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Over 100,000 march against gay marriage in France

Saturday, November 17, 2012

More than a hundred thousand people attended rallies across France Saturday in protest at plans to legalize gay marriage, according to police figures obtained by AFP.

In Paris alone, 70,000 people turned out at one rally, said police — organisers put the figure at 200,000 — while another 22,000 protested in the southeastern city of Lyon, said police, and up to 8,000 in the southern city of Marseille.

by Anonymousreply 11411/17/2014

Another myth shot to pieces. France seems to be as liberal as the Florida Panhandle with regards to social issues like these.

by Anonymousreply 111/18/2012

Majority is OK with it but this is a society where everyone gets to make noise. Hollande made it a campaign promise and the people who are protesting this are protesting his presidency.

For example, there was a widely circulating photo of two women kissing in front of a group of protesters. Turns out the 2 women are actually straight friends who kissed to piss off the protesting fraus.

by Anonymousreply 311/18/2012

I hate France. I went to Paris a few years ago and it was the worst trip ever. People were so rude. And I discovered pretty quickly that the perception that the country was very liberal was just a big lie, a big myth.

by Anonymousreply 411/18/2012

I had a prof who came from Paris, and one of the first things he told us is, "don go to Pair-ees - eet ees a sheet-hole!"

by Anonymousreply 511/18/2012

That's it! I'm burning all my fucking scarves!

by Anonymousreply 611/18/2012

[quote]Another myth shot to pieces. France seems to be as liberal as the Florida Panhandle with regards to social issues like these.

I agree. This was a surprise. It's something I would have expected for Spain where they have close ties to the Vatican, but didn't see this coming for France.

by Anonymousreply 711/18/2012

So nobody is going to blame this on the you-know-whos who are immigrating to France?????

by Anonymousreply 811/18/2012

"But we were promised croissant."

by Anonymousreply 1711/18/2012

This shouldn't be a shock. Anyone who assumes Europe is just so liberal!!!1111!!!!11!! is a fool. There are liberals there, sure, but there are also plenty of "traditionals" aka conservatives who are not for gay rights yet, if ever.

It will be a long, long time before most of the world, heck, most people in any country, are ready to fully accept gays, sadly.

by Anonymousreply 2011/18/2012

Does France allow gays in their military organizations?

by Anonymousreply 2111/18/2012

[quote] It's something I would have expected for Spain where they have close ties to the Vatican, but didn't see this coming for France.

Both legally and as far as public opinion Spain is actually one of the most gay accepting countries. It is certainly is more liberal than France on this issue.

by Anonymousreply 2211/18/2012

I just can't imagine wasting my time and energy on MARCHING to prevent people from getting married.

I wouldn't even march if I was on the anti-marriage side- embarrassing.

I hope someone films the whole thing, get all their faces on camera for posterity.

by Anonymousreply 2311/18/2012

[quote]Does France allow gays in their military organizations?

With the exception of Cyprus, all the EU countries allow gays to serve in their militaries.

France also has a national domestic partnership registry, which extends most of the rights of marriage, and in fact, increasing numbers of straight French couples have gone that route.

by Anonymousreply 2411/18/2012

[quote]Does France allow gays in their military organizations

Of course, every western military except the US allowed that. France has also had a form of civil unions since 1999.

by Anonymousreply 2611/18/2012

I'm sure those DLers who have made a habit of bashing all Muslims had a magnifying glass up to that picture or tried to enlarge it.

Anyone who has been there knows the "real" French have always been bigoted assholes.

by Anonymousreply 2711/18/2012

What percentage of the population is that?

I'm sure the freepers could scrounge up a similar number to rally here.

by Anonymousreply 2911/18/2012

Once again the French have their stinky noses in the air poo pooing something. People make life more difficult than really need be.

by Anonymousreply 3011/18/2012

R27, If you're referring to the picture in the linked article it seems to be of an LGBT rights protest, not an anti-marriage protest. Notice the rainbow flag in the background. And you're right, not a Muslim in sight.

100,000 protesters is hardly signifcant in a country inhabited by 65 million, and even if it WERE a majority opinion among the native French, at least they use democracy to express their opinions. The Muslims will just gang up on you and beat you to a pulp.

by Anonymousreply 3111/18/2012

R29, since France has 1/5th the population of the US, yes, I'm sure the Freepers could get 100K.

by Anonymousreply 3211/18/2012

The population of France is over 60 million.

