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Perfect films based on Broadway shows

Last night I watched the Sound of Music for the first time in 20 years. I realize that the movie vastly improves upon the original show due to Julie Andrews and the on-location filming, among a plethora of other wonderful things. It's quite possibly the most perfect film adaptation of a Broadway musical, and there couldn't have been a better adaptation.

What are some other flawless film adaptations of a Broadway musical?

by Anonymousreply 8312/18/2012

I agree that the Sound of Music movie improved on the musical but that's pretty rare. I can think of several movies that were as good but none that were better. It's easier to come up with movies that were significantly worse.

by Anonymousreply 112/08/2012

gypsy

by Anonymousreply 212/08/2012

I think that Grease was an excellent Broadway to movie musical. But the movie was a very different from the stage show.

by Anonymousreply 312/08/2012

The film version of Cabaret was better than the stage musical.

by Anonymousreply 412/08/2012

Les Jiz!!!!

by Anonymousreply 512/08/2012

The movie of GREASE is a steaming turd, and its vast popularity inexplicable. The original stage version is much, much better.

by Anonymousreply 612/08/2012

If anybody says Sweeney Todd I will have to stab then in the eye and make them into a pie.

by Anonymousreply 712/08/2012

west side story

by Anonymousreply 812/08/2012

R6: Agree about Grease. The show had an edge that was totally absent in the movie.

by Anonymousreply 912/08/2012

I don't know if it was that much better, but I think "The Music Man" was turned into an excellent movie.

by Anonymousreply 1012/08/2012

The film version of Oliver! is superior to the stage version.

by Anonymousreply 1112/08/2012

LESMIZLESMIZLESMIZLESMIZ!!!!!!!!!!!

by Anonymousreply 1212/08/2012

The film of Cabaret was NOT better than the stage version.

by Anonymousreply 1312/08/2012

Hard to take you seriously, OP, because "plethora" does not mean an abundance; it means an excess.

by Anonymousreply 1412/08/2012

Funny Girl

by Anonymousreply 1512/08/2012

[quote] The film of Cabaret was NOT better than the stage version.

Yes it was! Stop disagreeing with me!

by Anonymousreply 1612/08/2012

Paint Your Wagon

by Anonymousreply 1712/08/2012

[quote]there couldn't have been a better adaptation.

Yes there could have been.

They could have included the Baroness's songs ("No Way to Stop It" and "How Can Love Survive?").

And there could have been an extended scene where Christopher Plummer ate out Rolf's ass.

Then it would have been perfect.

by Anonymousreply 1812/08/2012

I agree with R11 and OP and would add "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying." I saw the stage production as a kid and the film. I immediately had my parents buy the soundtrack for me; I knew every song. Robert Morse has such a warm voice.

by Anonymousreply 1912/08/2012

[quote]And there could have been an extended scene where Christopher Plummer ate out Rolf's ass.

You obviously haven't seen the special Platinum Edition Blu-Ray, co-producted with Bel Ami. It's in the outtakes.

by Anonymousreply 2012/08/2012

THE KING AND I

SHOW BOAT (1936)

That's it.

by Anonymousreply 2112/08/2012

[quote]The film version of Oliver! is superior to the stage version.

I dunno... While I like the movie, I found that some of the big production numbers dragged on too long. I would have cut several of them in half.

My Fair Lady is basically the stage show on screen; I would rank it as equal to the stage version.

by Anonymousreply 2212/08/2012

r22

But the stage version had a real singing Brit!

by Anonymousreply 2312/08/2012

[quote] THE KING AND I

I love the movie but I find the stage show to be much, much better.

I would also add that Little Shop of Horrors is a great show and the film version is marvelous - specifically because of Ellen Greene.

by Anonymousreply 2412/08/2012

I'll say it. Chicago.

by Anonymousreply 2512/08/2012

What a sad life you live, r14.

by Anonymousreply 2612/08/2012

Second "Cabaret" ... in my opinion it's the only movie musical that's actually better than it's stage version.

And this might get me death threats -- but I think "Hairspray" is more enjoyable than the stage version. It's so good, in fact, that even with as lousy as Travolta and Walken are, it's still an extremely fun movie.

by Anonymousreply 2812/08/2012

Carousel and Oklahoma were excellent movies. I never saw the originals on Broadway but have seen regional theater productions. They couldn't touch the movies..

by Anonymousreply 2912/08/2012

I was also disappointed by Chicago. That MTV cutting. I suppose it would have been a bigger shame if it wasn't Marshall's choreography, but Fosse's that received the MTV treatment.

by Anonymousreply 3012/08/2012

Top Hat.

by Anonymousreply 3112/08/2012

Cabaret on stage and Cabaret on film are both wonderful but completely different. I can't help but adore both for different reasons. Even with the recent success of the Mendes Cabaret, which completely reinvented the stage version, there still can't be a successful new film of that production that won't be judged next to Fosse's film.

by Anonymousreply 3212/08/2012

I find the movie of Cabaret really dull outside of the numbers. Marisa Berenson and Helmet ____ are no substitute for the charming and tragic old couple in the stage version.

