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Harold and Maude

I finally saw it last night, after decades of vague intent to see it sometime. What an odd, trippy movie!

What did you think of Maude's choice at the end? Part of me could really relate.

by Anonymousreply 1710/26/2014

I first saw it when I was very young and loved it. I didn't understand why Maude did what she did at the end and wanted to shout NO.

I am much older now and I know why she did what she did and I agree with her.

Seventy is too young but after eighty you're just marking time. For me seventy is looming.

by Anonymousreply 112/27/2012

I didn't understand the ending when I was young, although I enjoyed everything else about the movie tremendously. It was shocking, and seemed so arbitrary.

SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS

She'd made up her mind to do what she did long before she met Harold, and had no fear of death, in fact she probably thought of it as an old friend. But she did meet Harold, and decided that the last thing she was going to do on this Earth was to make someone happy. That was why she was so interested in Harold, it wasn't regular romantic love, it was her last chance to pass on the best of herself.

by Anonymousreply 212/27/2012

Thanks! Wondered if anyone had seen this thread.

I am becoming like Maude - interested in quality of life, aliveness, and yet I have no fear of death. Meaning, no fear of the concept of no longer existing. I do have fears of ending up invalid, incontinent, incoherent, in pain, any combo of the aforementioned plus some other aspects I haven't thought of. To be elderly and in poor health/dying slowly, just flat out sucks.

If it wouldn't break anyone's heart too much, I would totally do what she did. It didn't break Harold's too much; he was devastated during her death but then as the credits roll he is playing Maude's banjo on a green grass hilltop and has happy-feet as he plays.

by Anonymousreply 312/27/2012

Well, don't forget Maude had no fear after surviving to Holocaust. The way she viewed that cop was priceless.

by Anonymousreply 412/27/2012

Bud Cort was really cute.

by Anonymousreply 512/27/2012

The scene where they steal the cop's bike is one of my all time faves. Wonderful movie.

by Anonymousreply 612/27/2012

Mostly fond of the location shots, as I grew up in the Bay Area.

by Anonymousreply 712/27/2012

Love Love LOVE Ruth Gordon in this. I was a Harold type. Always interested in women older than I who seemed to have some beneficial wisdom to impart. I would find them in the neighborhood when I was growing up, and then in more sophisticated circles as an adult. I think every gay boy should have an "Auntie Mame" character.

I remember missing the holocaust tattoo on Maude's arm the first time I saw it. Afterwards, I realized why she seemed live each moment to the utmost. I've known several concentration camp survivors who have the same optimistic joyful personalities. Honestly, I've never understood it. You've seen the depths of hell. How do you come back from that.

by Anonymousreply 812/27/2012

[quote] How do you come back from that.

They came back -- that's how they came back.

by Anonymousreply 912/27/2012

[quote]I've known several concentration camp survivors who have the same optimistic joyful personalities. Honestly, I've never understood it. You've seen the depths of hell. How do you come back from that.

An experience like that leaves a mark. There are many others who quietly fell apart after surviving it. It is an interesting question, why do some people become strong and optimistic after brutal adversity while others collapse.

by Anonymousreply 1012/27/2012

I loved that sex scene.The fireworks afterwards was a stroke of genius. As ugly as Ruth Gordon was,she was so damn charming in that role. Even more than in Rosemary's Baby.

by Anonymousreply 1112/27/2012

Her best role!

by Anonymousreply 1212/27/2012

My favorite line from the movie ...

Maude: Dreyfus once wrote from Devil's Island that he would see the most glorious birds. Many years later in Brittany he realized they had only been seagulls... For me they will always be - *glorious* birds.

by Anonymousreply 1312/27/2012

bump

by Anonymousreply 1410/26/2014

[quote]An experience like that leaves a mark. There are many others who quietly fell apart after surviving it. It is an interesting question, why do some people become strong and optimistic after brutal adversity while others collapse.

I think some of them lose their fear of life. They've seen the worst already.

by Anonymousreply 1510/26/2014

I had the sweetest neighbor about 20 years ago named Ruth. One day I went to take her some grapes from my garden and she had a short sleeved blouse on. I saw a number tattooed on her arm. When she saw me looking she said was Jewish, I knew that, and that was her concentration camp number. She had survived, the only one in her family who did. I didn't know what to say. I told her I loved her and would always support her. She was a lot like Maude in her view of life. She died very quickly but until then I made sure she was OK. Yeah I have something in my eye too. How could anyone survive that and be so sweet.

by Anonymousreply 1610/26/2014

I don't usually quote song lyrics but that line 'sour grapes because you lost your heart' goes into surreal overdrive when I think of the few holocaust survivors I knew. Not one of them was angry or bitter, though they each carried a righteous anger that transcended their egos. But it was like that anger got transmuted into something so much finer and totally in keeping with their dignified capacity to ride above the inhumanity they'd witnessed and by which they'd been systematically humiliated. Each of the four of them were what they'd describe as ordinary people, but they wore an extraordinary presence, like the character Maude.

by Anonymousreply 1710/26/2014
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