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The Official Atheist and Skeptic Thread

Since the religious, the "spiritual," and all those believe in astrology/witchcraft/ghosts/etc. get their panties in a bundle so easily, I am creating this thread so rational people can come to vent.

Let it all out. This is a safe place.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 11605/13/2013

What are the atheists supposed to post?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 209/01/2012

As the one "claiming to be psychic" I said it on my thread and will say it again here. I am an atheist and skeptic myself and think anyone who ever requests a "psychic reading" should be skeptical as hell.

I talk to to people like I talk to friends, dispense my opinions, try not to give advice, and sometimes I come up with strangely direct stuff for people I really shouldn't know much about. I don't get it, but I don't think it's paranormal.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 309/01/2012

[quote]I am creating this thread so rational people can come to vent.

Wait, what? That's what we do on *all* the threads here at DL..

LOL that you think you are so special that *you* have created an oh, so special thread so we can, ahem.. vent.

Um, ok.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 409/01/2012

The emotional melt down you're having in the psychic thread is far, far more interesting than this thread so far...

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 509/01/2012

Fascinating thread, OP.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 609/01/2012

I frankly think atheists are more interesting people than those who speak to the dead. I used to subscribe to Skeptic Magazine, and it was had fascinating articles. Made me want to visit the Humanist Association hq near SUNY Buffalo.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 709/02/2012

I happily embrace the void and marvel myself and enormity of life without a God, it makes it all seem that much more miraculous.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 809/11/2012

I hope god isn't in the details because I have a very messy desk.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 909/11/2012

Messy desk=messy neuro-synaps

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 1009/11/2012

Once upon a time, the church was the source of community support in times of emotional distress, economic disaster, job connections, even hook-ups. How do atheists substitute?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 1209/11/2012

[quote] I know every agnostic comes to Jesus when the chips are down.

actually, I have know mainly the opposite, so many you need to get out more often, bunky.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 1309/11/2012

"How do atheists substitute?"

By being good people to others around them. Doesn't that make sense? I'd do that ad no god compells me to be so.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 1409/11/2012

Here is what I don't get--we atheists happen to not believe in plenty of things, not unlike all same people in the world. But we're pressured, either by our fellow non-believers or others, to define ourselves based on one of the things we don't believe in. I don't believe in gods because I don't believe in gods--not in spite of the many people who believe in gods.

And I don't believe there's any reason for us atheists to engage in, essentially, declaring non-believers a bunch of stoopid-heads. We each arrive at our own belief system because of the life we have experienced. Making fun of people because they have a different belief system is a wate of time that mature adults don't feel a need to engage in.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 1509/11/2012

R17, It's R15 again. Yes I know that atheists volunteer at food banks and animal rescue orgs. But by regularly going to Church, even if you are a loner, creates an extended family. Some of the better run Churches appoint parishioners to visit the sick, help the needy find work, pull everyone together in case of natural disasters. People get to know one another and trust builds.

Now don't shoot me. I quit going to Church years ago, as I couldn't take the phoniness and pressure to give money I didn't have, to say nothing of the moral police and negative shaming. I'm just wondering WHAT fills the void for atheists, who may even be new to a city?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 1609/11/2012

r19 I don't know...most atheists are low-key and even allow their families to go be church-goers.

r18 has a great point. I don't understand why atheists need to declare themselves. I guess it's related to believers declaring for Jesus, or Allah or whatever.

Atheists simply don't have an opinion.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 1709/11/2012

[quote] People get to know one another and trust builds.

this statement strongly impies that this automatically occurs when a single person becomes a parishoner at some church, something that is clearly Not true.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 1909/12/2012

R19, your statement strongly implies that this is automatic with all individuals who become parishoners anywhere. this is also clearly Not True.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 2009/12/2012

[quote]I don't understand why atheists need to declare themselves.

i don't know of any, except here online. why would that bother you?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 2109/12/2012

[quote]they are just as fanatical and annoying as born again Christians.

well, if you mean online, then anything is just apparently. But in real life, hyperbole is thyne name, R21

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 2209/12/2012

Atheist here following the quantum scientists - will they discover there is life after death?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 2309/12/2012

R25, what the fuck are you on about?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 2409/12/2012

you aren't very smart, are you?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 2509/12/2012

Smart, just a little high :)

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 2609/12/2012

[quote]I don't understand why atheists need to declare themselves.

