Serving up this steaming pile of
Celebrity Gossip
Gay Politics
Gay News
and Pointless Bitchery
Since 1995

Britishisms that you did not understand

After reading the word "fortnight" for a few decades I finally found out what it meant.

Also for a shorter period "tosser"

Still not sure I get what "chav" means.

by Anonymousreply 34901/30/2015

Bollocks!

Does it mean "balls" (as in testicles)? Then why is it used instead of "bullshit" ?

by Anonymousreply 111/25/2012

I can never work out "taking the piss."

by Anonymousreply 211/25/2012

"Bobs your uncle" WTF?

by Anonymousreply 311/25/2012

Horses for courses.

by Anonymousreply 411/25/2012

taking the piss = making fun of

chav = wigger (Eminem, Ali G)

The cockney stuff is the worst; apples and pears = stairs, etc.

by Anonymousreply 511/25/2012

Does none of you know how to consult Urban Dictionary?

"Taking the piss" is the equivalent of "pulling your leg": to joke around, trying to fool a person into believing something that's not true. To have a laugh at someone's expense.

Why does "bollocks" (balls) mean "bullshit"? I don't know. Why does "fuck" have so many connotations that have nothing to do with fucking? Why do you say, "That's some good shit, man" when you're not referring to excrement?

A chav is an insolent, vulgar young person from the lower classes, particularly ones who wear baseball caps turned backward and hang out on street corners and in front of McDonalds.

by Anonymousreply 711/25/2012

It was a long time before I realized footpath meant sidewalk. I thought people were talking about a path worn by footsteps.

by Anonymousreply 811/25/2012

[quote]Still not sure I get what "chav" means.

A certain kind of flashy, lower-class jerk. In Britain there's a whole culture of them: they tend to get in your face, they wear a lot of bling and flashy clothes, they're obnoxious at soccer games, etc.

[quote]Does it mean "balls" (as in testicles)? Then why is it used instead of "bullshit" ?

Yes, it does mean testicles. Why should "bullshit" necessarily be the only possible metaphor for "lies" across all cultures?

[quote]I can never work out "taking the piss."

It means "humbling someone by mocking them."

[quote]"Bobs your uncle" WTF?

That's very old-fashioned and goes back to the early 20th century, mostly. It means, "And there you have it," and usually was used at the set of a series of instructions.

by Anonymousreply 911/25/2012

I thought Petula Clark was singing about sleeping in the subways she meant underground civic commuter trains, like the Tube. Actually, she's talking about these little tunnels the British sometimes have for their walkways.

by Anonymousreply 1011/25/2012

[quote]OP should be shot in the head for not knowing what fortnight meant "for a few decades".

Why? No one ever used it for any reason in the United States, nor have we since the 19th century. OP would only come across it in British novels.

Temper your rage, Mary.

by Anonymousreply 1111/25/2012

Bollocks is actually both the testicles and the penis. We don't have a word for it in America...

by Anonymousreply 1211/25/2012

R8 They also use "pavement" for sidewalk, which is confusing to Americans.

How about "poofter," or is that Australian? The first time I read that in a book I had no idea they were referring to someone like me!

After watching "Keeping Up Appearances," I had to look up "bacon bottie."

by Anonymousreply 1311/25/2012

[quote]After reading the word "fortnight" for a few decades I finally found out what it meant.

Was this before dictionaries were invented?

by Anonymousreply 1511/25/2012

What is the difference of quid, bob, pound? I've been labouring (!) under the impression that they are synonymous...

by Anonymousreply 1611/25/2012

"Slapper" and " Slag" sound the same but aren't somehow.

Chippie and CHips get me confused.

by Anonymousreply 1711/25/2012

So what's the difference between slapper and slag.

by Anonymousreply 1811/25/2012

r11, have you never read Shakespeare?

by Anonymousreply 1911/25/2012

The proper use of "quite" eludes me.

by Anonymousreply 2011/25/2012

I asked me mate if I could bum a fag.

by Anonymousreply 2111/25/2012

R8, footpath doesn't mean "sidewalk". A footpath is simply a path, primarily for walking along. What you Americans call a "sidewalk" is known as a pavement in the UK.

I have this great desire to call you an idiot on reading your post.

by Anonymousreply 2211/25/2012

R16 Also "guinea."

by Anonymousreply 2311/25/2012

[quote]What is the difference of quid, bob, pound?

Quid is slang for pound, the way buck is slang for dollar.

Bob is slang for shilling, which is a unit of currency no longer used in the UK. Before decimalization in 1971, there were 20 shillings per pound and 12 pence per shilling, and thus there were 240 pence in a pound. After decimalization, the shilling coin was superseded by the new five-pence piece, which initially was of identical size and weight and had the same value, and inherited the shilling's slang name of a bob.

by Anonymousreply 2411/25/2012

A guinea is an old coin that was valued at one pound plus one shilling.

by Anonymousreply 2511/25/2012

Why would someone get called an idiot for not knowing sayings from a country they did not grow up in? r22 is mean.

by Anonymousreply 2611/25/2012

Bollocks are testicles.

Bollocks also means bad The bollocks means good The dog's bollocks means the best

by Anonymousreply 2711/25/2012

[quote]Bollocks also means bad The bollocks means good The dog's bollocks means the best

Ah ... kinda like [italic]bullshit[/italic] is bad but [italic]the shit[/italic] is good.

by Anonymousreply 2811/25/2012

"Don't forget your Zimmer frame!" Come on, admit it, American AbFab-loving gays: how many of you knew what that meant the first time you heard it?

by Anonymousreply 2911/25/2012

What exactly does it mean calling somebody a "tart"?

also, what is with the "2 Stone" weight? is it rebelling against the metric system?

by Anonymousreply 3011/25/2012

A tart is a flirtatious, slightly slutty woman.

by Anonymousreply 3111/25/2012

Well, r22, thanks for the correction. I got that from a novel in which an Australian archivist was chiding herself for adopting American terms, in particular saying sidewalk when she meant footpath. It's in [italic]People of the Book[/italic].

by Anonymousreply 3211/25/2012

It's quite well known in the UK that Bollocks are actually people from Sandra Bollock's family.

by Anonymousreply 3311/25/2012

[quote]s with the "2 Stone" weight? is it rebelling against the metric system?

Quite a few Imperial units of measurement are still used colloquially in the UK. It's not "rebelling" as much as it simply hasn't completely died out.

by Anonymousreply 3411/25/2012

The Queen is in habit of screaming "Bollocks!" when in residence at Balmoral.

Only there though.

by Anonymousreply 3511/25/2012

It's "bacon buttie," R13 not bottie: a sandwich made with bacon. You can also have a chip buttie, which is what Americans call fries in two slices of buttered white bread.

You might, for exmaple, order a bacon buttie at the chippie and then eat it on the pavement outside where you can bum a fag off a chav. To make sure he doesn't get stroppy compliment him on his trainers but don't be wanky about it.

by Anonymousreply 3611/25/2012

R32 We often use footpath instead of pavement. It depends a little on where in Britain you come from I think. Footpath has a much wider definition than pavement which only refers to the raised walking area beside a road. Footpath can refer to little mud trails through a wood or field and other such places as well as a pavement.

by Anonymousreply 3711/25/2012

'Taking the piss': mocking someone who's full of himself. 'Piss-proud' is a non-sexual hard-on, so if you take the piss you deflate useless prominence.

More polite variants, which now seem genteel: 'Take the mick' (micturation), or 'Take the rise.'

'They're really taking the piss' also now means making demands which aren't reasonable: expecting meek compliance. High costs, for example: 'Seen these prices? They're really taking the piss.' Politer version: 'They're really having a laugh.'

by Anonymousreply 3811/25/2012

R10 I always thought that she was singing about sleeping on trains, until now.

Do Brits get confused by the American musical Subways Are for Sleeping?

by Anonymousreply 3911/25/2012

[quote]You can also have a chip buttie, which is what Americans call fries in two slices of buttered white bread.

Oh, yes, that's exactly what Americans call... that.

by Anonymousreply 4011/25/2012

French fries in bread? Gross.

Talk about a carb overload.

by Anonymousreply 4211/25/2012

[quote]Do Brits get confused by the American musical Subways Are for Sleeping?

Np, because Brits know what Americans mean by "subway." The ignorance appears to run only the other way.

by Anonymousreply 4311/25/2012

[quote]What exactly does it mean calling somebody a "tart"?

It means you're a tart, darlin'!

by Anonymousreply 4411/25/2012

R40, fair point. By the way, they are far, far more delicious than they sound.

by Anonymousreply 4511/25/2012

I want to be gangbanged by violent filthy chavs!

by Anonymousreply 4611/25/2012

[quote]I thought Petula Clark was singing about sleeping in the subways she meant underground civic commuter trains, like the Tube. Actually, she's talking about these little tunnels the British sometimes have for their walkways.

