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I just saw the film of the "The Hunger Games" and I have more questions than answers!

Perhaps some of you who read the books could help me, since I have yet to read them.

Questions inside.

by Anonymousreply 5101/27/2013

1.tWhat was the deal with Peter and Katniss and the bread? Why did she shy away from Peter at first since he had given her bread? Why did she need bread anyway, since it seemed like she was feeding her family with squirrels she killed? Why did his mom get so mad about him giving the bread to her?

2.tMost of the people in the capitol had that pastel-colored gender-bending makeup and hairdye and matching clothes, except for Woody Harrelson, Lenny Kravitz , Wes Bentley, Donald Sutherland. Donald Sutherland and Wes Bentley were two of the most evil characters, but Woody and Lenny were the two nicest people in the capitol. What was up with that?

3.tAre there any other cities in the dystopian future America, or just the capitol? Are there other countries still around besides the country that’s displaced America?

4.tWhy could Woody Harrelson send little floating packages to Katniss, but only sometimes? There was talk of people getting sponsors, and she seemed to be very popular, but no one else sent her little packages.

5.tWhat if you just refuse to be in the Hunger Games if your name is chosen? You seem to have so little chance of winning you might as well just lie down and be killed rather than have to die anyway and kill other innocents. Can’t people just kill themselves on the first day? I would think the younger ones would do just that—I can’t imagine why anyone would think they had a chance if they were 12 and chosen, and you’d risk dying by being eaten by the giant ugly dogs. Why not just eat the poison berries instead?

6.tHow did the people planning the games create fire and those giant evil ugly dogs out of nothing? Was the place where they fought like the holodeck, except it can kill you? If so, can’t they make enough food in those things to fill all the starving people?

by Anonymousreply 103/30/2012

1) HE gave Katniss burned bread to keep her family alive when they were about to starve to death. Shortly thereafter spring came and Katniss was able to find flowers, roots and other things to keep them alive. Her taking Peeta's bread was her lowest point in trying to provide for her family.

2) In the books Haymitch (Woody) was a drunken mess. This is downplayed in the movie. The rest are all capital dwellers who have a more luxe look on life.

3) we don't hear about other countries, just the 12 districts of Panem which are the remnants of the US.

4) she gets bread from district 11 after Rue's death. Haymitch until then only gives her sponsor gifts that lead her to go further in the games (see Catching Fire for more on this)

5) It[s been 74 years of this practice. If your name is called you go. The uprisings in the districts against the Capitol have not happened yet but do in the second book.

6) It's all about competition. The games makers only make things harder for the competitors, not easier. They're supposed to make for good tv and sometimes contestants beat what they do. Rarely, but Katniss does.

Not meaning to spoil but Seneca's game playing is trumped by Katniss and he pays the price.

by Anonymousreply 203/30/2012

+++

by Anonymousreply 303/30/2012

I would hope anyone who opened the thread should realize there are spoilers for the film in here.

by Anonymousreply 403/30/2012

[quote]How did the people planning the games create fire and those giant evil ugly dogs out of nothing? Was the place where they fought like the holodeck, except it can kill you? If so, can’t they make enough food in those things to fill all the starving people?

No, it is not a holodeck.

The technology of the game arenas is never explained. In the book, the dogs are actually the reanimated and mutated corpses of all the kids who have died.

The 12 districts are basically slave labour for the Capital... they're still being punished for the uprising decades ago. Feeding the slaves is not a priority.

by Anonymousreply 503/30/2012

I can't begin to tell you how much you missed by just seeing the movie. I was really disappointed. The book is a good, easy read. You should read it.

1a. Actually his name is Peeta, and since he's from a bread family, I like to think that's why he's named that. Like pita bread. In the book, he burnt a loaf because he saw she was desperately starving and felt sorry for her. He got yelled at by his mom, and was expected to throw it to the pigs, but instead threw it to her. His mom doesn't really know he gave the bread to Katniss - but food is scarce and that's why she was mad he ruined a loaf. Even though he's in the baker's family, Peeta's family only ever eats stale bread that can't be sold.

