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The Color Purple - on USA at 8:00

On right now...

Can Nettie stay with us a while?

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 9711/19/2012

You shore is ugleeeeeee

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 111/17/2012

Whatever.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 211/17/2012

Girl not safe in house full of mens.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 311/17/2012

Still unsure how "Ms. Celie's Blues" lost out to "Say You, Say Me."

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 411/17/2012

Apparently during the scene when the girls are seperated and everyone gets hysterical, many blacks in the theater audience would start laughing.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 511/17/2012

"She ain't my mammy!"

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 611/17/2012

I like the part where Oprah is on the ground, I forget how she got there, a gust of wind blows up her dress revealing her leg, and she tries to pull it down even though her character is supposed to be out of it.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 711/17/2012

I loved that soundtrack

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 811/17/2012

Margaret Avery is the best thing in the movie..

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 911/17/2012

Tina Turner was offered the role of Shug, but she turned it down.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 1011/17/2012

One of the few movies I can watch again and again.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 1111/17/2012

I was a mess again at the end of this.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 1211/17/2012

I agree with you R11. I have seen it repeatedly. That and Muriel's Wedding (which I'm watching right now) because Muriel's 'terrible'.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 1311/17/2012

Ha. Yes she *is*, R13.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 1411/17/2012

"She say she write. She never write. She say only death keep her from it.

I guess she dead."

Heart breaking.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 1511/17/2012

Most robbed movie ever. Should have won numerous Academy Awards, over "Out of Africa." Total bullshit.

The music was superb, the cinematography was so beautiful, and the acting was fantastic.

Margaret Avery WAS Shug Avery. So glad Tina Turner didn't accept the role. Margaret should have won for Best Supporting Actress.

And watching this particular showing of The Color Purple, really opened my eyes to what a good actress Whoopi Goldberg is.

She gave such a nuanced performance, from the shy, diminutive, and vulnerable Celie in the beginning of the movie, to the strong, steadfast, and compassionate Miss Celie towards the end of the movie. Whoopi was amazing.

I understand that the Academy sometimes awards actors and actresses who were seemingly "robbed" in previous years, hence Whoopi's Academy Award for "Ghost," which wasn't nearly as wonderful as her performance was in TCP.

This movie is Spielberg's triumph. It was really done to perfection, and it will be one of the great mysteries of the ages, how this movie didn't even win one Academy Award.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 1611/18/2012

[quote]This movie is Spielberg's triumph. It was really done to perfection, and it will be one of the great mysteries of the ages, how this movie didn't even win one Academy Award.

Actually it has been well documented why it didn't win anything. The film was highly controversial in it's day and the NAACP even protested it and said that awarding it anything would be racist (since they thought the characters were cartoonish and in their opinion stereotypical) The academy was afraid to vote for it fearing charges of racism. Oprah and time really rehabbed the movie's reputation.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 1711/18/2012

"Im poor, black, I may even be ugly; But dear god, I'm Here! I'm Here!"

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 1811/18/2012

The fact that we can recite lines from the movie, and name the actors and actresses, and sing the songs, is a testament to the lasting impression of the film.

Most of us can't name the actors, or even remember what "Out of Africa" was about. But The Color Purple is still around, and still delighting audiences.

This tells you all you need to know about the Academy and what they think is "worthy."

The deserving winners will always rise to the top, in the end. "Out of Africa" was not a deserving winner.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 1911/18/2012

I always get choked up at the scene where Shug and Celie find Nettie's letters.

How ever much of a joke Whoopi might have become in the years since, she totally deserved an Oscar just for that scene.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 2011/18/2012

The NAACP was correct r17. It was full of incredibly ugly stereotypes and there was really not one positive lead male role in the movie. It's understandable why white people seem to fall over themselves praising this movie.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 2111/18/2012

That's bullshit, R21.

The book was written by Alice Walker, an African American FEMALE. She is solely responsible for the characters, not Spielberg. He just put her words on film.

It's not like TCP had to be the African American ideal. It was a story told from one particular perspective. And Ms. Walker chose to tell it from the perspective of a woman who was abused by a man, but in the end, triumphed.

It put AA females in a very positive light, which is what I personally got out of it.

