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Patti Page

She's still alive, you know. Her musical style is strongly reminiscent of the McGuire Sisters. But she was a bigger star, wasn't she?

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 9111/16/2013

Loved that "Shrimp Boats" song she did.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 104/27/2012

No, that was Jo Stafford who sang about the shrimp boats.

I remember Patti singing about the Doggie in the Window, Olde Cape Cod and the Tennessee Waltz..

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 204/27/2012

Anything she sings is worth a listen, but "Tennessee Waltz" has always been my favorite song by her. "I remember the night and the Tennessee waltz, now I know just how much I have lost..." Gorgeous and sad.

She used to do this hand thingy when she sang live on TV, she would touch her thumb to the first finger and make a little gesture that always killed me. Plus, she was and is beautiful. One of the last of that era of great recording and night club artists.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 304/27/2012

Plus....she harmonized with herself! I can't tell you how astonishing that was at that time.

Much credit to the late, great Les Paul and Mary Ford for that multitrack business.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 404/27/2012

Wheel of Fortune - Rock and Roll Waltz - all those great hits

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 604/27/2012

Patti Page had a voice that could just melt you. When Old Cape Cod was a hit (1958?) they actually PLAYED it on Cape Cod in bars and restaurants over loudspeakers to give "atmosphere" to the place. I mean more than just putting it on the jukeboxes which, of course, it was too. I have heard stories of oldtimers who visited/vacationed there then and said the song was like the freakin' soundtrack to the place.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 704/28/2012

Love Kay Starr's version of "Wheel Of Fortune". So good. They even put it in "L.A. Confidential", playing under the murder montage. Didn't Starr have the biggest hit with it, not Page ?

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 804/28/2012

Al Martino sang it over the film's end credits, but Patti Page's version of "Hush...Hush, Sweet Charlotte" is about a bazillion times better.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 904/28/2012

My favorite was "Allegheny Moon" but she had many many hits. (The Singin' Rage Miss Patti Page!) Had her own TV show in the 50s.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 1004/28/2012

Didn't she perform in Carnegie Hall not too many years ago--maybe 10 or so?)

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 1104/28/2012

Was there no controversy or scandal in Miss Page's life and career? Nothing to dish? This thread will not last long.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 1204/28/2012

I greatly prefer Connie Francis to Patti Page.

Anyone else?

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 1304/28/2012

Anyone but Patti Page - big Bush suporter (not even being ironic) and wrote a song about him: "Yellow Rose of Texas"

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 1404/28/2012

R12:

Here's a comment from another version of "Tennesse Waltz," one that was done live in 1950 and also on youtube. I perfer the one at the link. It seems to answer your question.

"I know people who worked in the recording studio with Patti during her Mercury days and they describe her as "the perfect technician." She was always totally prepared and almost never made an error, even during the difficult overdubbing process. And, they said, she was always placid. Calm, no temperament, no drama. Just naturally gifted and, obviously, expecting the best of herself."

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 1504/28/2012

As pretty as she was in her youth in the 1950s, I'm surprised she didn't become a movie star in the Doris Day mold. They both had that blonde singing girl-next-door persona but only Doris was able to parlay it into a movie career.

Did Patti try and fail or was she just not interested? I only remember her in the early 1960s as one of the bitchy 3 wives (with Janet Blair and Anne Jeffreys as the rest of the trio) in the Kim Novak/James Garner romcom Boys' Night Out. I think Patti got to sing the title tune in that one.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 1604/28/2012

Patti had a brief movie career in the early 60s - besides "Boys Night Out", she was the leading lady in the movie of the "Dondi" comic strip, not to mention a good part in "Elmer Gantry", which was one of the biggest movies of 1960 - and she also had her own TV variety show for many years.

But as she herself has said, she preferred singing to acting so she didn't pursue her movie career all that much. And she was the NUMBER ONE FEMALE SINGER of the 1950s, having more #1 hit records than any other female singer, including Doris Day, Jo Stafford, Kay Starr, or Rosemary Clooney...

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 1704/28/2012

Sunny Gale did "Wheel of Fortune," then Kay Starr's cover was the hit.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 1804/28/2012

Oklahoman Patti wanted to sound like a hillbilly, which is why she sang bew-TEEE-ful Tennessee waltz.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 1904/28/2012

"Your Hit Parade" didn't refer to songs heard on a "jukebox" as part of their weekly survey . For legal reasons the announcer said "automatic coin machines."