I'm glad they do.

Discovering that there are other non-believing people like you, as a youth in the bible belt, is invaluable.

Learning of them kind of make its own "it gets better" moment and provides hope for the future in that you will one day find those other people and not have to live exclusively among the Christian hate tards.

There is no good purpose in keeping reason secret, and publishing it so like minded others can benefit from its existence is a good thing.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 2709/12/2012

[quote]I don't understand why atheists need to declare themselves.

Decent athiests hide their shame.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 2809/12/2012

[quote]Once upon a time, the church was the source of community support in times of emotional distress, economic disaster, job connections, even hook-up

Wishful thinking. Churches always take more than they give.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 2909/12/2012

Want to know more about atheism? Just call Madalyn Murray O'Hair. Oh wait minute, she's not available. But give her son a call. Damn it, that won't work either. But I'm sure her lovely grand-daughter Robin will speak with you. Yikes, probably not.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 3109/12/2012

r20 here - sorry, still don't understand why I, as an atheist, need to declare myself.

It's just not that important, it's not part of my identity. It's something that just IS NOT.

It's like going around saying, "I am not a nuclear scientist"

Unless its a nuke conversation or somehow relevant, why would my not being a nuclear scientist matter to anyone?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 3309/12/2012

Depending on context, there could be a jillion reasons (that's a million times jesus) why atheists might declare themselves. As an example, if those around you assume you share their values when, in fact, you don't, you may have to declare yourself. If those pushing for more church influence in government, wrongly assuming (because why would any non-believers declare themselves) that they speak for all, then the secularists may need to declare themselves. Noone like being browbeaten, whether it's about someone's faith or lack of it, but it's a daft question to ask why atheists would ever identify themselves as such.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 3409/12/2012

[quote] r20 Atheists simply don't have an opinion.

That's not true. Atheists believe gods do not exist, which is an uncommon opinion in most of the world.

Perhaps the word you're looking for is agnostic.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 3509/12/2012

Oh, R20, you're an idiot.

[quote]I don't understand why atheists need to declare themselves. I guess it's related to believers declaring for Jesus, or Allah or whatever.

You're hardly railing against anyone's invasion of your atheist privacy here. You're obviously implying that atheists act just like Christians and Muslims in stating their view of the existence of god(s) and that they should be silent about it.

No one wants to out you as an atheist. But people who are atheists have no obligation to be silent about themselves.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 3609/12/2012

This is a strange flyover thread. In LA or NYC most people assume you're an atheist. Or agnostic. Or an I-don't-care-ist.

Religion is for the plains, the buttes, and the bogs.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 3709/12/2012

Why did Jesus cross the road?

-He was nailed to the chicken.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 3809/12/2012

[quote]We each arrive at our own belief system because of the life we have experienced. Making fun of people because they have a different belief system is a waste of time that mature adults don't feel a need to engage in.

No, we don't all arrive at our belief system because of the life we've experienced. I arrived at my belief system via education, learning about science and reading books. My life experience has had little to nothing to do with it. It might be better if more people arrived at their belief systems via education rather than brainwashing, upbringing or social pressures.

And I agree that it's not a good idea to make fun of people who believe in some kind of god, but I do tend to feel sorry for them, particularly when they do so because they are uneducated and not very bright.

[quote]I don't understand why atheists need to declare themselves.

This is bordering on offensive, as it reminds me of nothing more than the heterosexuals that don't want gays to "declare themselves" with their comments such as: "I don't care what they do in the privacy of their own homes, but I don't need them shoving it in my face," when referring to a gay person simply stating that they are gay.

[quote]Atheists simply don't have an opinion.

Beyond ridiculous. Not believing in a god or gods does not equal not having an opinion on it. It's a very definite opinion that god(s) don't exist.