Okay, me too. I always thought Petula Clark was always telling her lover not to sleep in an underground railroad car. All these years. My my my.

by Anonymousreply 4711/25/2012

Oh come on, R11 you don't have to be British to know what fortnight means. I'm not from Britain, English is not even my first language, so quit throwing "Mary" around. Fortnight is a simple term. Maybe it's not widely used but it's not exactly obscure. And as R15 said it is easy to consult a dictionary. So yes, one has to be stupid to go on for decades not knowing a word which apparently came up pretty often in OP's reading yet he did not see himself fit to bother looking it up before spreading his/her ignorance in here.

by Anonymousreply 4811/25/2012

I knew what a zimmer frame was R29, but I read a lot of British books.

R42 - I agree that a Chip Butty (french fry - more like steak fries as I understand it - sandwich) sounds completely gross.

by Anonymousreply 4911/25/2012

I can't believe some of you have never had a chip butty with tomato sauce. What do you eat when you're hungover?

Gross is biscuits and gravy. Don't the biscuits go all soggy? Doesn't the chocolate melt?

by Anonymousreply 5011/25/2012

"Big girl's blouse"

by Anonymousreply 5111/25/2012

I can be a big girl blouse, when I don't get what I want and I'm feeling campy. But that how we roll in southern callyforneea.

by Anonymousreply 5211/25/2012

R50 what chocolate? I'm assuming you are being deliberately obtuse.

by Anonymousreply 5311/25/2012

R50, by "tomato sauce" do you mean "tomato ketchup?" In the USA tomato sauce means marinara, something eaten on pasta not something you'd dunk your fries/chips in.

What British people call biscuits are called cookies in America. American biscuits are a type of dinner roll made without yeast.

by Anonymousreply 5411/25/2012

Chav = "Council House And Violent". To Americans that would probably translate to trailer trash on meth.

by Anonymousreply 5511/25/2012

R50, see R54 with regard to biscuits.

by Anonymousreply 5611/25/2012

[quote] R11, have you never read Shakespeare? Anonymous reply 19

Exactly. Any adult who does not know what fortnight means is another example of an ignorant American. I'm sure everyone has some Shakespeare in high school.

Aside from the fact that anyone would be so intellectually lazy that they would go days or weeks, let alone decades, without bothering to look up a word they didn't know.

No excuses for this dullard at R11, et al.

by Anonymousreply 5711/25/2012

[quote]Gross is biscuits and gravy. Don't the biscuits go all soggy? Doesn't the chocolate melt?

It took me a minute to work out what you were on about; now I'm howling with laughter.

"Biscuits" in American English are more like scones, a bread-like item made with baking powder instead of yeast. There's no chocolate involved.

What are called "biscuits" in UK English are called "cookies" in American.

by Anonymousreply 5811/25/2012

Candy = prostitutes in UK Sweets = American candy

by Anonymousreply 5911/25/2012

My grandfather taught me some Cockney slang - Apple and Pears for Up the Stairs, etc. Forgot it all.

Re: all the bitchy superior "fortnight" definers, give 'em a couple of weeks, they'll get over it.

by Anonymousreply 6011/25/2012

I've traveled to the UK each summer for years. While I have heard expression that were new to me, I seldom had any trouble understanding their meaning in conversation. I guess some of us just stop thinking when a word or phrase is heard that is unknown to us. Too bad, British English is wonderful and I enjoy it completely.

I find it a matter of pride that you Brits founded our US. We owe our success and high standard of living to you. Too bad so many here in the US possess pride without much intelligence.

by Anonymousreply 6111/25/2012

Nothing like good warm, fluffy biscuits covered with cream gravy with lots of pepper.

by Anonymousreply 6211/25/2012

Fortnight generally is not an important word in any work of literature and is clearly a period of time. Most readers would not interrupt their reading by running to the dictionary for the specifics on a minor word.

by Anonymousreply 6411/25/2012

British TV cook Nigella Lawson is always using colloquialisms that I get a kick out of, but don't often understand.

by Anonymousreply 6511/25/2012

The only time the word fortnight is used in the US is when those pretentious tennis sports broadcasters cover the Wimbeldon matches. They think it makes them sound clever. They sound even more stupid.

by Anonymousreply 6611/25/2012

[quote]I find it a matter of pride that you Brits founded our US. We owe our success and high standard of living to you. Too bad so many here in the US possess pride without much intelligence.

LOL. Have you ever been to Amsterdam on a Saturday night?

by Anonymousreply 6711/25/2012

[quote]I find it a matter of pride that you Brits founded our US.

Er, that's very kind, but not exactly accurate. The Brits founded Canada. The US was created by insurgents that today would be considered domestic terrorists and guerrillas.

by Anonymousreply 6811/25/2012

I could have posted that, R67.

by Anonymousreply 6911/25/2012

I got into a taxi in London once and asked the driver to take me to a gay bar.

He turned around and said, "Tike it up the backsoid, do'ya?"

How Rude!

by Anonymousreply 7011/25/2012

All this talk of chip butties and biscuits and gravy led me to POUTINE! Let's drag the Canadians into this, too.

My (non-British) aunt makes fried potato sandwiches (not French fries/chips, but sliced potatoes) with lots of butter, salt and pepper, on nice soft Wonder-type bread. Yummy.

Re: Subway. I've seen official signs in the US marking a pedestrian passageway under a street or roadway as "subway."

Do they have American-style baking powder or buttermilk biscuits in the UK? If so, what are they called? They're not really like scones

by Anonymousreply 7111/25/2012

Not bothering to look up a word because it's not considered important is no excuse for ignorance and laziness, R64.

by Anonymousreply 7211/25/2012

Actually..... the French founded Canada and the British took it from them R68 and that is only if you ignore the Vikings 500 years earlier. Quebec City was the battle ground and the British won.

by Anonymousreply 7311/25/2012

R66, "The Fortnight" is the "official" second name used for Wimbledon. Commentators use it so as not to have to constantly say "Wimbledon." It only makes sense that US tennis commentators, who spend several weeks in London each summer, should use it as well. Nothing pretentious about it; they're just doing as the locals do.

The Fortnight before the Fortnight:

by Anonymousreply 7411/25/2012

Yes, you're right R73. I guess I meant the Brits founded what we now think of as the dominion of Canada.

by Anonymousreply 7511/25/2012

R71 American biscuits are just unsweetened scones. Some people use buttermilk to make them and most use baking powder. Scones are usually sweetened over here but you do get savoury varieties too.

by Anonymousreply 7611/25/2012

Also what you call gravy is more of a thick sauce and very unlike what Brits call gravy.

by Anonymousreply 7711/25/2012

The very first po boy was fried potatoes on french bread with beef gravy,

by Anonymousreply 7811/25/2012

I still need to know what the difference is between a slapped and a slag

by Anonymousreply 7911/25/2012

Your mother's a slapper, and your sister's a slag! NOW do you understand?

by Anonymousreply 8011/25/2012

R78 I've heard of "wet fries": French fries with brown gravy.

by Anonymousreply 8111/25/2012

R50 --

Years ago I was traveling in the States with an English friend. His first comment on seeing "biscuits and gravy" at a breakfast buffet was "Oh, how thoughtful - they chew it for you ahead of time!"

by Anonymousreply 8211/25/2012

Hey Tart, that is 50 quid for 1 stone of bubble and squeak. Don't be slag.

by Anonymousreply 8311/25/2012

Y'all, the term is actually Briticism.

by Anonymousreply 8411/25/2012

When I was in London in 1980, I went to see Sweeney Todd in the West End (geographically appropriate, eh?) I went to purchase my ticket and noticed that there were seats located in the "stalls." I had never heard that expression in conjunction with theater seating, so I had to ask the clerk if I would be standing up (like a horse) if I had a ticket in the stalls. She was patient enough to explain to me that "stalls" are what we call the Orchestra. If you think about it, neither term is very appropriate.

by Anonymousreply 8511/25/2012

R32, I hope you realise Australia is not in Britain.

R37, in which part of Britain do you "often use footpath instead of pavement"?

by Anonymousreply 8611/25/2012

One of my biggest blunders with the English language was when I thanked someone for the talk we had (which made it sound like it was a very serious and unpleasant lecture type of talk I didn't appreciate at all) when what I really meant was thank you for the chat.

by Anonymousreply 8711/25/2012

Uh Oh, Marian the Librarian is here. Ssssh.

by Anonymousreply 8811/25/2012

To me a footpath sounds like a path you find in a forest that isn't paved.

by Anonymousreply 8911/25/2012

scots friend uses "gies me the boke"

To be presented with an unattractive prospect such that the gag reflex is vigorously invoked.

by Anonymousreply 9011/25/2012

R60 has amused us.

The rest of you are a waste of tissue.

by Anonymousreply 9111/25/2012

In "Deduce, You Say!" Daffy says "Odds my bodkins." Seems kind of similar to "Well I'll be damned."