This is not a significant amount of people protesting nor an indication of the views of an entire country. Anyone who thinks the majority of French people are fascist should get their psychotic medication reviewed.

If you compare the politics of France and the US, the US is significantly more right wing and anti-gay.

by Anonymousreply 3311/18/2012

Um, no, R32.

Thanks R31 and R33 for your ration and reason.

by Anonymousreply 3411/18/2012

The catholic church must have really had to hustle to get what's left of their congregations organized and out into the streets for one last kick at the can before they disappear into irrelevancy.

The French can routinely get half a million to turn out just to protest attempts to mess with their holidays or tuition fees.

by Anonymousreply 3511/18/2012

Those protestors look really gay for an anti-gay group

by Anonymousreply 3611/18/2012

R31, it's cute how you make a distinction when it comes to 60 Million French, in that you don't hold all of them responsible for the actions of a few. I guess your brain stops working when we're talking about a group of people who number over a billion.

Oh, and here's the anti-gay marriage group:

by Anonymousreply 3711/18/2012

Here's another:

by Anonymousreply 3811/18/2012

Another:

by Anonymousreply 3911/18/2012

The times they are a-changing...even in France.

The struggle for civil rights goes on around the world. Of course, there are traditionalists in Europe; it has a thousand years of history, religion and structure. Its views on same-sex marriage won't go away overnight--but they will go away, or more precisely, defeated or changed over time.

by Anonymousreply 4011/18/2012

One more:

by Anonymousreply 4111/18/2012

Do the pictures make the numbers larger or what R37-R41?

by Anonymousreply 4211/18/2012

What r35 said.

by Anonymousreply 4311/18/2012

R42, reread my point @R37.

If you manage to think in one instance, your brain shouldn't then turn to mush when your bigotry rears its ugly head in speaking of an even greater number of people.

Comprendre?

by Anonymousreply 4411/18/2012

[quote]I agree. This was a surprise. It's something I would have expected for Spain where they have close ties to the Vatican, but didn't see this coming for France.

Generalísimo Francisco Franco has been dead for almost 40 years now. Spain hasn't had "close ties to the Vatican" for decades.

by Anonymousreply 4511/18/2012

Spain & Portugal very open to gay rights etc, not an issue.

by Anonymousreply 4611/18/2012

No, R44. You still don't explain the pictures.

Capiche?

by Anonymousreply 4811/18/2012

Looks like Mittens "missionary" work during the Vietnam War finally paid off!!

by Anonymousreply 4911/18/2012

We all know that an organized protest clearly represents society as a whole. It's having an effect, support for gay marriage in France recently plummeted to a low of 58%.

by Anonymousreply 5011/18/2012

[quote]I agree. This was a surprise. It's something I would have expected for Spain where they have close ties to the Vatican, but didn't see this coming for France.

Spain did have organized protests after Zapatero and the Spanish parliament passed their marriage law in 2005. I can't remember how large they were. Of course, the were organized by traditionalist Catholics and the vocal Opus Dei movement (which originated in Spain), but they largely fell on the deaf ears of the general pop. Look at the photos of the protesters in France -- elderly women, middle aged fraus and white folks and you know who organized.

Thing is that I don't think you will find a group of people more cynical about the Catholic Church than Spaniards -- both the non-believers and the believers. After Franco's reverence of the Church, his association with OD, and the general misery they both caused the population, people mostly use the church to mark rituals and milestones. Except elderly women who can be enthusiastic church-goers.

And the fallout from church shenanigns are still felt today. A recent scandal has been the revelation that the church kept newborn infants from unwed mothers (of all ages) for decades during Franco's regime, telling them the infant had become ill and died. Nuns would whisk the newborn away without the mother even having seen it. The church placed the infants with well-connected, wealthy donors. Once this was revealed, scores of mothers who'd given birth in the '50s, '60s and '70s began demonstrating and searching for the children who were taken from them. There have been some reunions. This stuff has played out on national TV. The historical memory of church chicanery in Spain will be long. Not surprisingly, a lot of Spaniards identify as agnostics or atheists and believers can be quite secular.

by Anonymousreply 5111/18/2012

Here's the speech Zapatero gave to Parliament.

