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I don't understand aging

Take President Bush, who is near death in the hospital. How can you die from a fever and a cough? Fevers usually indicate an infection in your body, but they're not saying Bush has an infection. If you have excellent nutrition and health care and healthy lungs and heart, how can you just die?

by Anonymousreply 4512/30/2012

Shit happens to shitty people sometimes?

by Anonymousreply 112/27/2012

The retard level around here lately has been astronomically high.

by Anonymousreply 212/27/2012

OP, it is very common for people to get pneumonia and associated other respiratory infections when they are very old and their immune systems are weaker.

It's one of the most common forms of death for people in their 80's.

by Anonymousreply 312/27/2012

[R2] Please don't use that word. It is hurtful to my clients, they understand very well what that word means and that you are talking about them.

by Anonymousreply 512/27/2012

See "Hissing And Cellular Atrophy" Gayling, et al. Journal of Aging. 2012

by Anonymousreply 612/27/2012

I'm not a gayling; I'm in my 40s.

by Anonymousreply 712/27/2012

Old age, true very-old age, is really just the act of dying in slow motion. The body's systems slowly falter and fail. Immune system is one of them.

That's why if you're phenomenally lucky, you get 80 or 85 good alive/active years in the world and then an aneurysm in your sleep. The alternative is a tedious and increasingly miserable decline.

by Anonymousreply 812/27/2012

Then R2 is correct

by Anonymousreply 912/27/2012

The news reports which I have seen are saying that he was hospitalized with bronchitis, which is indeed an infection, OP. It usually starts as a bacterial sinus infection and then spreads down into the lungs. When I have had bronchitis in the past, I have had coughing fits which deprive me of oxygen. I don't think there is anything at all unusual about the former president's condition. Old age complicates any illness.

by Anonymousreply 1012/27/2012

R8, that is true for some people, but not for all. There are many, many healthy people in their 80's and 90's today. And some are more active than people half their age.

Look at people like The Queen or Betty White.

by Anonymousreply 1112/27/2012

I have relatives who are in in their 90s and still very active. I had other relatives that started their decline in their 70s. The difference was the ones who are now in their 90s lived in urban places where they had to walk a lot. I think the sitting around for decades really fucks up your body. I could see HW just sitting in an easy chair all day being waited on by his personal staff so he never had to move a muscle, even when he was quite capable of doing so.

by Anonymousreply 1212/27/2012

In his case it's because all the evil has finally killed him and is seeking a new host.

by Anonymousreply 1312/27/2012

OP you're really quite uniformed about the function of the human body. Think of a car. Even a car with lower annual mileage, one that has been well taken care of, eventually wears out. I'm not talking about vintage museum pieces, I'm talking about cars people drive every day.

We use our bodies, fuel them & maintain them every day. 24/7. Everyone is born with certain genetic weaknesses, too.

Think of an rubber band. Over time and use, it loses it's elasticity. So do your lungs. So eventually your lungs won't work as efficiently as they once did. Fluid build up and opportunistic infections like pneumonia are very common. Especially once a person passes that 85th marker.

You're right that Bush has access to the very best medical care out here. The fact that they are issuing statements and telling us Bush is in the ICU, and that they can't get control of his fever, tells you he's in much worse shape than people realize.

I always thought it would be Carter who went next. This is not working out well for 41.

by Anonymousreply 1412/27/2012

what r8 said

by Anonymousreply 1512/27/2012

[quote]I could see HW just sitting in an easy chair all day being waited on by his personal staff so he never had to move a muscle, even when he was quite capable of doing so.

Maybe so, but it can't have hurt him that much since he has lived a long life. Most people don't get to be 88.

by Anonymousreply 1612/27/2012

[quote]I could see HW just sitting in an easy chair all day being waited on by his personal staff so he never had to move a muscle, even when he was quite capable of doing so.

He was extremely active until the past year or so, when a self-described "Parkinson's-type thing" had him using a wheelchair most of the time. But he went skydiving to celebrate his 85th birthday.

by Anonymousreply 1812/27/2012

"The retard level around here lately has been astronomically high."

In other words you don't know the answer to the question and don't have OP's intellectual curiosity and or are afraid to ask the question lest someone like you condemns you for your not knowing something.

by Anonymousreply 1912/27/2012

OP's question is actually one of those things that lots of researchers are trying to answer. It's easy to say, as R14 does, that the body simply 'wears out.' But what does that mean? And why should the body 'wear out' at 70 years or 80 or 90 and not 200 or 300 years?

I'm kinda baffled by people calling OP a retard.

by Anonymousreply 2012/27/2012

[R20] I am baffled that you don't know better than to use that word.

by Anonymousreply 2112/27/2012

It's strange what will bring out the knives at Datalounge. There are posters who will respond to almost any question with sourness and barely contained anger. You have to wonder what their lives are like...

by Anonymousreply 2212/27/2012

in the last year I know of three elderly people who died of side effects from the broad spectrum antibiotics they were prescribed for minor infections.

by Anonymousreply 2312/27/2012

OP and R20, in earnest: there are some very good pop-science books on the subject. (The subject of "Why does aging happen?") I went through a phase of interest in the topic when several of my friends' parents died while my own parents were still trucking along fine.

Of the four books I read on it, I thought this one was the best:

by Anonymousreply 2412/27/2012

I am curious as to why the body ages more rapidly as we get older. For example, why is the decline between 80 - 90 years so much more visible than say between 30 - 40 or 40 - 50?

by Anonymousreply 2512/27/2012

Evil doesn't die.

by Anonymousreply 2612/27/2012

[quote]Please don't use that word. It is hurtful to my clients, they understand very well what that word means and that you are talking about them.