Britishism or Daffy Duckness?

by Anonymousreply 9211/25/2012

Oye!

by Anonymousreply 9311/25/2012

"There's no chocolate involved."

1 cup sugar 1 cup milk 1/4 cup cocoa 1 TBS flour 1 big dab of butter

Bring to boil, stirring constantly. Spoon over hot, buttered biscuits.

Great for breakfast, heavenly when you're stoned!

by Anonymousreply 9411/25/2012

[quote]You can also have a chip buttie, which is what Americans call fries in two slices of buttered white bread.

Too healthy. I'll have mine deep-fried to add a little more flavor.

by Anonymousreply 9511/25/2012

R95 Sounds like that would make a great State Fair treat!

by Anonymousreply 9611/25/2012

[quote]scots friend uses "gies me the boke"

I had a Scottish stepmother for twenty years and I never understood a goddamned word she said. When she got to talking real fast, it was near impossible to make out a word. She would say "dee" for "do" and "hoos" for "house." She was a talker too.

by Anonymousreply 9711/25/2012

Here are some old English sayings.

by Anonymousreply 9811/25/2012

Actually,R73, Kanata was never lost, so it didn't need to be founded.

by Anonymousreply 9911/25/2012

We had bacon buttys for tea last night. I suppose we'll have sarnies at Roy's Rolls tomorrow noon.

by Anonymousreply 10011/25/2012

.

by Anonymousreply 10111/25/2012

[quote]Orchestra. If you think about it, neither term is very appropriate

Orchestra was in ancient Greek theater the area directly In Front of the stage. Thus the term

by Anonymousreply 10211/25/2012

Don't worry, OP, the internet is eroding British English and it's largely a one-way street. Fortnight is on the way out except for in relation to sport. Although I have noticed that you Americans have picked up and run with shite- which you never used to hear Americans say before we all started mixing so vigourously on social media.

Also, cunt isn't so much only used to insult women or by gay men to insult other gay men anymore is it? You're learning to love the word like we do.

But bollocks and wanker are too English by far for you, I fear. Nothing sounds quite so hilariously wrong as an American saying wanker.

And another thing, suddenly everyone is saying 'methinks' but lots of people get it wrong and say 'me thinks' like they're a caveman.

Last point- one word I urge you to adopt is rubbish. It's a great way to describe things that are sub-par. Garbage just doesn't cut it.

Anyway, until the next time- toodle pip, bitches x

by Anonymousreply 10311/25/2012

AYB, sub-par is "shit", "trash", and "junk".

by Anonymousreply 10411/25/2012

also love the way my scots friend says I'm done with work and on my way home

thats me hame

by Anonymousreply 10511/25/2012

I hear "rubbish heap" used all the time in the US.

by Anonymousreply 10611/25/2012

[quote] Does none of you know how to consult Urban Dictionary

Does you know how to consult a book of grammar?

by Anonymousreply 10711/25/2012

R107 That's actually correct: "none" is singular.

Doesn't "fanny" mean something quite different in the UK?

by Anonymousreply 10811/25/2012

You people who never heard "Bob's your uncle" were not SCTV fans.

by Anonymousreply 11011/25/2012

It's also in Hitchcock's "Frenzy," R110 (used by the custard-haired serial-killing greengrocer.)

by Anonymousreply 11211/25/2012

Is "biscuits and gravy" a southern thing, like grits?

by Anonymousreply 11311/25/2012

I prefer "crap" or "garbage" to "rubbish."

Rubbish sounds weak.

by Anonymousreply 11411/25/2012

R111=Someone who's never heard of Shoney's.

by Anonymousreply 11511/25/2012

Wait. I thought Biscuits and Gravy was a breakfast dish...

by Anonymousreply 11611/25/2012

"Does none" is more properly rendered "doesn't anyone."

by Anonymousreply 11711/25/2012

Odd. "Do None" rolls off the tongue more easily. I was surprised that Does None was right.

by Anonymousreply 11811/25/2012

"Car park" instead of "parking lot" makes me think of an amusement park with car rides.

by Anonymousreply 11911/25/2012

A Tosser is a short person? Really? A short person or a little person?

by Anonymousreply 12011/25/2012

[quote] [R111]=Someone who's never heard of Shoney's.

You are correct. We don't have Shoney's. We don't have Cracker Barrel either, though I've heard of it on Datalounge. Or Denny's.

We do have IHOP

by Anonymousreply 12111/25/2012

"And now a word from the British Council of Dentistry"

by Anonymousreply 12211/25/2012

"Caravan park" sounds more festive than "trailer park."

by Anonymousreply 12311/25/2012

Windscreen sounds like it lets all the wind come through.

by Anonymousreply 12411/25/2012

[quote] Windscreen sounds like it lets all the wind come through.

Yes. A screen is mesh. I imagine people driving while trying to see through a mesh screen filled with dead insects.

by Anonymousreply 12511/25/2012

It irks me that Americans write "booger" when they mean "bugger."

"Poor little booger" means poor little dried mucus.

by Anonymousreply 12611/25/2012

We don't have Shoney's or Cracker Barrel either, but don't you ever travel?

by Anonymousreply 12711/25/2012

Yuck, R126. And why is everything so "bloody" in the UK? Is it considered a rude adjective? Like "Fucking?"

by Anonymousreply 12811/25/2012

Oh, dear, I lived in America for five years and to this day had no idea Americans don't; use the word fortnight.

Also, I had to get out of the habit of telling people to come over at teatime. In fact, I don't think I use that expression any more. But tea time is four o'clock whether you're going to have tea or not.

The weirdest American words to me were platter, pitcher, seltzer, touch tone, rotary, TAB, spiffy..

Talking of which, I was quite amused by the way Americans used 'weird' ALL THE TIME. Is that still in fashion? I don't hear it hear it on DL much.

Also 'cute' (all the time)...cute in England means cutesy, adorable. Whereas Americans use it for handsome, attractive, very pretty etc..another word people don't use on DL much.

We used to say he lives IN Oxford Street, which sounded strange, now in England we also say ON Oxford Street....since about 2001, for some reason.

by Anonymousreply 12911/25/2012

[quote]Is it considered a rude adjective? Like "Fucking?"

Not quite as rude, in fact, it's become a gentler word now as most people say fucking here too.

'Bloody hell! I can't find my fucking car keys!'

by Anonymousreply 13011/25/2012

[quote] We don't have Shoney's or Cracker Barrel either, but don't you ever travel?

Not to Shoney's or Cracker Barrel, no.

I've never been to Olive Garden either, but that's another thread.

by Anonymousreply 13111/25/2012

Have the British finally exhausted "brilliant"? That poor word has been used beyond all measure.

by Anonymousreply 13211/25/2012

I'm curious about "bloody" as an epithet, too. Does it get that meaning in the UK because it refers to menstrual blood?

by Anonymousreply 13311/25/2012

[quote]Oh, dear, I lived in America for five years and to this day had no idea Americans don't; use the word fortnight.

Any halfway literate American understands what it means, even if we don't use it in everyday speech. It's like "cinema" in that respect, a word nobody really says but anyone should understand.

by Anonymousreply 13411/25/2012

R129'You always hear something like "in the Oxford High Street" on British TV shows. I always assumed it meant something akin to"downtown". Do most British towns have a High Street that's their commercial center?

Speaking of "on" vs. "in": Why do New Yorkers say "standing on line" when the rest of us say "in line?" (Except for the Brits, who are queueing up.)

by Anonymousreply 13511/25/2012

My grandmother was Irish and she used to say "bloody" all the time. The first time she babysat for my uncle and his wife, there was a misunderstanding. My uncle's wife was very nervous, never having left the baby with anyone before, so she called her house and asked my grandmother if everything was ok. Well, said my grandmother, she gave the baby a bath, put on a new diaper and put him in his pajama and no sooner had she done this when he pooped and she had to change the bloody diaper.

"We're coming right home!" said my uncle's wife.

It took a while for my uncle to calm his wife down enough to find out why she was nearly hysterical. He explained that the diaper wasn't bloody, it was just an Irishism. .

by Anonymousreply 13611/25/2012

The Brits truly do own the word cunt.

by Anonymousreply 13711/25/2012

[quote] Do most British towns have a High Street that's their commercial center?

Yes, it's our version of Main St.

by Anonymousreply 13811/25/2012

As an Australian we never use the words Cell Phone but Mobile Phone

by Anonymousreply 13911/25/2012

I remember having to look up "snogging" the first time I read it. And even now my auto-correct doesn't recognize it.

by Anonymousreply 14011/25/2012

[quote]... both the testicles and the penis. We don't have a word for it in America...