1b. She's awkward socially and didn't have friends, except for Gale. Her main function in life is to provide for her family's survival since her dad died and mother had a nervous breakdown. It is her single-minded life purpose. Even being an excellent hunter, her family is still on the brink of starvation. I wish they had put the nice meal in the Capitol in the movie, while she thought out all the days of hunting, foraging, and bartering she would have to do to recreate such a meal. Food was in desperately low quantities. So low, in fact, that she and Gale entered their names several extra times in the drawing each year so they could get extra allotments of grain.

Starvation is such a large premise in the book, I was really dismayed at the casting choices. Katniss would have had sharp, intense eyes, had not a bit of extra meat on her gaunt body, and probably look Native American. The full-faced, soft-eyed, big-butted movie version was a damn shame.

2. The look of the Capitolians was merely to contrast what poverty the twelve districts lived under. The Capitol lives on the backs of the people in the districts. Their extravagance is only possible through the dire circumstances the enslaved districts live under every day. Woody lives in Katniss's district. He is a representative, since he won a game one year. He is NOT from the Capitol. He still cares about hi district. Cinna? He's from the Capitol, but somehow has compassion, unlike anyone else. the book never explained why. Did you notice how the names of Capitolians mirror names from another time and place in history? The story is a device to re-tell history.

3. We only know of Panem. There is the Capitol, and there were 13 districts, but Dist 13 was obliterated when they formed an uprising. The Hunger Games were set up as a reminder that noone should revolt or they will be killed. The yearly sacrificial annual death of two children per district is a cold reminder of the Capitol's cruelty and willingness to take down anyone who stands in its way. This is how they keep their slaves in line: fear of death.

4. Packages are exorbitant in cost, particularly as the game goes on. Impoverished districts pool $ to send a packages. One has to show both promise of winning and be entertaining in order for Woody Harrelson to be able to convince them. Gifts are a big deal. His job was to arrange sponsors - he's the broker.

5. If you refuse, your district will be made to suffer. Also, noone wants to die when push comes to shove. You should read the book and see what the dogs REALLY were - I was traunatized.

6. Capitol only exists in excess on the backs of 12 districts. One doesn't exist without the other. The extravagance at the top is equally proportionate to the destitution experienced by the rest. Hierarchy. They don't WANT them to rise up, so they keep them hungry and impoverished slaves.

by Anonymousreply 603/30/2012

[quote]1. What was the deal with Peter and Katniss and the bread? Why did she shy away from Peter at first since he had given her bread? Why did she need bread anyway, since it seemed like she was feeding her family with squirrels she killed? Why did his mom get so mad about him giving the bread to her?

The scene was a flashback to times where Katniss was still too young to hunt and provide for her family. Afterwards she was just too embarassed to talk to Peeta and he didn't make any move towards her. His mom had maybe two reason to be furious with Peeta giving the bread to her. First was that he wasted bread that was supposed to be sold and second Peeta's father had a crush on Katniss' mom (back then when they were young) who chose a miner over him.

[quote]4. Why could Woody Harrelson send little floating packages to Katniss, but only sometimes? There was talk of people getting sponsors, and she seemed to be very popular, but no one else sent her little packages.

In the books Katniss realizes early on in the Games that her mentor communicates to her by the timing and what the packages include.

[quote]6. How did the people planning the games create fire and those giant evil ugly dogs out of nothing? If so, can’t they make enough food in those things to fill all the starving people?

Capital City's main (and only?) industry is to prepare and execute (including the PR media coverage) the Hunger Games while the city relies on the other districts to provide anything else. Scientist are well prepared to come up and invent new horrible things to keep the Games exiting and surprising for both the players and the audience.

[quote]If so, can’t they make enough food in those things to fill all the starving people?