There are so many movies that put men and women of all races, in all sorts of bad or negative stereotypes, so I don't see what all the fuss is about. It's a fictional movie - not a documentary.

The argument you put forth, op, whether true or not, is so stupid.

The movie touched peoples' hearts, and I can't think of anyone who hated this movie. So I think you're wrong.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 2211/18/2012

Talk to people of color from that era...sadly despite the NAACP, a lot of that was true. Awesome movie.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 2311/18/2012

[quote]She gave such a nuanced performance, from the shy, diminutive, and vulnerable Celie in the beginning of the movie, to the strong, steadfast, and compassionate Miss Celie towards the end of the movie. Whoopi was amazing.

What I find amazing is that this was essentially Whoopi's first film, and she was known primarily as a stand-up comic. Spielberg or the casting director must've had some strong foresight. Usually, comics find it hard to be cast in dramatic roles because they've been typecast as funny people.

Same with Oprah. This was her first movie. At the time, she was a regional celebrity with her burgeoning Chicago talk show. The story that I heard is that Spielberg saw her show and asked her to audition.

P.S. "Out of Africa" sucks ass! I finally watched it for the first time last year and kept falling or getting bored and turning it off. I eventually made it through, but it took me over a week. This is why people associate the Oscars with boring, pretentious filmmaking.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 2411/18/2012

No a lot of it was not true.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 2511/18/2012

[quote] He just put her words on film.

Not quite. The book redeems the male characters. Celie and 'Mister' become friends, even going into business together (He makes shirts to go with her pants). Harpo realizes that his desire to control Sophia is the cause of her misfortune. The movie omitted this.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 2611/18/2012

[quote]I understand that the Academy sometimes awards actors and actresses who were seemingly "robbed" in previous years, hence Whoopi's Academy Award for "Ghost," which wasn't nearly as wonderful as her performance was in TCP.

I got to have a lovely conversation about "The Color Purple" with Whoopi Goldberg. She even signed my DVD. She lost The Oscar to Geraldine Page. Now Miss Page might have been a force to be reckoned with onstage, I have always found her to be a ham bone on screen, though the Hollywood community bowed to her. Her win for "The Trip To Bountiful" was indeed a lifetime achievement after eight nominations. The performance and the film is all but forgotten today. I told Whoopi she was robbed and why and she was so very gracious heaping praise on Miss Page saying she was magnificent and we agreed to disagree with smiles.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 2711/18/2012

R26 - "Mister" was redeemed in the movie, at least in the eyes of the viewer. He paid for Celie's family to come home.

Also Harpo may not have had the scene where he is redeemed, but I felt they had reconciled. Sofia was helping him at the juke joint, "Mister" aid that he thought they were good together, they were at Celie's store and house at the end.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 2811/18/2012

[quote] "Mister" was redeemed in the movie, at least in the eyes of the viewer. He paid for Celie's family to come home.

Big deal! The book fleshed him out as a whole human being. The movie just had him do this one thing (perhaps solely because he had such hard luck after Celie left).

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 2911/18/2012

[quote]Most of us can't name the actors, or even remember what "Out of Africa" was about.

Are you sure you are a gay man? I can't tell you how many times I've heard "I had a fahhhm in Africa" at parties.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 3011/18/2012

The movie has problems with its treatment of the black male characters, yes. Anyone who read the book knows that Alice Walker fleshed them out and made them real human beings. It's almost as if Hollywood needed to make the black men the villains to rob the story of its complexity. It's a very one dimensional movie.

That said: it's beautiful and classic and heartbreaking. I simply cannot watch the scene where Celie and Nettie are reunited (NETTTIEEEEEEE!!!!) without bursting into tears and blubbering like a 5 year old.

And RE: black audiences laughing at the dramatic parts, this is sadly a common occurrence. We don't get a whole lot of movies geared toward us that deal with real human drama, so when it happens in a theater black folks tend to laugh because they don't know how to deal with it. I saw both Precious and Flight with largely black audiences.