by Anonymousreply 5211/18/2012

R53, we have to remember that every country has its conservative factions - that doesn't mean it is representative of everyone

by Anonymousreply 5411/18/2012

You're right of course R54, it's just kind of sad to see it happening. I hope there will also be reports showing support for gay marriage there.

by Anonymousreply 5511/18/2012

The notion that Europe is so very liberal is a myth. There is a lot of bigotry in Europe, as France and the UK attest.

by Anonymousreply 5611/18/2012

Hollande needs to get out and speak up forcefully and unwavering, just like Zapatero did when the right erupted over marriage equality. Hollande seems noticeably timid about challenging the antigay movement.

by Anonymousreply 5711/18/2012

If you go to the link at R1 and read the comments, you will see that most of the posters cite French news sources that say the Raw Story article is wrong about the numbers, that far fewer people showed up. Also, they say that the protests were largely organized by the National Front (the far right party) as well as the Church.

by Anonymousreply 5811/18/2012

France's gay world is closeted compared to even England. They're sexist, too. They are progressive in tems of workers rights because of strong unions and a labour movement. Not so progressive in tems of men, women, and gay people.

by Anonymousreply 5911/18/2012

Hogwash to the people saying the reason why the marriage equality advocates seem so punkish and weak is because human rights are assumed in Europe. If that is the reason, gay rights advocates are amongst the most naive and foolish advocates on the planet. Everyone knows you don't assume victory, you fight for it like your sweat, organization, and protests depend on it. You arouse your side to take to the streets, pressure Parliament, lure the media, until your agenda is the law, and then you remain vigilant to assure there are no slippages. This"we don't do grassroots and street protests" attitude among European gay rights advocates is foolish.

by Anonymousreply 6211/18/2012

[quote]This"we don't do grassroots and street protests" attitude among European gay rights advocates is foolish.

Is this really the case? I mean France is [italic]the[/italic] country for demonstrations and strikes. Gay activists there haven't done this there yet? I don't know about other European countries but there were plenty of demonstrations of support in Spain.

by Anonymousreply 6311/18/2012

Calm down girls.

These protest numbers are inflated. These protest mean nothing. The majority of the French are in favor of legalizing gay marriage.

Oh and by the way... just so you all know... the mayor of Paris is openly gay and announced it before his election.

He's been mayor since 2001.

My bet is all of France will have legalized gay marriage before the US does.

by Anonymousreply 6411/18/2012

I'm not understanding the idea that France, which IS insular and intolerant, is representative of the rest of Europe. Civil unions are legal in the UK, and have been for years - in Scotland a civil union has exactly the same rights and responsibilities as hetero marriage (the Catholic church are currently complaining that changing the name from union to marriage will cause volcanoes or something), and gay rights are flourishing in the UK. Far ahead of the US, in fact. Most of Europe is much more tolerant than France.

by Anonymousreply 6511/18/2012

What? France "insular and intolerant"? Most of Europe more tolerant than the French?

While France does have a far right party, they are boy-scouts compared to the far right parties in Northern Europe.

And in Northern Europe the Far Right parties are more popular and have made greater inroads.

Northern Europeans might be (up until now) more tolerant of gays... but take a look at how their far-right parties a gaining ground.

by Anonymousreply 6611/18/2012

When you say northern Europe, which countries are you talking about? Certainly Poland has become very right wing, but the ex-eastern bloc countries, like France, are not representative of all. Or am I misunderstanding your meaning? I live in Europe, and see firsthand where the problems lie.

by Anonymousreply 6711/18/2012

Gay marriage will become law in France. You need to worry about Hungary, Austria, and Serbia. Freaks galore in those countries.

by Anonymousreply 6811/18/2012

LOTS of Muslims in France

by Anonymousreply 6911/18/2012

When you say most of Europe, does that include Slovakia, Greece, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Hungary, Croatia, and Albania?

by Anonymousreply 7011/18/2012

Uh, r64 I think there's more than 1 mayor of Paris. The Gay Mayor is mayor to one part of Paris. There's a conservative gay mayor that's the Mayor in Arr. 11 etc.

And if anyone here has been keeping up with Paris or French news, Hollande can't come out and support gay marriage right now. He's under fire and the French despise him.

