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Looking for Mr. Goodbar

I just saw it again, over a decade after my last viewing. What a brutal piece of work it is.

For those of you who were around when it was released, what did people think was the film's message? Was Theresa considered a wanton woman who brought it all on herself? Or was she a liberated heroine? This movie makes for a good litmus test of values and politics, I guess.

FWIW, I thought Theresa was cool and tough the first time I saw the film, when I was in my twenties. I still see her that way, but her self-destructive tendencies are more evident to me now.

by Anonymousreply 26909/07/2013

Op, did you know it was based on a true story?

by Anonymousreply 103/11/2012

Here's the true story of Roseann Quinn. The most shocking thing about this story is that once upon a time, a public schoolteacher could afford to live alone in a doorman building on the UWS.

by Anonymousreply 203/11/2012

Why didn't this movie ever get released on DVD?

by Anonymousreply 303/11/2012

I learned that when reading about the film tonight, R1. Scary story.

by Anonymousreply 403/11/2012

...should have added, it's not clear to me whether the gay angle in the film was also based on fact. What I've read doesn't suggest so.

by Anonymousreply 503/11/2012

I saw it during its initial release.

It seemed like a heavy-handed, sex-phobic Message For Today.

The highlight was Richard Gere's ass.

by Anonymousreply 603/11/2012

R3...something to do with the music License rights.

by Anonymousreply 703/11/2012

[quote]I saw it on TV a few years ago. Very edgy and 'hip' back in the day but it just looks horribly old-fashioned and dated now.

Here we go again - another "It looks dated now" queen.

In case you didn't know, with the exception of maybe a few animated films, ALL movies look dated at some point because they all take place at a certain time.

by Anonymousreply 903/11/2012

The book was supposed to be about a deeply depressed self-hating woman who was basically trying to kill herself by putting herself in dangerous situations.

The author, Judith Rossner, hated the movie because they made the character seem happy (her words---debatable in my view.) The book got a lot of flack for being against female sexuality so Richard Brooks the writer/director of the film made it what he thought was more feministic(is that a word!?) by adding an element of sexual freedom and liberation to it. Some critics and Rossner said he was an old man who didn't really understand the point of the story.

I think the movie still holds up though if at times the lead characters motives are a bit muddled. Keaton was really at her best here and brought a sympathetic complexity to the role. Some of her line readings give my goosebumps..."to all the lonely people on Christmas Eve" "Scoliosis papa!" Great acting.

and Tom Berennger was chilling.

by Anonymousreply 1003/11/2012

I had the soundtrack on 8-Track tape, it had many great songs...including Donna Summer and Diana Ross.

by Anonymousreply 1203/11/2012

The movie was criticized for not adequately bringing forth the lead character's self-loathing. She'd been confined to bed for a year as an adolescent, she'd been lonely, she was unable to maintain school friendships because of her long absence from school. She kind of took on the persona of a "crippled" person.

I had the same problem she had (scoliosis), but was never told by my parents. The school nurse told them I had it and could get surgery to correct it, but I would be bedridden for a long time. Since both my parents worked, they said no. No surgery, because nobody could stay home with me during the day.

I would tell my mother that my foot turned in and she would say, "Well, turn it out!"

I'd tell her my friends were teasing me because one of my shoulders was much higher than the other and she'd say, "So pull it down. Or pull the other one up!"

I'm a chronic pain patient now.

by Anonymousreply 1303/11/2012

I'm sorry, r13...hope you're okay.

by Anonymousreply 1403/11/2012

I'm a dyke R9, but thanks anyway.

Not all old movies (eg The Godfather)look dated, BTW. The mark of a really great old movie is that the fashions and so on look interesting and stylish, rather than cheesy.

by Anonymousreply 1503/11/2012

Your argument doesn't hold water, r15.

"The Godfather" was a movie that took place in the 40's, but was made in the 70's. The filmmakers had historical perspective on their side and specific choices were made (in costumes, sets, etc) to properly evoke that time, hence the sense of timelessness.

Something like "Goodbar" is a film made during the specific moment in time being portrayed. It was made to speak to that particular generation's mood/zeitgeist. It was very much of the moment. So, in that respect, it is dated, but in a really wonderful way. It's a perfect time capsule of what it was like to be alive in New York at that very moment. It preserves in living, moving color the city and it's peoples and captures their emotional lives as well.

What makes a movie timeless is how universally it captures a theme or emotion that speaks to audiences in any time period. Something like "Sixteen Candles" (the only example I can think of right now) is incredibly dated in terms of it's costumes, etc., but it remains popular today not because of that, but because it captures what it's like to be young and experiencing love for the first time. The characters are archetypes that are recognizable to all generations.

Class dismissed.

by Anonymousreply 1603/11/2012

That's a shame R13. I have scoliosis too and it didn't bother me until I was about 40. Now if I stand for too many hours in the day I have back pain and sometimes sciatic nerve problems.

by Anonymousreply 1703/11/2012

oooo r18 aren't you edgy

by Anonymousreply 1903/11/2012

Recorded this movie on vhs. I have a weird morbid fascination with it and have watched it quite a few times. I remember watching it as a kid too and when teresa is killed at the end it was devastating. I can relate to her character and her search for any quick fix whether it be drugs or men and living for the moment. Not like that now but have been. Really dark movie but entertaining as hell and cast is excellent. Tuesday weld as her flighty neurotic sister, richard gere as the italian lowlife whom she fucks and then blackmails her. Really captured the 70s zeitgeist. Diane keaton is wonderful in a really tricky and provocative role. She could have won oscar for this but won for annie hall.

by Anonymousreply 2103/11/2012

The story is interesting/sad but the book is dated (in its attitudes) - maybe even more than the film.

by Anonymousreply 2203/11/2012

sorry to hear what you had been through/are going through, R13 - your post was interesting

by Anonymousreply 2303/11/2012

[quote]What makes a movie timeless is how universally it captures a theme

Even that will look dated if the film is shot or edited in a style that was popular during a short time period. [italic]The Maltese Falcon[/italic] does not look dated; [italic]To Live and Die in L.A.[/italic] looks very dated. The key is whether the filmmakers avoided being trendy in choice of technique.

by Anonymousreply 2403/11/2012

good point, R24

by Anonymousreply 2503/11/2012

I just watched the opening credits and noticed a song by Marlena Shaw. Does DL have any opinions on this singer?

by Anonymousreply 2603/11/2012

I considered it a sex-negative, disco-negative puritanical piece of crap. The book was much better and fairer to Theresa. She was just a young woman who worked hard and wanted to have fun and screw around in her spare time.

by Anonymousreply 2703/11/2012

r20 = rush limbaugh

by Anonymousreply 2803/11/2012

I remember my mother had the hardcover version checked out from the public library. Can't imagine what she was doing with it - she was so conservative and Catholic. One of her friends must've recommended but I don't she finished it.

I remember the book cover was a woman's body covered by a sheet except for her arm's that flailed above her head - in death or ecstasy, I guess.

by Anonymousreply 2903/11/2012

Movies do not "look dated" if one grasps the simple concept of "suspension of disbelief."

It is juvenile to gripe, or even note, that "Hey! That guy is using a pay phone! Why doesn't he have an i-Phone?!" Or "Hey! That car sure looks weird with tail fins!" Or "Hey! I don't care if it's called 'Quadruple Indemnity'! It's in black and white!"

by Anonymousreply 3003/11/2012

There was (is? I don't eat candy anymore) a candy bar called Mr. Goodbar. Was it named after the movie? It seems an odd thing to name a candy bar.

by Anonymousreply 3103/11/2012

I imagine that the poster's criticism of the film "looking dated" goes beyond whether or not the characters are using pay phones or wearing period clothing, r30. I imagine she means that even the techniques of film-making, story-telling, character-creation, its themes and odd morality etc seem dated.