How about "junk"?

by Anonymousreply 14111/25/2012

If she were "proper" Irish, she would have said "nappy" instead of "diaper," R136.

by Anonymousreply 14211/25/2012

[quote]As an Australian we never use the words Cell Phone but Mobile Phone

Same in England. I prefer cell phone, for some reason. It's sounds more futuristic.

by Anonymousreply 14311/25/2012

Does "bloody" come from "god's blood"?

by Anonymousreply 14411/25/2012

I noticed that. I the US it's "Call my cell." Everywhere else, it's "Call my mobile."

by Anonymousreply 14511/25/2012

As a child I came across the word vacation in a book and just could NOT get my head around it.

by Anonymousreply 14611/25/2012

[quote] Why do New Yorkers say "standing on line" when the rest of us say "in line"

Because we have always stood on line and we always will.

We also had stoops instead of porches.

by Anonymousreply 14711/25/2012

R125 TV and movie screens aren't mesh. Nor are room divider or computer screens.

Doesn't "bloody" have something to do with Christ's blood?

by Anonymousreply 14811/25/2012

R141 Or "genitals."

by Anonymousreply 14911/25/2012

This evening for supper, I had steak & kidney pud' with baked beans followed by treacle tart and custard, washed down with a nice cuppa. I could have had the Waitrose lemon drizzle, but I'll have it later in the week.

by Anonymousreply 15011/25/2012

[quote]Doesn't "bloody" have something to do with Christ's blood?

Yes.

Whereas 'Blimey!' means something quite different.

by Anonymousreply 15111/25/2012

How about "in hospital" vs. "in the hospital?" Or "at university" vs. "at the university?" (Although Americans do say "at college."

by Anonymousreply 15211/25/2012

R150 Is there a difference between treacle and golden syrup? Are they like corn syrup? Or molasses?

by Anonymousreply 15311/25/2012

[quote] If she were "proper" Irish, she would have said "nappy" instead of "diaper,"

She was northern Irish. I never heard any of the Irish relatives use "nappy."

They swore constantly. Every woman was a bitch, every man was a bastard and everything was bloody.

And my grandmother would say "hell for" when trying to convey that someone liked something very much.

"Oh, he was hell for the women, that one was!" "

"Oh, and she was hell for the money, wasn't she, that bitch?"

I used to watch grandmothers depicted on tv as sweet, apron-wearing women in floral dresses, a pearl necklace and a bun in the hair, knitting sweaters and baking cookies and I laughed and laughed. I'd never seen a grandmother like that.

Yep, I guess old grandma was pretty mentally ill.

by Anonymousreply 15411/25/2012

Well, R154, then they were simply Americanized. I live in Ireland, and I know no one outside the US and Canada uses "diaper."

by Anonymousreply 15511/25/2012

This is treacle tart.

by Anonymousreply 15611/25/2012

Speaking of nappies ... Do they still say "serviette" for "napkin"? And why do they use so many French words, like "courgette" and "aubergine"?

by Anonymousreply 15811/25/2012

I think its funny to see current British shows on American TV where the actors use American terms. The only people who speak more like those in England would be anyone with a Boston accent.

by Anonymousreply 15911/25/2012

Do we beam all our reality crap out to the rest of the world? Are they forced to endure the Kardashians along with us? This is what I want to know. Why should we be the only ones to suffer.

by Anonymousreply 16011/25/2012

[quote] I thought Petula Clark was singing about sleeping in the subways she meant underground civic commuter trains, like the Tube. Actually, she's talking about these little tunnels the British sometimes have for their walkways.

Reminds me of my first visit to London. Feeling worldly and sophisticated, I saw a "Subway" sign and descended the stairs, only to climb the ones in front of me and find myself on the other side of the street.

What I wouldn't give to have that innocence back.

by Anonymousreply 16111/25/2012

[quote]And another thing, suddenly everyone is saying 'methinks' but lots of people get it wrong and say 'me thinks' like they're a caveman.

Exactly. Methinks isn't "me thinks." They're etymologically different verbs (cf. German denken and dünken).

by Anonymousreply 16211/25/2012

About 14 years ago, when the first gay chatrooms became popular on the internets, UK gay bashers would come in and call us "shit box shaggahs."

And for those who need it spelled out for you, a fortnight is 14 days, or 2 weeks.

by Anonymousreply 16311/25/2012

About 20 years ago, I got a job creating American versions of British children's science books.

The nightmare of my life was that there is no short and simple American translation of "mains electricity," which made it impossible to translate captions without altering the whole layout.

by Anonymousreply 16411/25/2012

[quote] Do they still say "serviette" for "napkin"?

Some sources say that they're interchangeable. Others say a "serviette" is paper and a "napkin" is cloth. I was told that it was "serviette" all the time unless you were referring to a sanitary napkin, Guess not.

by Anonymousreply 16511/25/2012

[quote]Wait. I thought Biscuits and Gravy was a breakfast dish...

Usually, but I've had it with supper, particularly when the main course is fried chicken.

by Anonymousreply 16611/25/2012

What is a wanker? A guy who masturbates?

by Anonymousreply 16711/25/2012

My Scottish grandmother would refer to the kitchen counter as the bunker.

To her, scones were any kind of biscuit. She even made scones in a cast iron frying pan. Flour, baking powder, sugar, fat, egg, milk, a drop or two of vinegar, makes a biscuit - or in her case, some kind of basic scone. Of course, some were more laborious, elaborate, and baked in the oven. Often with raisins.

I am the only one in the family who has held on to this tradition, but I haven't tried the frying pan method yet

When she was really pissed off, she'd say "shit and corruption" or "it's a CONTINENTAL damn!"

by Anonymousreply 16811/25/2012

[quote] Do we beam all our reality crap out to the rest of the world

A lot of our reality shows started in the UK/Europe and have been Americanized for our networks. "Survivor" started in Sweden. "Big Brother" started in the Netherlands. The Idol tv series started in the UK.

Reality tv was imported to the US.

by Anonymousreply 16911/25/2012

Jumper = sweater. Go figure.

by Anonymousreply 17011/25/2012

[quote] She even made scones in a cast iron frying pan. Flour, baking powder, sugar, fat, egg, milk, a drop or two of vinegar, makes a biscuit - or in her case, some kind of basic scone. Of course, some were more laborious, elaborate, and baked in the oven. Often with raisins.

My northern Irish grandmother called that "soda bread." It was round -- the size of the skillet -- and fairly flat. When I first saw "Irish soda bread" in US bakeries, I was confused. It's dome shaped like a cake. And it's much sweeter.

by Anonymousreply 17111/25/2012

R170 - I had to explain "sweater" to my partner's relative in India; she thought an American "jumper" she would probably call a "pinafore".

by Anonymousreply 17211/25/2012

R171, did she do other variations? I remember leftover chicken and turkey ending up in pot pies with a similar dough as the top crust.

Easy to make and no yeast required.

by Anonymousreply 17311/25/2012

This thread is making me hungry!

by Anonymousreply 17411/25/2012

The title of John Lennon's book is A Spaniard in the Works, which just seemed like a funny/ surrealistic title to me. I finally understood it was a pun on the expression 'a spanner in the works' meaning something was loused up or broken. (workers could stop the production line and get a break by tossing a spanner in the works) Spanner is British for wrench, the American expression would be to toss a wrench or a monkey wrench into something. This would be more figurative like ' you really tossed a wrench into that!' meaning something was screwed up.

by Anonymousreply 17511/26/2012

How did Americans start saying "do none" rather than "does none"?

by Anonymousreply 17611/26/2012

We don't say either. We say, "Does anyone."

by Anonymousreply 17711/26/2012

In the UK they say "well done." In the US they say "well played" or "good job."

by Anonymousreply 17811/26/2012

You guys are going to have to swot up a lot before I condescend to tell you the difference between 'u' and 'non-u'.

by Anonymousreply 17911/26/2012

I'm American (from the north-east) and never heard of biscuits & gravy and just Googled it and it looks like someone barfed on someone's plate. How does that look appetizing?! :-/

by Anonymousreply 18011/26/2012

"Serviette" is strictly for the Hyacinth Bucket types.

by Anonymousreply 18111/26/2012

R61= a Brit

by Anonymousreply 18211/26/2012

R180, have you ever mopped up gravy with a dinner roll? If not, surely you've seen it done. At some point, southerners quit mopping up gravy with their biscuits and just started ladling it on directly.

by Anonymousreply 18311/26/2012

[quote] I'm American (from the north-east) and never heard of biscuits & gravy and just Googled it and it looks like someone barfed on someone's plate. How does that look appetizing?! :-/

Agreed.

I'm not r180 but I've never mopped gravy with a dinner roll. I've never had gravy and a dinner roll on the same plate. Dinner rolls come before the main course in a bread basket that is removed from the table when the main course is served.

by Anonymousreply 18411/26/2012

[quote]What is a wanker? A guy who masturbates?

