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New Olympic Controversy: Israelis want moment of silence for Munich victims

The IOC will not have a moment of silence at the Opening Ceremony, saying it is no place for any political statements.

I, for one, agree with this. They had a separate remembrance today, but will not acknowledge the massacre at the Ceremony. The Olympics are supposed to be above politics at their best, and shouldn't bow to pressure to commemorate what was a political disruption of the Olympics in the first place.

by Anonymousreply 8308/08/2012

It's always something with them, isn't it? Yes, it was a tragedy, but we don't need a moment of silence for something that happened 40 years ago.

by Anonymousreply 107/23/2012

Olympic athletes and the Olympic Games were attacked. It would not be "political" to commemorate, in international solidarity, this sad event, nor to stand together against such inhumanity and for worldwide togetherness.

But if one is as blind to the obvious as the OP is, one says the things the OP does. And of course the word "Israel" cannot be spoken without any context being considered "political" by demagogues.

I would think a simple commemorative moment of silence would be appropriate and a small thing concerning any nation. I would support it, regardless of the country involved. But then, I'm not a confused tool of the enemies of the Olympic vision.

by Anonymousreply 207/23/2012

I don't think it's necessary and I don't fault the Olympics for saying no. But I hardly think it's a political statement to commemorate the massacre of Olympic athletes. Unless it's merely the politics of respecting human life.

And, before I get accused of being something I'm not, I am a non-Zionist Jewish American. I don't even believe Israel should exist.

by Anonymousreply 307/23/2012

Very good!

by Anonymousreply 407/23/2012

Give them their moment of silence, be done with it, and move on.

The Olympics are indeed supposed to be above politics, but they're not.

by Anonymousreply 507/23/2012

haven't we suffered enough?

by Anonymousreply 607/23/2012

A moment of silence for the Greek holocaust in the early 20th century would surely be more fitting.

by Anonymousreply 707/23/2012

Attention whores.

by Anonymousreply 807/23/2012

[quote]Olympic athletes and the Olympic Games were attacked. It would not be "political" to commemorate

Yes, but the athletes and the games aren't pushing for this, the families of the Israeli athletes are. It is political, unless they want to also commemorate the innocent lives lost on both sides of the conflict. I doubt that is the case.

This is an all-or-nothing proposition. You either allow political statements or you don't. Period.

by Anonymousreply 907/23/2012

No moment of silence. Sorry, but no.

Why is anyone asking for a moment of silence at this time? And if it's just because it's the 40th anniversary of the Munich Olympics, well then, that's not a good enough reason. Why bring up this topic now?

by Anonymousreply 1007/23/2012

Israel marks Munich massacre anniversary in London

By ROB HARRIS, AP Sports Writer – 1 day ago

LONDON (AP) — Complaining that the Olympic movement is still ignoring their pain, Israelis marked the 40th anniversary of the Munich massacre on Sunday with a modest service in the atrium of a London apartment block.

Prayers were read for the 11 murdered Israelis, wreaths were laid for them and a plaque unveiled about four miles (six kilometers) from the Olympic Stadium.

However, there will be no minute of silence for them at Friday's opening ceremony.

"The International Olympic Committee have a moral commitment to commemorate the 11 athletes, coaches and referees," Israeli Olympic Committee secretary general Efraim Zinger said. "Not because they were Israelis, but because they were Olympians and were murdered during the Olympic Games.

"It's been 40 years since that dreadful day and I hope that the day will come that the IOC will recognize all 11 athletes as victims and find the proper way to commemorate their memory."

IOC President Jacques Rogge reiterated Saturday that the opening ceremony was not an appropriate arena to remember the dead despite pressure from politicians in the United States, Israel and Germany.

In talks over several years with Israeli officials, the IOC has not been able to agree to a suitable way of remembering the slain athletes at each games, according to Zinger.

"The frustrating fact is that until now, none of the alternative ways to commemorate was practiced," Zinger said.

Rogge does plan to honor the dead at a reception in London during the games on Aug. 6. IOC officials will also attend a ceremony in Germany on the anniversary of the attack on Sept. 5 at the military airfield of Furstenfeldbruck, where most of the Israelis died.

The tranquility of the Munich Games was shattered in the second week when eight members of the Black September militant group penetrated the laxly secured Olympic Village and took Israeli team members hostage. A day later, all 11 were dead.

Ben Helfgott, who was at the 1972 Olympics, said at Sunday's commemorations that the memorial service immediately after the massacre was "trivialized" because the murders of the competitors was equated with the deaths of the terrorists.

