francisco treat) and Kraft Mac and Cheese. Those are practically staples in some regions. Velveeta cheese food product is another that comes to mind. It doesn't need refrigeration, so they could stow it right by the Stove Top. They're equally salty.

So there's Aunt Jemima pancake syrup, but no pancake mix?

What's the "Pauly" stuff at the bottom?

And what on earth would the British do with corn syrup?

Just spied the McIlhenny tabasco. Highly recommended if you like to spice stuff up. I even put it on my tuna.

by Anonymousreply 8201/13/2013

I'd miss peanut butter, might reach for some pretzels, and the sodas on the lower left look good.

But really: other than the peanut butter, I personally could live happily without anything in the pic for the rest of my days.

by Anonymousreply 8301/13/2013

Kraft Mac n Cheese and Tabasco have been sold in UK supermarkets for many, many years r82.

by Anonymousreply 8401/13/2013

All that food is for fat people, OP.

by Anonymousreply 8501/13/2013

Butterfinger is the only thing I see there that I would want.

by Anonymousreply 8601/13/2013

I'm eating bacon cheddar flavored Snyder's pretzel bits right now. Yum. They're definitely junk, but at least they don't have hydrogenated oil or HFCS.

Too bad they couldn't import Hebrew National hot dogs. The European version of a hot dog is a pale, skinny, glorified Vienna sausage.

by Anonymousreply 8701/13/2013

[quote]And what on earth would the British do with corn syrup?

That's what I want to know. There's only so much fudge a person can make. I know that some people use it in place of syrup, but it really seems so unnecessary.

by Anonymousreply 8801/13/2013

[quote]They could at least have a decent Root Beer, something English people often love.

I once treated some visiting English friends to a root beer float because they saw it on a menu and asked about it, and they thought it was the most revolting thing they ever tasted. They said it tasted like toothpaste.

by Anonymousreply 8901/13/2013

It often goes in American recipes like pecan pie, r88.

British chefs interested in making a classic version might look for it, the way American chefs might hunt down some suet or clotted cream for a recipe.

by Anonymousreply 9001/13/2013

"Sadly, though, I see no Kraft Mac and Cheese dinner"

It's called "Kraft Cheesey Pasta" and has been sold here for at least 30 years...

by Anonymousreply 9101/13/2013

I bought some Jif because I was having trouble finding the natural stuff. I used to like it when I was a kid but, now, it tastes nasty. It isn't as peanutty, it was too sweet, and the texture was nasty. It's better when you have to stir it.

by Anonymousreply 9201/13/2013

Such a pity that none of the healthy, nutritious foods that so the U.S. is so well known for are represented on this pitiful display.

by Anonymousreply 9301/13/2013

This isn't a criticism, but most things American taste a bit...too sweet to my palate.

And, my god, the cheese is flavourless...

But I'm British - I now live several thousand miles away. I have no right to talk about about another nations taste...

by Anonymousreply 9401/13/2013

[quote]It often goes in American recipes like pecan pie, [R88].

But don't the British have a version of corn syrup? Isn't that what treacle or golden syrup is?

by Anonymousreply 9501/13/2013

[quote]And, my god, the cheese is flavourless

You are so right r94. I'm an American, and I think Europe has better cheese, bread and chocolate. Here in America they are flavorless.

by Anonymousreply 9601/13/2013

Pop-tarts were run of my grocery shelves by Toaster Strudel. I wasn't aware they were still made.

Tabasco pepper sauces are obviously the only thing on these shelves that are really top quality.

by Anonymousreply 9701/13/2013

[quote]This isn't a criticism, but most things American taste a bit...too sweet to my palate.

It's a very legitimate criticism and I think it's revealing because people from outside the U.S. sample some of our foods that are not supposed to contain sugar and are shocked when they're sweet.

There was a point when American food manufacturers realized that adding sugar or corn syrup increases consumption. Why should tomato-based products have sugar in them? When I make a pot of sauce, I put a teaspoon of sugar in to cut acidity. However, Ragu, Prego, Spaghetti O's and other products are chock full of it. It's absolutely unnecessary for one's eating pleasure, but do you think that food manufacturers would bother adding it if it didn't do something for their bottom line?

Papa John's pizza has corn syrup in the [italic]dough[/italic]! Completely unwarranted. I can't think of other stuff off the top of my head. Point is that plenty of use here are annoyed by this very thing.

by Anonymousreply 9801/13/2013

[quote]But don't the British have a version of corn syrup? Isn't that what treacle or golden syrup is?

Yes, golden syrup, but it's not a good substitute for corn syrup in American recipes like fudge or seven minute frosting.

by Anonymousreply 9901/13/2013

[quote]But don't the British have a version of corn syrup?

I don't know. I doubt it.

[quote]Isn't that what treacle or golden syrup is?

Treacle and golden syrup are not the same thing as corn syrup, as neither one is made from corn. They're both by-products from the production of cane sugar, if I'm not mistaken.

Golden syrup is incredibly delicious btw and would make an incredible pecan pie, probably better than one made with corn syrup! Still, sometimes you try a new recipe and you just HAVE to have exactly what it says, you know?

by Anonymousreply 10001/13/2013

[quote]American food manufacturers realized that adding sugar or corn syrup increases consumption.