There are some very strange, self-loathing atheists on this thread.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 3909/12/2012

Lets be honest here. A gay man has more chance of becoming president than an atheist. There is no one more hated than atheists in America. That sounds like a great reason to declare oneself.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 4009/12/2012

Okay ... I'll make everybody happy

I'm r20 and I am an atheist.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 4209/12/2012

I disagree, R44.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 4309/12/2012

I dont know if a god exists and I dont care. If I was to find out tomorrow that god does exist, it would not change how I live my life. I would still be a good person, treating others with respect and leaving things as I found them or if I can, better than I found them. I do that because its the right thing to do, not because I am in fear of eternal punishment.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 4409/12/2012

What is the difference between humanists and atheists? I know both tend to feel hostility toward each other.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 4509/12/2012

I agree with r47

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 4609/12/2012

I'm not sure that's the case, r48. It would be difficult to be a humanist without being an atheist - maybe so much so that there is a hostility towards theists wanting to be under the humanist tent.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 4709/12/2012

No a lot of Atheists seem to view humanists as wimps while Humanists don't seem to like Atheists.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 4809/12/2012

Whenever someone asks me why I don't believe in "God", I ask them to define god first and then I'll tell them if I believe. Shuts 'em right up. Remember, before there was monotheism - people did have moral lives (and amoral lives). Some people were great and lived wonderful lives, others were awful, did evil things, and lived contemptible lives. NOTHING HAS CHANGED WITH THE INVENTION OF "GOD". Same shit, different millennium.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 4909/12/2012

The article you posted is actually exposing the fallacy of the humanist vs atheist tradition. It includes three untenable quotations from people with the hostile view and then explains why these arguments are troubling.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 5009/12/2012

[quote]but if you're going to share that you're an atheist, it's a deal breaker.

you type stupid

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 5109/12/2012

[quote]Atheism has become a pseudo religion as in a lot of new or militant atheist approach it with a fervour religious sensibility

no, it hasn't.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 5209/12/2012

I have never met these mythical, belligerent atheists posters like R56 keep referring to.

I am an atheist and those people I know who are atheists all don't really talk about it much. When I do tell people I am an atheist, I get this circle of people standing around me, asking me if I really don't believe, why don't I believe, they don't believe that I don't believe...

It's annoying.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 5409/12/2012

[quote]know both tend to feel hostility toward each other.

not really.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 5609/12/2012

[quote]Atheists seem to spend more time on what they are skeptical about than actual believers.

I've never encountered this type, and I've been an atheist ever since I came of age twenty years ago.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 5709/12/2012

[quote]Atheists seem to spend more time on what they are skeptical about than actual believers.

That is actually true. As a rule, atheists tend to know [italic]more[/italic] about religion than religious folks do.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 5809/12/2012

I can't support any kind of "Don't Ask Don't Tell" policy for atheists. There's too much fear and ignorance about what atheism is. George H. W. Bush once told a reporter that he didn't think atheists should be considered citizens because we are "One Nation Under God."

It upsets me to see political parties genuflecting to the believers at events like the recent Conventions. I think prayer and simiar demonstrations of faith should be omitted from political events, out of respect for those who do not believe.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 5909/12/2012

Well, of course atheists speak out on their positions. When you're a hated minority, it's your job to stand up for your beliefs. Sound familiar?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 6009/12/2012

Plus, R62 - If any of those idiots TRULY believed their own shit, then they'd pray in PRIVATE like the bible tells them to. It's all so much put on horse-shit, but then, they know it themselves just as much as atheists do. They're just trying to prove something to themselves - to fit into a cultural model of some sort.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 6109/12/2012

R22, R23, My original post (R15) said that "once upon a time some small town churches provided emotional and financial support." I NEVER said it was still true every place. In fact I'll go so far as to say that that's one of the big reasons for declining church attendance. I was just asking where atheists go as a substitute for what religion is SUPPOSED to provide, and for some never did.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 6209/12/2012

R32, I've become disappointed with organized religion because it doesn't always follow the original teachings of the prophets. Any church that as you say, "takes more than it gives," will decline. Look at small towns in times of natural catastrophes. The better churches provide resources for the needy. I'm just asking what atheists have as a substitute for immediate community organizing in times of disaster.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 6309/12/2012

R66 - Nothing says that atheists can't volunteer or help out a local church if that church is doing good work in a time of need (or otherwise). What do you think, atheists don't contribute to charities if the charities are religious in nature?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 6409/12/2012

R67, Maybe I'm not being clear. My point is that sometimes churches serve a very valuable function. When people come together weekly, they MAY get to know each well enough that when tragedy happens to one or many, they are there to support each other. I've seen a few churches offer job counseling or networking, as well as holding recovery meetings, and encouraging those that need them to participate. Yes many churches focus more on fundraising than on helping others. Either way there are plenty of negative "strings" attached which I personally detest, and thus avoid attending church. So WHAT do atheists offer as a substitute for the ideal of bringing community members together for mutual benefit?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 6509/12/2012

Starbucks, R68.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 6609/12/2012

the DL

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 6709/12/2012

R68, I understand. You're asking how atheists build a secular support system outside of church. Here in Seattle, one of the most unchurched cities in the nation, people rely on their own custom-built support systems: families, friends, and neighbors.

