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Spot Where Julius Caesar Was Stabbed Discovered

LiveScience.com – 3 hours ago

Archaeologists believe they have found the first physical evidence of the spot where Julius Caesar died, according to a new Spanish National Research Council report.

Caesar, the head of the Roman Republic, was stabbed to death by a group of rival Roman senators on March 14, 44 B.C, the Ides of March.

The assassination is well-covered in classical texts, but until now, researchers had no archaeological evidence of the place where it happened.

Now, archaeologists have unearthed a concrete structure nearly 10 feet wide and 6.5 feet tall (3 meters by 2 meters) that may have been erected by Caesar's successor to condemn the assassination. The structure is at the base of the Curia, or Theater, of Pompey, the spot where classical writers reported the stabbing took place.

"We always knew that Julius Caesar was killed in the Curia of Pompey on March 15th 44 B.C. because the classical texts pass on so, but so far no material evidence of this fact, so often depicted in historicist painting and cinema, had been recovered," Antonio Monterroso, a researcher at the Spanish National Research Council, said in a statement.

Classical texts also say that years after the assassination, the Curia was closed and turned into a memorial chapel for Caesar. The researchers are studying this building along with another monument in the same complex, the Portico of the Hundred Columns, or Hecatostylon; they are looking for links between the archaeology of the assassination and what has been portrayed in art.

"It is very attractive, in a civic and citizen sense, that thousands of people today take the bus and the tram right next to the place where Julius Caesar was stabbed 2,056 years ago," Monterroso said.

by Mark Antonyreply 5410/13/2012

I always though the Ides of March was the 15th.

by Mark Antonyreply 110/11/2012

There is no proof that Julius Caesar ever existed. He was a myth created by Shakespeare.

by Mark Antonyreply 210/11/2012

R2 = Rick Santorum ?

by Mark Antonyreply 310/11/2012

I thought that he was stabbed in the back

by Mark Antonyreply 410/11/2012

It was much more difficult to kill and be killed in those days. Today you can be killed by bullet, by car, by bomb, drone, etc and your killer doesn't have to touch you or look you in the face.

Back in Roman times, you had to stab someone, strangle them, suffocate them or poison them. Poison wasn't easy against rich people because they had people who tasted their food for them. They'd wait to see if the person got ill.

So you pretty much had to stab, strangle, beat, or suffocate someone. It must have been very painful to be killed, especially in battle. You wouldn't get your head blown off in a split second and be dead before you knew it. You had to get sliced by a knife/sword or pierced with an arrow, maybe trampled by a horse and that shit fucking hurt.

by Mark Antonyreply 510/11/2012

Romans killed by plunging a sword vertically from the top of the chest through the heart. This was the way people saw it done in the arena.

by Mark Antonyreply 610/11/2012

R4, according to the autopsy report, he was stabbed 22 times

by Mark Antonyreply 710/11/2012

You forgot boiling oil, and scalding or burning someone alive, R5. Also, a rock fired from a slingshot directly to someone's head might produce a sudden and nearly painless death.

by Mark Antonyreply 810/11/2012

How cool. I just got back from Rome a few days ago and actually visited this site. The place is now filled with cats. They even have a crazy cat lady who takes care of them.

by Mark Antonyreply 910/11/2012

Caesar! You in danger, guuurl!

by Mark Antonyreply 1010/11/2012

Did the Romans often burn people to death or boil them in oil, R8?

Boiling in oil seems to be an Eastern thing. I remember being in a museum in either Uzbekistan or Tadjikistan and seeing dioramas depicting their history. One showed men with their heads sticking out of giant vases. "They are being boiled in oil," the tour guide told me.

Was this back in the 1200s, when the Mongols came through the area? I asked.

No, it was during the Civil War.

The Soviet civil war? In the 1920s? I asked

Yes.

I was shocked that people were still being boiled in oil in the 1920s, but old habits die hard, apparently.

And I thought burning people alive became popular as Christianity grew.

by Mark Antonyreply 1110/11/2012

The Romans burned people alive all the time in the arena. They served them up to animals, boiled them - ghastly stuff.

by Mark Antonyreply 1210/11/2012

Pompey on fire, Pompey on fire!

by Mark Antonyreply 1310/11/2012

I forgot crucifixion.....

by Mark Antonyreply 1410/11/2012

All the Romans did it all in front of an audience for fun and sport.

by Mark Antonyreply 1510/11/2012

What's with all this talk about death & methods of execution?

Get back on topic, bitches!

by Mark Antonyreply 1610/11/2012

"It was much more difficult to kill and be killed in those days. "

Given that there was no effective medical care in ancient Rome, an infected paper cut or a coughing baby could destroy your enemies.

Poison was also very popular, perhaps because it required no physical effort.

by Mark Antonyreply 1710/11/2012

Lot of paper laying around Imperial Rome, was there?

by Mark Antonyreply 1810/11/2012

So after all this they couldn't bother to show the goddamned "site" specifically?

Asses.

by Mark Antonyreply 1910/11/2012

[quote] What's with all this talk about death & methods of execution?

[Quote] Get back on topic, bitches

Um, the topic is the MURDER of Julius Caesar. The ASSASSINATION by STABBING. The forceful, violent taking of human life.

by Mark Antonyreply 2010/11/2012

R9 did you see my mom there? She just returned home on Tuesday.

by Mark Antonyreply 2110/11/2012

Wasn't there also some form of death with two horses stampeding in opposite directions with the body of the victim tied to both of them?

by Mark Antonyreply 2210/11/2012

Yes, R22. I think that has happened in more than one civilization.

by Mark Antonyreply 2310/11/2012

You forgot being stoned to death, they liked that method.