Isn't sugar also a good preservative? As in old fashioned foods like evaporated milk?

by Anonymousreply 10101/13/2013

An ingredient like corn syrup in a pecan pie has a lot more to contribute than taste. The make-up and consistency has to be similar or the final product won't set properly. For instance, most professional bakers insist that you must always use cane sugar when you bake because beet sugar does not behave the same way.

by Anonymousreply 10201/13/2013

I don't know if it was used as a preservative, R101. It's condensed milk that's sweetened and it's used for all sorts of baking. AFAIK, evaporated milk doesn't have sugar. It's just canned milk that smells and tastes bad. I don't recall it being sweet when my mother used to buy it (in case the frig went out).

by Anonymousreply 10301/13/2013

OP, that's hardly indicative of the best of America.

But then again, our stores here do the same. There's an "international" section and the British section has a few tea biscuits and Aero bars.

by Anonymousreply 10401/13/2013

The only things I could recommend from that stuff:

Tootsie rolls, junior mints, payday, butterfinger, it looks like baby ruth beside the butter fingers.. all the other candy is awful. (i like sweet tarts, twizzlers and sprees as well, but they are all sour chemical goodness)

The grits... Cook them and add a little cheddar or greyere cheese, a sprinkle of garlic powder, a slice of butter, salt and pepper. Canned pumpkin (for making pumpkin bread and pumpkin chocolate chip cookies/biscuits (MUCH easier that dealing with it)

The Crisco is good for making things like American style biscuits, which look a bit like scones, but are soft and fluffy in the middle. I used to make these for my british housemates, and they loved them with butter and jam with afternoon tea.

Jolly Rangers soda is in no way an American staple (and first time Ive seen it to be honest... I might avoid that)

by Anonymousreply 10501/13/2013

UK/Irish pancakes are different. They're like crepes. We used to eat them until we came to visit our cousins and his mam made us American pancakes. After that, we always had those at home. You don't need a mix to make pancakes. They are very easy to make from scratch.

by Anonymousreply 10601/13/2013

Pancakes are a cinch from scratch and taste much better than the boxed mixes.

by Anonymousreply 10701/13/2013

However, if you've never made pancakes from scratch, good luck.

by Anonymousreply 10801/13/2013

[quote]However, if you've never made pancakes from scratch, good luck.

Funnily enough, I once asked DL how to make American pancakes from scratch and had about 50 responses.

I took all the best advice & I can now make sensational American pancakes. I've become a master at it.

You don't see a lot of things like Pringles on those shelves because you can get them anywhere here.

Also, the whole venture is brand new. I should think it will improve with trial and error over the years.

Also...thanks for all the responses. I couldn't believe it when I returned to my computer this evening.

I'm going to re-read the whole thread tomorrow and then head out to Tesco with my list.

by Anonymousreply 10901/13/2013

[quote] Barqs is the only good root beer. Everything else tastes watered down to me.

A&W is and always has been superior to Barqs.

[quote] Tesco's stores in the US (which are sadly closing) have a UK section and I buy several of their products, but they are really overpriced. Salad Cream, Mango Chutney, Curry powder and mustard are just a few of the items I buy at F&E.

If you have Cost Plus World Market anywhere near you they also sell most of the items that you listed, and more.

by Anonymousreply 11001/13/2013

Butterfingers candy bar, or any of the candy. I like HP but A1 is pretty good.

Other than that, not much OP. Maybe the peanut butter if you like it.

Stay away from the cereal - they didn't even bring you the best of the bad stuff.

by Anonymousreply 11101/13/2013

When I lived in NYC a long time ago, I used to go to Myers Of Keswick for my English stuff.

It's still there!

by Anonymousreply 11201/13/2013

Re Junior Mints. They're better frozen.

by Anonymousreply 11301/13/2013

[quote] All that food is for fat people, OP

England is catching up to America with fat people

by Anonymousreply 11401/13/2013

Yes Myers of Keswick is still there. Greenwich Village also has some British restaurants: Tea & Sympathy and A Salt & Battery (fish & chips).

Also several of the grocery stores have international sections which sell overpriced British goods. For example, the Morton Williams on Bleecker Street sells salad cream, brown sauce, tins of beans, and cheese & onion Hula Hoops among other products.

by Anonymousreply 11501/13/2013

[quote]A&W is and always has been superior to Barqs.

If you like foamy water. Barqs has a nice deep flavor to it.

by Anonymousreply 11601/13/2013

Payday candy bars, Lifesavers,JIF, A-1, French's mustard, Stovetop stuffing, and Lucky Charms are all good.

by Anonymousreply 11701/13/2013

The English already have a wide range of insanely flavoured salt fat treats. Their potato chips (crisps) make ours seem gourmet. In London over the holidays I saw Chicken and Stuffing and Flame Broiled Steak. They were as hideous as you might imagine.

Thought the Worcestershire Sauce did actually taste like it.

by Anonymousreply 11801/13/2013

I did get the Tabasco chocolate at World Market. Inspired by this thread, I've just had a couple of segments and they're pretty good—Mexican-style chocolate, very spicy and flavorful.

I think that whole display (which someone here aptly described as "gas station food") selects either junk food or ingredients that go into American recipes for which the other ingredients are already available in British food stores. So canned pumpkin for pumpkin pie, corn syrup for pecan pie (can you get pecans elsewhere in the store?). You can get the eggs and so on in another aisle. Marshmallow fluff and peanut butter for fluffernutter sandwiches; the while bread is already to hand. You can make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich with any jam, though grape jelly is classic. The "British section" in American supermarkets usually has chocolate bars, tinned spotted dick, Bird's custard powder, etc.

For junk food, I'd go with the Pop tarts and a fluffernutter sandwich (but Jif isn't the best peanut butter, even among the commercial brands). Boylan soda is pretty classy as soda goes. Grits are pretty innocuous. The rest of it just depends on your taste for junk food—as people are saying here, a palate trained on British or European chocolate might not like Hershey's. Have fun experimenting, OP!

by Anonymousreply 11901/13/2013

R82, Regular corn syrup is used for baking, ie candy, cookies, pie, cakes, depending on the recipe.

by Anonymousreply 12001/13/2013

There's nothing there that I would want to buy. As a college kid, I would have loved the Lucky Charms. Not so much now.