It's called The Hunger Games and not The Well Fed Battle Games.

by Anonymousreply 703/30/2012

The dogs aren't actually reanimated Tributes, they're muttations created to resemble dead Tributes, in order to mind fuck with the still living Tributes. It's the same trick they use with the screaming birds in the Quarter Quell.

Btw Haymitch (Woody) isn't from the Capitol, he's from District 12. He's a previous winner who travels to the Capitol with them to mentor them. Cinna is the only one from the Capitol who doesn't go in for all that elaborate body manipulation stuff and I guess it's just to show his personality (also, he probably directs that into his fashion design, rather than designing his own body).

by Anonymousreply 803/30/2012

I agree, R9. I'm all about ending emaciation on screen, but in this one particular movie, it was really called for. I was so turned off by her healthy, full look. That is NOT how Katniss looks.

by Anonymousreply 1003/31/2012

First of all, I agree with a few others, you really should read the books, they are amazing. I did love the movie and think over all they did a good job, but it isn't nearly as good as the book.

1. Peeta gave the bread to Katniss because she was literally near the brink of starving to death. Her dad had just died, she hadn't figured out about hunting yet, and she was weeks from being old enough to sign up for the extra rations of grain and oil in exchange for having her name entered in the reaping more times. His mom likely got mad because that bread was meant to be sold, so him burning it cost his parents money, and while they had more money than some others in district 12, such as Katniss and Gale's family, they weren't exactly well off.

2. The people in the Capitol dress in extravagant styles and adorn their bodies in very outlandish ways. Sceneca Crane, played by Wes Bentley, was more reserved in how he dressed, but his beard showed a bit of the Capitol's extravagant style. President Snow, played by Donald Southerland, is very evil and controlling but is "above" the ever changing fashions of the Capitol. Fashion isn't his main concern. Cinna, played by Lenny Kravitz, was also much more uniformed in his appearance, though the hint of gold eye liner was his small reflections of the Capitol styles. His kindness, despite living in the Capitol, is never fully explained. It is explained in the book though that this is his first year as a stylist for the games and he requested District 12, which is considered the worst District to have. Haymitch, played by Woody Harrelson, is not from the Capitol at all but is a past winner of the Hunger Games that still lives in District 12 and acts as a mentor to the District 12 tributes each year.

3. Panem, which is the country that rose up after the destruction of North America, is made up of the Capitol and 12 outlying districts. The Capitol controls everything that goes on in Panem. The 12 districts really only serve to supply the Capitol with what it needs. There are no other known countries still in existence around the world other than Panem.

4. He was the mentor, which means he convinces people to become sponsers and arranges the delivery of any gifts. So the packages she got could have come from several different sponsors, but still would have been delivered by Haymitch.

5. Refusing to be in the Hunger Games would only in turn hurt those you have left behind, such as your family and friends. The Capitol, and President Snow, in particular, will stop at nothing to punish and torture anyone who does not go along with their agenda. Once you are in the arena, there is nothing stopping you from doing something to get yourself killed, except for the survivor instinct we all have within us. Add to that the fact that in some cases, such as Katniss', your death will greatly hurt your family and likely endanger them, where as, if you live they are promised an easier life.

6. There really is no explanation of how they are able to create the dogs, which are actually called Muttations, or how they are able to shoot the fire at will, except for the fact that this is in the very far future and the technology that they have is far advanced from what we have now. As far as them being able to make enough food, sure they could, however one of the ways they keep the districts "in line" is controlling their access to food and other amenities.