Basically, in a figurative sense. It means jerk (which, if you think about it, comes from "jerk off.")

by Anonymousreply 18511/26/2012

R185, in the US we call someone a "jerk off" who is a jerk, asshole, prick. SO I gather a wanker is the Brit equivalent.

by Anonymousreply 18611/26/2012

[quote]What is a wanker?

r184

by Anonymousreply 18711/26/2012

I pity people who think that biscuits and gravy look like someone barfed on a plate. It's a delicious Southern dish, traditionally served for breakfast but equally wonderful for dinner.

There are some sad, soulless people on datalounge.

by Anonymousreply 18811/26/2012

My mom is from Massachusetts originally, later New Jersey, and is unfamiliar with "country" food. We were at a breakfast buffet, and she asked me, "What's THAT stuff?" implying she wasn't too impressed with the look of the item. I replied, "It's gravy to put on your biscuits."

by Anonymousreply 18911/26/2012

The gravy that goes on biscuits is usually a cream or milk gravy, with crumbled sausage in it.

by Anonymousreply 19011/26/2012

A fortnight is not 14 days, but an abbreviation of Forteen Nights.

by Anonymousreply 19111/26/2012

[quote]I'm not [R180] but I've never mopped gravy with a dinner roll. I've never had gravy and a dinner roll on the same plate. Dinner rolls come before the main course in a bread basket that is removed from the table when the main course is served.

Well, as a Southerner, I haven't done that either. A dinner roll is torn into small pieces as eaten and each piece buttered. Usually comes before dinner or with a salad. However there is an option to get more bread if desired. This is in restaurants however. At home anything goes as it's more casual.

Do you usually set courses for home meals? We eat family style with everything on the table since we don't have footmen doing the removes. Do you live in Downton Abbey?

by Anonymousreply 19211/26/2012

"To clever by half" Say what?

by Anonymousreply 19311/26/2012

Mummy

by Anonymousreply 19411/26/2012

Do Brits still say "chance would be a fine thing" or is that old-fashioned now?

by Anonymousreply 19511/26/2012

[quote]"To clever by half" Say what?

*Too* clever.

by Anonymousreply 19611/26/2012

wanker is an asshole/bastard

by Anonymousreply 19711/26/2012

Blimey!

Shut ya gob!

Oye guvenah!

by Anonymousreply 19811/26/2012

R188, I'm not one of the earlier posters who made the vomit comments but I'm afraid I must agree. Many ethnic or local cuisines have food that resembles vomit. I simply don't eat it.

by Anonymousreply 19911/26/2012

Why are the British so ignorant of their colonies like Australia and Canada, yet so knowledgeable about the USA?

by Anonymousreply 20011/26/2012

R200 Are you familiar with the expressions "cultural imperialism" and "dominant culture"?

by Anonymousreply 20111/26/2012

American here.

We had to explain to a British chippy why she needed to stop saying, "Come knock me up about 10 in the morning."

I went through an Irvine Welsh phase relatively painlessly, but later discovered that in the UK, apparently, "fanny" refers to a woman's veejayjay instead of her butt as we think in the US. So while the mystery of so much heterosexual assfucking in literature was solved, I am left wondering what Brits call our "fanny packs."

"None" can mean "not one" or "not any" and may take singular OR plural verbs as appropriate.

We should do the "twee" thread again. That was fun.

by Anonymousreply 20211/26/2012

When my mum went home to England after many years away she made a horrendously funny faux pas. Upon meeting her neice who was nine months pregnant and had also just gotten a new feather haircut - popular in the 70s, she gave her a big hug and said, 'Oh, I see you got a shag.' She was mortified when she found out what she had said.

by Anonymousreply 20311/26/2012

r202

They were called "bum bags". Only worn by Americans and "continentals".

by Anonymousreply 20411/26/2012

which one of the Mitford sisters are you r 179?

by Anonymousreply 20511/26/2012

[quote] in the UK, apparently, "fanny" refers to a woman's veejayjay

Which is why cooking instructor Fanny Cradock's husband brought down the house at the end of her donut episode by wishing the TV audience a good night, adding, "and may all your donuts turn out like Fanny's."

Speaking of the craft of cooking, they often refer to it as "cookery" in the UK, a term seldom heard in the USA. The Brits also call the oven and stove-top "the cooker," and they call dishwasher detergent "washing up liquid."

I love the words "bog" and "karzy" to descrbe the toilet, as in "where's the bog?" or "I'm in the karzy!" Karzy is a slang term based on the Italian word "casa" for house.

by Anonymousreply 20611/27/2012

R204, That is pure BULLSHIT. I've been to England and Wales many times, and it most certainly WAS worn by locals. I've seen many Brits wearing that Shit in other countries too.

by Anonymousreply 20711/27/2012

[quote]wanker is an asshole/bastard

No it's not. A wanker is some pretentious.

Other immensely useful English words are 'naff' (from polari), meaning cheesy/second rate; 'zoosh' (also from polari) meaning tease something up to make it look good; and 'luvvie', the delicious patronising word used to refer to any theatrical and movie star who takes themselves seriously or lives totally in the theatrical world.

by Anonymousreply 20811/27/2012

some=someone

by Anonymousreply 20911/27/2012

We're not so ignorant of Australia and Canada - especially not Australia. I don't know where you got that idea, R200.

And I've never seen a British person wearing a bum bag, either. In fact, I don't even recall seeing many foreign tourists wearing them.

by Anonymousreply 21011/27/2012

[quote]After reading the word "fortnight" for a few decades I finally found out what it meant.

It took you DECADES to look it up...

The IQ of the Datalounge reader just hit a new low.

I mean that makes you dumber than Michael Phelps, and he's retarded.

I would even venture to guess you're dumber than Corky.

by Anonymousreply 21111/27/2012

Nancy

Obviously

Fanny Craddock joke:

What's the different between Fanny Craddock and a hearty rural walk?

The latter is a pant in the country...

by Anonymousreply 21211/27/2012

[quote] 'zoosh' (also from polari) meaning tease something up to make it look good

Queer Eye For The Straight Guy made this word happen in the US for about a year in 2003.

by Anonymousreply 21311/27/2012

Treacle is darker than golden syrup. Golden syrup is much more common, used as a topping for pancakes and as an essential ingredient of Anzac biscuits. I don't know what treacle is used for...except for treacle tart in the Harry Potter books.

by Anonymousreply 21411/27/2012

Have the phrases "big girl's blouse" and "pants!" been discussed? oR "gets on my tits"?

by Anonymousreply 21511/27/2012

I wonder if "chav" is related to the Spanish "chavo", which means something like "guy."

by Anonymousreply 21611/27/2012

I think the reason we don't use Golden Syrup in North America is that unlike our European friends, we have maple trees here!

by Anonymousreply 21711/27/2012

R217 Isn't golden syrup like (Karo) corn syrup?

by Anonymousreply 21811/27/2012

Six of one and half a dozen of the other. Swings and roundabouts both mean the same. =Same Same.

by Anonymousreply 21911/27/2012

An ex-colleague who was Welsh often used to say "look you". Is this peculiar to Welsh people or is this something all Brits say?

by Anonymousreply 22011/27/2012

[quote]I wonder if "chav" is related to the Spanish "chavo", which means something like "guy."

Yes, they are both from the same Romani word.

by Anonymousreply 22111/27/2012

"Look you" is very Welsh as is the odd turn of phrase "there's lovely" (that's nice). Both seem to be literal translations from Welsh.

R206 - I've always spelt it khazi, myself. Go to Newcastle and it turns into 'netty'.

by Anonymousreply 22211/27/2012

Have we discusssed "Wescott", which is a contraction of "waist coat", in other words, a vest?

by Anonymousreply 22311/27/2012

Why is there no word for "three weeks"?

by Anonymousreply 22411/27/2012

R223, it's spelled waistcoat and hasn't been pronounced "wescott" in decades.

by Anonymousreply 22511/27/2012

[quote] I think the reason we don't use Golden Syrup in North America is that unlike our European friends, we have maple trees here!

From the UK here. Maple Syrup costs a fortune!

"Wanky" is pretentious or convoluted for the sake of it. i.e. "Judith Butler's theories are a bit wanky". Wanker can be the same, but you can call anyone a wanker and it just means they're an asshole.

"Knee high to a grasshopper" is another one older women say, but Eartha Kitt says it in Mink Schmink as well.

by Anonymousreply 22611/27/2012

Really R226? How much is it?

We use "knee high to a grasshopper" in the South too.

Do you guys use "faster than a duck on a june bug"?

by Anonymousreply 22711/27/2012

A 12oz bottle in most shops costs the equivalent of 9 or 10 dollars. "A fortune" is hyperbole on my part, but considering how cheap golden syrup and peanutbutter is over here, the price is ridiculous.

by Anonymousreply 22811/27/2012

Maple syrup is expensive everywhere. It takes a lot of sap to boil down to syrup consistency.