Those are arguably the only two true dramas to be released in the last 10 years with black characters dealing with real pain and tough issues. Heavily dramatic scenes in both were met with hoots and hollers from the black audiences. I wish that there was more for us, but...nope.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 3111/18/2012

I heard they're making a sequel that's going to be less dramatic. Martin Lawrence will play Celie

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 3211/18/2012

R31 is not black.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 3311/18/2012

Mister is humanized also through his relationsbip with his father. And Shug's father has a positive arc. The naacp was mad a white guy directed it.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 3411/18/2012

Oh shut up, R34.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 3511/18/2012

Whoopi was amazing in this movie. Oprah was ok, but to her, acting is about getting rid of her haughty accents and speaking in the black vernacular; she pretty much plays the same part in every movie. Very limited as an actress. I agree with those who thought the men in the film were one-dimensional - they were. Spielberg made too many compromises to make this movie mainstream - he made the film for white people. Of course, not everything from a book can be translated into film, but he went overboard. He pretty much gutted the grit and pathos out of the book, and the sexual relationship between Celie and Shug was made into a mere shadow of what it was in the book. After years of being raped by her father and then husband, Shug teaches Celie that sex can be pleasurable, and teaches her how to masturbate and pleasure herself. Squeak's rape by one of her own white relatives is also cut out of the book - her character was totally shortchanged.

And notice how the children, with the exception of Harpo, don't age? Did Spielberg feel that all he had to do was just put a bunch of black children in every other scene without showing them grow up over twenty years?

I enjoy Whoopi's performance in this film, but as a film, it has a lot of glaring faults. YMMV.

IOW, Spielberg took a ballsy, gutsy, sensual book about a black woman's self-discovery and turned it into a Disney flick for white folks.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 3611/18/2012

Time has been kind to the film, and a lot of the criticisms of racist or cartoonish portrayals have not held up, but the juke joint scenes are absolutely cringe-worthy, like something from those old banned Warner Brothers cartoons featuring grinning darkies. Spielberg literally had black people hanging from the rafters, smiling and snapping along to the music.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 3711/18/2012

Get it over. It happened sometimes.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 3811/18/2012

R38 = Stroke victim?

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 3911/18/2012

I assumed any children seen in later parts of the movie belonged to Harpo and Sophia, with maybe a few from Squeak too.

How long was Sophia in jail for? Are we to assume she sustained brain damage there? She looked fine at the end during the reunion scene.

One thing I didn't like is that the film showed black men as superstitious, being afraid of women talking back, having hair shorn or having curses cast on them.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 4011/18/2012

Lots of bitchy bitches here today

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 4111/18/2012

[quote]One thing I didn't like is that the film showed black men as superstitious, being afraid of women talking back, having hair shorn or having curses cast on them.

The hair thing does have roots in pre-slavery Africa, but it is carried to the extreme here.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 4211/18/2012

I thought it was Spielberg's best film, and should have won Best film and Director...Out of Africa? Oh, honey!

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 4311/18/2012

Superstition abounds in this country. Hardly limited to black men.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 4411/18/2012

Sophia was in jail long enough for her children to fail to recognize her. Has to be at least 5 years.

The criticisms here are so ridiculous I wonder if people have even seen the damn movie. People age. The people at the juke joint are trying to get a view of Shug.

Worst of all, the bullshit about all the terrible black men in the film, which only works if you completely ignore half the film and as if the the film is trying to representative of all black people always. Try applying that ridiculous standard to every movie.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 4511/18/2012

[quote]Apparently during the scene when the girls are seperated and everyone gets hysterical, many blacks in the theater audience would start laughing.

Apparently? Where? I ran the picture for weeks to very mixed New York area audiences and I never for a second experienced that.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 4611/18/2012

Color Purple = Designer Poverty

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 4711/18/2012

[quote] People age.

Squeak doesn't age in 20 years. Sophia looks decades older than Shug by the end of the movie.

[quote]The people at the juke joint are trying to get a view of Shug. By hanging from the rafters, a-grinning and a-snapping, like the very worst "darkie" images.

We get it: you love the movie unreservedly. Some of us noticed problems with it. Get over it.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 4811/18/2012

Sophia was in prison eight years.

I pulled this out for one of my daughter's friends who had never seen it. There was much ugly-crying and sobbing throughout the movie, including the end where the sisters reunite and play patty-cake in the field full of purple flowers.