The film looks dated. Junk culture and kitsch just date more quickly than art. That's all.

by Anonymousreply 3203/11/2012

I had a friend I went to school with that came out in the 70's moved to NYC and was murdered by some trick...it was all very Goodbar-ish...

Horrible..

by Anonymousreply 3303/11/2012

[quote] There was (is? I don't eat candy anymore) a candy bar called Mr. Goodbar. Was it named after the movie?

Yes. There was a big merchandising campaign for the movie, which included not only a candy bar but also action figures (featuring all of Theresa's one night stands), collectible glasses sold at McDonald's, and a Parker Brothers board game.

Seriously, though, the Mr. Goodbar candy bar was introduced in 1925, long before the movie.

by Anonymousreply 3403/11/2012

I remember that, R34. I had the Hershey's Mr. Goodbar branded back brace. It was a limited offer tied-in through Burger King when you bought a whopper and a Mr. Goodbar shake. I think it was a $1.49 extra.

by Anonymousreply 3503/11/2012

The most disturbing part is the end, where she has an orgasm after being stabbed--her death wish was finally realized.

by Anonymousreply 3603/11/2012

Mr. Goodbars are yummy but my favorite is the Krackel!

Why can't I buy a full sized Krakel bar? I can only ever find them in that miniatures pack. Where I'm forced to pick out and throw away those vile Hershey's Special Dark minis. Yuck!

I can easily find a full sized competing Nestlé Crunch bar but those bars are too sweet and gag me, too.

by Anonymousreply 3703/11/2012

Bruce Willis was a bartender in the place on 72nd where she met the killer, but not at that time. The bar changed it's name because of the notoriety.

by Anonymousreply 3803/11/2012

Bruce Willis killed her?

by Anonymousreply 3903/11/2012

r2, Roseann wasn't a public school teacher, she worked for the archidocese. Rosie would have been fired for having sex without the benefit of marriage, if she hadn't been murdered first.

by Anonymousreply 4003/11/2012

[quote]I'm forced to pick out and throw away those vile Hershey's Special Dark minis. Yuck!

Dark chocolate is good for you, R37. Send them to me -- all your black jelly beans too.

by Anonymousreply 4103/11/2012

r20, go fart somewhere else.

by Anonymousreply 4203/11/2012

I love r37.

by Anonymousreply 4303/11/2012

I lived in that building, in a studio on the 11th floor, from 1989 - 1990.

The neighborhood has changed and I could never afford to live there now.

by Anonymousreply 4403/11/2012

where do you live now, R44? Still in Manhattan?

by Anonymousreply 4503/11/2012

"The Maltese Falcon does not look dated"

Once you can get past the black and white of course.

by Anonymousreply 4603/11/2012

A fantastic movie, I wish it would come out on DVD. great soundtrack album too. Could it be the music rights that is holding up the DVD? I know this came out on VHS (I have a copy) but I heard that for DVD the rights to all the songs have to be renegotiated. I remember when I saw this movie. I had read the book and knew the outcome but the ending filmed with that stobe light still was shocking.

by Anonymousreply 4703/11/2012

R45,

It's been a long strange journey, including stops back in my hometown of Detroit and 9 years in Austin, TX (which I loved except for the fact that it was in TX) -

I'm now in Jersey, living at the shore with family.

I go into the city every few weeks...wish I could still live there.

by Anonymousreply 4803/11/2012

[quote]Class dismissed.

Next time you decide to lecture, get to know the difference between it's and its.

Otherwise, you make a good point. However, some can argue (as they have) that the movie is thematically dated as well, with its (see how it's used? no pun intended) punishment of promiscuity with a tragic ending (pre-AIDS).

by Anonymousreply 4903/11/2012

They really used the music of the period so well...it was the first time I heard this Bill Withers song...and Diane was at the height of her powers, she looked so good and performed so well.

by Anonymousreply 5003/11/2012

R13- I know where you are coming from. My best friend was diagnosed with scolosis as a child and he now suffers from chronic back, neck pain and his leg goes numb. I reallu feel for you guys and I know it isn't easy living with chronic pain. Take care of yourself.

by Anonymousreply 5103/11/2012

Well, "Looking For Mr. Goodbar" was my very first VHS purchase. I remember how much I loved the music and Richard Gere's ass. The ending really shocked me, and gave me nightmares at the time.

Diane Keaton gave her finest performance, and should have won an Oscar for this film.

by Anonymousreply 5203/11/2012

R21- the candybar has been around a lot longer than the book and the movie that was made from the novel.

by Anonymousreply 5303/11/2012

I had the soundtrack LP. A few years ago I found the soundtrack on CD although I don't know if it's still in print. Might be available on ebay. Really great disco songs used in that movie.

by Anonymousreply 5403/11/2012

[quote]it's a perfect time capsule of what it was like to be alive in New York at that very moment. It preserves in living, moving color the city and it's peoples and captures their emotional lives as well.

Right, the fact is that it was actually filmed in Chicago (standing in for New York) added to the cheap feel of the film and invalidates your point.

I still love it though.

by Anonymousreply 5503/11/2012

Just checked. amazon. com does have the soundtrack CD but it's around $250 bucks new and used it runs around $50. Yikes. It's a great album but that is pretty steep pricing.

by Anonymousreply 5603/11/2012

"... a public schoolteacher could afford to live alone in a doorman building on the UWS"

New Yorkers are so narrow-minded. They never get beyond obsessing on shelter. Sad.

by Anonymousreply 5703/11/2012

It was available for rent on Amazon Instant Video last year. It looked great on HD Widescreen, wish it was available on Blu-ray with Commentaries and extras.

by Anonymousreply 5803/11/2012

You can get the VHS tape for $100, but who owns a VHS player nowadays?

by Anonymousreply 5903/11/2012

Yeah, a DVD with commentaries would be great. It's a good movie and has a great 1970s look/vibe.

by Anonymousreply 6003/11/2012

[quote]Diane Keaton gave her finest performance, and should have won an Oscar for this film.

She sort of got it indirectly for Annie Hall which came out the same years. Many people thought she got the Oscar for the joint performances.

Shame Diane only gives the film a single line reference in her autobiography...then continues to jabber away about her mother.

by Anonymousreply 6103/11/2012

"The most shocking thing about this story is that once upon a time, a public schoolteacher could afford to live alone in a doorman building on the UWS."

Not in that time period. It was before gentrification. Most people didn't want to live in the UWS in the 60s and 70s because it was full of Puero Ricans and considered the gateway to Harlem. Any person could find a small, cheap apartment like that woman had. Before the 1980s, it was very easy to find a cheap apartment in Manhattan and a person could change apartments frequently. Once the 1980s came, rents went through the roof and the middle class and the artists began leaving Manhattan for cheaper digs.

by Anonymousreply 6203/11/2012

Diane always seems very uninterested in talking about her films. She'd rather talk about her art work or her real estate passion or her love life. Anything but her movie work.

The biography sounds like a snooze.

by Anonymousreply 6303/11/2012

[R13] and [R17] My heart is with you too and may science find a way soon to end your pain. Life has enough as it is.

by Anonymousreply 6403/11/2012

I liked her story on Grammy Hall (who saw a Hassidic Rabbi every time she looked at Woody Allen.)

by Anonymousreply 6503/11/2012

The ultimate Diane Keaton movie of course (sort of). Richard Gere is hotter than fuck in this, would love to see it again but sadly it's one of those that doesn't seem to be on DVD.

by Anonymousreply 6603/11/2012

[quote] She'd rather talk about her art work or her real estate passion or her love life. Anything but her movie work.