There are plenty of resources for job counseling and networking through local colleges, professional organizations, and the like. Plenty of recovery groups in town, too. There's Planned Parenthood, AA, Second Harvest,99er support groups, etc. It would never occur to me or my friends to darken the door of a church for material support. We help each other out to the best of our ability.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 6809/12/2012

Did you know Maryland, Pennsylvania, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, Texas, and South Carolina ban atheists from holding public office?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 6909/15/2012

Unconstitutional R72

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 7009/15/2012

ridiculous, but this is clearly why there are no high-profile atheists in the public sphere, they are all literally closeted.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 7109/15/2012

Does anyone really believe in the Catholic hocus-pocus-dominocus? You're kidding, right?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 7209/16/2012

Gabriel Vahanian dies at 85; key figure in 'God Is Dead' movement

The French-born theologian's 1961 book 'The Death of God: The Culture of Our Post-Christian Era' helped define a philosophical movement.

By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times

September 16, 2012

Despite a provocative title, Gabriel Vahanian's book "The Death of God" caused no public stir when it was published in 1961.

By the middle of the decade, however, a massive upheaval was underway in American society and Vahanian, a little-known Syracuse University professor of religion, found himself at the center of a furious national debate.

The French-born academic entered the spotlight in 1965 when Time magazine's Easter week cover posed the question that Vahanian and other radical theologians had raised: "Is God Dead?" The arguments pro and con were still churning more than a year later, when the magazine noted that the easiest way to boost Sunday church attendance was to announce a sermon on the divine demise.

Vahanian, a key thinker in what became known as the "death of God" movement, died of natural causes Aug. 30 at his home in Strasbourg, France, said his son-in-law, Jeffrey W. Robbins. He was 85.

Time had named him one of the four best-known theologians of the movement, which, according to the magazine, argued it was "no longer possible to think about or believe in a transcendent God who acts in human history" and that Christianity "will have to survive, if at all, without him."

In Vahanian's view, America in the early '60s was a "post-Christian world," driven away from faith by the Holocaust and other World War II horrors.

"Now man has declared God not responsible and not relevant to human self-knowledge," he wrote. "The existence of God, no longer questioned, has become useless to man's predicament and its resolution."

That message found a receptive audience as the '60s unfolded in one convulsion after another — the assassination of a president and struggles over the war in Vietnam, civil rights and free speech.

"It was a period of transformation, and his book was one of the expressions of '60s radicalism," theologian Thomas J.J. Altizer, another prominent death-of-God theologian, said of Vahanian during an interview last week. "He was articulating it theologically, and he had a better understanding than any of us of the actual death of God at that point in history."

Postulating the death of God brought death threats to the group, which also included Paul van Buren and William Hamilton. Hamilton, who died in March, lost his teaching position at Colgate Rochester Divinity School in New York even though he was tenured.

Vahanian often joined his like-minded colleagues in public forums, but he was not in lock step with them theologically. A French Protestant who admired John Calvin and worshiped with a Presbyterian congregation, Vahanian approached the question of God's relevance from the vantage point of a lifelong churchgoer.

"He was an iconoclastic thinker through and through," said Robbins, who teaches religion and philosophy at Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania along with his wife, Noelle Vahanian, one of Gabriel's two children.

Unlike others in the God-is-dead camp, Vahanian approached the issue as a cultural critic, looking for ways to talk about God in an increasingly secular world.

"He was doing a cultural analysis, whereas the others were doing a more traditional philosophical, theological critique," said James B. Wiggins, a longtime friend and colleague in the religion department at Syracuse. "Finding ways to give expression to the theological in terms that were intelligible to an ever more secular culture was the project in which he was engaged throughout his career."