And I sob every time I watch this movie. SOB.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 4911/18/2012

I caught the very end last night as well. I haven't watched it all through in a long time, because so much is difficult to watch. But, for me, the scene where Shug returns to her Father's church and he embraces her is an even bigger sobbing moment than the reunion of Celie and Nettie. (Maybe because it took my dad 10 years to finally accept my coming out as a lesbian.). But I sob convulsively every single time I see that scene.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 5011/18/2012

I never understood why Shug was even involved with Albert/Mr. Once she realized how abusive he was to Celie, why did she stay with him?

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 5111/18/2012

I believe that Shug was using Mister.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 5211/18/2012

I think Shug was staying for Celie.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 5311/18/2012

I almost always shed a tear when I see the scene where Nettie and Celie are split apart and then the scene where they reunited at the end, and when Shug hugs her father. I know, MARY!

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 5411/18/2012

Margaret Avery was great.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 5511/18/2012

I heard CHAKA KHAN was approached to play Shug. Hearing her sing Celie's Blues woulda been awesome!

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 5611/19/2012

Margaret Avery loses points for not dong her own singing.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 5711/19/2012

Thanks, r48. That's not really my view of the movie, but I love it when someone speaks for me. Especially when they stick things into a quotation of my post that I didn't say.

I have no problem with anyone have criticisms of the film as long as they are based in reality. I defy you to find "a-grinning and a-snapping" in the scene.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 5911/19/2012

[quote]That's not really my view of the movie, but I love it when someone speaks for me. Especially when they stick things into a quotation of my post that I didn't say.

Don't be an ass. I was replying to you and didn't hit "return" when I should.

[quote[I have no problem with anyone have criticisms of the film as long as they are based in reality. I defy you to find "a-grinning and a-snapping" in the scene.

That's not the start of that scene. Go back a minute or two

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 6011/19/2012

Here you go, r59: a-grinning and a-snapping, and hanging from the rafters. You don't seem to remember this film as well as you claim.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 6111/19/2012

I loved the book and I love the film. Regarding issues of racism and misandry towards black men I think it's best to recall the context of this book and film historically. This was released when the Cosby Show was first on air and both suffered from complaints of not showing "realistic" black people. As another poster up thread touched on this movie suffers from having to bear the weight of a race's expectations because there were so few portrayals of blacks and black life at the time.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 6211/19/2012

Chaka Khan played Sophia in the Broadway version.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 6311/19/2012

"Apparently during the scene when the girls are seperated and everyone gets hysterical, many blacks in the theater audience would start laughing."

Who WOULDN'T be in stitches watching that? It was so over the top; wailing and sobbing hysterically, Nettie and Celie ("Pleze lettah stay! Pleaze lettah stay!") are clinging to each other for dear life, while Mister pounds their hands and carries Nettie off, hauling Celie, who's hanging onto Nettie's skirts, down some wooden steps (clunk, clunk, clunk). It was pretty hilarious. And it was ALL Spielberg's inspiration! It didn't happen in the book. All that happened in the book was Nettie leaving with missionaries and Celie telling her to write, Nettie telling her nothing but death can keep her from it. All the wailing and sobbing and screaming and violence, the whole pitiful farewell scene...all made up Spielberg slop.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 6411/19/2012

R16 = Whoopi Goldberg

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 6511/19/2012

"The deserving winners will always rise to the top, in the end. "Out of Africa" was not a deserving winner"

Oh shut up, you idiot TCP fangurl. "The Color Purple" was a load of sentimental crap. And the reason people remember lines and scenes from the movie is because it was so CAMPY. It definitely deserved no Oscars, which is why it won nary a one.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 6611/19/2012

The Color Purple I am not ashamed to admit is one of my favorite movies. I can watch it again and again and still get the same impact as if I'm watching it for the first time. It's Spielberg's masterpiece.

Quincy Jones wrote a truly magnificent score, and the movie just wouldn't be the same without it. Should have won an Oscar. This is an outrageous crime by the Academy.

Oprah should have won an Oscar too. Her Sophia is probably one of my favorite characters from a film. The scene of her and Celie and Miss Millie in the store after she's released from jail and you can hear "The First Noel" being played never fails to get me in the heart.

I've never thought of it as a movie about the "black experience," I've always seen it as a movie that is raw and unforgiving and ultimately a human story. It never preaches about being solely the experience of a black woman in a black world, but as a person who is a victim and eventually rises. It's a universal theme, and Spielberg does a great job of making Celie's struggle identifiable to everyone.