As far as the other posters above who mentioned Jennifer Lawerence's full face, etc. distracting them from the movie. I am sorry if you were disappointed, but I personally would rather have an actress that portrays a character perfectly than one who looks the part but destroys the character with bad acting. That to me would be a far worse distraction. Jennifer Lawerence's portrayal of Katniss was utter perfection!

by Anonymousreply 1104/03/2012

yes op, she really is that fat...

by Anonymousreply 1204/03/2012

Why was the little black girl killed? She wasn't even wearing a hoodie...

by Anonymousreply 1304/03/2012

I know it's wrong, but I found R13 really funny.

by Anonymousreply 1404/03/2012

I enjoyed the movie but I didn't quite understand the transition from Peetah helping the alliance against Katniss (was this a ruse in which he was trying to throw the others off by convincing them he was on their side against Katniss?) and his helping Katniss. While I generally found the narrative clear (although I haven't read the book) I found this to be a bit muddled.

by Anonymousreply 1504/03/2012

His inner intent was not to help the alliance. It was a means to an end - he used it to negotiate for his own life when they found him, but secretly knew he'd help Katniss if possible. And then he did, when she was stung by tracker jackers. that's when the alliance broke and he had to escape because then they were going to kill him.

In the book, he had been laying under the mud for quite some time, with a badly infected leg that would have killed him within a couple days of when Katniss found him, had it not been for the medicine. The leg was injured by his allied group. They were a bunch of vicious kids from the stronger districts that trained all year for the Games. Hiding in the mud bought him time, because his leg was not good enough to allow him to walk.

by Anonymousreply 1604/03/2012

Minor observation: I agree with you guys pointing out that the starvation element was missing when Katniss starts out in her home district but I vaguely remember a point being made in the book that during the two weeks of training before the Games she had fattened up. That was mainly because she had never had such an excess of food but it was also because she needed to be more healthy before the Games started.

by Anonymousreply 1704/03/2012

The makeup,hair styles and costumes looked like somethng out of HR Puffinstuff...

I didn't understand Elizabeth Banks character at all.. Why was she cast when Judi Dench was born for the role?

by Anonymousreply 1804/03/2012

You must not have seen the film whenever there is a killing it is shot in a way you can't tell what is going on...

by Anonymousreply 2004/03/2012

r18, when I read the book(s) I imagined Jennifer Coolidge doing her squinty eyes thin lipped facial expressions while wearing some tacky clothes and make up as Effie Trinket.

Finnick who's introduced in book two I imagined to look like Kris Holden-Ried and President Coin from book three looked like Vanessa Redgrave.

by Anonymousreply 2104/03/2012

I haven't seen the movie but wondered why they created a role of Seneca Crane - when he's only referred to in passing in the second book.

I'm just in the beginning of Mockingjay now.

by Anonymousreply 2204/03/2012

The movie was boring and poorly directed.

by Anonymousreply 2304/03/2012

It was mentioned by someone in another thread but I can only see Linda Hunt as Coin.

by Anonymousreply 2404/03/2012

Panem is never said to be solely the US- it says the ruins of North America. I assumed Canada was now part of Panem.

by Anonymousreply 2504/03/2012

r24. I believe there are a lot of readers who have their own ideas how the characters look like. They will most likely be disappointed when someone else gets cast.

by Anonymousreply 2604/03/2012

Redgrave and Hunt would have been great as Coin about twenty years ago...I think Jamie Lee Curtis or someone of that ilk. It would be a good role for Jane Lynch to show her dramatic chops in as well.

by Anonymousreply 2704/03/2012

That was me, R24! Unless others can also see Hunt as Coin.

by Anonymousreply 2804/03/2012

I see Coin played by Tabitha.

by Anonymousreply 2904/03/2012

This movie was so good, OMG!

by Anonymousreply 3004/03/2012

The society depicted in "The Hunger Games" is what the Republicans would consider Utopia.

by Anonymousreply 3104/03/2012

r31. Word.

by Anonymousreply 3204/03/2012

Katniss isn't supposed to be starving apart from during part of the Games. The book opens with her and Gale sneaking out to enjoy a "feast" of fruit, cheese and fresh bread, before embarking on a very successful hunting and foraging expedition, part of which they sell or swap for other foods. There are many references to their food and Katniss being a successful hunter - coming back with large quantities of game, dozens of fish, gallons of strawberries, etc. That is done intentionally to show that Katniss is a rebel and a survivor even before she enters the Arena - that she's able to feed her family and have enough left over to sell, in a district where people starve. They don't have tons of food or very nice or varied food, and she mentions that even with her hunting they sometimes go to bed hungry, but there's no indication she's supposed to be anywhere near starvation point. It's unlikely she would be as successful a hunter and warrior as she is if she was emaciated.