I like Hershey's Special Dark chocolate (I know, I know, it's not great chocolate), but I've never purchased it, always just eating the miniatures around Halloween. So, probably wouldn't buy that.

Not being a food snob. There is American junk food that I'd probably at least appreciate the option of buying. But, none of it is in that picture.

by Anonymousreply 12101/13/2013

I bought a Ding Dong. I had to spit it out. Confirmed my opinion that American fast food is actually the worst on the planet. Nothing tastes natural.

by Anonymousreply 12201/13/2013

There is irony in some of our crisp flavourings, R118.

by Anonymousreply 12301/13/2013

I'd get the Crisco for baking.

by Anonymousreply 12401/13/2013

R122 Ding Dongs, like Twinkies, haven't been good for decades. When I was a kid the filling was fluffy and light and the cake was moist and spongy. Now they are dry and the filling is made out of god knows what. I tried one a few years ago and thought it was horrible.

by Anonymousreply 12501/13/2013

Crisco is awful for baking.

by Anonymousreply 12601/13/2013

I love Lucky Charms - haven't had them in ages. Had no idea that there was a chocolate version.

I should take a photo of the British foods section at my local Shaw's, I think OP would think the same as we think of the Tesco American shelves.

by Anonymousreply 12701/13/2013

I would want Tate's chocolate chip cookies. Trader Joes sells them as Highbrow chocolate chip cookies. They are thin and crisp.

by Anonymousreply 12801/13/2013

Quaker Oatmeal maybe, if that was all there was. Fortunately, we have better choices in the US. Same with JIF peanut butter. Aunt Jemima doesn't actually have any maple syrup in it - it's just HFCS and chemicals. There's a more palatable, real version of everything on the right half of the shelves available in America so you don't have to buy shit like that.

by Anonymousreply 12901/13/2013

[quote]An ingredient like corn syrup in a pecan pie has a lot more to contribute than taste. The make-up and consistency has to be similar or the final product won't set properly.

I'm not a big corn syrup fan, so I've made pecan pie with maple syrup before. It came out fine. It tasted great, set perfectly, and really you probably wouldn't even notice much of a difference. Much healthier in the end, too. imho Corn syrup is poison.

But yes for things like candy and fudge I suppose such a substitution probably wouldn't work.

by Anonymousreply 13001/13/2013

R82, The Karo corn syrup is invert sugar, and it has particular properties which are needed in some recipes. But there are other invert sugars in countries where corn is not the staple---rice syrup for example. Nowadays the food factories in the USA have substituted HFCS for cane sugar in all sorts of products, and most of these products are inferior to what people of my generation grew up with. I don't know if it is as unhealthy as people claim, but the products made with it in place of cane sugar simply do not taste as good.

by Anonymousreply 13101/13/2013

[quote] I bought a Ding Dong. I had to spit it out. Confirmed my opinion that American fast food is actually the worst on the planet. Nothing tastes natural.

You're confusing fast food (McDonalds, Burger King) with prepared, processed food (Twinkies, Ding Dongs).

But you're right. They're both crap.

by Anonymousreply 13201/13/2013

R117, Lucky Charms is probably half sugar. Why not buy a decent whole grain flake and high quality marshmallows? My 99c store had natural chocolate and mint flavored ones. Far cheaper and healthier and tastier way to go.

R121, Have to agree with you that Hershey's special dark chocolate is a less expensive alternative, now that cocoa can be considered a health food.

R122, Hostess products today represent the worst of American food, using the worst quality fat and sweetener. Look for better tasting copycats online. Or visit Simon's Restaurant at Palms Place in Vegas, where the make top-of-the line imitations.

by Anonymousreply 13301/13/2013

Corn syrup is not to be confused with High Fructose Corn Syrup.

Regular Karo (or corn) Syrup is what is used to make, among other things, hard candy, and has been used for over a century to do so.

by Anonymousreply 13401/13/2013

There are trans-fat free types of shortening now but I'm not sure they are used in American fast foods. I sometimes wonder why the companies can't use plain ol' butter, which is actually healthier than many of the fats they use.

I hope the US eventually shifts to a safe natural sweetener like coconut sugar or "Zero".

by Anonymousreply 13501/13/2013

[quote]There is irony in some of our crisp flavourings.

I love going to London and buying different flavors. If you put out a prawn flavored chip in the US people wouldn't even know what to make of it.

Also I wish that the US Pret a Manger stores would give us some of the sandwich flavors that the UK has. I liked the cheese and pickle sandwiches.

by Anonymousreply 13601/13/2013

I'll bet it's just that one store. A lot of Americans who work for big firms live in Kensington. Nobody else would pay top dollar (pounds actually) for that shit.

by Anonymousreply 13701/13/2013

"Crisco is awful for baking."

If you combine it with butter, it works better than either of them alone (especially in making cookies).

But Crisco is truly excellent for frying chicken.

by Anonymousreply 13801/13/2013

[quote]I sometimes wonder why the companies can't use plain ol' butter, which is actually healthier than many of the fats they use.

I'm sure they could, but the alternatives are cheaper, and that's why they don't.

by Anonymousreply 13901/13/2013

[quote]Barqs

[quote]A&W

[quote]Dad's

All root beers bow down to Hires, which I can no longer find in California and am very sad.

by Anonymousreply 14001/13/2013

[quote] I sometimes wonder why the companies can't use plain ol' butter, which is actually healthier than many of the fats they use.