Soon the UMP is going to come back and Jean-Louis Cope is going to be the PM - just watch.

by Anonymousreply 7211/18/2012

r8 an r69, I agree, not enough has been said about the possible influence and participation of Moslems/Muslims in all of this. Maybe they are finally getting what they tried to do in the 8th century at Tours when Charles Martel turned them back. A Moslem France, what a novel idea; I wonder what all the pro-immigration freaks think of that.

by Anonymousreply 7311/18/2012

[quote]but the ex-eastern bloc countries, like France,

indeed

by Anonymousreply 7411/18/2012

If France grants Gay Marriage they will be ahead of the UK. In EVERY country where Marriage rights were granted, there were demonstrations. Why pick on France?

by Anonymousreply 7511/18/2012

r73 - while normally I would agree with you, looking at the photos show just the French at the protests, not Muslims.

And I'm one of the lonely Zionist types here at DL, so I'd be the first to say this, but no. It's not the Muslims in this case, well not from the photos.

by Anonymousreply 7611/18/2012

It's the catholic church and the old school conservatives. They are small group in France but they are still there... just as they are in Spain and the UK (Anglican there)

by Anonymousreply 7711/18/2012

r72 is an odd duck. You meant Jean-François Copé. And how can you know that name without knowing that since 1977 Paris has had, in addition to a mayor for each arrondissement, a strong central mayor (currently Bertrand Delanoë).

by Anonymousreply 7811/18/2012

74, the meaning of "but the ex-eastern bloc countries, like France" was referring to the earlier part of the conversation, comparing those countries to France, as in addition to, not saying France is ex eastern bloc.

by Anonymousreply 7911/18/2012

She has stated her boundaries

by Anonymousreply 8011/19/2012

In gay we trust

by Anonymousreply 8111/19/2012

And the inevitable follow-up

by Anonymousreply 8211/19/2012

these protesters were actually Ukranian, not French

by Anonymousreply 8311/19/2012

These girls certainly have a point of view

by Anonymousreply 8411/19/2012

[quote]Moslems/Muslims

There is no difference. Just call them Muslims.

by Anonymousreply 8511/19/2012

Can you imagine how stocky those lesbians would be if they were Americans?

by Anonymousreply 8611/19/2012

I hear some saying these antigay groups are small, but the media sure is paying a lot of attention to them, and the government seems to be rather faint in its response to them. Internationally, the media perception is that the antigay forces have the gay rights folks on defense, and the progay side is rather mute in the face of the opposition. I would like to see some huge progay rallies in support of equality.

by Anonymousreply 8711/19/2012

Marseille is full of Muslims. Not surprised if many of the protersters were Muslim.

by Anonymousreply 8811/19/2012

Hollande is a wimp and the right knows it. He is already unpopular and conservatives are taking advantage of his weakness.

Hysterical fighting has broken out between the two men who wanted to succeed Sarkozy as head of the center-right opposition party. French politics are never tranquil but they are a real hot mess right now.

by Anonymousreply 8911/19/2012

France seems to be declining.

by Anonymousreply 9011/19/2012

France just lost its top Moody ranking so it won't get better for Hollande. Considering it's gotten to this point, I guess I'm not surprised how quickly his approval ratings dropped.

by Anonymousreply 9211/20/2012

r90 is posting from every year since 1789. Still the world's 5th largest economy, bitches!

by Anonymousreply 9311/20/2012

Oh, France has the fifth largest economy? Oh, I couldn't see that far down the list.

by Anonymousreply 9411/20/2012

/

by Anonymousreply 9511/21/2012

[quote]Hogwash to the people saying the reason why the marriage equality advocates seem so punkish and weak is because human rights are assumed in Europe.

The people who say that are 1000% correct. Every gay European I've met says that they don't have to fight for anything. They even see no problem with civil unions and not marriage. One of America's core values is separate-but-equal doesn't fly. Americans feel entitled to having the same rights as everyone else. Europeans are very naive when it comes to a lot of things. They see no problem with government intrusion either. "Well, if you have nothing to hide, you shouldn't worry," is something you'll hear a lot from them." They just automatically buy into a lot.

Europe uses a lot of what America did for themselves. Look at Stonewall. They've never had such things as that, at least not on the level that they've been able to brand their own groups by it. They never had the civil rights riots of the 1960s, and so, either. Look at the ACLU. America is very used to causing an uproar when it wants to.

