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Memo to Aussie actors playing Americans on US TV...

When you get a line in a script which says so and so is "miles away" you stress "away," not "miles."

Two weeks ago an Aussie actor did it on Revolution and on Thursday night an Aussie actor on Last Resort did the exact same thing.

I've noticed that Brits do this, too, but haven't caught them making this cultural boo-boo when they've played Americans.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 2810/18/2012

Weirdest thing ever. Simon Baker is in an ad being shown in Australia and he uses an American accent rather than his native Aussie accent.

Is he from the wrong side of the tracks and his accent mark him, or what?

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 110/13/2012

Memo to OP. I'm an American and have never heard an American stress "away" in "miles away."

You're not only a bossy and obnoxious control freak, you're wrong. completely annoying.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 210/13/2012

He's playing his Mentalist character in those ads, R1, which is why he has an American accent.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 310/13/2012

What R2 said.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 410/13/2012

Also when you're having a barbie don't excuse yourself to go to the loo.

Oh yeah and don't correct Americans by showing them what a knife is. We know.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 510/13/2012

What R4 said.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 610/13/2012

What R6 said.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 710/13/2012

Memo to idiot OPs who start ridiculous threads: you wasted your $18 and our time.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 810/13/2012

What R7 and 8 said.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 910/13/2012

Normally, Aussies seem to end every sentence like it's a question.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 1010/13/2012

R2, you're the one who's wrong about this. I didn't say I agree with how we say it but Americans would say something like "But the nearest hospital is miles AWAY" not "But the nearest hospital is MILES away." I've noticed Brits say it that way for many years.

R8, you're a moron. My $18 have gone to contributing to many threads. My comments on Madonna's bomb W.E when I was among the first to attend a test screening made for a very popular thread and were nearly copied word for word in a British newspaper.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 1110/13/2012

Lynn Stairmaster is an insufferable know-it-all who believes her own shit-stained undies are works of art.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 1210/13/2012

Please let the OP alone. However, OP, what really bothers me more than your example is when they pronounce "miles away" as "kilometers adistance, mate."

Dame Judith Anderson and Helen Reddy both did this throughout their acting careers. Most inauthentic.

Maybe R8 will die soon, since she is one of those cunty turdettes who wastes her and our time taking the time to tell us how she wasted her time and blaming someone else for it. Or is it turdy cuntette? I forget which one is the Americanism.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 1310/13/2012

OP, what in the fucking hell are you talking about? If I refund you the $18 myself will you just go away?

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 1410/13/2012

"he lives fifty miles away."

The away is stressed but only lightly.

I've never heard anyone way "he lives fifty MILES away"

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 1610/13/2012

R16, you're correct when focusing on a different phrase from what OP has now twice said. When anyone puts a NUMBER in front of the word "miles away" as in "fifty miles away" there is barely any emphasis and maybe on "away." It's merely factual and descriptive.

OP is moronically categorically saying that anyone who says "miles away" in general emphasizes "away." That is false.

This brings us to you OP at R11, where you first say you're not saying we agree how to say it... and then you go right back to saying how "Americans" -- unqualified -- would say a phrase. Can you even be consistent with yourself?

As for the phrase, you are STILL wrong. I have NEVER heard an American say "miles away" without a number or adjective in front of it EXCEPT to emphasize that something is "MILES away." I have never heard someone say generally, for no emphatic purpose, that the nearest hospital is "miles away", fact, no emphasis. "A few" miles, yes, "several" miles", "twenty..." yes. The ONLY time I have ever heard someone say something is "MILES away" unqualified, is for emphasis of "MILES".

Compare:

The nearest hospital is a few miles away. R16 is correct.

The nearest hospital is MILES away. The rest of us are correct.

See R2, R4, R6, R7, R9...

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 1710/16/2012

I don't understand why there are so many Aussies and British actors getting all these Hollywood roles? Is it because they health insurance and don't have to hold down jobs while auditioning? Are they given "grants" by their governments in order to "support the arts abroad?" Can anyone give any insights? Are casting directors just beguiled by their accents that they just give them roles? I mean, there HAVE to be some good Americans out there that are losing out to these guys.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 1810/16/2012

I haven't noticed that OP but I will admit to what does bother me. American actors who land a part in a Brit film and someone forgets to tweak the script for American English. Perfect examples are Laura Linney and Andie McDowell. Americans using English syntax and sentence structure drive me crazy.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 1910/16/2012

IMO, UK actors are better actors R18 because they receive more and better training. Hollywood has always been about looks and screen presence, not good acting. Of course there are great American actors but they are mainly character actors and not "stars". I'm sorry but Julia Roberts and Tom Cruise CANNOT act. John Wayne couldn't act. They play themselves in every role. Don't have enough Aussie examples that I've seen to critique.

P.S. Don't we have this conversation every few months?

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 2010/16/2012

It will be hard for anyone to ever top Joely Richardson's occasional British accent and Julian McMahon's constant Aussie slips on NIP/TUCK, especially evident in the later seasons.

Julia: ChriSTian!

Christian: JuliaR!

Julia: Why, ChrisTian, I KAHN't!

Christian: Yah KAN, JuliaR! It's MILES away, but yah KAN!

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 2110/16/2012

I have to agree with Everybody other than OP. OP, where in the U.S. are you from? Miles is almost always emphasized rather than away. "That's MILES away from here!" I've never heard anyone in the States say "that's miles AWAY from here!"

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 2210/16/2012

"I've never heard anyone way "he lives fifty MILES away"

I have heard similar statements countless times with the emphasis on MILES. If one is emphasizing it being a long way away, the emphasis would certainly be on MILES in the States. One would think it might be on FIFTY. But it's not. And I've never heard anyone stress AWAY in such a phrase.

Maybe the problem, OP, is that you don't understand stress rather than you disagreeing with the majority on this thread in concept.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 2310/16/2012

A bit OT, but Hugh Jackman's wife was on TV a few weeks ago and I was shocked. Not only did she look like a homeless person (no surprise there), she now has the most horrible faux American accent.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 2410/16/2012

Yes, and be sure to add redundant and double negative phrases like OP's

"exact same thing."

Others "ain't never"

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 2510/16/2012

The OP is an idiot, people can talk the way that they want to nutcase. Who even thinks about those kinds of things? Just talk without thinking about it.

by Lynn Stairmasterreply 2610/16/2012
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