In front of a tightly packed audience featuring a relative of one victim, London Mayor Boris Johnson recalled watching the events unfold as an 8-year-old child in England.

"What sticks in my mind is that sense of sacrilege and a feeling of horror that the world's greatest sporting event should suffer such an attack, and that an attack should be mounted against people who had been training for what should have been the greatest event in their lives," Johnson said. "And I think the world watched with a sense of numb disbelief as those events unfolded because sport should transcend politics.

"It should bring out the best in the human race. It should draw people together in admiration for achievement and for effort. And yet some people chose to profane that great celebration and to cut short the lives of 11 innocent (people)."

Johnson said he hoped the Olympics, which run until Aug. 12, are only remembered for sporting endeavors and that athletes of all faiths are able to "unite in a city that unites the world."

But the games are starting against a backdrop of security fears surrounding the Israeli delegation, featuring 38 athletes.

Israel is on the alert for plots targeting its citizens overseas after five Israelis vacationing in Bulgaria were killed in a suicide bombing last week, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Sunday.

"Unfortunately we are part of a very distinguished list of countries" whose teams are susceptible to attack, Zinger said. "We have to live with it."

by Anonymousreply 1107/23/2012

r3 I don't believe Jews like you should exist.

by Anonymousreply 1207/23/2012

[quote]Why bring up this topic now?

Perhaps for the same reason it's been brought up every four years since 1972.

by Anonymousreply 1307/23/2012

I might agree with the Israelis if the Olympics were in fact HAPPENING IN MUNICH.

What does London have to do with any of this?

by Anonymousreply 1407/23/2012

Maybe the Munich Olympics could be acknowledged in the opening ceremonies speech in London...something about keeping the athletes safe in these current days of ensuring utmost security as we reflect back to the Munich Olympics of 40 years ago. But 40 years shouldn't be the issue. In fact why bring it up?

And why do we want to make Munich feel as if it did something wrong. It wasn't that city's fault because of the 1972 terrorism.

But a moment of silence in London? NO.

by Anonymousreply 1507/23/2012

Its one of the widows of the '72 team. She's trying to make it a permanent fixture of the Opening Ceremonies. The German government actually paid the families millions of Euros in 2002 after years and years of pushing.

by Anonymousreply 1607/23/2012

Why a moment of silence for those athletes and not for the victims of the Olympic Park bombing in 1996? They were killed by a terrorist too.

by Anonymousreply 1707/23/2012

Kudos to the IOC on resisting this mawkishness.

by Anonymousreply 1807/23/2012

[quote]What does London have to do with any of this?

You mean besides the Olympics being in London?

It's not about the city, dummy.

by Anonymousreply 1907/23/2012

Why not a moment of silence for Steven Spielberg? 5 nominations no wins!

by Anonymousreply 2007/23/2012

I don't understand. A statement commemorating the deaths of Olympic athletes in Munich is a "political statement"??? Does that suggest that there's a pro- and con- on the issue -- that there are those who want to celebrate the deaths?

by Anonymousreply 2107/23/2012

[quote] Does that suggest that there's a pro- and con- on the issue -- that there are those who want to celebrate the deaths?

Is that what you're suggesting yourself: That not to be in favor of marking this moment of silence means somehow you're sanctioning the deaths of the athletes who were killed forty years ago?

by Anonymousreply 2207/23/2012

[quote]It is political, unless they want to also commemorate the innocent lives lost on both sides of the conflict.

That argument would make sense if Israelis had ever killed Arab athletes at the Olympics. I don't remember this happening, though.

by Anonymousreply 2307/23/2012

"Why a moment of silence for those athletes and not for the victims of the Olympic Park bombing in 1996? "

Because Jews believe they are a special people. Typical.

by Anonymousreply 2407/23/2012

Goody! Another pretext to bash Jews! Of course this has nothing to with anti-Semitism.

by Anonymousreply 2507/23/2012

R22 -- don't follow this at all. I don't think the refusal to commemorate the deaths is equivalent to sanctioning these deaths. But what does that have to do with anything? I never said that the IOC sanctions the deaths, but I disagree that a statement condemning the deaths would be a "political statement," because there should be no political difference on the subject.

by Anonymousreply 2607/23/2012

No one deserves a moment of silence at the London Olympics regardless of what happened in Munich in 1972.