I was surprised to hear her talk at reasonable length and with some depth about Annie Hall on a radio show recently (promoting her book)

I'll try and find the clip...

by Anonymousreply 6703/11/2012

[quote]However, some can argue (as they have) that the movie is thematically dated as well, with its (see how it's used? no pun intended) punishment of promiscuity with a tragic ending (pre-AIDS).

The morality tale aspect of the movie was tired at the time of its release. It's plotted like a Baptist Church tract on sexual abstinence.

by Anonymousreply 6803/11/2012

Richard Gere's intro...hubba-hubba!

by Anonymousreply 6903/11/2012

Got to see it at MoMA last year - after years of watching it on a shitty worn-down VHS copy seeing it on a big screen was a revelation. Richard Gere's ass bouncing up and down in a jockstrap alone! I really do think it is Keaton's best performance though.

by Anonymousreply 7003/11/2012

I would like to hear that, R67, if you can find it...

TIA

by Anonymousreply 7103/11/2012

[quote]The morality tale aspect of the movie was tired at the time of its release. It's plotted like a Baptist Church tract on sexual abstinence.

It was released in the late 70s when Hollywood joined in with and profited from the backlash against sexual freedom. Straights couldn't handle all that manna from heaven so blundered back into moral outrage to hide their shame and personal ineptness.

I think Dressed to Kill was released around the same time, as was the first of the Friday The 13th movies and, Carrie.

by Anonymousreply 7203/11/2012

Diane Keaton is more famous now for those Loreal ads, which is kind of interesting.

by Anonymousreply 7303/11/2012

"Once the 1980s came, rents went through the roof the middle class and the artists began leaving Manhattan for cheaper digs."

Where did they go? Where do people like this live now?

by Anonymousreply 7403/11/2012

Soho.

by Anonymousreply 7503/11/2012

"Where did they go? Where do people like this live now?"

At first they started to go to neighborhoods near Manhattan like Hoboken and Astoria. Now it's more like Long Island City and some neighborhoods in Brooklyn.

by Anonymousreply 7603/11/2012

[quote]I would like to hear that, [R67], if you can find it...

Hon, I've tried to find it but to no avail.

She posted it on her twitter account and now I can't find it...but here's the link, trawl back to Nov '11 for lots of links to her interviews and reviews...it was an L.A. radio show.

by Anonymousreply 7703/11/2012

Diane is kooky at times.

by Anonymousreply 7803/11/2012

I've never seen the film or read the book. Why was the man she was looking for called Mr. Goodbar?

by Anonymousreply 7903/11/2012

The title has 2 meanings, a bar or a man...not candy.

by Anonymousreply 8003/11/2012

"Why was the man she was looking for called Mr. Goodbar?"

She was looking for chocolate, but black men knew to stay away from a crazy white girl.

by Anonymousreply 8103/11/2012

[quote] I think Dressed to Kill was released around the same time, as was the first of the Friday The 13th movies and, Carrie.

Dressed to Kill (1980)

Friday the 13th (1980)

Carrie (1976)

by Anonymousreply 8203/11/2012

Like Katharine Hepburn who was in four films with Cary Grant she only said one sentence about Cary Grant (something about laughing with him) and I can't remember if she said anything about the movies in her "autobiography." I think she (KH) said something that if she wrote an autobiography it would be bs. Seems like Keaton also avoided the subject of her life.

by Anonymousreply 8303/11/2012

This is a movie that you think is good when you're 12 yo. It certainly doesn't stand the test of time, in any way.

by Anonymousreply 8503/11/2012

[quote]She posted it on her twitter account

Does she tweet or does her assistant do it for her? I can't stand it when celebrities use Twitter to promote their shit.

by Anonymousreply 8603/11/2012

Movies in 1977:

Star Wars

Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Saturday Night Fever

New York, New York

The Turning Point

by Anonymousreply 8703/11/2012

[quote]Does she tweet or does her assistant do it for her? I can't stand it when celebrities use Twitter to promote their shit.

As a 'follower', from what I can tell, she tweets her own shit...and not very often. Check it out yourself.

by Anonymousreply 8803/11/2012

Just did my "follow," thanks R88.

I don't follow celebrities unless they post interesting insights or links.

by Anonymousreply 8903/11/2012

Even though it was filmed in Chicago, the city is never mentioned by name in the film.

by Anonymousreply 9003/11/2012

Bit of trivia.

In a scene with Diane Keaton sitting at a bar reading a book. The book is The Godfather.

Barbra Streisand wanted to sing either the opening or closing song but her voice was considered to "glossy" for the gritty movie.

by Anonymousreply 9103/11/2012

Alternative titles-

Mr. Zagnut

Mr. Kitkat

Mr. Charleston Chew

by Anonymousreply 9203/11/2012

Who sang the theme song? It was in the soundtrack.

by Anonymousreply 9303/11/2012

R5/Op...the gay killer thing was completely fictional. Just some anti-gay propaganda slapped onto their sexphobic piece of garbage.

by Anonymousreply 9403/11/2012

It was a warning to young women who moved to Manhattan and didn't understand the dark side.

by Anonymousreply 9503/11/2012

The actual killer was gay.

by Anonymousreply 9603/11/2012

My trivia was a bit off. I found this.

Columnist Liz Smith wrote in August 1977:

Director Richard Brooks admits that Barbra Streisand offered to sing her hit “Love Comes From Unexpected Places” over the opening titles of his yet unseen, but eagerly anticipated movie, “Looking for Mr. Goodbar,” starring Diane Keaton. Richard graciously turned down the offer, feeling La Streisand would prove too powerful for the movie. But later, in thinking it over, Richard asked Barbra if she would sing the end credits. SHE turned THAT down ... [For the record, singer Marlena Shaw recorded a different Mr. Goodbar them, “Don't Ask to Stay Until Tomorrow.”]

by Anonymousreply 9703/11/2012

When she has her orgasm she says "O Henry"!

by Anonymousreply 9803/11/2012

I noticed that book in the clip posted here R91! Thought it was oddly self-referential to do that.

by Anonymousreply 9903/11/2012

Funny how self-proclaimed feminist Streisand wanted to be part of an anti-feminist backlash flick. But then, she's always had 'issues' around sex herself, so maybe she identified.

by Anonymousreply 10003/11/2012

Does she really have an orgasm when she's being stabbed?

It's been forever since I saw it, but I don't remember that.

by Anonymousreply 10103/11/2012

I doubt she analyzed the film to that extent, R100

by Anonymousreply 10203/11/2012

The end of the film is disturbing. As Theresa and the guy are having sex, she says, jokingly, "You got your peanut butter in my chocolate." He flies into a rage, screams, "No, bitch! You got your chocolate in my peanut butter" and begins stabbing her.

by Anonymousreply 10303/11/2012

When he stabs her, she yells "Do it! Do it!" while under a strobing light. It is very disturbing and frightening.

by Anonymousreply 10403/11/2012

In the original script Theresa liked to hang out at gas stations. It was called Looking for Mr. Goodwrench.

by Anonymousreply 10503/11/2012

I was very young, but I think people saw the book and movie as a cautionary tale of looking for love in all the wrong places, not as a puritanical, anti-sex or anti-women's sexual freedom work per se, but a piece suggested by one woman's true story and the dark side of the sexual revolution. It was a time when things were not as knee-jerk polemicized as they are now. People weren't so quick to categorize things as being pro or con, as plebiscites of permissiveness or credos of condemnation. Or at least that's how my nostalgic rosy-colored memory recalls it. I'm more than willing to consider I might be wrong about that

by Anonymousreply 10603/11/2012

Yeah, I first saw this on videotape. But, recently saw this on On Demand. Looked amazing on HD widescreen.

by Anonymousreply 10703/11/2012

The only movie when Diane wasn't just being Diane with a different script. God I hate her.

by Anonymousreply 10803/11/2012

[quote]People weren't so quick to categorize things as being pro or con, as plebiscites of permissiveness or credos of condemnation.