Many European activists came forward and said that what happened in New York with gay marriage passing, had a profound affect on them and many countries. They watched that go down closely. Finally, people weren't all too happy with just civil unions.

by Anonymousreply 9611/21/2012

It is odd how so many Western Europeans are so complacent about gay rights. It's probably because they don't have a Religious Right so intent on destroying them... As R91 sort of intimates, many of them have not recently had to fight for their basic civil rights.

by Anonymousreply 9711/21/2012

Now that America is for gay rights, they are against it. Typical French.

by Anonymousreply 9811/21/2012

True, r97...

But in France also, it seems unlikely that anyone--an employer, the gov--would try to use the civil union status to discriminate or look down on someone or to favor the married status as far as the law goes. It makes the marriage movement a lot less urgent there.

Marriage is for religious people; civil unions are for modern ones. It's a mindset that could never work here.

by Anonymousreply 9911/21/2012

Maybe because a lot of the civil unions in Europe already granted all of the rights that traditional marriage does, R96?

And are you really saying that gay marriage passing in New York was the "inspiration" gay activists in Europe needed to want that for themselves? Please. Gay marriage was in place in lots of European countries before it was even contemplated in New York.

by Anonymousreply 10011/21/2012

Don't you think that in every country that has legalized gay marriage already or is planning to, there are opponents? Do you actually believe that gay marriage is accepted by 100% of the population in those countries where it's legal and that no one ever voiced their opinion about it?

If the federal government in the U.S. planned to legislate that gay marriage was legal across the United States, you don't think people would organize protests?

France may indeed not be as great as the "myth" or not as liberal, but this means France is a completely valueless shithole?

by Anonymousreply 10111/21/2012

"Marriage for all" march set for Dec 16. It will be big.

by Anonymousreply 10211/26/2012

What a relief. I thought America had first dibs on all the assholes on the planet. Turns out they're everywhere.

by Anonymousreply 10311/26/2012

The UK has a lot of them too.

by Anonymousreply 10411/27/2012

[R10] I've met you many times. You're the guy who goes out of his way to shout and post homophobic slurs, but get a couple beers in you and you're begging all the gay friends of friends to cornhole you proper.

by Anonymousreply 10511/27/2012

Carla Bruni has spoken out against her husband Nicolas Sarkozy's anti-gay comments after the ex-French president - now desperate for a political comeback - said the government "humiliate[d] families" by legalising equal marriage.

The Model, singer and songwriter, who is Sarkozy's third wife, told the French edition of Vogue that she can't say she has ever seen anything remotely wrong in a family led by a same-sex couple. We're with you there, Carla.

"I’m rather in favour because I have a lot of friends – men and women – who are in this situation and I see nothing unstable or perverse in families with gay parents," she said. "My husband is opposed for reasons linked to his political vocation, because he sees people as groups of thousands rather than people we know personally."

Sarkozy had said in a TV interview: "The government is humiliating families and humiliating people who love the family." When pressed, he denied that he would reverse the recent law change if he were voted back into power, because the unemployed are his top priority. Gee, thanks, Nic.

by Anonymousreply 10609/23/2014

Oh Carla your husband is a spineless whore who would say anything for a vote. And a shady little cunt too.

by Anonymousreply 10709/23/2014

R8 you are right.

It is NOT the actual French but the "religion that hates everyone and everything" who is against the gays.

I have been to France many times and spent a summer there--the French do not care who does what to who sexually.

Not so the whackadoodle immigrants from you know where.

by Anonymousreply 10809/23/2014

You mean the Muslims?

by Anonymousreply 10909/23/2014

t

Nicolas Sarkozy declared he is in favour of repealing the law legalising same-sex marriage in France, passed in the spring of 2013. This public stance is a first for Sarkozy, and a dramatic change from his previous, more liberal, position on the topic. Several of his allies and fellow senior party members have criticised the former president’s new posture.

“The law must be rewritten from top to bottom,” Sarkozy first said in front of an audience of 3,000 in Paris. He was then heckled by numerous people chanting “Repeal Repeal” while other booed him​, the AFP news agency reported.

The ex-President then changed tone: “If you’d like it better that one says we must abrogate the law to create another one… In French, it means the same thing, it has the same results. But, well, if that pleases you, honestly, it’s not very costly.”

Saturday’s political meeting was organised by “Sens Commun” (common sense), a fringe political group claiming up to 10,000 members and has links to the UMP party.​ It is reported to be an offshoot of “La Manif Pour Tous,” a movement born out of the opposition to the bill legalising same-sex marriage in France, nicknamed “Taubira law” after the French Minister of Justice. In the run-up to the passing of the law, “La Manif Pour Tous” regularly drew tens of thousands of people on the streets to protest against the bill.