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 2004/28/2012

r17, you forgot the incomparable Teresa Brewer in your list of top female singers of the 1950s. Hits include: Ricochet Romance, A Sweet Old-fashioned Girl, Let Me Go, Lover and Music! Music! Music!

Does anyone else here remember her or know her music? I just love her!

She's another singer that was pretty enough for a film career but didn't have one.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 2104/28/2012

Patti Page's Carnegie Hall concert was recorded. It's available from Amazon. She sings a variety of songs, not just her hits. Pretty decent album.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 2204/28/2012

Amazingly, Patti won her FIRST and ONLY Grammy Award for that Carnegie Hall concert.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 2304/28/2012

Though I realize she was hugely popular in the 1950s and maybe even early 60s, was she really respected much as a song stylist by popular music critics and peers the way Ella Fitzgerald, Rosemary Clooney, Jo Staford or even Doris Day were?

Would she ever have been described as A Singer's Singer?

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 2404/28/2012

She wasn't a jaz singer like Rosemary Clooney, Ella Fitzgerald, Peggy Lee. She was a pop singer like Doris Day. Doris Day and Patti Page both had great pop voices, but they just weren't jazz singers.

BTW Teresa Brewer did in fact make at least one movie. I once saw a still from a western in which she was singing with Guy Mitchell (another great pop singer from the 50s)>

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 2504/29/2012

Agree with R25: Ella Fitzgerald, Peggy Lee Rosemary Clooney had 40-50 year careers at the top because they could sing a wide range of songs, including jazz (although it's a stretch to call Clooney a jazz singer).

You can add Joni James, Kitty Kallen and others to the list with Patti Page. All good singers, but they were pop singers & may not have had such an intense drive for success as Fitzgerald, Clooney and Lee (and may have had happier lives).

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 2604/29/2012

Where does Connie Francis fit in all this? Didn't she inherit Patti's crown in the early 60s as America's favorite female pop singer?

As a kid, my impression was that she had been around forever but in retrospect, I imagine her top-selling popularity only spanned from about 1959 to 1962. She was long gone from the charts by the time of MOtown and The Supremes, not to mention Petula Clark and Dusty Springfield.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 2704/29/2012

Connie was a bridge between 50's pop music and 60's rock and roll. Her first big hit "Who's Sorry Now?" was a remake of a very old song that somehow sounded fresh and hip to the late 50's teenagers. It was a great slow dance song at the sock hops and weekend dances that were held in school auditoriums. She then went on to make even better records and they included some very nice rocking songs that were very easy to jitterbug to at the dances. Plus, she was liked by both kids and their parents.

Not unlike most of the late '50's and early '60's recording stars, she was torched and burnt to the ground by the Beatles in '64. They literally changed the course of music almost overnight. There was barely time for a recovery from the British invasion before Disco took over and Connie's first song, unfortunately, at her big comeback show was "I Will Survive." Not a good start, she killed it and not in a good way.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 2804/29/2012

Rosemary Clooney's career was too long. For the last decade she sounded like Walter Brennan's grandfather. The booze and 3-pack a day cigarettes ruined a gorgeous voice.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 2904/29/2012

Jill Corey and Keeley Smith were forgotten for years. Jill still is.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 3004/29/2012

Don't forget about me!!!

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 3104/29/2012

[quote]Connie was a bridge between 50's pop music and 60's rock and roll

I love you R28 You know all of that about Connie Francis and yet the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame will not even nominate her. Love you.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 3204/29/2012

Julie London is another one of those almost forgotten fifties era singers. My parents had a couple of her records (mostly, they had albums of show tunes.) I tried to listen to a couple of her songs on youtube; she favored a very, very slow tempo that's very much out of style today.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 3304/29/2012

Eydie Gorme was in there as well, starting out at ABC-Paramount Records in the late '50s. She didn't make a 'hit' until moving to Columbia with "Blame It On The Bossa Nova" in 1963.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 3404/29/2012

Conne Francis' life should be made into a movie. She was raped, divorced, committed to a mental hospital by her own father, was in mental hospitals several times, lost her singing voice, and I think there may have a suicide attempt too. Amazingly, she is still around!