Butter has a short shelf life compared to chemically made shortening.

by Anonymousreply 14101/13/2013

[quote]Golden syrup is incredibly delicious btw and would make an incredible pecan pie, probably better than one made with corn syrup! Still, sometimes you try a new recipe and you just HAVE to have exactly what it says, you know?

I'm trying to stay away from GMO-laden corn syrup. When I baked pecan and pumpkin pies over the holidays, I substituted either Lyle's Golden Syrup or homemade simple syrup for corn syrup. For dark corn syrup, I added molasses. Lyle's makes the best pecan pie I've ever eaten.

The only product in that photo I would buy is grits.

by Anonymousreply 14201/13/2013

Crisco ain't just for frying. You ever get a sticky something stuck in your hair, like gum? That's right, Crisco. Spread this on a baby's bottom, you won't even know what diaper rash is. Shoot, I seen ladies rub it under they eyes and on they husband's scaly feet. Clean the goo from a price tag, take the squeak out a door hinge. Lights get cut off, stick a wick in it and burn it like a candle. And after all that, it'll still fry your chicken.

by Anonymousreply 14301/13/2013

The only thing we ever used Karo syrup for was my mother's sleeve Pekingese dog's seizures. The sleeve pekes were prone to hypoglycemia and Karo worked like a charm.

[quote] I remember when I lived in Italy in 1980 you could not find peanut butter ANYWHERE.

In the 1970s, my mother's best friend's daughter went to school in TX. She used to have her mother send her ingredients for Italian food. They didn't sell mozzarella, ricotta, boxed lasagna pasta, decent tomato sauce, oregano, Italian seasoning and other basics for Italo-American cooking. The only time she ever saw cooked spaghetti was in cafeteria-style restaurants and it was baked casserole-style.

I'm sure it's changed.

To the person who had to go to a British store for mango chutney --- seriously? I can buy two or three manufacturers versions of mango chutney in my local supermarkets. Also, pretty decent frozen Indian foods like samosa, tandoori chicken, saags, biryanis, nans and butter chicken are in the freezer section. But no raita, unfortunately.

We have a large Polish community in the area, so we have a whole Polish section in the supermarket. And a Goya section for Latin American immigrants.

by Anonymousreply 14401/13/2013

[quote] Lucky Charms... Why not buy a decent whole grain flake and high quality marshmallows?

Why stop there? Why not grow your own wheat, puff the marshmallows from heated fresh cane sugar, milk the cow, and throw the pottery for the bowl?

Mary, it's #$%#$%# bowl of Lucky Charms, not an eagerly awaited new dish from rare terroir ingredients at Per Se.

by Anonymousreply 14501/13/2013

Besides stove top stuffing and pumpkin pie filler, there's nothing really good to eat. A lot of shit.

by Anonymousreply 14601/13/2013

Re-examining the shelves I'm intrigued by:-

Cookie Dough Bites

Life Saver Gummies

Nutter Butter Go packs

I want to try Hamburger Helper (or maybe not...they used to advertise a lot in America in the 70s and I never tried it)

Quaker Instant Grits.

I wish they had Count Chocula & American Variety Packs...I used to get them imported as a kiddie. I thought Cheerios were nasty though.

I also used to love Bazooka Grape Flavor in those large squares, remember?

by Anonymousreply 14701/13/2013

[quote] Nobody else would pay top dollar (pounds actually) for that shit.

I don't understand the pricing schemes. They don't seem to reflect the relative value of the products. The Stove Top (just cubed dried bread and a spice packet), for example, would retail for no more than $2 here and very often you can find it on sale for $1. It's 3.50 pounds (~$6, depending on the exchange rate). Yet the beef jerky retails anywhere from $6 to $8 here ($5 on sale) and it's also 3.50 pounds.

As for root beer? Nothing beats Sprecher's from Milwaukee. I have found one convenience store in my left coast city that carries single bottles.

by Anonymousreply 14901/13/2013

R100, when people sneer at English food, it's generally quite justified, in my view. However, Lyle's Golden Syrup is absolute nectar of the gods -- one of the exceptions that prove the rule (Colman's Mustard is the other one).

Thanks, R119 -- I have an appointment near a Cost Plus/World Market store tomorrow & will be sure to go look for the intriguing Tabasco chocolate.

by Anonymousreply 15001/13/2013

[quote]The only product in that photo I would buy is grits.

Oh, for shame! I only see instant grits there.

Well, if you absolutely needed a fix and there were no other alternatives... Just don't let me (or any other Southern cook) ever see you buying them!

;)

by Anonymousreply 15101/13/2013

Not only would I recommend none of those products (and don't buy them here in the U.S., with the possible exception of an occasional Hershey bar) but I have found that in Europe, American chocolate brands are widely available (and the product is often much better than it is here being produced for a more competitive market).

by Anonymousreply 15201/13/2013

[quote] Lyle's Golden Syrup is absolute nectar of the gods

Agreed.

by Anonymousreply 15301/13/2013

It's not all good stuff like in your picture, OP. The US also has some bad stuff.

by Anonymousreply 15401/13/2013

[quote] If you put out a prawn flavored chip in the US people wouldn't even know what to make of it.

Not if you lived in NYC. Korean delis are filled with stuff like that. Unfortunately, Korean delis are disappearing. There used to be one almost on every corner. But the owners' kids are all becoming doctors, computer whizz and financial specialists. Bummer.

by Anonymousreply 15501/13/2013

R151, I make regular grits here, but if I were stuck in the wilds of London I might consider instant grits.