See ya later, alliterator!

by Anonymousreply 10903/11/2012

Unfortunately, the follow-up movies didn't do as well at the box office:

Looking for Mr. Steak: Theresa hangs out in dumpy 1970s chain restaurants, looking for men. She tells the men to treat her like a piece of meat. One of them ends up butchering her.

Looking for Mr. Clean: Theresa has rough sex with muscular, bald sailor types. One of them ends up poisoning her with harsh cleaning solvents and uses a Magic Eraser to hide the evidence.

by Anonymousreply 11003/11/2012

Lol! That's hilarious

by Anonymousreply 11103/11/2012

If this happened today, I would put the response rate at 95% that she deserved it because she was an irresponsible slut. Who DOES that?

by Anonymousreply 11203/11/2012

I'm not sure that's true, R91. In the liner notes for Streisand Superman she notes that from reading the book, she thought the song Love Comes From The Most Unexpected Places (by Rupert Holmes, I believe) would've made a good theme song for Looking For Mr. Goodbar. Not sure she actually worked on the film.

by Anonymousreply 11303/11/2012

R110, you forget Looking For Mr. Pibb.

by Anonymousreply 11403/11/2012

Looking For Mr. Goodbar is definitely a DL movie. There's a thread about it at least once a year.

by Anonymousreply 11503/11/2012

Thanks for weighing in, Rush Limbaugh/r112.

by Anonymousreply 11603/11/2012

Do men also deserve to be killed for having sex, or just women?

by Anonymousreply 11703/11/2012

Oh sorry, R91. Read your post at R97. Ooo, written by Kim Carnes and Dave Elligson.

Here's Kim's version.

by Anonymousreply 11803/11/2012

R115: Looking for Mr Goodbar, Rosemary's Baby, and All About Eve

by Anonymousreply 11903/11/2012

It's "Cruising"- for girls!

Imagine trying to make this in the '80's. There'd be condoms and dental dams everywhere.

by Anonymousreply 12003/11/2012

The summer I was 12 I had to stay with my aunt & uncle for a few weeks because my mom was in the hospital. I would start reading the Mr. Goodbar book and then put it on my nightstand to go to sleep. The next day it would be gone and back in the book case. After a few days of this happening I found out my Aunt didn't think it was age appropriate (probably wasn't) so she kept putting the book away. The only thing I remember about the book was cockroaches crawling on her as I was always afraid of bugs.

by Anonymousreply 12103/11/2012

Still my favorite candy bar- even though for a fleeting second I think of knives. I even feel I'm eating healthy cuz there's nuts in it (unfortunately, not Richard Gere's).

by Anonymousreply 12203/11/2012

She just needed a good psychiatrist.

by Anonymousreply 12303/11/2012

'Mr. Goodbar' was the name of a singles bar she frequented. "Looking For..." refers to what the police said while investigating the crime.

by Anonymousreply 12403/11/2012

How are singles bars different from other bars? Who goes into a bar and reads a book? This is confusing.

by Anonymousreply 12503/11/2012

That's what they used to call them in the 1970s. Probably because some normal girls were entering bars, as opposed to just barflies and drunken old men in taverns.

by Anonymousreply 12603/11/2012

One of the most disturbing endings in film.

It's still a lesson for today as the guy with the cockatoo can attest.

As for the soundtrack, couldn't you just assemble a playlist with songs bought one at a time on iTunes? Why pay for the original record unless you're a fan of the film or a vinyl freak.

by Anonymousreply 12703/11/2012

The last time I saw was back during its initial release and I think I saw it a couple of times. The only song I remember was Thelma Houston's DON'T LEAVE ME THIS WAY.

by Anonymousreply 12803/11/2012

The place Rosann frequented was TW Tweeds R124. "Goodbar" was in the book. Title refers to any guy from Good-bars. The police had no problem finding the killer

by Anonymousreply 12903/11/2012

The made for network tv sequel "Trackdown: Finding the Goodbar Killer" is one of the best tv movie of the 1980's. Surprisingly grim and brutal, it also looks sympathetically at the older gay male who has turn in his now-married-to-a-woman bi lover (and Theresa's murderer) to the cops.

by Anonymousreply 13003/11/2012

Never saw it, but would like to. Is it along the visual vein of Time Square? That movie was awesome in its grittiness, but it could have been so much more. Any other movies like that I should see?

by Anonymousreply 13103/11/2012

Me too, r128. Also:

Could it be magic and Try me by Donna Summer

Love Hangover by Diana Ross

Back Stabbers by The O'Jays

by Anonymousreply 13203/11/2012

I always liked the opening titles the best - great black and white stills of 70's bar life with the different songs fading in and out.

"... iknow iknow iknow iknow I know. iknow iknow iknow iknow I know. iknow iknow iknow WE CAN MAKE IT.

by Anonymousreply 13303/11/2012

I've never seen the movie, but when I was a kid it'd come on HBO (late 80s/early 90s). Again, I never watched it...just remember it as "The candy bar movie" (and wondering why they it wasn't' called looking for Snickers...an infinitely better treat).

by Anonymousreply 13403/11/2012

How can we contact Paramount to release this movie on Blu-ray?

by Anonymousreply 13503/11/2012

It's such an indelible part of the late 70s and the follow-up to the Sexual Revolution. There are a lot of problems with the movie (the scenes with Teresa/Roseann's family, in part, are very muddy and hard to follow), but it really made an impression.

by Anonymousreply 13603/11/2012

[quote] How can we contact Paramount to release this movie on Blu-ray?

You could start here:

Paramount Home Entertainment 1-323-956-3010

by Anonymousreply 13703/11/2012

Thx!

by Anonymousreply 13803/11/2012

I've noiced that most people who suffer from scoliosis are gingers--why is this?

by Anonymousreply 13903/11/2012

I haven't seen it in over 20 years and really only remember the ending; watching the opening credits, I noticed some gay content -- aside from the killer being gay, is there any other gay content in the film?

by Anonymousreply 14003/11/2012

If Paramount refuses to release it maybe Olive Films will. There has been a thread about Goodbar on Home Theater Forum. Lots of folks want a widescreen DVD. I know I do.

by Anonymousreply 14103/11/2012

So the candy bar was first, but where does the term "Mr. Goodbar" come from originally? Why call a candy bar that? Why name a book after the candy bar?

by Anonymousreply 14203/11/2012

Saw it a year ago( you can find it on the net)I didn't find it dated, really like it, but neither Gere or Keaton surprised me, her performance is filled with her annoying little tricks and he was already an empty vessel, the only one who truly stand out for was Berenger.

by Anonymousreply 14303/11/2012

[quote]The made for network tv sequel "Trackdown: Finding the Goodbar Killer" is one of the best tv movie of the 1980's.

No, it wasn't, it was weak and very boring. I was the schmuck who probably read a comment like yours on the internet and with great trouble and expense got hold of the VHS.

[quote]one of the best tv movie of the 1980's.

You talk such crap, really.

by Anonymousreply 14403/11/2012

I'm sure he meant "best" as in Alexander: The Other Side of Dawn.

by Anonymousreply 14503/11/2012

Thanks for starting this thread, OP. I just reserved the book from our library.

by Anonymousreply 14603/11/2012

I'm with R144. That description sounds like it would be a horrible and exploitative film. What's left to tell?

by Anonymousreply 14703/11/2012

[quote]Thanks for starting this thread, OP

Don't worry there'll be at least seven more before the end of the year.

by Anonymousreply 14803/11/2012

[quote]What's left to tell?

Actually, plenty...it's just that that TV movie was poor & lame and didn't fulfil the criteria.