And the Israelis wonder why they piss off people all the time.

by Anonymousreply 2707/23/2012

R25 wears a yarmulke.

by Anonymousreply 2807/23/2012

Whereas r28 prefers a swastika armband.

by Anonymousreply 2907/23/2012

Maybe after that moment of silence we can have a moment of silence for the 1,400 Palestinian civilians killed as a result of Israeli strikes in late 2008/early 2009.

by Anonymousreply 3007/23/2012

Any Israeli athletes that win a metal should extend a clenched fist on the podium as a symbol of solidarity with their slain compatriots.

by Anonymousreply 3107/23/2012

ooo, what a burn, r30.

by Anonymousreply 3207/23/2012

Let's have a moment of silence for Greece, the birthplace of the Olympics, and then take up an international collection of funds from London Olympic tourists so that Greece can get back on its feet.

by Anonymousreply 3307/23/2012

I've already dismantled that argument in r23, r30. Do try to keep up.

(Oh, and you pulled that number out of your ass, btw.)

by Anonymousreply 3407/23/2012

NBC Sports anchor Bob Costas says he plans his own on-air commemoration this week of the Israelis killed in Munich 40 years ago despite the refusal of Olympic authorities to do so during Friday's opening ceremony for the London Games.

by Anonymousreply 3507/23/2012

Ah, I don't know. To underlined the ultimate breach of security and terrorists' victory during the opening ceremony? Doesn't seem like a comfortable good idea.

by Anonymousreply 3607/23/2012

Someone on this thread must have missed his tourist bus in Bulgaria last week.

by Anonymousreply 3707/23/2012

[quote]NBC Sports anchor Bob Costas says he plans his own on-air commemoration this week of the Israelis killed in Munich 40 years ago despite the refusal of Olympic authorities to do so during Friday's opening ceremony for the London Games.

Well, he knows how to keep his job.

by Anonymousreply 3807/23/2012

then r12 u would not exist b/c Adam and Eve were Jewish and so was Jesus.

by Anonymousreply 3907/23/2012

There was no Adam and no Eve. They are religious fairy tales. So is Jesus Christ.

by Anonymousreply 4007/23/2012

Let's hope r37 etc. is just a dumb troll.

(He should get banned either way.)

by Anonymousreply 4107/23/2012

They did an entire flag thing at whatever Winter Olympics happened after 9/11. They dragged out a flag that survived the collapse or something.

I think they should acknowledge the Munich massacre.

by Anonymousreply 4207/23/2012

and r40 that is what u got out of my post. The post was to show r12 what a F**k up he is. and BTW I do believe that those ppl exist but to each his own on that matter.

by Anonymousreply 4307/23/2012

The did today, R42. Ceremony in London.

by Anonymousreply 4407/23/2012

Doesn't the Israeli contingent typically wear black armbands, as part of their uniforms, to commemorate their fallen countrymen?

There are many very angry posters on DL.

by Anonymousreply 4507/23/2012

[quote]Doesn't the Israeli contingent typically wear black armbands, as part of their uniforms, to commemorate their fallen countrymen?

R45. Girl, you just gave me a fabulous idea to perpetuate our martyrdom, just in case you were unaware of one of our little inconspicuous personality traits.

by Anonymousreply 4607/23/2012

The IOC are fascists. This is no surprise. Anti-semitic.

by Anonymousreply 4707/23/2012

[quote]What does London have to do with any of this?

"Whatever you do, don't mention the War.

I mentioned it once but I think I got away with it."

by Anonymousreply 4807/23/2012

[quote]Why a moment of silence for those athletes and not for the victims of the Olympic Park bombing in 1996? They were killed by a terrorist too.

You mean victim. And she was not an athlete.

Frankly, I don't think pushing for this is worth the antisemitism it will generate. If Basque separatists had killed French athletes at the games, there would be no problem having a moment of silence. But it was 40 years ago. Let it go.

by Anonymousreply 4907/23/2012

[quote]Frankly, I don't think pushing for this is worth the antisemitism it will generate.

That's a rather defeatist position. I say: let the anti-Semites come out and shame themselves.

by Anonymousreply 5007/23/2012

If a tradition had been started at the Olympics immediately following Munich, it would make sense. After 40 years too much time has gone by.

by Anonymousreply 5107/23/2012

[quote]Maybe after that moment of silence we can have a moment of silence for the 1,400 Palestinian civilians killed as a result of Israeli strikes in late 2008/early 2009.

As long as you have a moment of silence for the 1500 israelies those Palestinians have blown to pieces on purpose in 12 years of suicide bombings.

by Anonymousreply 5207/23/2012

[quote]As long as you have a moment of silence for the 1500 israelies those Palestinians have blown to pieces on purpose in 12 years of suicide bombings.

