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'A very different kettle of fish'

Is this an expression used in America or is it a British expression only?

I need to know because I'm writing something that I want to post on an American website and it, therefore (obviously) needs to make sense to Americans.

TIA

by Anonymousreply 1601/08/2013

Google is your friend.

by Anonymousreply 101/08/2013

OP never saw a Laurel & Hardy film.

by Anonymousreply 201/08/2013

It is not like it is even a popular expression in the US.

by Anonymousreply 301/08/2013

If you want your writing to sound as if your great-grandpa wrote it, then "kettle of fish" is perfectly acceptable in the US.

by Anonymousreply 401/08/2013

[quote]If you want your writing to sound as if your great-grandpa wrote it, then "kettle of fish" is perfectly acceptable in the US.

OK, I'll think of another way to express it.

Thanks for the swift response.

by Anonymousreply 501/08/2013

[all posts by right wing shit-stain # a removed.]

by Anonymousreply 601/08/2013

It's "a fine kettle of fish" btw. Perhaps you are thinking of "that's a horse of a different color".

by Anonymousreply 701/08/2013

Or a whole other ball of wax?

by Anonymousreply 801/08/2013

A whole different ballgame

by Anonymousreply 901/08/2013

I prefer "a whole nother Oprah" myself.

by Anonymousreply 1001/08/2013

On the news yesterday (BBC), there was a piece on the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats maintaining the coalition. One leader mentioned "stepping up to the plate" and the other mentioned having a "full tank of gas." Metaphors seem to cross the pond both ways.

by Anonymousreply 1101/08/2013

[all posts by right wing shit-stain # a removed.]

by Anonymousreply 1201/08/2013

Nobody likes fish!

by Anonymousreply 1301/08/2013

If you want to avoid metaphor, "A different matter entirely" is fine and will be understood by both UK and US speakers.

by Anonymousreply 1401/08/2013

OP's metaphor doesn't mean that at all. It is a sarcastic statement about being in a fucked up situation.

"Well, that's a fine kettle of fish you have gotten us into."

by Anonymousreply 1501/08/2013

He didn't write "fine kettle", r15, but "different kettle".

Cambridge Idioms dictionary for "different kettle of fish" is:

"if you say that something or someone is a different kettle of fish, you mean that they are completely different from something or someone else that has been talked about"

by Anonymousreply 1601/08/2013
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