I had them once at a friend's home. They are the same thing to regular grits as instant oatmeal is to real oatmeal, but they'll do in an absolute grits-jonesing pinch.

by Anonymousreply 15601/13/2013

I grow my own grits and marshmallows.

by Anonymousreply 15701/13/2013

[quote]Unfortunately, Korean delis are disappearing. There used to be one almost on every corner.

I remember this. I used to live on the stuff from their salad bars. The thought of it makes me feel sick now.

I used to to go the one on Bleeker Nr Carmine. Wonder if it's still there.

by Anonymousreply 15801/13/2013

R144, your mother's friend's daughter just didn't want to spend her party money on food when she could con her mother into sending her food. In the 1970s, she could have bought all of those products in any supermarket in Texas. I often ate spaghetti and lasagna at Pizza Huts in Texas in the 1970s. If she only saw "cooked spaghetti" at a cafeteria, it would be because that was the only place she went.

by Anonymousreply 15901/13/2013

I would ask then to import mallomars in winter, just in case there is a blizzard.

by Anonymousreply 16001/13/2013

Nutter Butters are good cookies, OP. Give them a try.

by Anonymousreply 16101/13/2013

[quote] Texas. I often ate spaghetti and lasagna at Pizza Huts in Texas in the 1970s

No you didn't.

You ate what you THOUGHT was spaghetti and lasagna at Pizza Hut,

No Sicilian would eat that rancid spooge.

by Anonymousreply 16201/13/2013

[quote]I would ask then to import mallomars in winter, just in case there is a blizzard.

Strange you should say that...we're expecting a snow storm tomorrow.

[quote]Nutter Butters are good cookies, OP. Give them a try.

Yes, I will, R161 and I'll report back.

by Anonymousreply 16301/13/2013

Agreed R162 - calling Pizza hut spaghetti Italian food is like going to Olive Garden.

There just weren't the variety of restaurants in the South in the 70's. Cafeterias, yes - but ethnic food? Nope.

by Anonymousreply 16401/13/2013

[quote] All root beers bow down to Hires, which I can no longer find in California and am very sad.

Probably because it's now owned by the same group that makes A&W (Dr Pepper/Snapple group) and they're slowly trying to kill it off.

by Anonymousreply 16501/13/2013

[bold] Killing A Product – The Demise of Hires Root Beer [/bold]

by Anonymousreply 16601/13/2013

Swiss Colony had these shrimp chips in their mall stores in the 80's.

by Anonymousreply 16701/13/2013

R149, are you anywhere near L.A.? If so you can find your rootbeer at the Galco's Soda Pop Stop in Highland Park.

They will also ship.

by Anonymousreply 16801/13/2013

[quote]if I were stuck in the wilds of London I might consider instant grits.... They are to regular grits as instant oatmeal is to real oatmeal, but they'll do in an absolute grits-jonesing pinch.

Permission granted, r156.

But just don't let me see it happening. That's all.

;)

by Anonymousreply 16901/13/2013

I'm in Sacramento, R168. Fortunately, said convenience store is only a few blocks from me. Thanks for the link. I might try it for their low cal rootbeer (delicious) and Orange Creme soda which they don't stock.

I had no idea there are so many brands of root beers.

by Anonymousreply 17001/13/2013

Tesco's in Sussex too. I like Tesco.

by Anonymousreply 17101/13/2013

R144, I grew up in TX in the seventies and Italian products were indeed available in Houston, at least. There were several import stores as well offering high quality olive oils and cheeses. My mother cooked a lot of Italian. The daughter just didn't want to spend her money or didn't want to shop.

by Anonymousreply 17201/13/2013

A1

Tobasco

Once every few months, Pop Tart

Those are the only items I see that I eat

by Anonymousreply 17301/13/2013

R145, Lucky Charms charges a lot for its chemical taste. Buying the 99c marshmallows I described and 99c whole wheat flakes is just as easy, far healthier, and a whole lot cheaper. Lucky Charms = poison.

R147, Hamburger Helper is also not food but chemicals. Many Americans don't know the difference. (Please see R147) Pasta or instant rice, spices, and some form of tomatoes would be better to buy.

by Anonymousreply 17401/13/2013

OP, (warning--do not ingest this) the quintessential American product to consume is called "Purple Drank" but you must make it yourself, at home.

It is a mixture of 7-UP, your choice of Jolly Roger Candies, and cough syrup. It is pure shit, and can kill you, but it is commonly imbibed amongst rappers and inner-city folk.

What I would do instead, is to make a Purple Drank-light, and just leave out the cough syrup. This way you can impress your English friends with your grasp of American ghetto culture and still be alive the next morning.

by Anonymousreply 17501/13/2013

The grits are authentic and Southern. Add butter and salt, and a little milk or cream.

by Anonymousreply 17601/13/2013

Oh sorry. They're INSTANT Grits. Not as good, but not horrific. If you prep them a bit and cook them a good while, they might be more like the real thing.

by Anonymousreply 17701/13/2013

eeech they are selling every cliche horrible product. We have a lot of wonderful products they are not selling.

by Anonymousreply 17801/13/2013

Pop Tarts are an unhealthy but decadent treat. Heat with butter on top and toast.

by Anonymousreply 17901/13/2013

And I cross my heart promise I won't feed them to you, R177.

I'm laughing at the thought of trying to explain grits to someone who's never eaten them.

by Anonymousreply 18001/13/2013

Wow, it's like dollar store garbage all rolled up into one delicious store isle. I'd recommend the A1 sauce on steak and maybe hamburger helper.