Back to waistcoat: isn't "vest" an undershirt in BritEnglish?

by Anonymousreply 22911/27/2012

I was about eight years old when I first met Cathy Lee on the playground. We became fast friends. Just as thick as Louisiana blackstrap molasses on a stack of johnnycakes as high as an elephant's knee---

by Anonymousreply 23011/27/2012

REAL maple syrup is pricey here but "pancake syrup" which is fake-maple is usually found instead.

by Anonymousreply 23111/27/2012

[quote]I think the reason we don't use Golden Syrup in North America is that unlike our European friends, we have maple trees here!

Is golden syrup the same thing as the fake "maple" syrup sold in the US as Mrs Butterworth's, Aunt Jemima etc.? (I'm embarrassed to admit how old I was before I realized that mass-market "maple" syrup isn't real maple.)

by Anonymousreply 23211/27/2012

R12. The American word you are looking for is cockandballs. ONe word, cockandballs. It comes from the Greek word "cockandballsum". If you don't believe me, Look it up.

by Anonymousreply 23311/27/2012

R232, see the Wiki for golden syrup

by Anonymousreply 23411/27/2012

Yeah, vest is undershirt in the UK. Pants are called trousers.

Sweaters are jumpers.

Sneakers/trainers are called guddies/gutties.

by Anonymousreply 23511/27/2012

R123, the wife of a friend of mine came here from South Africa. There, they call erasers. "Rubbers." She tells a very funny story about going into a stationary store and asking for a rubber!!!!

by Anonymousreply 23611/27/2012

Got it, R234. Thanks!

by Anonymousreply 23711/27/2012

I think "golden syrup" is the same as Karo -- corn syrup.

by Anonymousreply 23811/27/2012

I remember when I was a a kid, we lived in England for a year. I was on a bus, leaning over the seat talking to a friend.

Out of the blue, some woman runs up from the back of the bus and starts hitting me with her handbag and screaming, "TAKE THE PISS OUT OF ME WILL YOU,"

I had no idea why she was hitting me or why an old lady was talking to a child about drinking her urine.

by Anonymousreply 23911/27/2012

What was the aftermath, R239?

by Anonymousreply 24011/27/2012

Erasers are called rubbers in the UK as well.

by Anonymousreply 24111/27/2012

Regarding TV shows. Series vs. season. That made me stumble a little bit at first.

by Anonymousreply 24211/27/2012

On another note, it is odd how much polari and gay slang is in mainstream British culture. Growing up watching the drag queen Lily Savage, the queeny John Inman on Are You Being Served, and Kenneth Williams and Charles Hawtrey in the Carry On films, it seems that gayness has always been just acceptable in the culture. I do realize that drag queens and femmes are only part of the spectrum, but still.

by Anonymousreply 24311/27/2012

r243, men doing drag is quite the tradition since the Shakespeare days. Just because at one point women were allowed to act on stage doesn't mean that the general Brit audience no longer enjoys men in drag in hilarity ensues set ups.

by Anonymousreply 24411/27/2012

elevators are called lifts, flash light are called torch lights. snogging means kissing.

by Anonymousreply 24511/27/2012

Do Americans use the word diddies?

by Anonymousreply 24611/27/2012

I don't know what Karo is, but Golden Syrup is not a corn syrup - it's made from sugar cane (or maybe sugar beet). It might be the same kind of consistency but I wouldn't know.

The US has financial incentives to make the use of US produced corn syrup cheap - it's cheaper there than other sources of sugar. The same is not true in UK. Maize isn't grown here and cane/beet sugar is cheaper and normal. (I suppose that is another difference, UK Maize = US corn, UK corn is wheat or other crop like it).

I've never seen corn syrup in the UK to buy and it's much less commonly used in manufactured foods than in the US. HFCS is even rarer again (there are strict legal restrictions on it). For instance, coca cola in the UK is made with cane sugar.

by Anonymousreply 24711/27/2012

My mother had a sleeve Pekingese and he used to have seizures when he was young, due to low blood sugar. We kept a bottle of Karo syrup in the house and would slowly pour a teaspoon of it in his mouth and he would be fine after that.

I hadn't thought of that for years.

by Anonymousreply 24811/27/2012

Brits are schooled from their earliest days to appreciate camp and drag via panto and its prevalence on TV. Straight Americans have always been uncomfortable with drag, and 'butch but nellie' genderfuck of any sort they simply can't deal with.

by Anonymousreply 24911/27/2012

Incidentally, I still have no idea what the fuck pantomime is.

by Anonymousreply 25011/27/2012

Fanny. Ask Brits why the all laugh when tourists talk of their "Fanny Packs". (It means vagina you twats!)

by Anonymousreply 25111/27/2012

Pantomime can be glorious. Imagine all of your washed up celebrities and the occasional local drag queen thrown together with some actors and local kids to perform a bastardized fairytale, with some local and pop culture references thrown in.

It's like Into the Woods, mixed with Family Guy, mixed with RuPaul's Drag Race. And when done right, it's great fun.

by Anonymousreply 25211/27/2012

R252, but how's that different from, say, dinner theater or summer stock? I guess I don't get the concept.

by Anonymousreply 25311/27/2012

I thought panto was kind of like this

by Anonymousreply 25411/27/2012

It seems so many ex Coronation Street people left the show "to do pantomime"

Is that really true, or is it shorthand for being fired?

by Anonymousreply 25511/27/2012

Panto doesn't take itself seriously.

by Anonymousreply 25611/27/2012

Isn't panto a once in a year (around Christmas) theatre stage event?

IIRC Daniel Radcliffe did one with Stephen Fry.

by Anonymousreply 25711/27/2012

I take it this panto is different than that weird Marcel Marceau shit?

by Anonymousreply 25811/27/2012

Panto has a bigger budget than dinner theatre. It's usually produced by the theatre - there are some licensed templates and then each place will have parts tailored to that area or to reference the performer in it. So when Pamela Anderson did panto there were probably a million Baywatch jokes in there.

Loads of soap opera actors do panto after leaving a show, but many do it during their time on a show as well. There's a lot of mugging to the audience.

Some of them are truly strange. I saw an Aladdin with "Single Ladies" thrown in there with Cole Porter's "Come to the Supermarket in Old Peking".

Here's Pamela doing Genie in a Bottle!

by Anonymousreply 25911/27/2012

Also, panto takes place from around the start of december through to around the 2nd week of January. It's a Christmas holidays thing, with about 11 shows a week. Lots of schools take the kids to them.

by Anonymousreply 26011/27/2012

Here's a Cinderella panto, with DL fave Sian Philips as the wicked stepmother.

by Anonymousreply 26111/27/2012

[quote]You can also have a chip buttie, which is what Americans call fries in two slices of buttered white bread.

[quote]Oh, yes, that's exactly what Americans call... that

The first poster was just missing a comma after the word fries, and most of us were able to figure it out - he just meant that a chip buttie is [what-Americans-call-fries] in two slices of buttered white bread.

No big whoop, r40

by Anonymousreply 26211/27/2012

Most of the panto I've seen has been local am-dram stuff. Loads of local references, usually massive amounts of innuendo for the adults that the kids aren't supposed to get.

Men dressed up as Pantomime Dames (usually the filthiest comedy is from the Dame). The lead hero "principal boy" character always being played by a girl (e.g. Dick Whittington, Aladdin etc.). The hero always romances and gets "his" girl (who is a ye generic pretty girl). The Dame often gets a male love interest as well (although this is played even more for laughs). The villain is always way, way over the top. The whole thing is gay and campy through and through.

A lot of fun. As long as you don't take it in the least bit seriously and have your bar order in for the intermission. Quality of acting, singing, scripts usually not high but that's not the point. All the audience participation stuff is a huge amount of fun (especially when you are a kid or you are taking kids). Sweets chucked into the audience, bellowing "he's behind you!", "Oh, yes he is!","Oh no he isn't", "clap your hands if you believe in fairies". Do Americans not have these kind of cultural references in other contexts?

by Anonymousreply 26311/27/2012

That panto stuff sounds scary. Even the word "panto" gives me the creeps.

by Anonymousreply 26411/27/2012

And there's all the distinctly cosy camp gay 'national treasures' on Brit TV doing their afternoon and evening chat shows and guest appearances: Paul O'Grady, Graham Norton, Julian Clary, Alan Carr. There's no US comparison. They all make a New Year's Eve Anderson Cooper look the soul of well-mannered butch. Simon Amstell was the soberest, but even he got into a witty gay-off (as they put it) with John Barrowman when the latter was a guest.

by Anonymousreply 26511/27/2012

Brits of all classes adore innuendo. The filthier, the better. Here's the difference between the UK & the US expressed in one clip: the Edwardian era's Cucumber Song.

by Anonymousreply 26611/27/2012

Well, this thread's gone all pear shaped.

by Anonymousreply 26711/27/2012

Another thing I was wondering about (having recently rewatched "Notes on a Scandal"), what's up with wearing tissue paper crowns on Christmas Day?

by Anonymousreply 26811/27/2012

I am absolutely in love with Graham Norton and so glad we get him over here. His interveiws are, by far, the most interesting and hilarious on the talk show circuit here in the US.