Anyway the book opens on Reaping Day and she leaves for the Capitol only a few hours later, where she spends two weeks stuffing herself silly with all kinds of very rich, fatty foods. In order to be properly realistic JL would have had to change her weight/body several times -- to be slim/athletic for the opening scene and D12 flashbacks; emaciated for the parts in the Games where she's starving; and plumper for the two weeks she spends pigging out. That would not be healthy or practical.

by Anonymousreply 3304/03/2012

Does anyone think that Peter (Josh Hutcherson) looks so much better as a blonde?. The blonde hair softens his looks.

by Anonymousreply 3404/03/2012

Really people, the "Hunger" of the "The Hunger Games" does not just refer to a shortage of food. I give people who have only seen the film a pass on this, but it amazes me that fans of the books never really discuss its deeper symbolism.

Katnis, the people who support her and are later inspired by her example to rise up against the Capital, hunger for justice, for self-determination, and for the freedom to live and love without fear.

Katnis' success as a hunter isn't just about feeding her family. The sector she lives in is a barren landscape devoted to mining the coal that fuels the energy needs of the Capital and the other sectors. Whenever she sneaks past the fence surrounding her sector she enters a flourishing wilderness with an abundance of food for both the body and the soul.

The whole economic set up, with the Capitol living off the backs of the other sectors... welcome to America's relationship to the rest of the world since the end of WWII...welcome to the 1%...welcome to the grievances that lead to movements like the Arab Spring.

It's a shame these books are billed as Young Adult and marketed towards teenage girls. They should have a much broader audience. And for those who lament the casting choice for Katnis in the film -a hot chick is the only way most of the hetero-male audience will agree to see a "chick-flick".

by Anonymousreply 3504/06/2012

I liked the movie. With a few exceptions, they did a good job of portraying the book.

by Anonymousreply 3604/06/2012

No interest in this sh*t film

by Anonymousreply 3704/06/2012

I want a three-way with Peeta and Gail (the boyfriend back home)... damn that girl was a lucky bitch!

by Anonymousreply 3804/11/2012

Finally saw this and thought it totally sucked balls. Firstly, I never believed Katniss was in any real peril since I knew there were three more films on the way. Also whenever she was threatened by another Tribute they got non-threatening, non-sensical verbal diarrhoea which was a sure tip off that something lame would interfere and Katniss would survive.

The only thing of interest - how would she reconcile killing the little black girl, how would she kill Peeta - were conveniently reconciled with lame plot devices like somebody else killing the LBG and a little announcement made about pairs from the same district. Lame!

Mostly I was disappointed in the character of Katniss. I thought she would be like Ellen Ripley. Instead she was just a character who was protected by lame developments in the plot; when faced with anything challenging the lame plot devices conspired to protect her from having to take action at all. She was just completely passive.

I agree the most disturbing element of this franchise is that its being made for 12 year-olds and in such a way to lessen the impact of the violence on the audience. That it rips off Orwell, Shirley Jackson, Logan's Run, Battle Royale, Romeo & Juliet and just about every other pop cultural thing going makes it even more LAME.

At least when I saw Twilight I could understand its appeal to teenage girls. This, I don't get at all.

Jennifer Lawrence was better in Winter's Bone and Woody Harrelson looked slightly embarassed to appear in this. I did like Lennie Kravitz though.

by Anonymousreply 3909/16/2012

I loved Jennifer Lawrence in the role. She is also cute.

by Anonymousreply 4009/17/2012

r39: Along with many other parts of our culture, we've seen the disappearance of many archetypes and myths that previous generations had in common, appreciated, and learned from.