"One marriage for homosexuals, one for straight couples"

“I want a marriage for homosexual couples and a [different] marriage for straight couples, which takes into account the differences, because it is not the same thing,” Sarkozy also told the audience. Both will be celebrated in city halls, the difference, according to him, lays on the consequences of the marriages on filiation. French law currently grants the same rights to gay and straight couples.

Sarkozy, who harbours renewed presidential hopes, has tossed his hat in the ring to regain control of UMP, France’s main conservative party. The Sens Commun movement had invited all three candidates to the UMP presidency to quiz them on social issues.

One of the three, Bruno Le Maire, who refused to abrogate the law, was booed. Another, the UMP MP Hervé Mariton, an outspoken opponent of same-sex marriage and a darling of the “Manif Pour Tous”, received a standing ovation.

Sarkozy also received thunderous applause when he told the socially conservative crowd he was firmly against medically-assisted procreation and surrogacy pregnancies. But, while medically-assisted procreations are legal for clinically infertile straight couples in France, the Taubira law does not legalise either for same-sex couples.

The 59-year-old, who only recently returned to politics after his 2012 loss in the presidential elections was, until Saturday, very vague on the topic, reportedly not to be divisive in the conservative party.

Conservatives divided on same-sex marriage

In addition to the jibs and the uproar coming from the left side of the political spectrum, the division feared by Sarkozy did take place.

Since his declarations, several former UMP ministers and former allies publicly criticised his newfound viewpoint.

Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet,​ a former minister under Sarkozy, his spokesperson during the 2012 presidential campaign, “strongly disagrees with his orientation”. For Kosciusko-Morizet, who currently backs Sarkozy for UMP leader, the abrogation of the law is “neither desirable, nor possible”.

Alain Juppé, Prime minister under Jacques Chirac and three-time minister under Sarkozy, said repealing the Taubira law “was not a good idea” and that same-sex marriage was a commonly accepted new step.

The French MEP Nadine Morano, often lampooned in satirical shows for being a Sarkozy cheerleader, tweeted: “The French had expected other priorities than the rewriting of the Taubira Law.”

Another of Sarkozy’s close allies, Nice mayor Christian Estrosi, told AFP he stayed by his previous statement that same-sex marriage was a “step forward” and that he was among those who say we will not go back on it.”

Sarkozy's changing stance

In 2007, a few days after his election, Sarkozy told the French gay community that "all the difference between love and desire is that love needs social recognition". He then commited to improve the PACS, France’s civil partnership, to include social, fiscal and successional equality between straight and same-sex couples. The reform never took place, according to the AFP news agency.

In 2011, reports surfaced that then-President Sarkozy was “privately” in favour of same-sex marriage. Running for reelection in 2012, Sarkozy was ready to include it in his programme. “He worked on it for weeks. He became a real specialist,” a conservative MP told French daily newspaper Libération.​ Same-sex marriage was eventually not on the president’s platform.

With his previous liberal positions, doubts persists over Sarkozy’s conversion, suspected to be fuelled by electoral interest. “Let’s not be credulous, it is for the moment nothing but a declaration of intent,” officials from La Manif Pour Tous said after the former president’s declaration.

It does not help his case that Sarkozy was recently reported as saying in private: “I don’t give a damn​ about same-sex marriage. It’s not a topic.”

At the very least, same-sex marriage seems less and less of an issue for the very own voters Sarkozy is courting, bar a vocal socially conservative minority.

According to a Ifop poll published on Saturday on the centre-right French news website Atlantico, 68% of the French are in favor of same-sex marriage and 53% are in favour of adoption for same-sex couples. Among UMP voters, the proportions are 58% and 38%, a rise of respectively 25 and 16 percentage points since January 2013.

by Anonymousreply 11011/17/2014

Thanks for bumping on the second anniversary of the march (and this thread), R110

by Anonymousreply 11111/17/2014

French cunts.

by Anonymousreply 11211/17/2014

All these alleged heterosexuals fighting to keep gay people down ... you really gotta give them credit for evidencing the truth that THEY are abusive and cruel (just like the god most of them worship).

by Anonymousreply 11311/17/2014
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