This saddens me. Europe will now develop fatty liver and all sorts of obesity related illnesses.

by Anonymousreply 18101/13/2013

Ok they only product I would recommend is the Snyder's pretzels. If they have the Buffalo wing flavor get those. Delicous!

by Anonymousreply 18201/13/2013

OMG if that's the representative choice of food products known as "american" I feel super dirty.

by Anonymousreply 18301/13/2013

6 why not make your own Mac and cheese?

by Anonymousreply 18401/13/2013

[quote]I'm laughing at the thought of trying to explain grits to someone who's never eaten them.

Well, admittedly grits occupy a place in Southern culture that's more than a little tough to explain, but basically they're just ground cornmeal porridge, usually eaten with savory things like butter, bacon or cheese for breakfast.

by Anonymousreply 18501/13/2013

No milk in grits unless you want it to taste like cream of wheat.

by Anonymousreply 18601/13/2013

The corn syrup for my fabulous pecan pie.

The jerky to eat at the beach.

The hot sauce for eggs and grits.

The A1 Sauce for steak if you don't have Pickapeppa sauce there.

by Anonymousreply 18701/13/2013

They used to sell IBC in glass bottles at restaurants with a huge markup in the price.

by Anonymousreply 18801/13/2013

It might be unorthodox, r186, but try making grits with buttermilk.

Especially if you're making cheese grits: Yum.

by Anonymousreply 18901/13/2013

Some people use cream in grits when making cheese grits. It's absolutely wonderful. I bet buttermilk would taste wonderful too.

by Anonymousreply 19001/13/2013

[quote]Wow, it's like dollar store garbage all rolled up into one delicious store isle.

I didn't see a seafood section.

by Anonymousreply 19101/13/2013

Wait til Dunkin Donuts invades...

by Anonymousreply 19201/13/2013

Just wondering -- how many northerners out there moved to the south in adulthood and became grits fans?

by Anonymousreply 19301/13/2013

[quote]Wow, US exports obesity now.

Britain is the fattest section of Europe, hon.

by Anonymousreply 19401/13/2013

For all the British snobs, allow me to remind you yet again that we Colonies kicked your ass.

It's about time you get over it.

by Anonymousreply 19501/13/2013

OP: You'll need a scale to weigh yourself daily. All that crap is going to make you as fat...an an American.

by Anonymousreply 19601/14/2013

OP...you have to go to expensive delis to get all that bloody junk? Good lord.

by Anonymousreply 19701/14/2013

Okay, R185. Grits are like polenta only the corn meal is ground finer. They're soupy and eaten for breakfast. Some like them with butter, salt and pepper while others like to cook them in cream or buttermilk and melt cheese in them. Some consider the addition of cream or buttermilk to be a sacrilege.

I'm sure there were several cases of heart failure in the restaurant where I watched a young woman put a big pat of butter on her grits and then drown them in syrup.

by Anonymousreply 19801/14/2013

If they're soupy, you're putting too much water in.

by Anonymousreply 19901/14/2013

R182 only the white of the corn is used for grits, polenta is the whole grain and therefore 'healthier' as if modern corn can ever be called healthy.

by Anonymousreply 20001/14/2013

[quote] For all the British snobs, allow me to remind you yet again that we Colonies kicked your ass.

Only after the French came to our assistance.

by Anonymousreply 20101/14/2013

(R25), HP Sauce is just Heinz 57 with a different label....

by Anonymousreply 20201/14/2013

[quote]only the white of the corn is used for grits, polenta is the whole grain and therefore 'healthier' as if modern corn can ever be called healthy.

Is there even such a thing as "the white of the corn"?!? It's corn, not eggs.

Both polenta and grits are made from ground nixitamalized corn. Polenta is yellow because it's made from yellow corn, and grits are white because they're made from white corn, though there are, of course, less familiar (but still delicious) versions of white polenta and yellow grits, respectively.

There are very small, subtle differences in the variety and grind of the corn traditionally used for polenta and grits, but these alone do not affect the nutritive qualities of either dish.

I'm a bit puzzled as to why someone would feel at liberty to invent such an explanation, but it takes all kinds, I guess.

by Anonymousreply 20301/14/2013

Hominy refers to corn kernels without their germ and their hull, or bran. The germ and hull might be removed by soaking the corn in a special type of solution or by crushing the kernels and then sifting them out. It can be served whole or ground, and as a cereal or as a vegetable. The ground kernels can also be pressed into patties and fried. This dish is especially popular in the southern United States.

The hull is the outside of the corn. Thus only the white of the corn is used for grits. With polenta the hull is not removed, thus it is a whole grain.

No one made up anything these are facts..are you a Republican? They don't like facts.

Hominy grits...

by Anonymousreply 20401/14/2013

What's the nutritional value in grits vs oatmeal? Oops, I asked for grits "hot cereal" once in a restaurant; waitress said it was for mixing up with eggs.

OP, Use the A-1 and mustard to make a delicious Welsh Rabbit/Rarebit. Add pasta if you wish to make mac&cheese. Avoid chemical-laden mixes.

by Anonymousreply 20501/14/2013

R202 - No, it's not. In the same way that pasta isn't potatoes, even though they're both carbs. You're not even trying, are you?

by Anonymousreply 20601/14/2013

"For all the British snobs, allow me to remind you yet again that we Colonies kicked your ass"

You mean the British Colonials kicked the German king's ass...

by Anonymousreply 20701/14/2013

What's that American thing - bottled smoke? Liquid smoke?