And Sally is never "explained" in the stage version like in the movie ("I'm nothing because my father doesn't show he loves me!")

by Anonymousreply 3312/08/2012

Wow, really disagree about Carousel, R29. You must have seen some really stinky regional theater productions. The whole "If I Loved You" scene is devoid of emotion, unlike every good theater production I've seen, especially the Lincoln Center one. How I wish that Nicholas Hytner, the director of that production, would do a film of Carousel.

by Anonymousreply 3412/08/2012

Although I found a lot to like in CHICAGO, DREAMGIRLS and HAIRSPRAY and even SWEENEY TODD, I have to say that LES MISERABLES is better. I saw an advance screening and it is almost perfect, though it is not made for theatre people nor film people so I can't predict how it will do with audiences/critics.

by Anonymousreply 3512/08/2012

I don't agree with Oliver. Nancy is supposed to be an alcoholic, physically and emotionally abused, down and out woman with no hope. And there is strawberry-blonde, pretty, pearly-toothed Shani Wallis belting out "As Long As He Needs Me" with clear trilling belltones. The original Broadway production had throaty, whiskey-voiced Georgia Brown pleading for the love she was so starved for.

by Anonymousreply 3612/08/2012

Showboat was a horrible version of the show. They changed the ending around and cut some of the songs.

The Sound of Music is the biggest piece of crap ever done - a blight on the R&H legacy. Stage version, movie version it makes no difference.

South Pacific, My Fair Lady and Oliver were excellent and true to the show.

by Anonymousreply 3712/08/2012

[quote]And this might get me death threats -- but I think "Hairspray" is more enjoyable than the stage version. It's so good, in fact, that even with as lousy as Travolta and Walken are, it's still an extremely fun movie.

Oh, I disagree. Travolta sucked the air out of it. His casting made no sense whatsoever.

by Anonymousreply 3812/08/2012

Crying in heaven.

by Anonymousreply 3912/08/2012

Another vote for West Side Story and I'll add Bye Bye Birdie.

by Anonymousreply 4012/08/2012

Bye Bye Birdie the movie is fantastic...the recent revival on Broadway was a piece of crap.

by Anonymousreply 4112/08/2012

Bye Bye Birdie was a drag between the opening and closing Ann-Margret numbers.

by Anonymousreply 4212/08/2012

[uote]And this might get me death threats -- but I think "Hairspray" is more enjoyable than the stage version. It's so good, in fact, that even with as lousy as Travolta and Walken are, it's still an extremely fun movie.

"Hairspray" is pretty fabulous but would be perfect if director Adam Shankman hadn't cut the show's best number, "Mama, I'm Big Girl Now" and put a version over the end credits.

by Anonymousreply 4312/08/2012

Little Shop of Horrors

by Anonymousreply 4412/08/2012

West Side Story. Definitely, West Side Story.

by Anonymousreply 4512/08/2012

[quote]They could have included the Baroness's songs ("No Way to Stop It" and "How Can Love Survive?").

I agree. It was ruined for me when they skipped over "No Way to Stop It."

by Anonymousreply 4612/08/2012

[quote]Oh, I disagree. Travolta sucked the air out of it. His casting made no sense whatsoever.

Did you see "Hairspray" in a theater? I did many times. Audiences loved his Edna and roared at his dance finale. Whatever you think of Travolta personally, his casting made perfect sense.

by Anonymousreply 4712/09/2012

[quote] Audiences loved his Edna and roared at his dance finale.

Thousands of Americans can't be wrong.

by Anonymousreply 4812/09/2012

Surprised that no one listed my favorites "The King and I" and "South Pacific". Maybe I am out of touch. As a native Iowan I liked the already mentioned "Music Man", having met Meredith Wilson

by Anonymousreply 4912/09/2012

The Rocky Horror Show

by Anonymousreply 5012/09/2012

[quote]Cabaret on stage and Cabaret on film are both wonderful but completely different. I can't help but adore both for different reasons. Even with the recent success of the Mendes Cabaret, which completely reinvented the stage version, there still can't be a successful new film of that production that won't be judged next to Fosse's film

Thanks. I agree with this.

by Anonymousreply 5112/09/2012

I know I am in the minority, but I loved the movie version of CAMELOT. On stage the affair was only implied. Not in the movie.

by Anonymousreply 5212/09/2012

[quote]And there could have been an extended scene where Christopher Plummer ate out Rolf's ass.