The Hunger Games seems to be the writer's reaction to this and to a lot of what else that has been going on.

by Anonymousreply 4109/17/2012

man you should read the book;then you will have no more questions.By the way his name is Peeta not Peter

by Anonymousreply 4209/30/2012

I thought this was the most shockingly homophobic movie I ever saw.

And what was the point? None!

Hideous!

by Anonymousreply 4301/26/2013

Are you a 14-year old girl, OP?

by Anonymousreply 4401/26/2013

How was this film homophobic?

by Anonymousreply 4501/27/2013

[quote]In the book, he had been laying under the mud for quite some time, with a badly infected leg that would have killed him within a couple days of when Katniss found him, had it not been for the medicine. The leg was injured by his allied group. They were a bunch of vicious kids from the stronger districts that trained all year for the Games. Hiding in the mud bought him time, because his leg was not good enough to allow him to walk.

In the book, Peeta was covered in the mud for several days. Camouflaged, so the others couldn't find him.

by Anonymousreply 4601/27/2013

Jennifer Lawrence lost 20 pounds for the role, how can you say she was fat? Totally ludicrous.

by Anonymousreply 4701/27/2013

The heroine Katniss (um, what’s up with that name?) lives in a poverty stricken, mountainous American rural mining town – it’s obviously meant to represent Appalachia. The people who live in that town appear to be predominantly God-fearing white country folk. If they lived in present day America they would be members of the extreme Christian right. But alas, Katniss must desert this tough yet wholesome country life and travel to a big city that somewhat resembles the Emerald City of Oz, except everyone who lives there appears to be homosexual, or at least ‘homosexualized’. The men are all effeminate and wearing make up and bizarre dandyish outfits, and the women appear to be men in drag. This is no accident. The romanticization of Christian, wholesome country life and the demonization of amoral corrupt city life (i.e. Sodom and Gomorrah) is promulgated daily by the Christian right. Born-agains believe that evil people (i.e. desiring women of all ilks and homosexuals) are created by cities. This message is masterfully concealed in The Hunger Games by the notion that the city folk in the movie are merely a symbol of dystopian ‘decadence.’ Well they are, but if they were decadent macho men and their feminine wives, being decadent with their decadent families, it would present a very different picture than the image of queer party people as a God-loving heterosexual’s nightmare. Okay, I recognize that the movie contains no crosses, and no mention of the word God, or Christianity. But the images speak to a Christian worldview. True, using homosexuality as a stand-in for decadence is a time worn tradition. After all, it makes sense. (Queers can’t make children and contribute to the ‘future’ unless they do something unqueer – copulate with the opposite sex -- in real life, a test tube, or in mommy’s belly). And on the bright side, I’m sure this movie gave tons of work to unemployed gay actors who were more than grateful to portray the depraved cityfolk -- unless of course the director (as is so often the case) thought homosexual urbanites were best played by heterosexual actors stretching their ‘instruments.’ If what I’m saying about the film seems crazy to you, then it may be that the idea of the effeminate male as queer, decadent undesirable/impotent figure of fun is so incredibly entrenched in our culture these days (especially with the rise of the gay male TV designer fag) that we don’t even notice it.

by Anonymousreply 4801/27/2013

I remember reading that the author developed the concept for the novels watching coverage of the Iraq war (i.e. Jessica Lynch and her wiped out unit of poor young people going to an oil war to try to be able to get a basic college education) and the excesses of the bush administration.

I think she captured the zeitgeist rather well.

by Anonymousreply 4901/27/2013

The books were okay and the movie was terrible.

by Anonymousreply 5001/27/2013

[quote]I remember reading that the author developed the concept for the novels watching coverage of the Iraq war (i.e. Jessica Lynch and her wiped out unit of poor young people going to an oil war to try to be able to get a basic college education) and the excesses of the bush administration.

I think she captured the zeitgeist rather well.

Ahem. Think she got the concept from reading this book. I think she borrowed the zeitgeist rather well.

by Anonymousreply 5101/27/2013
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