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Grammar Question

Is it correct to say "help out my friend" or "help my friend out?" The second sounds strange to me.

by Anonymousreply 901/06/2013

Try: Help my friend.

by Anonymousreply 101/05/2013

R1 is correct, but doesn't address the OP's question --

It is "help out." You want to keep the word phrase together.

by Anonymousreply 201/05/2013

I like to say I'd love to help you out, which way did you come in?

by Anonymousreply 301/05/2013

"Help my friend."

or

"Help out my friend."

But, do not end a senteence with a preposition such as:

"Help my friend out."

by Anonymousreply 401/05/2013

.

by Anonymousreply 501/05/2013

The rule about prepositions at the end of a sentence is a prescriptivist bugaboo from Classical Latin. Most grammarians agree it should not be applied to English.

It is a hypercorrection, like pronouncing the "t" on "often."

by Anonymousreply 601/05/2013

Do not end a sentence with a preposition when it can be avoided. Of course, there are always exceptions such as, "Where are you from?" and a few other examples. However, there usually ways to write/speak without ending a sentence with a preposition.

by Anonymousreply 701/05/2013

R1's solution illustrates the good practical advice offered by "The Elements Of Style" for dealing with issues of grammar: recast the sentence.

by Anonymousreply 801/05/2013

As Churchill allegedly once wrote when his editor 'corrected' a postpositional preposition "This is the sort of English up with which I will not put."

With regard to the OP's question, you could nitpick on a slight difference in meaning

a) Help (out) my friend = Assist my friend

b) Help my friend out = Get my friend out (of the house, a predicament, container etc)

by Anonymousreply 901/06/2013
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