I'd like to try that on some chicken...

by Anonymousreply 20801/14/2013

The color of grits come from the color of corn used, not the part of the kernel, r204. Hence you can have white polenta and yellow hominy grits. Hominy comes in both golden or white varieties, which wouldn't be possible in the world as you imagine it where removing a yellow hull reveals a non-existent white kernel.

by Anonymousreply 20901/14/2013

And the process of nixitimalization increases, not decreases, the digestibility and therefore the nutritive value of the corn.

by Anonymousreply 21001/14/2013

Feel free to ignore facts, but the fact is the hull is removed from grit corn and polenta is not made form Hominy.

Hominy uses the WHITE inside of the corn. Grits are made from this.

by Anonymousreply 21101/14/2013

I don't see Ritz crackers, and isn't "gobstopper" a UK term for gumballs?

by Anonymousreply 21201/14/2013

Dear idiot,

Yellow vs. White

Additionally, yellow grits use the whole kernel of corn, whereas white grits have had the hull removed. According to The Old Mill website, yellow grits have more corn flavor and a smoother texture than white grits, and northerners tend to favor yellow grits, while southerners prefer white grits. The Old Mill company operates a 175-year-old water-powered gristmill that still produces ground grains today.

by Anonymousreply 21301/14/2013

eHow, r213? Really? Really?!

And Northern grits. Tee-hee.

Meanwhile, the facts: White hominy is made from white corn kernels, and the sweeter yellow hominy is made from yellow. White grits are made from ground white hominy, and the yellow grits are made from ground yellow hominy.

It's certainly possible to make a porridge from the whole-ground corn--either white OR yellow--but this is technically not really grits, and there is no regional divide when it comes to which taste a particular individual might prefer. And hominy, ie the nixtimalized corn, NOT the whole corn, is healthier.

You're welcome.

by Anonymousreply 21401/14/2013

[quote]I used to to go the one on Bleeker Nr Carmine. Wonder if it's still there.

OP, I live in this neighborhood. Most of them are gone now, replaced by high end specialty shops. It's sad to see the neighborhood become Harrod's Food Hall.

by Anonymousreply 21501/14/2013

[quote]Just wondering -- how many northerners out there moved to the south in adulthood and became grits fans?

r193, I was raised in the North, but my mother was from the South. She never served us grits, always oatmeal. I guess she grew up eating grits and didn't want them anymore. I lived in the South for a few years and now I prefer grits over oatmeal. So take that Mom!

by Anonymousreply 21601/14/2013

[quote]OP, I live in this neighborhood. Most of them are gone now, replaced by high end specialty shops.

I just google mapped it and I think it's still there (Green Village).

I had a look around Bleeker as well. It's much smarter than it was when I left back in '88.

Very peculiar experience looking at that street. Something about the layout of New York makes you know your local streets so well. You're always marching up and down the same streets, whereas in London, you can vary your routes every time.

by Anonymousreply 21701/14/2013

I remember buying Bazooka bubblegum many years ago when I was a child. They were called Bazooka Joe then, cost a penny a square (well, oblong really) and had a cartoon inside. You collected the cartoons and sent off for a rubbish gift depending upon how many you had. Every corner shop in Britain sold them.

The main competitor seemed to be Anglo bubblegum. Then both just disappeared.

by Anonymousreply 21801/14/2013

[quote]Then both just disappeared.

No, they both still exist.

Anglo has some very nasty chemicals...so I avoid it.

by Anonymousreply 21901/14/2013

R212, Ritz crackers are generally available in any UK supermarket and have been probably 50 years or more. The US section is presumably for stuff that isn't normally sold here.

by Anonymousreply 22001/14/2013

Oh, there's a five letter word that brings salvation. (Yeah, salvation!) Yes, there's a five-letter word to bring you peace of mind. So let the whole congregation Raise their hearts in exultation. For now we see where once we all were blind. (We were blind!) Five little letters bringin' hope to all mankind. Let me hear you say T! (T!) Let me hear you say E! (E!) Let me hear you say S! (S!) C! (C!) O! (O!) Tesco saves! (Tesco saves!) Tesco saves! (Tesco saves!) Jesus saves but Tesco saves you more! (Saves you more!) The special... 'Cause man can't live by bread alone, Even though they bake it all in store. (Bake in store!) You'll smell it as you glide in through the automatic door. Come on in! Come on in! Why wait until you die to go to heaven (heaven knows) When paradise awaits you in those well-stocked aisles? From Australian cream from Devon ... displayed in ... eleven. Their pharmacist will help you with your piles. They sell unattractive clothing in a range of ugly styles. Tesco saves! (Tesco saves!) Tesco saves! (Tesco saves!) Jesus saves but Tesco saves you more! (Saves you more!) The good Lord may deliver you, But Tesco can deliver too. ... is all you've ever dreamed. You'll truly know redemption when your vouchers are redeemed. Within these walls you'll see such revelations. You will find the Tesco sign is just a Holy Grail, And in the coming by-and-by, From their web site in the sky, You'll marvel at their range of goods on sale. So sinners, come and join the pilgrims on the Tesco trail. Tesco saves! (Tesco saves!) Tesco saves! (Tesco saves!) Jesus saves but Tesco saves you more (more, more), The Mount of Olives, the Fatted Calf, Some DVDs to make you laugh, And don't ignore their range of gourmet dishes. (Gourmet!) You'll find them in the bakery between the loaves and fishes. Hallelu! Hallelujah! Go down, Moses! Tesco saves! (Tesco saves!) Tesco saves! (Tesco saves!) Jesus saves but Tesco saves you more! (Saves you more!) There's plenty of endangered cod, Luscious racks of Lamb of God. Don't forget insurance for your budgie. Then go and grab yourself a bumper pack of something fudgy.