Oh god, here we go again.

by Anonymousreply 5307/23/2012

[quote]You mean victim.

Two people were killed: Alice Hawthorne of Albany Georgia, by the bomb blast itself, and Turkish cameraman Melin Uzunyol, who died of a heart attack triggered by the incident.

[quote]And she was not an athlete.

That makes no difference, and you know it. You're splitting hairs.

by Anonymousreply 5407/23/2012

[quote]And why do we want to make Munich feel as if it did something wrong. It wasn't that city's fault because of the 1972 terrorism.

It was Germany's fault the police response was so incompetent. Most of the athletes who died, died in the fucked-up rescue. And it took decades for Germany to release the files about the police response. They stonewalled hard on information requests.

by Anonymousreply 5507/23/2012

Stay with me here. I'm thinking....Holocaust memory moment with whipped untermenschen incinerated by giant Olympic torch.

by Anonymousreply 5607/23/2012

Let's have The Spice Girls sing "Ha Va Nah Geelah" while Beckham lifts the queen in a chair above his head.....

Problem solved!

by Anonymousreply 5707/24/2012

[quote]...a political disruption of the Olympics in the first place.

Wow. Innocent people massacred is just a political disruption.

by Anonymousreply 5807/24/2012

You know, if they want to honor the athletes killed in Munich I think they should, but not during the actual Olympic Opening Ceremonies. Maybe as a pre- ceremony event.

I remember the Munich attack. I watched it on TV as a youngster. I was so excited about the Olumpics. I was twelve. What happened was horrible.

We all watched it unfold, like a movie, but with no happy ending. I'll never forget the commentator: "They're all gone."

Anyone who remembers will agree it was horrific to watch it on live TV. But I don't think it should be a part of the ceremony to open this year's games.

by Anonymousreply 5907/24/2012

R42 They did that because we're America; the greatest country in the world and a shining beacon of light to all other countries wishing for democracy.

International events are forced to recognize us because we can do no wrong; we are the savior of this world.

I love America so much it makes me cry sometimes.

by Anonymousreply 6007/24/2012

enough already just give me a hot hairy arse

by Anonymousreply 6107/24/2012

Don't you get it? It's political because they were JEWS!

If a dozen Christian athletes were killed in a plane crash, there would be a memorial.

Damn Jews - they cause all the wars.

by Anonymousreply 6207/24/2012

When I was in college, one of my dorm mates got into it with another and there was one of those arguments Anglos have with low voices, clenched teeth and veiled contempt. Ethnics find this fascinating because our "discussions" are filled with screams, threats, and broken furniture, but in this case, it was far more scary than any of our cultural bombast just because it was so quiet.

I took one of the contenders aside to "calm" her and my roommate took the other, and as I walked her out to the lawn for some air, she said (meaning the guy with whom she'd gotten into the argument), "Abused children always grow up with big egos."

In those Carter years, it was all about "egos" and having a big one was considered a sin against the "community" (usually the women, minorities, and weaker males), but only until "fairness" occurred and the beta group were allowed egos of their own. Still, many of the Beta group also had big egos, these just never manifested against White Males.

I wasn't a Psychology major, I was in the hard sciences, so many of the labels the Psych people threw around were confusing -- there was something there and they attempted to comment and understand it, but their terminology was all over the place, often arbitrary, and could change at any time. Such was it with "ego" (now called Narcissistic Personality Disorder, especially when it is merely self-protective behavior against those who really have the disorder) yet, the "abused child" part never changed. I always think of the day when I hear stories such as this -- the demand for a commemoration.

To blame it on Judaism is easy -- abused groups like abused children often make demands that the rest view as excessive and out of place -- but to do so would perpetuate the problems psychology often causes in its scientifically unscientific quest to solve them. Notice it is some of the widows making the request, not the entire World Jewish Community. Many of this community now think it was a good idea, especially those who believed the Games should have been stopped after the attack, but as we've seen in just our little forum, it isn't every single Jewish person in the world. Also notice it is 40 years later. Why not 20 years later? Where were the widows then?

The key to all this has nothing to do with Judaism, but perhaps only time and place and where some of the widows -- and the rest of us -- find themselves now. The women are getting on in years, and times are not too great for anyone.

I noticed back in the dot-com melt down up in the Silicon Valley, as the situation worsened, more people flocked to the cemeteries to visit their dead. Especially on Sundays, the graveyards were more crowded than the mall. Once the situation reached a quasi-equilibrium, the dead were again left in peace.