I love this movie so much, thanks for starting the thread, OP.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 6711/19/2012

This film taught me that:

Black males are evil

Black females are cool

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 6811/19/2012

[quote] including the end where the sisters reunite and play patty-cake in the field full of purple flowers.

I now find the film shrill and overproduced, like all 1980s pop culture in retrospect... but oh, that final shot! That whole final scene, including the moment when Shug looks over to Albert in the field and realizes he made the reunion possible... impossibly moving.

If only the score weren't so bombastic. The same tune played only on a piano might have been better.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 6911/19/2012

More changes Spielberg made:

Lesbian love is expressed by come chaste kisses and tinkling wind chimes. In the book, Celie and Shug are deep kissing and sucking each other's titties and...well, you can imagine the rest.

Sofia gets slapped by the rich white man when she sasses his wife. She solves every disagreement with physical violence, so she punches him, knocks him down even. The police rush in and it's a free for all; and Sofia comes out fighting with everything she's got. In the process, the police end up beating the shit out of her. In the movie, Spielberg pretties it up; Sofia is pitiously screaming "leave me alone! leave me alone!" before she gets sucker punched with a club and falls down unconscious, her skirts up, showing her bloomers. No doubt Spielberg thought that his version would wring pathos out of the scene and make the audience cry.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 7011/19/2012

Back when Spielberg was Spielberg. He's lost a lot of the magic that he brought to his earlier movies.

I'd rather sit through this and ALWAYS than LINCOLN or MUNICH. Those just aren't Spielberg movies to me.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 7111/19/2012

[quote]More changes Spielberg made:

Spielberg didn't change anything, you Fool. The book was adapted by Menno Meyjes who made the changes and wrote the screenplay. Speilberg agreed to direct the script.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 7211/19/2012

Celie and Nettie didn't play patty-cake in the book.

In the beginning of the film they're teenagers, right? And they're playing patty-cake? What teenage girl who's not retarded plays patty-cake?. And of course, they're playing patty-cake in a field bursting with wildflowers in the the beautiful sunshine.

The FILM "The Color Purple" was pure Stephen Spielberg. A movie by Stephen Spielberg about BLACK people? No wonder it's ridiculous.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 7311/19/2012

[quote]The FILM "The Color Purple" was pure Stephen Spielberg. A movie by Stephen Spielberg about BLACK people? No wonder it's ridiculous.

What an incredibly racist statement to make. By that philosophy, white people shouldn't even be able to watch the film, empathize with the characters or understand the themes.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 7411/19/2012

Spielberg tried to redeem himself with AMISTAD, but that was a beautifully photographed, preachy mess.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 7511/19/2012

You are being absolutely ridiculous, r61. People moving and smiling while someone sings. Racism!!!

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 7611/19/2012

"Spielberg didn't change anything, you Fool. The book was adapted by Menno Meyjes who made the changes and wrote the screenplay. Speilberg agreed to direct the script"

Did the screenplay have Harpo falling through the roof twice? Did it have Mister the supreme male chauvenist pig, trying to cook for Shug and making such a mess of it he blows up the stove (the explosion was such that he would have been killed if it had happened in real life)? I doubt it. It was Spielberg's movie and everything on the screen was HIS doing. And cheap laughs are something Spielberg is quite fond of (neither of the slapstick aforementioned calamaties happened in the book).

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 7711/19/2012

"What an incredibly racist statement to make. By that philosophy, white people shouldn't even be able to watch the film, empathize with the characters or understand the themes."

Actually "The Color Purple" appealed more to WHITE people than blacks. Just like "Precious." They're very similar movies.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 7811/19/2012

I'm sure you have data to back up that statement, r78.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 7911/19/2012

[quote]You are being absolutely ridiculous, [R61]. People moving and smiling while someone sings. Racism!!!