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 7309/16/2012

Vahanian was born Jan. 24, 1927, in Marseille, France. His parents, Mesrop and Perouse Vahanian, were Armenian refugees who had fled to France after World War I to escape persecution in Armenian areas of Turkey.

He earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Grenoble in 1945, followed by studies at the Protestant Theological Faculty of Paris.

In 1958 he earned a doctorate at Princeton Theological Seminary and joined the Syracuse faculty. He led efforts to establish its graduate program in religion, which, Wiggins noted, was unusual for a secular university with no theology school. He also became a key figure in the study of religion and literature.

Vahanian remained at Syracuse for 26 years, leaving for France in 1984 to accept an appointment at Protestant Theological Faculty in Strasbourg.

He married Barbara Swanger in 1962. Besides his wife and daughter, he is survived by a son, Paul-Michel, and two grandchildren.

Although the public spotlight on his ideas receded, Vahanian "remained a death-of-God theologian in a profound sense," Altizer said. "He understood better than any of us the way God is dead in our culture" and especially how atheism was important to faith.

"The Christian era has bequeathed us the 'death of God,' but not without teaching us a lesson," Vahanian wrote in his 1964 book "Wait Without Idols." "God is not necessary, but he is inevitable. He is wholly other and wholly present. Faith in him, the conversion of our human reality, both culturally and existentially, is the demand he still makes upon us."

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 7409/16/2012

Who is dumb enough to still support the Catholic Criminal Conspiracy?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 7509/16/2012

Religion is the speed bumps on the road to improving humanity.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 7809/16/2012

only one Freak posting over the weekend? this is a first!

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 7909/16/2012

And we lost this guy who was putting up a good fight:

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 8009/16/2012

I get atheists and agnostics confused.

I do not particiapte i any organize religion (I was raised Catholic, though. I think that there is some sort of higher power out there - but do not think it is a "god" or being. It may be a power rooted in physics or science, but I don't beleive there is this all knowing "being" out there who watches our every move and that a person can pray to to get things. I am not sure there is a afterlife, although the thought that I would simply cease to exist when I die is unsettlig. So, what exactly am I - agnostic?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 8109/16/2012

Yes

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 8209/16/2012

R83, that is a true shame

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 8309/16/2012

Hey dim dumbshit @79 -

there is no hell, there is no heaven, there is no fairy-tale imaginary God. Go crawl back under the rock from whence you came. Oh, and by the way, we are sending a tornado to wipe out your hateful existence.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 8409/16/2012

R79 = Ted Haggard

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 8509/16/2012

R84, agnostics believe the existence or non-existence of any deity is unknowable.

Atheists believe supernatural gods don't exist.

Christians believe their god exists, but not the gods of others.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 8609/16/2012

[bold]Key Figure in "God is Dead" Movement... is Dead[/bold]

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 8709/16/2012

if there are any actual believing christians here, riddle me this:

If your 'God' is omnipotent; i.e., all-powerful as reported by your bizarre 'Bible' - why doesn't 'God' just wipe out that ol' Devil?

I'll tell you why He doesn't ...because killing off Satan would be bad for the 'God' business.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 8809/16/2012

Brought up nominally Catholic and so my schooling for the first twelve years, all Catholic schools.

Interestingly around the age of eight or so I had the inkling that what I was being taught about the church had, how shall I put it, a scent of bovine effluent to it.

By age fifteen I was taking Confirmation classes. Now I was dead set against doing so, I couldn't see the point of lying my way through it, just parroting the good Catholic. But my grandfather was something of a Catholic holy roller. So a little (in today's terms probably $2,000) bribe go handed to me.

I guess it means I can be bought. Because I even told the priest in the final interview before Confirmation that I didn't believe or believe in anything.

They went right ahead and confirmed me anyhow.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 8909/16/2012

that's why Catholics are the best liars. Confirmation proves it

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 9009/17/2012

[quote]I guess I'm of the school of thought that there are no atheists in a glory hole.

I'm still waiting to hear about how r13 found Jesus in an adult bookstore.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 9109/17/2012

[quote] I am sure [r13] meant to say foxhole,

Well, DUH! I doubt that anyone thought he really meant 'glory hole.'