It was filmed. It was supposed to jumpcut back and forth between this scene and Julie singing "A Bell is No Bell" to Liesl.

But they got cold feet and cut it.

by Anonymousreply 5312/09/2012

I am a big fan/critic of cinema production values (set, lighting, cinematography). In that sense, I think that the film version of OLIVER! captured the atmosphere of East London's squalor better than a stage version does.

by Anonymousreply 5412/09/2012

It's musicals day at Amazon (Sunday, 12/9), with the Gold Box deal of the day the special anniversary editions of Singing in the Rain and The Sound of Music. Additionally, they'll have lightning deals throughout the day on Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, South Pacific, West Side Story, Fiddler on the Roof, Annie Get Your Gun, etc.

by Anonymousreply 5512/09/2012

R55 Thanks! I just picked up "Rain" and "West Side". I'm trying to figure out what the last one of the day is -- the quote is from Elton's "Your Song." Is that from a musical I'm unaware of?

by Anonymousreply 5612/09/2012

R56, I assume that's "Moulin Rouge."

by Anonymousreply 5712/09/2012

I agree with R34 about the revival of Carousel being superior to the old film version. I thought Hugh Jackman was going to produce a new Carousel film. What ever happened to that? Hopefully, the success of Les Miz will help get a new Carousel off the ground.

by Anonymousreply 5812/09/2012

r49, do you have blisters on your fingertips from reading the waffle iron?

by Anonymousreply 5912/09/2012

R19, I would disagree. I, too, saw the film at a young age; years later - 1980? I saw an excellent prodcution of the musical at San Francisco State. The musical is much better, especially the wonderful song the Bud Frump character leads - "Coffee Break" (great song and dance numbre.)

by Anonymousreply 6012/09/2012

No "Coffee Break" in the movie version of How to Succeed. It was filmed but edited out. Also cut but not filmed, "Happy to Keep His Dinner Warm," "Paris Original," and "Love from a Heart of Gold." I don't miss those latter numbers but I wish they had kept "Coffee Break" as it was filmed. Other than the score omissions, yes, it's a faithful adaptation of the stage play.

by Anonymousreply 6112/09/2012

[quote]It's musicals day at Amazon

EVERY day is musicals day at Data Lounge.

by Anonymousreply 6212/09/2012

Li'l Abner.. faithful translation of the stage musical.

And two from Warner Bros.

The Pajama Game and Damn Yankees although both had a couple of songs removed.

by Anonymousreply 6312/09/2012

[uote]Even with the recent success of the Mendes Cabaret, which completely reinvented the stage version, there still can't be a successful new film of that production that won't be judged next to Fosse's film

Yes a Broadway version film would be a musical which the Fosse version is clearly not.

by Anonymousreply 6412/09/2012

[quote]Did you see "Hairspray" in a theater? I did many times. Audiences loved his Edna and roared at his dance finale. Whatever you think of Travolta personally, his casting made perfect sense.

I've seen "Hairspray" twice, once on Broadway and once in a regional production. Both times the guy playing Edna was great.

Travolta in the film was most definately not.

by Anonymousreply 6512/09/2012

[quote]Travolta in the film was most definately not.

Uh huh. And lot's of people have no prejudice against him.

by Anonymousreply 6612/09/2012

I love the movie version of Oklahoma but hate the movie version of Carousel.

Gordon MacRae had lost his looks and gotten fat and bloated and even Shirley Jones looked kind of bovine. Barbara Ruick was a screechy Carrie and uninspired casting compared to Gloria Grahame as Ado Annie. I can't even remember who played Mr. Snow and the woman who sings You'll Never Walk Alone but Charlotte Greenwood and Gene Nelson are perfect in OKlahoma.

by Anonymousreply 6712/10/2012

[quote]No "Coffee Break" in the movie version of How to Succeed. It was filmed but edited out. Also cut but not filmed, "Happy to Keep His Dinner Warm," "Paris Original," and "Love from a Heart of Gold."

Not to mention "Cinderella, Darling" and "The Pirate Ballet."

by Anonymousreply 6812/10/2012

One that they messed up, and that should be remade is "Guys and Dolls."

by Anonymousreply 6912/10/2012

[quote]One that they messed up, and that should be remade is "Guys and Dolls."