You're flailing now, r61. First, you "defied" me to find images of people grinning and snapping, then when I did, you not only couldn't admit you were wrong, you changed the goal posts. Comparing a supposedly "serious" drama like "The Color Purple" to a frothy musical from two decades before like "Bye Bye Birdie" is pathetic in the extreme. And I didn't say it was "racist." I said it played into the old images of the grinning, jiving darkies, which it does. There's no good reason to have a background character hanging upside-down from the rafters, snapping along to the music. That's not "moving and smiling" like a normal person.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 8011/19/2012

And didn't you say you had "no problem" people who had criticisms of the film, so long as they were "based in reality," r61? Yet another move of the goal posts.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 8111/19/2012

I defied you to find places where the people in the film were acting like racist caricatures, hanging from the rafters, a-singin' and a-grinnin'. What you pointed me to was completely innocent and normal response to a performance.

Being a serious drama, the characters should have been sitting calmly with their hands folded in their laps and serious looks on their faces IN A BACKWOODS HOOCH JOINT WITH A HOT WOMAN SINGING.

You are making ridiculous claims about the nature of this film based on a bunch of ridiculous notions about how people would and should act...when for all you know a background actor made a choice to try and do something to get a little facetime.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 8211/19/2012

No goal posts moved. You just have a ridiculous idea of what people act like in such a situation. According to you, no drunk guys have ever tried to get the attention of women by acting like fools before in the history of the world. This is just a negative stereotype.

Grow up.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 8311/19/2012

What exactly is "realistic", r62?

Please proceed.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 8411/19/2012

r72, the fact that he agreed to direct such a script tells you everything you need to know.

He okayed what went up on that screen.

It's troubling that so many people here admire this film.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 8511/19/2012

[quote]I defied you to find places where the people in the film were acting like racist caricatures, hanging from the rafters, a-singin' and a-grinnin'.

No, you didn't, you desperate thing. Your words are right there, upthread:

[quote]I defy you to find "a-grinning and a-snapping" in the scene.

[quote]What you pointed me to was completely innocent and normal response to a performance.

People hanging upside-down from rafters, snapping along to music is anything but a normal response.

I'll skip the rest of your increasingly hysterical ranting, since it's quite obvious you were talking out your ass when you said you had "no problem" with people finding fault with the film if it was "based in reality."

To recap: You said: "People age." I responded by pointing out how inconsistent the aging was on the characters. You suddenly stopped talking about aging.

Then you "defied" me to find images of people grinning and snapping. When I did, you went completely hysterical and tried to compare a drama to a musical. You're an ass and I stand by what I first said to you: We get it, you love the film. Some people had problems with it. Get over it.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 8611/19/2012

r86, you are talking to a troll. Anyone who can watch this movie and not find it utterly offensive and troubling trash is a troll.

Ignore it.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 8711/19/2012

Sweetie, I'm not hysterical in the least. I stopped talking about aging because there was no point in it. If you don't see gray hairs and glasses and slow-moving women by the end of the movie, nothing I say will change that.

So I am now going to stop talking about the Juke Joint scenes because you are obviously going to see it as "a-grinning and a-snapping" where I will always see it as the normal response to a hot mama singing a hot song in a bar. The normal response of black people or white people.

Nowhere did I ever say anyone needed to have my opinion of the film. Everyone is entitled to his or her opinion. You aren't entitled to your own facts, though. You are seeing nonsense that simply isn't there.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 9011/19/2012

And the irony is, here's what I originally said:

[quote]Time has been kind to the film, and a lot of the criticisms of racist or cartoonish portrayals have not held up

I never once said the film was racist and only pointed out two minor problems I had with it, only to be met with shrieking. I actually own a copy of the movie and know it well enough that I can quote it extensively, but some of you girls can't bear to hear anything negative said about it, can you?

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 9211/19/2012

Ignore r88. It's the same troll.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 9311/19/2012

R91, it's one thing to dislike a film, but your reasoning is stupid. You don't even like The Color Purple, so WTF are you doing pissing yellow (trolldar) all over this thread? Why don't you torture people in some other thread? Surely you can find racism in the "Worst Actor to fachieve some level of fame" thread?

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 9411/19/2012

Ummmm, r89 - the movie may be universal but it purports to speak about a certain population of this country. It does so with some of the most offensive stereotypes since Gone With The Wind and Birth of a Nation.

It may be universal to you and people of your ilk but to most critical thinking people - it was a truly reprehensible film.

Shame on you.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 9511/19/2012

[quote]Why don't you torture people in some other thread?

Hilarious. GET A GRIP, GIRL.

by Leon Rippy, Store Clerkreply 9611/19/2012
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