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 3504/29/2012

I can still watch Eydie on youtube and enjoy her showmanship. Julie London, not so much.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 3604/29/2012

Julie London was and is one of my favorite singers. Such a sexy voice and a sexy woman too! She knew her voice wasn't loud and strong--she once said she had a "thimble-like voice." But she hits all her notes dead on, and when she sings, it's like she's singing just to you--a very intimate singer. She could sing jazz as well. Her husband was Bobby Troupe, famous musician and composer (he wrote "Route 66"). (She is great when she sings with just a bass.)

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 3704/29/2012

Georgia Gibbs, Jaye P. Morgan, Joni James, Giselle MacKenzie, Gogi Grant, Gale Storm

Toni Arden -- Vic Damone called her "The greatest girl singer in the world." Frank Sinatra called her "A singer's singer."

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 3804/29/2012

Dorothy Collins!

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 3904/29/2012

Did Dorothy Collins ever have a hit record? She got her start singing commercials for cigarettes and then became a featured singer on "Your Hit Parade."

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 4004/29/2012

Brenda Lee was something else entirely. So young and so petite and yet when she opened up that mouth to sing, she had jaws dropping. Many people were convinced that she was a 35 year old little person because no kid could sing like she did.

As much as I like her rocking records, she could belt out a tearjerker like nobody's business. Listen to "All Alone Am I" or "I Want To Be Wanted" or my favorite, "Break It To Me Gently." Yet, "Sweet Nothin's" with that great sax playing will get you to rocking.

It ain't the official Christmas season until I hear "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree" by Lil Miss Dynamite backed by the great sax of Boots Randolph.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 4104/29/2012

Peggy Lee and Rosemary Clooney lasted so long because they always had great arrangements and the best musicians around. I saw both ladies perform at Carnegie Hall (separately) very late in their respective careers.

They also had more determination and drive than all the other female singers mentioned, with the possible exception of Ella Fitzgerald.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 4204/30/2012

R40, Dorothy Collins never had a hit record in her heyday (the only "Your Hit Parade" singer to have a hit record in the 50s was Gisele Mackenzie, who had a hit with "Hard to Get" in 1956), but years later Dorothy was in the original Broadway cast of Stephen Sondheim's FOLLIES and introduced what is now a truly classic show tune, "Losing My Mind" - which in the 90s was a hit in England for Liza Minnelli and the Pet Shop Boys...

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 4304/30/2012

[quote]Conne Francis' life should be made into a movie. She was raped, divorced, committed to a mental hospital by her own father, was in mental hospitals several times, lost her singing voice, and I think there may have a suicide attempt too. Amazingly, she is still around!

In the 1980s, she used to call Cindy Adams (Only in New York, kids!) and rant and rave about how she had discovered the cure for AIDS, but the Reagan administration was blocking her access to the newspapers and the networks.

Connie wouldn't let anyone help her. Finally it was Dick Clark who talked her into going back into the mental hospital.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 4404/30/2012

.....and Patsy Cline?

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 4504/30/2012

Ella Mae Morse is an interesting case. She started out as a band singer with Freddie Slack and had a mammoth hit with "Cow-Cow Boogie" in 1941 but continued recording until well into the '50s with some of the earliest rock 'n roll singles by a white female artist. (she was widely believed to be black). But Capitol gave her mostly lousy songs so she never hit it big when should should have.

Elvis described her as his biggest influence on his singing style.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 4604/30/2012

There was a sadness and melancholy about Dorothy Collins for me, even going back to her Hit Parade days. I think she depressed people in spite of her obvious talents.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 4704/30/2012

Commercials were live in the early days of Hit Parade. They had several rehearsed in advance that were timed according to how fast or slow the show was running. One time, they needed a 90 second commercial but the band and cue card holder started the 60 second commercial. Dorothy Collins read the script and sang the Lucky Strike theme song for 60 seconds followed by Dorothy Collins standing in front of the TV camera just smiling for what must have been the longest 30 seconds of her life.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 4804/30/2012

Patsy Cline was one of a kind. She could sing anything and make it her own. Don't get me started on the little 'cry' in her voice. Amazing.

Bawdy, campy, boisterous and ready to have a good time come hell or high water. Then, she could glam it up and look absolutely smashing with long gloves and little fur stoles with glittering diamonds here, there and everywhere.