[quote]diddies?

What is that? Never heard of it before.

by Anonymousreply 26911/27/2012

r269

Tits.

by Anonymousreply 27011/27/2012

I miss seeing Mrs. Slocum and her pussy!

by Anonymousreply 27111/27/2012

r271

You never see her pussy! But she does talk about it a lot.

by Anonymousreply 27211/27/2012

I was once at Oxford and heard someone say they were going to Paaark their Cah in Oxford Yahd.

by Anonymousreply 27311/27/2012

r221 chav is short for council housed and violent

it is a generally given to people who represent the lowest end of society who live in social housing and claiming government benefits. identifiable by wearing baseball caps, hooded tops and bad taste designer clothes (go to youtube and see Plan B - Ill Manors video) and generally engage in petty crime and breed like rats.

It can also be used to describe the class of a person i.e. they may look classy but they open their mouths and you can tell they are 'proper chavvy'.

It is the eqivalent of trailer trash (likewise with the word pikey)

If you want to upset a Brit in an arguement, especially if they are middle class but any class will do, just say 'why don't you fuck off you dirty chav'. Fists at noon would commence.

by Anonymousreply 27411/27/2012

[quote]identifiable by wearing baseball caps

Do Brits call them "baseball caps" or do they have a separate word for them? I mean, seeing as baseball is not a common sport in Britain.

by Anonymousreply 27511/27/2012

r275 yes brits call them baseball caps

by Anonymousreply 27611/27/2012

In college "at uni," I had two close friends from the UK and I drove them mad with questions like this, after I'd started watcing AbFab and wasn't sure about the slang.

They assured me that "Bloody, buggery bollocks!" was simply an Edina phrase, not in common usage.

Bloody, they claimed, dated back to Bloody Mary and didn't refer to menstrual blood.

Wank means to jack/jerk off and wanker could be taken as jerk or jerk-off in the US.

Similarly, the French enculé (one who gets fucked up the ass) is used like we use cocksucker in the US, isn't necessarily a gay slur. We use "cocksucker" to mean jerk or asshole.

My best Brit friend once called my cat--a purebred Persian-- "poncy." That one I could figure out.

I didn't argue. Xaviera was a poncy cat for a guy, even a gay one.

by Anonymousreply 27711/27/2012

camp as a row of tents = campy

as useless as a chocolate tea pot = useless

twatted = drunk

arseholed = really drunk

off for a kip = to take a nap

have a slash/have a squeeze = to go pee

by Anonymousreply 27811/28/2012

there is no difference between slapper and slag apart from slag is more often used for men.Thats it.

by Anonymousreply 27911/28/2012

Edina's line on AbFab.."something in a blue Kagool is hovering on the stairs".. Took me forever to figure out what she was saying, and that a Kagool is a lightweight jacket with a hood.

I like the British show "Clatterford" a lot ("Jam and jerusalem" in the UK) but I don't know what they are talking about half the time. Same with "Misfits"..

Also I've always been confused by cupboard/closet.

by Anonymousreply 28011/28/2012

US: A tempest in a teapot

UK: A storm in a teacup

by Anonymousreply 28111/28/2012

Another mainstream injection of UK camp came from 'Round The Horne' on BBC radio in the mid-Sixties.

Julian and Sandy were wildly camp, and spoke fluent Polari. Kenneth Williams tirelessly displayed his startling credentials.

by Anonymousreply 28211/28/2012

In the same vein, "cunt" and its variations in French are beyond comprehension in American English.

Tu es con = You're an idiot, a silly fool, a jerk

Je suis con = I'm stupid, foolish.

Sale petite conne/conasse = You filthy, little cunt!

C'est des conneries! = It's all bullshit, made-up crap, exaggerated bragging.

by Anonymousreply 28311/28/2012

Just be aware that Graham Norton is Irish, r265 and r269.

by Anonymousreply 28411/28/2012

[quote] Another thing I was wondering about (having recently rewatched "Notes on a Scandal"), what's up with wearing tissue paper crowns on Christmas Day?

The crowns come inside christmas crackers, with the prize wrapped in them. They're excellent for decorating old people with.

by Anonymousreply 28511/28/2012

[quote]My best Brit friend once called my cat--a purebred Persian-- "poncy." That one I could figure out.

Well? What did it mean? Cute, prissy, what?

by Anonymousreply 28611/28/2012

Tissue paper crowns at Christmas:

Before you start Christmas dinner, you pull a Christmas cracker. One each. In it is a paper hat, a motto or exceptionally corny joke and some kind of plastic toy or novelty item. You wear the hat during Christmas Dinner to be festive. It's tradition.

by Anonymousreply 28711/28/2012

We do Christmas crackers but ours are filled with small key chains, compasses, tiny mirror compacts and small useful tools.

by Anonymousreply 28811/28/2012

(R144) I've always understood "bloody" was a shortening of the term "by my lady" (as in Mary the BVM) that started in the Middle Ages. It started as sort of exclamation and moved on to the all around intensifier that it is now

by Anonymousreply 28911/28/2012

Is "half-seven" seven-thirty or six-thirty?

by Anonymousreply 29011/28/2012

Poncy = fey, prissy. A big ponce = a flame queen.

by Anonymousreply 29111/28/2012

I understand it but I momentarily get confused when Brits (and other nationalities) put the day first, then the month, then the year. For example, today would be abbreviated as 28/11/12, but in America we write 11/28/12. We also say "November 28th" as opposed to "the 28th of November." We save two syllables. :-)

.

by Anonymousreply 29211/28/2012

7:30, R290.

by Anonymousreply 29311/28/2012

The Daily Mail believes you can have a billion and still appear a complete chav:

"The only thing missing from the socialite's chavtastic look was a Croydon facelift hairstyle - an extreme ponytail that pulls the skin of the face taut."

by Anonymousreply 29411/28/2012

[quote] Brits are schooled from their earliest days to appreciate camp and drag via panto and its prevalence on TV. Straight Americans have always been uncomfortable with drag, and 'butch but nellie' genderfuck of any sort they simply can't deal with.

Queen's video for I Want to Break Free was the four of them dressed up in drag in homage to Coronation Street and its characters. MTV refused to play it in the US telling them Americans would be uncomfortable with the drag. MTV told them that - but a bunch of near naked big assed women shaking their booties like pole dancers was okay.

by Anonymousreply 29511/28/2012

[quote]Do Brits call them "baseball caps" or do they have a separate word for them?

Yes, it's a prole cap.

by Anonymousreply 29611/28/2012

ponce= pimp or person who lives off immoral earnings

poncey = dilletante, affected, too much time on hands, affected.

by Anonymousreply 29711/28/2012

Yes, things we would not be seen dead in, along with the fanny pack.

by Anonymousreply 29811/28/2012

My favorite British words are twee and poncey.

by Anonymousreply 29911/28/2012

Ha, R299, the words themselves are twee.

by Anonymousreply 30011/28/2012

R299 "Twee" is used regularly on this side of the pond as well. "Poncy," not so much.

by Anonymousreply 30111/28/2012

[quote]Bob is slang for shilling, which is a unit of currency no longer used in the UK. Before decimalization in 1971,

Bob is still used in East Africa where the shilling is the primary currency.

by Anonymousreply 30212/02/2012

[quote]The Daily Mail believes you can have a billion and still appear a complete chav:

In America, you can have millions and still be white trash: Donald Trump.

by Anonymousreply 30312/02/2012

Slapper is derived from Slap - a slang term for make-up. So, if you're getting tarted up with a tonne of slap, you are, indeed, a slapper.

by Anonymousreply 30412/02/2012

r304

Are you a cute hoor?

by Anonymousreply 30512/02/2012

Brilliant. I love this one.

by Anonymousreply 30612/02/2012

r [129], New Yorkers use the phrase “on line” when referring to waiting. In all other contexts, we use “in line.”

r [159], “courgette” sounds like a flirtatious corgi?

r [288], unless you are getting custom-made crackers, the paper crowns are in them. I use them at every dinner party I host during the Christmas season. They are great ice-breakers when guests don’t know each other.

‘bloody” originated as a minced oath, which is variant of a profane phrase, and was a more acceptable version of “by Our Lady,” a reference to the Virgin Mary. Think “darn” for “damn” and “heck” for “hell.” Since many profane terms were blasphemous and punishable, the minced oaths were useful.

r [92], “odds bodkins” is my favorite minced oath. It is a substitute for "God's body,” which was a blasphemous reference to the belief of the heretical Cathars of 12th-century France that Christ was not a human when on earth (hence, had no body) and that there was no resurrection.

Could folks stop showing off by dropping Brittishisms they know without providing their meaning? By now, the phrases are getting pretty obscure.

by Anonymousreply 30712/02/2012

r307

No brackets, no space!

by Anonymousreply 30812/02/2012

Why do British people think that saying "bottom" is hilarious?

by Anonymousreply 30912/04/2012

I get razzed for saying "on line" (as in "be prepared to find a lot of people on line already, no matter how early you get there!"), but it's completely ingrained.