The (true) story was about the actual killer and who he was and how they tracked him down. There was also a book on this subject too, which I also have, but haven't read yet.

by Anonymousreply 14903/11/2012

[quote]Trackdown: Finding the Goodbar Killer"

starring Miss Shelley Hack!!!

by Anonymousreply 15003/11/2012

The strobe light at the end is stunning. The film got a best editing nomination...the academy got it right that year.

by Anonymousreply 15103/11/2012

[quote]Roseann wasn't a public school teacher, she worked for the archidocese. Rosie would have been fired for having sex without the benefit of marriage, if she hadn't been murdered first.

At the very least, she would have to prove she wasn't using birth control. It's important to the old men who run the CC that women play Russian roulette every time they have sex.

by Anonymousreply 15203/11/2012

Me too, r146.

by Anonymousreply 15303/11/2012

[quote]The film got a best editing nomination.

Initially I read this as 'best ENDING nomination'.

That should be a category.

by Anonymousreply 15403/11/2012

I kinda think bringing home strange men to fuck is little more Russian Roulettish than her birth control choices, but push that agenda if it makes you happy.

by Anonymousreply 15503/11/2012

This is Sandfa Fluke's facorite movie!!

by Anonymousreply 15603/11/2012

LOL @ r156

by Anonymousreply 15703/11/2012

I am intrigued by the earlier comments about a film seeming dated.

I have seen Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho" (1960) many times, and I think it really holds up as a well-made film. All of the choices work together -- excellent casting, the black and white photography, the musical score, the clever camera angles and editing, and the way he maintained suspense. These things make it a classic.

I tried to watch Gus Van Sant's 1998 version of "Psycho" and found it unbearable. He updated the costumes and the look and filmed it in color. Otherwise, he remade it shot for shot. The dialogue seems forced, the casting is awful (I would have swapped Julianne Moore and Anne Heche, and Vince Vaughn is not plausible as Norman Bates). This is a great example of what it means for a movie to be "dated."

Anyway, my point is that good movies stand the test of time, even when they serve to capture the essence of a particular era.

by Anonymousreply 15803/11/2012

[quote]I kinda think bringing home strange men to fuck is little more Russian Roulettish than her birth control choices

Maybe someone (who can) should start a thread on this. I'm sure plenty of us have (horrid) stories to tell.

by Anonymousreply 15903/11/2012

Sorry, R155. I didn't realize there was a contest.

by Anonymousreply 16003/11/2012

[quote]Anyway, my point is that good movies stand the test of time, even when they serve to capture the essence of a particular era.

When I describe a movie as badly dated it's usually in reference to badly made, poorly directed films in a style that might have been 'acceptable' at the time. Not in reference to the hairstyles and clothes.

Goodbar was poorly/cheaply made (in spite of it's excellence & power). At one point Diane slams a door at her parent's house and you can see the set shake. Likewise her dumpy room looks very 'studio' and we never see through the window.

by Anonymousreply 16103/11/2012

Why hasn't someone posted this movie on Youtube???

by Anonymousreply 16203/11/2012

[quote]Why hasn't someone posted this movie on Youtube???

It's much too X rated. It would be pulled in a flash.

by Anonymousreply 16303/11/2012

r159, that would be a really interesting thread.

by Anonymousreply 16403/11/2012

OH Shelley Hack. She can turn up in the most unsuspecting of threads. She's as pervasive as Kevin Bacon. Way off topic I know but has any wooden actress ever been given so many opportunities in Hollywood? From Charlies Angels until her disappearance I think she was given the lead in about 8 TV series.

by Anonymousreply 16503/11/2012

R165, I really miss Joanne Pflugg. I really do.

by Anonymousreply 16603/11/2012

[quote] I really miss Joanne Pflugg. I really do.

So do I.

by Anonymousreply 16703/11/2012

Joanne Pflugg!! Now there's a name I haven't heard in years!

by Anonymousreply 16803/11/2012

She was in everything on television, had a fantastic figure, and is now a Christian speaker of some type.

by Anonymousreply 16903/11/2012

Imagine the possibilities if Ms. Joanne Pflugg had been the lead? Oh wait never mind. I'm thinking Joanne Worley. I can see her going into the single bar with her boas and helmet hair. Looking at Richard Gere's ass and yelling "WOOOOOOOOO".

by Anonymousreply 17003/11/2012

It's a little known fact that this was originally going to be Ron Howard's directing debut. The original title was "Looking for Mr. Goober" and was a dark look at the underbelly of Mayberry. Then that witch Diane Keaton stole the script off my living room coffee table and the rest is that mess you see on the screen today.

by Anonymousreply 17103/11/2012

Is it available on Netflix?

by Anonymousreply 17203/11/2012

Confirmed William Atherton as perennially creepy.

by Anonymousreply 17303/11/2012

No, r172. It's been in my saved queue for a couple of years, it is not released to DVD.

by Anonymousreply 17403/11/2012

It was available to rent on Amazon Instant Video last year, but no longer available now.

by Anonymousreply 17503/12/2012

I've finally found the link to that Diane Keaton interview that I referred to earlier that someone was interested in hearing.

by Anonymousreply 17603/12/2012

All you ever wanted to know about Mr. Goodbar... but were afraid to ask.

by Anonymousreply 17703/12/2012

What an excellent and very full summary, R177.

Thanks for posting it.

by Anonymousreply 17803/12/2012

Her grandmother is ROSE MCGOWAN!

by Anonymousreply 17903/12/2012

Here's a very interesting audio interview with Judith Rossner, author of the original book.

by Anonymousreply 18003/12/2012

Allegedly, the killer was quite a hunk, not unlike the Jon Voight character in "Midnight Cowboy." Big and blond and built and always on the lookout for a trick to help him make it through the night.

Despite Googling his name, John Wayne Wilson, I have never been able to come up with a picture of him.

It is said that he told the jail guard that he wanted some sheets so he could hang himself and the guard thought he was bullshitting. He gave him the sheets. Wilson promptly hung himself.

by Anonymousreply 18103/12/2012

thanks, R180. That is a good site, too.

by Anonymousreply 18203/12/2012

I've seen pictures of him. He was all you describe and more. I would have tricked with him.

by Anonymousreply 18303/12/2012

[quote]Despite Googling his name, John Wayne Wilson, I have never been able to come up with a picture of him

There's a very grainy one of him in this collage of headlines about the murder...see it?

by Anonymousreply 18403/12/2012

& again, slightly larger...

by Anonymousreply 18503/12/2012

He kind of looks like Perry King.

by Anonymousreply 18603/12/2012

Yeah, he does.

by Anonymousreply 18703/12/2012

I bought a VHS copy of this from Amazon a year ago. My friend & I think the Tuesday Weld character's lines are funny and she's good, I think she was nommed for this. The way Diane unwittingly scores coke in the bathroom is funny, some guy says "I'm looking for a white lady named Bernice" as code for coke. There's a hot Italian type guy who is a closet gay who's trying to prove he's not by hitting on Diane. The subplot with Amy and the young black actor from "Roots" as her brother was not in the book, it doesn't really add much. This film was released the same year as "Annie Hall" I believe.

by Anonymousreply 18803/12/2012

Yes, R188 the same year. Time had a cover story on Keaton and both movies. Goodbar came out in the fall.

by Anonymousreply 18903/12/2012

Great movie, must be released on DVD!

by Anonymousreply 19003/12/2012

"So the candy bar was first, but where does the term "Mr. Goodbar" come from originally? Why call a candy bar that? Why name a book after the candy bar?"

I guess the name of the candy bar is just a named designed to make the consumer think it's delicious: Mr. Goodbar.

In the book one of the bars Theresa cruises in is called "Mr. Goodbar." It's described like this: "a comfortable place with old gum-ball machines for table lamps and one wall covered entirely with a shellacked montage of candy wrappers." It's the bar where she meets the pick-up who kills her.