This demand isn't about Judaism, but a symptom of uncertainty, which is usually the main problem.

by Anonymousreply 6307/24/2012

How many moments of silence do these people need?

by Anonymousreply 6407/24/2012

R61 is the only one worth reading.

by Anonymousreply 6507/24/2012

I read R63 last night; that's an interesting concept. I posted upthread that 40 years seems like too long to wait. If it has to do with a feeling of unease among the survivors it makes more sense.

Thanks for providing food for thought.

by Anonymousreply 6607/24/2012

[quote]That makes no difference, and you know it. You're splitting hairs.

It does make a difference. The Israelis were killed by an international enemy while participating in the games so their deaths are directly relevant to the Olympic's core purpose of peace among nations. The ancient games involved a sacred truce so athletes from warring states could participate.

The Atlanta bombing was a domestic attack with a domestic agenda and while it occurred in the host city during the games it did not represent an attack on the games themselves. In any case, the appropriate time to consider a 10th anniversary Atlanta memorial would be at the 2036 games.

by Anonymousreply 6707/24/2012

The overblown Olympics have become a joke anyway...it is all political and all about making money for the sponsors...and a minute of silence by the world's athletes to remember their fallen fellow athletes is not too much to ask and would be very powerful. The Israelis came in peace in Munich and left in coffins. The UK games are going to be a big fail. The Brits are all talk, anal details, planning......and they always fuck it up. I hope a tornado hits the stadiums. And screw all of you anti semites. Get off of most of your social media outlets and stop taking your meds that were invented by JEWS and ISRAELIS if you hate us so much!

by Anonymousreply 6807/24/2012

[quote]Also notice it is 40 years later. Why not 20 years later? Where were the widows then?

They have been asking for a moment of silence at each games fro the past 40 years and have been refused 9 times. This time, they have the support of the host nation and the fact that it is the 10th Olympics since the attack.

by Anonymousreply 6907/24/2012

Many innocent lives have been lost on both sides of the conflict. Which is a fucking mess and Israel and everyone else involved has a great deal to answer for.

But this would be a commemoration of a massacre of Olympic athletes during the Olympics. There's a major difference.

Not that I think it should happen. I don't. But for practical reasons. It's going to piss people off, enough has been done to commemorate the massacre, and, rightly or wrongly, it's inspiring controversy.

But talk about false equivalencies.

by Anonymousreply 7007/24/2012

Does anybody actually watch the silly opening ceremonies?

I watch specific events, but only with the sound off because I can't stand the phony patriotism and the manipulative human interest yarns.

"He's dedicating this race to his grandmother who raised him who had her legs amputated last week."

by Anonymousreply 7107/24/2012

[quote] The Israelis were killed by an international enemy

An "international" enemy? Only to those neo con chickenhawks who are currently trying to get Americans to die for yet another Likudnik war.

Those Israelis were killed by Palestinian terrorists because of the ongoing conflict *within Israel*

by Anonymousreply 7207/24/2012

I'm perplexed, r72. Are you claiming the Palestinians of Black September were Israelis? I'm sure that would've come as quite a shock to them.

by Anonymousreply 7307/24/2012

,

by Anonymousreply 7407/24/2012

No.

by Anonymousreply 7507/24/2012

Just as relevant

by Anonymousreply 7607/24/2012

This eternal back-and-forth is exactly why it's unwise for the Olympics to involve itself in any way.

And, btw, a pox on both your houses; you deserve each other.

by Anonymousreply 7707/24/2012

Jews and Muslims should do UFC fights

by Anonymousreply 7807/24/2012

We could turn the entire Olympic games into a remembrance of Jewish suffering.

by Anonymousreply 7907/24/2012

I blame Bethany.

by Anonymousreply 8008/02/2012

the Jew have all the money.

by Anonymousreply 8108/02/2012

In the other Games, did they have off-site ceremonies, too?

by Anonymousreply 8208/03/2012

Yeah Aly Raisman!!!!! Proud Jew getting Gold in floor excercise event using Hava Nagila for her music. did those fucking IOC anti semites watch her routine - or did they turn it off because it was offensive to them? The British honored victims of the Underground terrorist attack which had nothing to do with the Olympics. It would not have hurt if they took 1 minute out of a 4 hour opening ceremony to honor OLYMPIC athletes who were murdered during the games. But I guess using unfunny Mr.Beane was more important.

by Anonymousreply 8308/08/2012
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