I don't think your clients at the home are reading the DataLounge.

by Anonymousreply 2712/27/2012

Actually, I think the decline is most noticeable from age 30 onward. This is obviously the start of a radical aging process. It probably has to do with humans having such a short lifespan (20-30) up until the 20th century when medical and dental technology improved greatly.

In the past, people would start having children at the onset of puberty (12+) and were dead in their early 20s. In common people, it was a rareity for them to age past 40, although it was somewhat more common in the well-fed and pampered aristocracy.

I think the recent trend of having children later in life and improved nutrition, healthcare, dental hygiene, and exercise will result in the gradual increase of the age in which we start looking rough (30).

by Anonymousreply 2812/27/2012

r12 G H W Bush was known to be quite active when younger, a big tennis player. WASPS, especially WASPS of his generation, made a big deal out of sports, etc. (One reason the Kennedy's did it, they were trying to out-WASP the WASPS.) I suspect he stayed active as long as he could, habits like that don't go away as you get older.

by Anonymousreply 3012/27/2012

The fever is a symptom honey, and when it doesn't respond to medication and lasts for two weeks, it is a symptom of something serious.

[quote] I suspect he stayed active as long as he could, habits like that don't go away as you get older.

He was skydiving a few years ago.

by Anonymousreply 3112/27/2012

A lot of it has to do withfamily history, genetics, then there's the environment, and stress levels, and the kind of lifestyle and medications taken, diet, etc. Everyone's body ages differently.

My father's grandmother, who I barely remember, smoked unfiltered cigarettes. She had four-five a day until she died at the age of 96. She ate a terrible, unhealthy Southern diet,existed on something like four hours sleep all her life, and while she walked to her corner grocery store to get milk, I don't think she ever did any exercise as we know it. Five kids, three died of influenza before they were 6.

by Anonymousreply 3212/27/2012

Interesting but false NWO Big-pharma propoganda from Miss r28.

Go to any very old(dating back at least to 1700) cemetery in the USA or Europe and you will see that folks lived well into their 80s and 90s back then just as much as today. 'Modern medical science' has little, if anything, to do with it.

We often wonder why Satanists such as David Rockefeller, GHW Bush, Kissinger,Queen Elizabeth and Phillip, Carters,etc. all seem to be so long lived. We figured the answer was that these demons avoided 'modern medicine'.

by Anonymousreply 3312/27/2012

Thanks for the link, R24. Just the sort of book I love.

Actually life expectancy is an odd thing. In 16th Century England, if you made it to age 21, your life expectancy was 71 years. The problems for them of course were all the childhood diseases.

So except for childhood immunizations, we havent increased life expectancy that much.

by Anonymousreply 3412/27/2012

Sounds illuminutty, if you ask me.

by Anonymousreply 3512/27/2012

Well George now pees when he laughs and he needs an army to help him walk so this near death thing is working very well for him.

by Anonymousreply 3612/27/2012

Is he really near death?

Sssh, but our firm (financial) is prepping in case a national day of mourning is declared as a holiday.

by Anonymousreply 3712/27/2012

Once you go into the hospital, you get weaker. Older people lose muscle very fast. Chances are after a few weeks in the hospital he can no longer walk or even sit up for very long. And those muscles aren't coming back. If he lies on his back all the time, which he has to do, he will continually have pneumonia, which will get worse with each episode.

by Anonymousreply 3812/27/2012

Your life is like the seasons:

1-20 spring

20-40 summer

40-60 fall

60- winter

The President is lucky, he has the best of care that has helped him make it to 88 and good genes. I do wonder why he is getting Tylenol instead of aspirin, the miracle drug.

by Anonymousreply 3912/27/2012

I'm laughing at those in this thread who equate skydiving with being active.

Did you not notice that GHWB was strapped into the parachute along with another skydiver who did all the work? All he did was get into the plane (probably with assistance); the rest was all done for him.

by Anonymousreply 4012/27/2012

EXACTLY, R38. Earlier this year my grandfather was hospitalized after a fall, and he never recovered, even though he wasn't at all sick when he went in. He couldn't even sit up by himself after a couple of weeks in bed, let alone walk, and he died about three months later, without ever having returned home (though he had been discharged to a long-term rehab facility by then).

Oh, and OP? I had a 29-year-old friend die from double pneumonia, and nothing else, a few years ago. You have to take this kind of shit seriously; not everyone has some dramatic battle with cancer or heart failure before they pass away.

by Anonymousreply 4112/27/2012

[quote]In other words you don't know the answer to the question and don't have OP's intellectual curiosity and or are afraid to ask the question lest someone like you condemns you for your not knowing something.

Uh...no. It's an idiotic set of questions that would only sound plausible coming out of the mouth of a 5-year-old.

by Anonymousreply 4212/30/2012

[quote]Please don't use that word. It is hurtful to my clients, they understand very well what that word means and that you are talking about them.

Why are your clients reading Datalounge?

by Anonymousreply 4312/30/2012

First, a public press release about a former President's health, especially a Bush who was also director of the CIA, is not going to be comprehensive and fully honest.

My understanding is that Poppy has already been hospitalized for a month, which in the USA in this era is unusual except for the wealthy and those with excellent insurance -- anyone not in those 2 categories would not have been in a traditional hospital ICU for that period of time; i know from personal experiences. Also, Poppy certainly has not been hospitalized for a month for a fever only, as others have mentioned.

Important! Aspirin is not a miracle drug! Aspirin can be quite dangerous, especially to children. Always ask a doctor before assuming it is safe to take aspirin, especially if fever is present!

by Anonymousreply 4412/30/2012

It is being reported today that former President Bush has been moved from ICU to a regular room at Methodist Hospital because doctors say that his condition has improved. So it might be that reports of his imminent death were premature.

by Anonymousreply 4512/30/2012
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