[SPOKEN] I feel the spirit, sister! Yes the sprit of ... I feel the spirit too, sister! Will you take over from me at the cee-lestial organ? (I will, sister!) Brethren, let us embrace the Tesco way of life, For they can supply gas, electricity, mobile phone, legal advice, internet and banking. Thou shalt brave the world omnipotent, And wish them success with their brand new store in Nanking. Thou shalt be inexorably drawn towards the expensive items By the teams of retail psychologists Who are paid shitloads to manipulate your psyche. Thou shalt not worship at the shrines of Aldi and Lidl, For yea, verily, they are false gods. (False gods, false gods!) What are they, my sisters? (False gods!) What are they, my brothers and sisters? (False gods!) Say it loud! (False gods!) Say it louder! (False gods!) And anyways, their carrying bags are ... Thou shalt purchase strawberries in winter, Nuked tomatoes all the way from Californ-eye-ay. And apples—apples, apples, apples—that have spent a year in refrigeration. Yea, thou shalt also purchase bags of chlorine-washed salad leaves, Especially prepared for you In countries where people are dying of starvation. Thou shalt shun the independent record store And use the Tesco web site to stream your favorite songs. Thou shalt pop in for a pint o' milk And somehow end up spending forty-seven pounds. I have been moved. I have been moved. Now you move!

[SINGING] Tesco saves! (Tesco saves!) Tesco saves! (Tesco saves!) Jesus saves but Tesco saves you more! (More and more each day!) Their stores are found both near and far, Lots of space to park your car. Prime locations! Sites, they sure can pick 'em. (They pick 'em.) And sometimes they collapse on railway tracks like in High Wycombe. Tesco saves ... Tesco saves you more ... So all you chil'en, fight the fight. Ye unbelievers, see the light. It's time to lift thine eyes unto the stars (unto the stars) 'Cause next month Tesco opens up its flagship store on Mars. ... Tesco saves you more Yeah, Lord!

by Anonymousreply 22101/14/2013

R221, are you off your meds again?

by Anonymousreply 22201/14/2013

Jolly Rancher soda?! Never seen it. Gross.

And no, I wouldn't be excited, because I don't like any of that stuff. If I were forced to buy something, I'd take the Stove Top stuffing. But what a weird array.

A lot of restaurant food does taste different to me in other countries (England included) than in the USA, but there's really nothing one can do except get used to it.

I splurge on something from the international section here in the States every now and then. When I was a kid, I would always choose an international sweet of some sort when we went to the candy store at the mall. So fun.

by Anonymousreply 22301/14/2013

[quote]I just google mapped it and I think it's still there (Green Village).

r217, Green Village closed in the Fall. Bleecker Street is totally changing. It started in the area between Hudson Street and 7th Avenue. That stretch of Bleecker is now all high end clothing stores. But now the gentrification is travelling east and everything on Bleecker between 7th Avenue and 6th Avenue is becoming high end. I think all that's left that's original are the record store, Rocco's bakery and Murray's cheese shop. The landlords know they can get high end shops and are raising the rent and the small Korean delis can't afford it anymore.

by Anonymousreply 22401/15/2013

[post redacted because independent.co.uk thinks that links to their ridiculous rag are a bad thing. Somebody might want to tell them how the internet works. Or not. We don't really care. They do suck though. Our advice is that you should not click on the link and whatever you do, don't read their truly terrible articles.]

by Anonymousreply 22501/15/2013

I wouldn't mind horsemeat if it were young healthy mare or gelding which was slaughtered and butchered. But healthy viable horses are extremely expensive, and if they are putting horsemeat in hamburger, you can bet that it is from an old sick horse that should be used only for dogfood.

by Anonymousreply 22601/15/2013

OP, all of those items are the worst of the worst of our US junk food.

I'll admit to occasionally using A1 steak sauce, Tobasco, and Stove Top Stuffing, to which I add sauteed onions, mushrooms, garlic, and celery. I love maple syrup on American-style pancakes, but only get the 100% pure stuff from Vermont or Canada. Same with peanut butter. I couldn't live without a few Snickers bars per year, but didn't see them in your pic.

There's an aggressive rebellion against processed junk food here in California. Don't get me wrong -- fast food restaurants still thrive -- but everyone's doctor and every news article says to stay away from the middle aisles of the grocery store.

By the way, when I was in London, prices for everything were just outrageous to me, so I ended up shopping at a Tesco, which I recognized from a trip to Thailand! An affordable treat was getting pre-made tuna salad and cucumber sandwiches or prepared meals with fresh veggies from Marks and Spencer.

by Anonymousreply 22701/15/2013

OP, you are so lucky to have discovered the best of America at your local Tesco.

by Anonymousreply 22801/16/2013

America excels at brightly colored packaging technology. Second only to Japan.

by Anonymousreply 22901/16/2013

Well, this took me too long, but here is the British foods section at the local Shaw's in New England. It pretty much sucks. And yes, many of the items are actually Irish.

by Anonymousreply 23002/02/2013

.

by Anonymousreply 23102/03/2013

6 pounds for Aunt Jemima syrup? Her big maple titties aren't worth that much. Nevertheless, I would suggest getting the syrup and the peanut butter and use them for making a peanut butter and syrup sandwich. It's a sweet, gooey, sticky load in your mouth that is almost as good as the other kind.

by Anonymousreply 23202/03/2013

Aunt Jemima is HFCS and will kill you.

by Anonymousreply 23302/03/2013

None of the items in R230's pic are American.

by Anonymousreply 23402/03/2013

R234 Read his post again.

by Anonymousreply 23502/03/2013

Do they sell Linden Butter Crunch cookies?

by Anonymousreply 23602/03/2013
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