The first bunch of 45's I ever owned included "Walking After Midnight" by Patsy and I was a fan from then to this day.

I absolutely hated Jessica Lange as Patsy Cline in "Sweet Dreams" but Beverly D'Angelo playing Patsy in "Coal Miner's Daughter" fucking nailed it. What a travesty that Beverly wasn't tapped to star in the movie of Patsy's life.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 4905/01/2012

Patsy didn't like "Crazy," and hated "Walkin After Midnight."

Even the greatest of artists can use a bit of objective advice.

She credited Kay Starr (still with us!), Hank Williams, Judy Garland, and Shirley Temple, but I always thought she knew about Ronnie Gilbert also.

They were two of the first women to really belt out a popular song.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 5005/01/2012

Ronnie Gilbert as part of the Weavers has lead on the second verse of "The Banks of Marble" and is absolutely fantastic. Listen to that old song and the lyrics are more meaningful today than when it was recorded by the Weavers.

v.2 - I saw the weary miner / Scrubbing coal dust from his back / And I heard his children cryin' / Got no coal to heat the shack.

chorus - But the banks are made of marble / With a guard at every door / And the vaults are stuffed with silver / That the miner sweated for.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 5105/01/2012

R51:

Here you go, at 1:13.

I think this is from the reunion at Carnegie Hall.

I've traveled 'round this country From shore to shining shore It really made me wonder The things I heard and saw

I saw the farmer working Plowing sod and loam I heard the auction hammer Knocking down his home

The banks are made of marble With a guard at every door And the vaults are stuffed with silver That the farmer sweated for

I've seen the weary miner Scrubbing coal dust from his back I've heard his children cryin' "No coal to heat the shack."

But the banks . . .

I'd seen my brothers working Throughout this mighty land I prayed we'd get together And together make a stand

Then we might own those banks of marble With a guard at every door And we might share those vaults of silver That we have sweated for.

-- Les Rice, the composer of this song, is (was?) a New York State apple farmer and one-time president of the Ulster County chapter of the Farmers Union.

May Day -- everyone to the streets.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 5205/01/2012

Patti Page is the best pop singer of all times. She could sing any song and one felt that one was in heaven just to hear her.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 5309/11/2012

[quote]I greatly prefer Connie Francis to Patti Page.

Anyone else?

Yes, I prefer Connie Francis to LOTS of other people. Why do you ask?

Patti Page was overshadowed by her siblings (Geraldine and Satchel), but was quite a singer.

Dorothy Collins was sensational in Follies.

And Ronnie Gilbert was something of a tramp(oline).

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 5409/11/2012

Patti Page and Karen Carpenter are the best pop singers of all time.

Can you imagine Karen and Patti harmonizing on Old Cape Cod?

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 5509/11/2012

Sadly Patti Page's great fame did not last very long.

I remember seeing her perform in front of a small afternoon audience at Disneyland in 1969.

She was boxed in by big band music earlier and rock music later on, so the major part of her career was only about 10 years.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 5609/11/2012

Didn't realize this thread is still around. After reading this a few months ago, I began collecting music by most of the people mentioned here.

This afternoon I listened to Georgia Gibbs, Kay Starr, Dinah Shore, Jaye P. Morgan, Jane Morgan, June Valli, Joni James, Giselle MacKenzie, Gogi Grant, Toni Arden, Judy Holliday, Joan Weber, Ames Brothers, The Chordettes, Edith Piaf, Frank Sinatra, McGuire Sisters, Jane Froman, Vera Lynn, Helen Forrest, Andrews Sisters, Guy Mitchell, Eddie Fisher, Russ Columbo, Teresa Brewer, Julius LaRosa, Rosemary Clooney, and Caterina Valente. I play them while working on an art project with some friends. The one song that seems to get everyone's attention is "Padre" by Toni Arden. People stop talking and either sing or hum along with it.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 5709/12/2012

Patti Page, Joni James and Sunny Gale are my favorites..all are still with us but only Patti still performs on occasion

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 5809/13/2012

Connie Francis became the top selling female vocaist of all time until a few years ago. She had 56 chart hits in America alone and she is credited foe internationalizing American music. She was a phenomenon in that all generations and ethnic groups liked her. Once her chgart success , which was vast, ceased, she became the top female concert act. Her voice is very distinctive and coould handle all genre of music, and she did so. Connie was the biggest star in the world for some time. She still performs and packs them in but due to her age, she limits her performances. Her second autobiography is due out soon.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 5909/17/2012

Connie Francis is th ebest all around female pop star...handled all genre and ethnic music, all extremely competently. Loved around the world and by all generations.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 6009/17/2012

well, i never!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

we all adore Patti and Connie is ok but Patti is supreme

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 6109/25/2012

[quote]Can you imagine Karen and Patti harmonizing on Old Cape Cod?