It wasn't the smoking copious amounts of pot kind of stoned.

by Mark Antonyreply 2410/11/2012

Being Drawn and quartered, R22

by Mark Antonyreply 2510/11/2012

Nothing like a good old beheading.

by Mark Antonyreply 2610/11/2012

Vive le guillotine!!

by Mark Antonyreply 2710/11/2012

Did the coroner's report state that there were 22 wounds or is that just myth?

by Mark Antonyreply 2810/11/2012

Et tu Brute.

by Mark Antonyreply 2910/11/2012

A coughing baby, R17?!?!? Can you imagine people running into battle carrying coughing babies?

by Mark Antonyreply 3010/11/2012

[quote]Spot Where Julius Caesar Was Stabbed Discovered

[quote]Um, the topic is the MURDER of Julius Caesar. The ASSASSINATION by STABBING. The forceful, violent taking of human life.

You must have been absent from your 5th-grade English reading comprehension class that day.

by Mark Antonyreply 3110/11/2012

According to our resident PETA-freak troll, it was eating meat what done him in.

by Mark Antonyreply 3210/11/2012

Beheading was a treat compared to the other methods.

by Mark Antonyreply 3310/11/2012

Wait! Like every tourist who ever walked by this bus stop in the Argentine, I was told that that spot down there was where Julius Caesar died.

How is this news?

by Mark Antonyreply 3410/11/2012

Not my head!

by Mark Antonyreply 3510/12/2012

The Ides of March is the 15th of March--not the 14th.

OP's story has a discrepancy in it since it states both the 14th and the 15th.

by Mark Antonyreply 3610/12/2012

I remember reading about an historical beheading (not sure if it's Marie Antoinette or one way back in Elizabethan times) But the lady being beheaded did not die right away. I think the blade was not sharp enough and the executioner had to do two more hacks before it was done, much to the gasps of those in the crowd. Also read somewhere that after individuals were beheaded the first 20 seconds or so their eyes and moths would still be moving. Of course they had no voice but they could still communicate...

by Mark Antonyreply 3710/12/2012

Eugen Weidmann - last man to be publicly guillotined in France on 17 June, 1939

by Mark Antonyreply 3810/12/2012

R37, Marie Antoinette went to the guillotine which was designed expressly to decapitate in one error-proof blow. I think you are thinking of Mary Queen of Scots. It took three blows of an ax to sever her head from her body. Some say her executioner picked up the head and displayed it, deliberately removing the wig to humiliate the dead queen. Others say he grabbed for the head but only caught hold of the wig, causing the head to fall to the floor and roll around.

One chronicle claims the queen moved her mouth for a full 15 minutes after her head was cut off. There are some today who believe a decapitated person may retain consciousness longer than has been previously supposed.

by Mark Antonyreply 3910/12/2012

It's amazing to see all this talk about someone who didn't exist - this JC is as much a myth as the other one. Get over it.

by Mark Antonyreply 4010/12/2012

Apparently Cleoppatra used the age old Egyptian method of an asp bite. That must have been a slow and painful death.

by Mark Antonyreply 4110/12/2012

Modern historians doubt Cleopatra really used an asp. She was a pretty damn good pharmacologist for her day and used her knowledge on people and animals. She was also very vain, and death by asp bite is painful and ugly. And it's not always fatal. Her two handmaidens were found dead with her. She probably killed them first, then used the potion on herself.

by Mark Antonyreply 4210/12/2012

Ah, there you go, Cleopatra - she never existed and the story of the snake, well, another myth.

by Mark Antonyreply 4310/12/2012

Yes R7, that's what the coroner, Horatius Cainus said while slowly taking off his sunglasses.

by Mark Antonyreply 4410/12/2012

R43, How dare you suggest that, muthafucka?

by Mark Antonyreply 4510/12/2012

[quote]Wait! Like every tourist who ever walked by this bus stop in the Argentine, I was told that that spot down there was where Julius Caesar died. How is this news?

I think they've known for centuries that Large Argentina was the general location, and they just discovered evidence of the exact spot?

by Mark Antonyreply 4610/12/2012

[quote]There is no proof that Julius Caesar ever existed. He was a myth created by Shakespeare.

I suppose you also think there is no proof of Obi-wan Kenobi?

by Mark Antonyreply 4710/12/2012

[quote]Poison wasn't easy against rich people because they had people who tasted their food for them. They'd wait to see if the person got ill.

Pfft!

by Mark Antonyreply 4810/12/2012

[quote]You wouldn't get your head blown off in a split second and be dead before you knew it. You had to get sliced by a knife/sword or pierced with an arrow, maybe trampled by a horse and that shit fucking hurt.

And you might linger for days, deserted in the bloody mud.

by Mark Antonyreply 4910/12/2012

Didn't they have people who went through the mud stabbing wounded people who were still alive and killing them? As an act of mercy so they wouldn't linger. And to loot the bodies, of course.

by Mark Antonyreply 5010/12/2012

It was the Countess of Salisbury, r37.

by Mark Antonyreply 5110/12/2012

Thank goodness for electricity!

by Mark Antonyreply 5210/12/2012

There is a great part in the 'Phillipics' where Cicero accuses Mark Antony of having a homosexual relationship with rich daddy's boy Curio for the money. He then goes on to say that Curio was distraught by his father ordering him to end the affair and threatened to go into exile to be with his boy.

by Mark Antonyreply 5310/13/2012

Apparently that second Phillipic was one of the reasons Octavian and Antony assassinated Cicero (but it must have had more to do with general politics as the Second Phillipic of Cicero on mark Antony was never read aloud.)

by Mark Antonyreply 5410/13/2012
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