The title of the book "Looking for Mr. Goodbar" is a play on the old saying "looking from Mr. Right." At least that's what I heard.

I think it's myopic to say that the movie was anti-sex or a "cautionary tale." I always viewed it as just a portrayal of the life and death of a lonely, confused young woman.

The murderer of Roseann Quinn said that as he was attacking her she screamed at him "kill me!" In the movie she screams "do it!" In the book Teresa's last thoughts are : "Help Mommy Daddy Dear God, help me--do it do it do it and get it over w..."

by Anonymousreply 19103/12/2012

[quote]The subplot with Amy and the young black actor from "Roots" as her brother was not in the book, it doesn't really add much

I agree...it's probably the draggiest part of the whole film. But it showed the main protagonist as especially warm and caring, so I guess it worked for that reason.

by Anonymousreply 19203/13/2012

Thank you, R176!

by Anonymousreply 19303/13/2012

IIRC, Rossner wrote her book after another writer wrote a book based on the same murder; however, the 1st writer was slammed for portraying Theresa as, yes, a slut. Rossner's version was meant to be sympathetic to Theresa and why she might have ended up as she did.

Anyone else remember this?

by Anonymousreply 19403/13/2012

I downloaded the movie off the internet several months ago and it was a decent copy. I thought it was pretty good, although very disjointed in its portrayal of Keaton's character. Sometimes she came off as retarded and others she came off as very warm and intelligent.

by Anonymousreply 19503/13/2012

"agree...it's probably the draggiest part of the whole film. But it showed the main protagonist as especially warm and caring, so I guess it worked for that reason."

The reason for the subplot was to make Teresa likeable and sympathetic. If she was depicted the way she was in the book, the movie goers would probably have yelled at the screen "hurry up and get killed already!" The Teresa in the novel was, as one critic put it, "a chilly, unpleasant woman." But she was very caring towards her students. She mused about her Jekyll and Hyde life; by day she's Teresa, a sweet, kind teacher of little children, by night she's Terry, who "whored around in bars."

"IIRC, Rossner wrote her book after another writer wrote a book based on the same murder; however, the 1st writer was slammed for portraying Theresa as, yes, a slut. Rossner's version was meant to be sympathetic to Theresa and why she might have ended up as she did.

Anyone else remember this?"

Actually Rossner's book came out first, in 1975. In 1977 a journalist named Lacey Fosburgh came out with "Closing Time: the true story of the Goodbar murder." It's not a very good book. She doesn't even use the real names of the two principles! In "Closing Time" Roseann Quinn is "Katherine Cleary" and John Wayne Wilson is "Joe Willie Simpson."

Wilson's family cooperated fully with Fosburgh, so there's a lot of info on him, none of it interesting. He was just a dumb, not very intelligent clunk.

Quinn's family and friends would not speak about her at all after her death, so Fosburgh has to dig up what she can about her, and none of it is much good. Fosburgh's take on Quinn is that she had a lot of self hatred primarily due to being crippled by scoliosis, maybe even a death wish. She was a lonely, emotionally cut-off woman. As for her being portrayed as a "slut"...well, it didn't seem that way to me. She picked up guys in bars, but then that was what lots of people did back then, It wasn't considered any big deal.

Fosburgh stupidly recreates the conversation she imagines Quinn and Wilson might have had in the bar before they head off to her place. Why make stuff up? It's supposed to be a NONFICTION account of an actual crime. Considering the lack of information she had on Quinn, I guess she was trying to fill the book out in whatever way she could.

Anyway, here's a short review of "Closing Time":

"Well, almost the true story--names have been altered and Fosburgh, who covered the original murder for the New York Times, has added some not very convincing street-wise dialogue. Her point seems to be the existential absurdity of it all: the chance events that led Joe Willie Simpson, a quiet farm boy turned drifter, to meet the lonely Catholic schoolteacher in the kind of bar that's designed for just such purposes. . . . What Fosburgh does is to reconstruct the lives of the murderer and the victim in such a way that the withdrawn, emotionless Joe Willie becomes as much to be pitied as Katherine Cleary, the girl he stabbed eighteen times. (The throw-away-the-key and execution-is-too-good-for-'em crowd will hate it.) Only too late would Joe Willie be tagged as a schizophrenic-- after, that is, he had knotted some sheets together and hung himself in the Tombs. The prosecutor took the words right out of Fosburgh's mouth: ""He reminded me of L'Etranger and Camus' existential hero. He was like Mersault, the guy who killed his mother. He had no feelings, no remorse. He didn't care about anything."" And back home in Illinois, where Joe Willie's ""American Gothic"" family lived, his mother just couldn't take ""anything more bad said about him in the newspapers""--because she knew in her heart that ""He's a good boy, a real fine boy."" None of these tragic facts were understood by the press or by a public baying for revenge. But for the Mr. Goodbar audience, neither Joe Willie nor Katherine Cleary has enough emotional ballast to score the second time around."

by Anonymousreply 19603/13/2012

"He kind of looks like Perry King."

I don't think so. I think he looks weird and creepy. He was very mentally ill. His relatives claimed that he had been hit by a car as a child and that altered his personality. I doubt that. He was probably schizophrenic, and car accidents don't cause that.

by Anonymousreply 19703/13/2012

Here's the theme tune. I think it's excellent.

by Anonymousreply 19803/13/2012

here are the opening credits for the movie. Missing the very beginning where Keaton is shown crossing the street. Great still photos that really set the tone for this movie.

by Anonymousreply 19903/13/2012

The only thing Keaton has said about the movie is how embarrassed her father was by it...something like that. I think she said it on Oprah. I guess it may have been uncomfortable for him, if you think about it. There was some clause in Keaton's deal with the film that there were to be no stills of her nude scenes.

We never really know why there's been no DVD.

Richard Gere is also sneary about it...I think I saw that on Oprah too. (Bet Oprah loved it...she's as '70s-loving as any genuine old-time DLer).

by Anonymousreply 20003/13/2012

I think it does have something to do with the music rights. Someone once posted about that here in another thread. Rights have to be renegotiated for DVD separately from what was done when it came out on VHS. By the way, when I won my first VCR-- the first three tapes I bought were Goodbar, West Side Story and Cabaret.. and they cost about $40.00 each. This was right at the beginning of the VCR craze. You had to look long and hard for movie rental stores.

by Anonymousreply 20103/13/2012

Why anyone would want this released is beyond me. "True" story or not, it's sexist, homophobic, and sexphobic. We don't really need that sort of trash around now.

by Anonymousreply 20203/13/2012

[quote]the first three tapes I bought were Goodbar, West Side Story and Cabaret.. and they cost about $40.00 each

That's such a great choice. Funny. $40 each? Woe! Even the recordable ones cost a lot for a long time.

[quote]By the way, when I won my first VCR

How did you win it? Full details, please.

[quote] I know ....... elder gay

Is that supposed to be a bad thing?

by Anonymousreply 20303/13/2012

Jesus Christ, what is wrong with this place? [R50] posts a clip of a movie that shows Keaton sleeping on a bare mattress and pillows with only ticking and we have not had ONE posting about the lack sheets and their necessary minimum thread counts?

I am going to Qwhip. You guys are losing your edge.

by Anonymousreply 20403/13/2012

R203- Actually my mom won it. At a country club dance raffle thing a majig I believe in Springfield, Mo. I didn't even know about it. Went home to visit one weekend and there it was in my room. At the time, my folks didn't want it. New technology and it was a few years later that I returned the favor and bought them one. It was one of those massive front loader Zenith things. There was a video rental place that rented movies for $6.00 for one night. This was before Blockbuster and local mom and pop stores.

by Anonymousreply 20503/13/2012

[quote]we have not had ONE posting about the lack sheets and their necessary minimum thread counts?