Even though I am a huge Connie Francis fan who would like to see her at least nominated for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame before she dies...

I must admit that Patti Page and the late Karen Carpenter harmonizing on "Old Cape Cod" with Richard Carpenter far away from the recording process would have been beautiful. It would have been just downright beautiful.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 6209/25/2012

Sunny Gale was a childhood friend of Eddie Fisher in Philadelphia. "Sunny Gale Sings" was released in 2000. Anyone know where she is now?

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 6309/25/2012

What about Vikki Carr???

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 6409/25/2012

Patti Page held on to a sense of humor and down-to-earth manner. Well into "middle" age she was appearing with Forrest Tucker at the Muny in St. Louis, and she'd go out with locals, accept invitations, hang out. She was mortified by poor Tucker, who played her love interest and could barely walk. He didn't live long after that. She laughed about their dance numbers. She still sounded good.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 6509/25/2012

Connie all the way. She is nominated for the new Pop Music Hall of Fame.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 6609/25/2012

I saw Vikki Carr in Vietnam back in '65. She was part of the Danny Kaye show that was traveling around Vietnam doing shows for the guys. She was great, he sucked big, hairy, donkey balls.

I caught an old documentary on the Weavers the other night on my local PBS station and went on the net to see how many of them were still with us. Surprisingly, three of them are still alive: Pete Seeger is 93, Fred Hellerman is 85 and Ronnie Gilbert just turned 86. Ronnie came out as bisexual a while back and was married to a man for about 9 years back in the '50's. In 2004 she married her longtime partner, Donna Korones, during that brief time that gay marriage was allowed in California.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 6709/25/2012

Catarina Valente?

Dear sweet spirits, how have we forgotten her?

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 6809/25/2012

Patti sang bew-TEE-ful. The way it's mispronounced in Tennessee.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 6909/26/2012

Connie (born Concetta Franconero) was Grand Marshal of the San Gennaro Festival in New York this month.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 7009/26/2012

Connie and Eydie widened their fan base considerably singing in Italian and Spanish, respectively.

Eydie's Spanish records sold better than her English albums.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 7109/26/2012

[quote]She was part of the Danny Kaye show that was traveling around Vietnam doing shows for the guys. She was great, he sucked big, hairy, donkey balls.

More details, please!

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 7209/26/2012

My favorite Patti hit tune is Butterflies. It is just never played on the radio in this century but I listen to it on my CD player often. I also just love her My Jealous Eyes and her versions of You Belong to Me and Why Don't You Believe Me are A+ and went gold in the 50s.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 7310/03/2012

A few black female artists had huge hits in the early fifties. Savannah Churchill had one with "Sin". Great verion eclipsed by Eddy Howard, (#1 bestseller) and The Four Aces. Eartha Kitt made The Top 10 with "C'est Si Bon" and "Santa Baby". Sarah Vaughan hit it big with "Whatever Lola Wants" and "Broken Hearted Melody". Besides those mentioned in other posts, several others came to mind: Vera Lynn. "Auf Wiederseh'n Sweetheart" hit #1.

Margaret Whiting was huge in the '40s. But in 1950, she hit again, teaming with Frank deVol, for "I Said My Pajamas".

Others who teamed with a male singer for hit records, were: Debbie Reynolds, (with Carleton Carpenter, for "Aba Daba Honeymoon); Betty Hutton, (w/ Perry Como, for "A Bushel and a Peck", Ethel Merman, (w/ Ray Bolger, for "Dearie" and "I Said My Pajamas") There were others, but here's just a sample.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 7410/03/2012

Ms. Page, herself, told this story on radio during an interview. In late 1952, her "I Went to Your Wedding" was spending week after week as the #1 pop record. She said an officer told her the following. He and others were due to bomb a target in Korea, and as they neared the target base, her song was announced as the next one to be played. The pilot signaled for the others to circle the target, (while the record was playing), and after it finished, they dropped the bombs. She said it before the times arrived when what she revealed could be used for listeners with agendas.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 7510/03/2012

Patti Page revealed that Ella Fitzgerald gave her a great compliment about her singing abilities. She cherished this, because many consider Ella to be the greatest.