I've said as much many times on talk shows! And I'd be PERFECTLY cast as Adel... er, I mean, as Nathan Detroit!

by Anonymousreply 7012/10/2012

Vin Diesel tried to remake "Guys and Dolls", it was announced a year or two ago.

Swear to God, truth is stranger than fiction.

by Anonymousreply 7112/10/2012

perfect:

Oliver!

Cabaret

excellent:

Chicago

very good:

My Fair Lady

Fiddler on the Roof

The Sound of Music

Show Boat (original 1930s version)

decent:

Oklahoma

Grease

Sweeney Todd

Show Boat (remake)

How to Succeed

Call me Madame

mixed:

Gypsy

meh:

Rent

Finian's Rainbow

Brigadoon

Phantom

bad:

South Pacific

Nine

The Wiz

Mame

Annie

Paint Your Wagon

and, finally, the worst adaptation of a musical:

A Little Night Music

by Anonymousreply 7212/10/2012

I love Finian's Rainbow for Petula Clark's performance. I hate the orchestrations for Old Devil Moon, and Tommy Steele is embarrassing. But in general it's quite a charming movie.

I also love Man of La Mancha, mostly because although the singing was mediocre, O'Toole and Loren gave brilliant performances in the book scenes.

by Anonymousreply 7312/10/2012

I'd also add Fiddler on the Roof. All the great music is still there (the songs that didn't make it from the stage to the screen should be considered a mercy killing), the performers are brilliant, the scenery is gorgeous, and above all the John Williams orchestrations utilizing Isaac Stern on the violin seem to be filling in a gap that could never work on stage.

I'd love a new film of Guys and Dolls desperately, especially if it could get the Anna Karenina treatment and set the entire show in a Broadway theatre, with stagehands, backdrops, very artificial looking...

by Anonymousreply 7412/10/2012

[quote]I love the movie version of Oklahoma but hate the movie version of Carousel.///Gordon MacRae had lost his looks and gotten fat and bloated and even Shirley Jones looked kind of bovine. Barbara Ruick was a screechy Carrie and uninspired casting compared to Gloria Grahame as Ado Annie. I can't even remember who played Mr. Snow and the woman who sings You'll Never Walk Alone but Charlotte Greenwood and Gene Nelson are perfect in OKlahoma.

Actually, Carousel was filmed first, but released AFTER Oklahoma!. I think Carousel played two major theaters (Radio City and...?) Before Oklahoma! was released, but it did not get nation wide distribution until after Oklahoma!.

by Anonymousreply 7512/10/2012

On A Clear Day You Can See Forever

by Anonymousreply 7612/11/2012

Doea this count? Off-off Broadway, but great!

by Anonymousreply 7712/18/2012

I really like THE PAJAMA GAME. John Raitt is incredibly sexy (especially when he turns up shirtless at the end), and he and Doris Day have believable chemistry. And Babe is a great part for DD because she gets to be genuinely strident and pissed off (both of which she could do so well), but she also has some quieter numbers for her voice too, where her singing excelled.

I also love the film's balance between "opening the material up" and preserving the small intimate moments that must have worked so beautifully in the original stage show. The beautiful way they do the "Once a Year Day" number in the park is a great example of the former, while Reta Shaw at her most charming in "I'll Never Be Jealous Again" is a good example of the latter.

by Anonymousreply 7812/18/2012

R72, you should check out CAMELOT and FORUM. They might be in competition with NIGHT MUSIC for your coveted last slot.

by Anonymousreply 7912/18/2012

I'd say the all-time worst film adaptation of a musical would be LADY IN THE DARK. they jetiisoned almost all those great Kurt Weill songs (including all but a few instrumental bars of "My ship," which the whole plot depends upon, and is also the most beautiful song in the score) and focused instead on the book. (Which was sexist even for the time, and which was the weakest part of the show.) Plus it has that hideous disfiguring sausage-roll hairdo on Ginger Rogers.

by Anonymousreply 8012/18/2012

r79, I've seen Camelot and Forum and, no, they pale in comparison to the debacle that is Night Music. I'd even say that Camelot is far better than its director Josh Logan's horrendous South Pacific, which is still better than Night Music.

by Anonymousreply 8112/18/2012

Most movies today are such crap that a live theatre performance is almost always to be preferred.

by Anonymousreply 8212/18/2012

Cabaret owns this thread.

I also like Evita the movie -- gave it an epic feel, which her story needs.

by Anonymousreply 8312/18/2012
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