It was supposed to be sordid ( of course, I know you know that we know that, but still....) I think the lack of sheets was overdone. The whole apt. set was ridiculously ghoulish, actually. In fact, dirty, soiled sheets would have been even more sordid. We could have had close-ups.

by Anonymousreply 20603/13/2012

Well, if the aforementioned sheets were any less than 400 thread count, and her killer was in fact gay, it could probably be argued as justifiable homocide.

by Anonymousreply 20703/13/2012

Was the real Rosemary Quinn a slob with roaches crawling around and no sheets on her bed?

Most women are squicked out by roaches.

by Anonymousreply 20803/13/2012

Actually Roseann Quinn WAS a slob. Maybe she was slovenly due to depression. At any rate, her apartment was filthy. According to "Closing Time" Wilson told his gay lover that "it was a mess...it looked like it hadn't been cleaned in weeks."

Here's a description of her apartment from "Closing Time":

"Clothes wer all over the floor. A box of sugar had spilled on the floor. The sofa bed was unmade, opened out into the middle of the room and there were dirty dishes in the sink. Spaghetti sauce had dribbled down the front of the stove, and orange juice had hardened on the floor.

The twenty-three year old man looks around with the eyes of someone who had always lived in a spotless house and liked it that way. His sense of the woman shifted and took on an element of disgust."

by Anonymousreply 20903/13/2012

"Now he's shacked-up with some teenybopper with a mini brain and a maxi mouth! They have his & her towels, his & her robes, his & her vibrators!"

"Mommy & Daddy think I pee perfume! You're my rock, baby!"

"Now I'm pregnant and I don't know if it's Chicago or New York! I'm a mess!"

"I'm through with it! Through with the whole mind fucking scene!"

"One morning I woke up in a room full of naked asses! Mine was one of 'em! Guess that's all I've ever been, another naked ass!"

by Anonymousreply 21103/14/2012

"The cockroaches are taking over the world!"

by Anonymousreply 21203/14/2012

I'm learning to live with them.

by Anonymousreply 21303/14/2012

I just finished this book last week, after reading this thread. It has been haunting me, I felt like I was inside her head.

The book must have been pretty racey in its day.

by Anonymousreply 21403/25/2012

As a result of reading this thread, I found a copy of the soundtrack on vinyl last week for $1 at Amoeba in LA. Though you could probably piece it together on iTunes or something, it's an incredible soundtrack. Really captures that moment in time and the selections of songs and the order in which they occur is seamless and incredible.

So glad I found it!!

by Anonymousreply 21503/25/2012

Wow, R215. On Amazon, the cheapest used copy costs $59.99, while a new copy sells for $247.24.

by Anonymousreply 21603/25/2012

[quote]Really captures that moment in time and the selections of songs and the order in which they occur is seamless and incredible.

Yes, it's a great soundtrack. Did any other film in the '70s use the recent music of the time so well in a film? I don't think so.

I love the way they also used lesser known songs so well...like the great Bill Withers song in this clip.

It's actually the classy soundtrack that really lifts the film into a different stratosphere.

by Anonymousreply 21703/25/2012

I agree about the music, and the opening credits with the photos & music is very atmospheric

by Anonymousreply 21803/25/2012

Before rentals were available, I bought LFMG for $50.00 at the local mall. Yes, they were expensive back then. One of the earliest VHS releases.

by Anonymousreply 21903/25/2012

I know, r216. And those prices are for the CD version. My $1 copy is in fantastic shape - no warp, scratches or skips. A great find!

I wonder why the prices are so inflated. It can't be just for the short instrumental pieces and theme song. I think those are the only tracks unavailable elsewhere.

by Anonymousreply 22003/25/2012

I agree R215- Great soundtrack. Practically wore out the LP. When the CD release came out, I snapped it up. I believe it's out of print now.

by Anonymousreply 22103/25/2012

Me too R219. One of the first VHS tapes I bought. Still have it. Guess it will have to do until we get this on DVD which doesn't look too promising.

by Anonymousreply 22203/25/2012

R220 - Probably because the CD is out of print or the distributor is no longer in operation? Don't know but that seems likely.

by Anonymousreply 22303/25/2012

Most likely, R223. Extremely rare, out of print titles like this movie's soundtrack can push the price way up, even for used copies.

by Anonymousreply 22403/25/2012

I wonder if the music rights to this film are different since Donna died.

by Anonymousreply 22507/24/2012

the movie is on youtube!

by Anonymousreply 22612/19/2012

Since Paramount has farmed out DVD production and about 600 catalog titles to Warner Bros. I'm sure it's only a matter of time now before a DVD version is available.

by Anonymousreply 22712/19/2012

"Squicked out?" How are things over at Mary Catherine's Academy for Girl" r208?

by Anonymousreply 22812/19/2012

"Here lies love! And lies & lies & LIES!!"

by Anonymousreply 22912/19/2012

"It's scoliosis, Papa!!"

by Anonymousreply 23012/19/2012

[quote]Most women are squicked out by roaches.

So was she, remember how she and her sister shrieked when they went to the fridge and took something out and it was crawling with roaches.

I actually thought the set for her apt was very cheap and tacky. The sets were the weakest link of the film. Also the filming in Chicago for New York. But in spite of this, the film was very powerful.

by Anonymousreply 23112/19/2012

I just bought Rosner's book, is it any good?

by Anonymousreply 23212/19/2012

Yes!

by Anonymousreply 23312/19/2012

Thanks R226, I'm very excited to see it again. I saw it first in 1991 after reading the book. At that time, I liked the book much better but there were still some really great scenes in the film. I hope I enjoy it this time.

by Anonymousreply 23412/19/2012

I think it was a sympathetic tale about a woman looking for love in all the wrong places and losing her life, a cautionary tale about the singles bar scene.

by Anonymousreply 23512/19/2012

Here's the story of Roseann Quinn, on whom the book and movie was based.

by Anonymousreply 23612/19/2012

How much was rent back in the early 70's?? a studio in that building is now $2400!!!

by Anonymousreply 23703/20/2013

The story was about a shy and awkward girl who was trying her best to join the sexual revolution, in spite of her personal insecurities and all the hangups of a strict Catholic upbringing.

I read the book when it was new (I like the movie much better) and I also bought the VHS tape. I still have it -- as well as Cabaret -- but I have nothing to play them on.

If you ever get the chance, try to find Rossner's book Emmeline. Now, THAT book IS chilling.

by Anonymousreply 23803/20/2013

I liked the book very much. Theresa Dunn is one incredibly fucked up chick, an emotional cripple. Diane Keaton made her seem likeable and warm in the movie, but as one book critic said she's a "chilly, unpleasant woman." She has very low self esteem and considers herself liberated and in control of her life by having casual sex with men she meets in bars.

The book begins with the confession of the killer. It's incredibly realistic-sounding; the guy is obviously mentally ill, but hearing the tale from his point of view makes you truly understand how a bar pick-up escalated into a rape-murder.

And of course the book ends with Theresa meeting the handsome blonde guy in the bar (he's with his male lover), taking him home for what she thinks will be a good sex session where they satisfy each other and then he leaves, but it all goes VERY wrong and there she is, helpless with a man in her apartment who won't budge when she tells him "you can go now." He gets mad, she gets scared...it turns into a horror story. What goes on in her mind as she realizes what's happening to her is is terrifying. Terrifying.

by Anonymousreply 23903/20/2013

This should be in the scary movies that are not horror movies thread.

by Anonymousreply 24003/20/2013

Does Criterion Collection take requests? This seems like the perfect movie for their library.

by Anonymousreply 24103/20/2013

R241 Fotomat has the VHS rights in the US. I imagine that is what is holding up the DVD release.