Here's an interesting anecdote about the record now ensconced in The Grammy Hall of Fame. Seems as how Mercury Records had Patti record "Boogie Woogie Santa Claus" for the 1950 christmas market, anticipating a sure-fire hit. But they needed a "B" side. After a wide search, they settled on covering an old country hit: "Tennessee Waltz". For decades it was the second bestselling pop recording in history, behind Crosby's "White Christmas".

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 7610/03/2012

Re: Teresa Brewer. She had the opportunity to star in movies, but she preferred to raise a family. She had huge admirers in jazz. Duke Ellington was one. Later, she recorded with some jazz giants, like Count Basie, Stefanie Grappelli, etc!

Note: After Billboard started publishing its year-end annual list of The Bestselling Popular Records of a particular year, the first female to have the Bestselling Record (in 1954) of The Year, was Kitty Kallen, for "Little Things Mean a Lot". Prior to that, Peggy Lee, "Manana" came close in 1948, and Kay Starr, "Wheel of Fortune" did the same in 1952.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 7710/04/2012

I like Patti, but Connie will always be my Diva, followed by Petula Clark, then Dusty Springfield

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 7810/04/2012

Went to see the new flick The Master and the film ends with Helen Forrest singing one of Patti's major hits from the 50s: Changing Partners..i just almost fainted from pure joy but would have rathered have heard Patti's golden version..

Gene

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 7910/26/2012

[quote]Others who teamed with a male singer for hit records, were: Debbie Reynolds, (with Carleton Carpenter, for "Aba Daba Honeymoon);

Debbie Reynolds also teamed with Eddie Fisher on "A Man Chases A Girl - Until She Catches Him." Don't know if that was before or during their marriage.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 8010/26/2012

Patti Page had a two siided hit on Mercury Records with Vic Damone when i was a kid and Debbie and the late E Fisher were married when they recorded the ditty way back when.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 8110/27/2012

Didn't Connie Stevens have a huge hit with Edd "Kookie" Byrnes singing:" Kookie, Kookie, Lend Me Your Comb?"

Or was he not even singing on the recording? I remember vaguely seeing them do the number on TV.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 8210/27/2012

yes, indeed and you can watch them both on youtube wtih Dick Clark EB was so cute at the time and Connie so slim Kookie, Kookie

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 8311/01/2012

R65 here. Apologies - it was Janis Paige who appeared with Forrest Tucker. Stupid me.

But poor old Patti no longer fits the title of the thread. She died yesterday (as the "official" "Patti Page Is Dead" thread discusses).

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 8401/02/2013

To Heaven: Patti, we all miss you but we have our(yours) CDs: thank goodness

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 8503/07/2013

i still listen to every day and miss THE SINGING RAGE

One of her many millions of fans: 50s reign supreme

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 8609/24/2013

I explored her songbook when she died and was shocked at the low key nature of her recordings and singing style. I had presumed singing rage to be a testament to her being a pioneer in angry singing, kind of like a Pat Benatar but from the '50s. So, if you're looking for that type of performance you'll be disappointed in the songs of Patti Page. Still it would be a hoot to hear Benatar lay her style of screaming to ditties about doggies and lobster stew.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 8709/24/2013

About a dozen years ago, Patti Page won a Grammy for her live at Carnegie Hall album...richly deserves because she sang a wide range of songs, not just her hits from the 1950s.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 8809/24/2013

patti, you are so missed

we still hear you on the radio and cds

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 8911/16/2013

r87 Rage as in wildly popular,not tempestuous or dangerous. Patti was everywhere in the 50's. People loved her music, her style, her looks,and her personality. She had a "big sister" quality that appealed to a lot of folks, she just seemed like a real nice girl. "Tennessee Waltz" was probably her finest and biggest singing accomplishment.

by drinking wine and starting threadsreply 9011/16/2013
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