I prefer "Gadzooks!" (God's Hooks = cricifixation nails) as an oath myself.

by Anonymousreply 31012/04/2012

There's a post about the Marlo Thomas bio where someone describes her as "in a swivet." Is that a Britishism and, if so, what does it mean?

by Anonymousreply 31112/04/2012

[quote]I prefer "Gadzooks!" (God's Hooks = cricifixation nails) as an oath myself.

Ditto "Zounds!" (which is properly pronounced "zoonds" and not "zownds"). It's a contraction for "God's wounds," which also refers to the crucifixion.

by Anonymousreply 31212/04/2012

"Take it up the chuff." Get fucked in the ass.

by Anonymousreply 31312/04/2012

Bottom

by Anonymousreply 31412/04/2012

[quote]Bollocks is actually both the testicles and the penis. We don't have a word for it in America...

We do these days, "Junk".

by Anonymousreply 31512/04/2012

r307, quite interesting post, Thank!

by Anonymousreply 31612/04/2012

How come Brits say Happy Christmas instead of Merry Christmas?

by Anonymousreply 31712/06/2012

Wasn't sure which thread to bump, but this will do. I'm actually British, but the fam moved to California when I was 10. At that time, "horny" was not in my lexicon. So, here's my question, does "horny" mean something different to UK gays?

In the US, "horny" very clearly means one is turned on/sexually aroused. But, gone back to the UK several times as an adult and the last few times I've used the usual apps (Grindr, Scruff) to hook up with a couple of guys. And - humble brag here, sorry - nearly every day I'd get a message from some bloke saying that I looked "horny". And it was just a headshot of me smiling - nothing particularly sexualized about it. So, when they said "horny" they meant "hot" or "sexy" as in THEY found me sexually attractive. They were not saying that I looked like I was sexually aroused. Which would be a weird thing to say to someone anyway.

So, does "horny" have a completely different meaning in the UK or do I just attract illiterates?

by Anonymousreply 31801/28/2015

Don't Brits say "randy" when they're feeling sexually aroused?

by Anonymousreply 31901/28/2015

Other than Austin Powers, R319?

by Anonymousreply 32001/28/2015

I've been reading Stuart MacBride and kept seeing references to Magnolia walls.

WTF?

Turns out it's the sort of basic white walls you find in homes and so on.

Why it's called a Magnolia wall, I have no idea.

Also slightly confused as to why it's a custom to give grapes to people in the hospital.

by Anonymousreply 32101/28/2015

Bloody poms...

by Anonymousreply 32201/29/2015

She's up the duff = she got knocked up

by Anonymousreply 32301/29/2015

R321 meant "in hospital." I just know it.

by Anonymousreply 32401/29/2015

a proper wand. whats that mean? it wad said to ron when his broke

brilliant said numeral times ?

wanker?

bubber beer they order itin resturant.

by Anonymousreply 32501/29/2015

[R274][quote]chav is short for council housed and violent

I believe that's what's called a "backronym." As was pointed out up thread, it's from a Romani word, and is in Spanish as "chavo."

by Anonymousreply 32601/29/2015

[quote]Why it's called a Magnolia wall, I have no idea.

Magnolia is the name of the colour of the paint.

Don't paint colours have names in America?

[quote]Also slightly confused as to why it's a custom to give grapes to people in the [sic] hospital.

What do Americans take to people in hospital?

by Anonymousreply 32701/29/2015

[quote]What do Americans take to people in hospital?

When we visit someone in the hospital, we typically take flowers. I'd much rather get grapes. Or chocolate. Flowers belong outdoors.

by Anonymousreply 32801/29/2015

What a charming language the Britons speak!

by Anonymousreply 32901/29/2015

[quote]When we visit someone in the hospital, we typically take flowers. I'd much rather get grapes. Or chocolate. Flowers belong outdoors.

I agree and apparently flowers aren't healthy in a sick person's room...they take the oxygen out of the air.

I tend to take people magazines.

by Anonymousreply 33001/29/2015

[quote]I've been reading Stuart MacBride and kept seeing references to Magnolia walls.

If someone's referring to magnolia walls in a book, they're probably to the room's bland safeness.

It's a slightly patronising reference usually.

by Anonymousreply 33101/29/2015

I luv r40.

by Anonymousreply 33201/29/2015

[quote]So, does "horny" have a completely different meaning in the UK or do I just attract illiterates?

No, horny in England mean the same as in America...you know, "gagging for it" or "hot to trot".

by Anonymousreply 33301/29/2015

[quote]One of my biggest blunders with the English language was when I thanked someone for the talk we had (which made it sound like it was a very serious and unpleasant lecture type of talk I didn't appreciate at all) when what I really meant was thank you for the chat.

"I gave 'im a right talkin' to!"

by Anonymousreply 33401/29/2015

Bob's your uncle.

by Anonymousreply 33501/29/2015

Bob's my auntie.

by Anonymousreply 33601/29/2015

But surely all those Grindr tricks couldn't have been saying "You look sexually aroused" to r318, could they? How could they tell from just a face pic?

by Anonymousreply 33701/29/2015

So is Magnolia sort of "off-white"?

by Anonymousreply 33801/29/2015

Funny to see this thread reappear all these years later. I'm sorry to admit that I was being deliberately obtuse and knew full well what biscuits and gravy were, though I've never tried them. But it still sounds odd and conjures up Penguins floating in in Bistro.

by Anonymousreply 33901/29/2015

Oh Lofty, leave it out, luv!

Pull the other one

Are you all right? (Weird meaning somewhere between "hello" and "may I help you?", maybe)

by Anonymousreply 34001/29/2015

I'm gobsmacked.

by Anonymousreply 34101/29/2015

My grandparents were from Northern Ireland and what they called "soda bread" is called "farls" in Britain and Scotland.

Whenever those dome-shaped cakes showed up in American bake shops around March 17 called "sodabread" I was all "What the FUCK?"

I see there is a mix sold in Canada and maybe the UK that can be used to make farls in a jiffy called Brodie's, but the shipping is too expensive to order in the US.

Anyway, I was 45 years old before I found out what the rest of the world called what I called "sodabread."

by Anonymousreply 34201/29/2015

[quote]Are you all right?

Mustn't grumble.

by Anonymousreply 34301/29/2015

[quote] "a proper wand. whats that mean? it wad said to ron when his broke brilliant said numeral times ? wanker? bubber beer they order itin resturant."

R325, I can only guess that you are a HARRY POTTER fan? Well, let's see.... 1) When Ron's wand broke, his spells came out all funky, so his wand was clearly NOT a proper one anymore. He needed a PROPER wand to do a spell properly. Get it? 2) Brits say "brilliant"" all the freaking time. It's comparable to us Americans saying, "Great!" (or "FABulous!") all the freaking time, 3) A "wanker" is like a "tosser," I reckon. A sort of useless, hapless individual who probably jacks off rather too much, 4) When you write "bubber beer," I think you may have misheard "butter beer," which I think might be akin to ginger beer---not really "beer" at all, but something non-alcoholic that under-age wizardry students at Hogwarts would be allowed to drink.

by Anonymousreply 34501/29/2015

LOL R40!

I just learned about chip butties while watching WILD CHILD a few weeks ago. It's a movie from 2008 about a spoiled Beverly Hill princess (played by DL fave Emma Roberts) who is shipped off to boarding school in England. There she eventually meets a local chap (played by another DL fave Alex Pettyfer, in one of his first roles) who takes her to some pub and he shows her how to make a chip buttie. Basically, a french fry sandwich with butter and ketchup. They showed him make it and eat it and I almost threw up!

Seriously, it looks like something a homeless person would make out of the leftovers he'd find in a garbage can. Whoever thought of that combo?

by Anonymousreply 34601/29/2015

R327 - We have paint colors in America, but we don't say to people, "Here's my living room with cranberry walls" or "The dandelion walls in my kitchen."

As for people in the hospital, it depends on why they're there. I took a gift pack of toiletries (hand creme, soap, body spray) to a female relative in the hospital after a car accident. Another friend I took a few bottles of flavored water that he liked. Never tried taking grapes, I wonder if they'd be allowed?

R338- Yes, an off white

by Anonymousreply 34701/30/2015

A jam butty is the British equivalent of cream cheese and jelly, only it's butter instead of cream cheese. I've always thought of a jam butty as a raw jam and toast.

by Anonymousreply 34801/30/2015

There are other British butties that horrify. Treacle butties, lemon curd butties, sugar butties. Yes, a sugar buttie,

I think Heinz baked beans poured atop white bread was a typical teatime dish in the 1950s and 1960s.

by Anonymousreply 34901/30/2015
Loading
Need more help? Click Here.