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 9209/17/2012

apparently he did.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 9309/17/2012

Bump.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 9412/03/2012

Religion is like a dog's herd instinct to follow the leader. No alpha male would ever be part of such a thing.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 9512/03/2012

Happy Festivus, everyone!

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 9612/03/2012

[quote]there are no atheists in a glory hole.

Well, you're already on your knees ...

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 9712/03/2012

Faith I can get belief in psychics I just can't.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 9812/03/2012

Howdy

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 9901/19/2013

I often wonder how many people are closeted atheists. I can't think of one god that makes sense.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 10001/20/2013

One thing I've always wondered about is how do Atheists resolve their hatred for believers with family members or friends that may not be atheist.

Seth MacFarlane has made no secret he hates and constantly mocks anyone who isn't atheist, but his family are not atheist. Does he still have a relationship with them, do they know how little he thinks of them? I think he is a narcissist so maybe he simply doesn't care.

But in general how do atheists resolve relationships people they might love with not being an atheist?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 10102/10/2013

Atheists are people who have hit rock bottom and crawled their way back with the realization that we are all, utterly, alone. Deists, on the other hand, have not come to this realization, which by definition means that they have never hit rock bottom. God is their cushion in life, and for many, belief gives them the comfort and an ease with "knowing" things will turn out alright in the end.

Think about it for a moment. We are inculcated with strange beliefs, from Santa Claus to Jesus Christ. We're supposed to come to some understanding that Santa is really our parents, but Jesus is not? Or, is it mere coincidence that god is called "father" by so many?

You go through life, you meet all sorts of people, and you decide or realize who is going to be your friend and who is not. If you have any understanding of religion and belief, that factors into the equation, R106. You have to decide if belief in god is the most important aspect, and live your life accordingly. Some atheists think non-belief is so important, they cannot have a relationship with anyone who believes; others think religion is just another aspect of a person and the life they have led.

I view it like people who have to drive the latest, nicest car, while others are happy with a car that runs, and still others prefer to walk or take public transit. Just because someone walks doesn't mean they won't ever need faster transportation. But, everybody has to get from point A to point B, and you have to do it somehow.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 10202/10/2013

In that case a person is taking atheism too seriously. Think of the word atheism, it includes "theism", therefore its square one is rooted in a belief, in the case of atheism it is the belief there is no god. In a way it is like saying a-sexual is still, fundamentally, a form of sexuality.

To take atheism so seriously it has the power to fracture relationships and distort ones view on people is to take it to far, no different than taking any religion too far.

It's a difficult question, and one that can only really be answered by the individual on their own terms and yes it is their choice and their right to get through life the best way they feel they can. That being said how can I view a Atheist that refuses to be friends with a believer any different than a religious person who refuses to be friends with a person who does not share their beliefs?

Maybe neither are right, maybe neither are wrong, but for me, I don't think or feel I am cool with it. I don't think I'd be all right with the idea some choosing to be my friend simply and wholly based on what I believe or what I don't believe.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 10302/10/2013

Atheists have quite a dilemma. In order to believe that God doesn't exist, one must have a concept of God.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 10402/10/2013

No, silly. One can make do with the conception of others. Indeed one must.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 10502/10/2013

In the case of someone like Seth, I'm guessing that is just who he is, he comes off as totally arrogant and sanctimonious. He'd be the same if he were religious and act accordingly.

I think it's a natural trait in people regardless of what they believe. Same as Bill O'Riley, Hannity or Sam Harris

Funnily I don't necessarily think Dawkins or Dennett are sanctimonious, they seem to have their convictions, yes, but not like Harris, Gleen Beck or Seth MacFaralne who seem to be outright sanctimonious narcissists.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 10602/10/2013

R15 you can have a circle of friends and family. Churches are not necessary to some of us. I don't have a spiritual bone in my body and, quite frankly, I don't care of there is a god or not.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 10702/10/2013

neither do I

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 10802/10/2013

Atheist bump

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 10905/12/2013

I used to like Shermer, but he isn't skeptical enough for me.

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 11005/13/2013

R109, what does having a concept of something have to do with believing it's real?

Do you have a "concept" of the Easter Bunny or Santa Claus riding on his sleigh with his reindeer pulling him across the sky?

Do those concepts require you to believe the characters exist?

by Pollyanna Prisspot, School Marmreply 11105/13/2013
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