From IMDb:

Fotomat (Drive-Thru Movies) Video (1979) (USA) (VHS)

by Anonymousreply 24203/20/2013

[quote]This should be in the scary movies that are not horror movies thread.

It's there. I posted it.

[quote]Fotomat has the VHS rights in the US. I imagine that is what is holding up the DVD release.

The day it's finally released, DL will go nuts.

by Anonymousreply 24303/20/2013

[quote]"It's scoliosis, Papa!!"

Who is the nutcase who quotes these lines all over the thread?

by Anonymousreply 24403/20/2013

BTW, I love DL...almost 250 posts on a Looking For Mr Goodbar thread! Where else?

by Anonymousreply 24503/20/2013

The YouTube full version has been deleted. They pulled it probaby long ago.

by Anonymousreply 24603/20/2013

Yes, r241. They just released the Criterion version of Last Days of Disco on Blu-ray. It was requested many times.

by Anonymousreply 24703/21/2013

Relax your crack, r247, when someone starts a movie thread, some of us find it amusing and fun to quote some of the funnier lines of dialogue from the film.

by Anonymousreply 24803/21/2013

oops meant r244

by Anonymousreply 24903/21/2013

I lived in SF in the late 70's; also later during the late 80's through 2008. Back in - 79? when the film opened (I think that's the right year?), my boyfriend of the time - who had Fridays off, and saw EVERYTHING - went to the first performance in SF and said that near/at conclusion, people were yelling, "violence to women!" at the screen.

I said, dear God, were they encouraging it?; he said, no, men - largely gay men - were yelling, upset at all the violence to women.

Ah , films in theaters - good times.

by Anonymousreply 25003/21/2013

Damn it! Someone bring this out on DVD.. Criteron is an excellant idea.

by Anonymousreply 25103/21/2013

[quote]Relax your crack, [R247], when someone starts a movie thread, some of us find it amusing and fun to quote some of the funnier lines of dialogue from the film.

My crack was and is relaxed and I think the quoting thing is funny. My 'nutcase' post was meant in an affectionate way, I'm sorry it was misinterpreted. Maybe it's a British American thing, lost in translation.

'I'd rather be seduced than comforted.'

by Anonymousreply 25203/21/2013

Am I crazy in thinking that it would make a wonderful ballet?

by Anonymousreply 25303/21/2013

I fucking loved this film when I saw it nearly 20 years ago. But I'd be damned if I can track it down, no doubt torrents is the only way to access it as it seems to be out of print all round.

What's not to love, perhaps the best Keaton role and prime Richard Gere.

by Anonymousreply 25403/21/2013

[quote]What's not to love, perhaps the best Keaton role

Came out the same year as Annie Hall.

The combination of the two won her The Oscar.

She became a cult sort of...her clothes and style, her talent.

She was on the cover of Time but the attention frightened her and she hid from the world. Had it been 2013, they wouldn't have let her.

Her timing was good though. It was a powerful period for films.

by Anonymousreply 25503/21/2013

Speaking of Diane Keaton, is somebody blackmailing her? How else can the last 15 years of her career be explained?

by Anonymousreply 25603/21/2013

Reds was a great performance as well, maybe her best. But it wasn't anywhere near as interesting as the extreme Goodbar, which is still pretty shocking and unique today.

I do agree with what many say about the 70s being the last golden age of film. 80s movies are fun and fluffy but drastically down in quality. I need to see me some more from the 70s.

by Anonymousreply 25703/21/2013

r257, apology accepted and my crack has relaxed. "Watch the kiddies play!" the sultry older brunette at the orgy to Diane as she turns on the 8mm projector showing porn.

by Anonymousreply 25803/21/2013

[quote]apology accepted and my crack has relaxed.

That's good. Now we both have relaxed cracks and all is well with the world.

"What are you hooked on?"

"Anything I can get".

by Anonymousreply 25903/21/2013

[quote]How much was rent back in the early 70's?? a studio in that building is now $2400!!!

Imagine, now someone lives in that very place and for $2400 a month.

by Anonymousreply 26003/21/2013

they do have dvd's out

by Anonymousreply 26103/21/2013

R260 and it's 250sf

by Anonymousreply 26203/21/2013

I've enjoyed this thread. This movie aired on TV when I was a teen, years after it was originally released. I wasn't into it (it was probably background noise more than anything else), and recall watching only a few brief scenes. I did, however, see the very ending, and I agree that the strobe light and image of her face fading was striking, and that stuck with me to this very day. Now, due this thread, I want to truly see the movie *and* read the book.

Re the book: I recall being aware of it as a kid or teen (having no idea of its subject matter). If memory serves, the Mr Goodbar candy wrapper was yellow with big red block letters. I have a memory of the book cover having the exact same color scheme and lettering -- it looked just like the candybar, which is one reason I noticed it (that, and the same name). However, when I looked on Amazon, I didn't see any of the various versions with that particular cover, and I didn't see it referenced upthread. Does anybody else remember that cover?

Re the culture: Some people have posted about the murder, novel, and movie within the context of the sexual revolution, the increasing independence of the modern woman, and the last days of disco, etc.

However, Quinn was murdered at the very start of '73 (and for all intents and purposes, it may as well have been late '72), when the sexual revolution and Women's Lib were just hitting their stride, and disco (as most people think of it) was in its infancy. Rossner's GOODBAR wasn't published until '75. The film was released in '77 (the same year as SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER) which is when disco exploded into the maintream, and would remain a cultural lightning rod for at least another two years. It certainly wasn't anywhere near death at the time.

The observation I'm attempting to communicate is that although all three events took place during the 70s, they each occurred during different cultural zeitgeists: murder in '72/'73 (sexual revolution/Women's Lib, porno becomes chic, values and behaviors begin to relax); book in '75 (all of that stuff in '72/'73 have taken hold, even if transient. This is also something of a bridge between the bookend periods); movie released in '77 (the sexual revolution and Women's Lib have been established for years, disco & the club scene explode, casual drug use becomes mainstream, all of which help fuel [in part] a reckless hedonism).

Quinn's New York and singles scene of '72 was not the same New York and singles scene of '77. I theorize that the movie was likely influenced in part by the years intervening between the murder, the book, and movie production. As either a cautionary tale or a story of young, single woman in the big city (take your pick), the movie still worked because all of that behavior was still relatively new (and scandalous) for the time. Forty years later, I believe that the messages still resonate because they concern universal truths and behaviors: personal identity, the need to connect and belong, society's expectations of people in specific demographics, the risks that people take, etc.

by Anonymousreply 26303/22/2013

Move the thing along to 14:18 to hear Richard Gere talk about Goodbar.

Thought it might be of interest.

by Anonymousreply 26404/11/2013

PLUS another good clip from the film @ link

by Anonymousreply 26504/11/2013

"Was the real Rosemary Quinn a slob with roaches crawling around and no sheets on her bed?"

It's Roseann. And yes, she was a slob.

In the only book that's been written about the case "Closing Time", the killer told his male lover about Roseann Quinn's apartment:

"It was a mess. It looked like it hadn't been cleaned in weeks."

"Clothes were all over the floor. A box of sugar had spilled on the floor. The sofa bed was unmade, opened into the middle of the room, and there were dirty dishes in the kitchen. Spaghetti sause had dribbled down the front of the stove and orange juice had hardened on the floor."

"The twenty-three year old man looked around with the eyes of someone who had always lived in a spotless house and liked it that way. His sense of the woman shifted and took on an element of disgust."

Sugar and orange juice on the floor? Well, that certainly would have attracted a bunch of roaches.

by Anonymousreply 26604/11/2013

"Spaghetti sauce had dribbled down the front of the stove and orange juice had hardened on the floor."

I don't think that is that shocking.

by Anonymousreply 26704/11/2013

See what happens, my darlings, when you don't clean up after yourselves. You get butchered.

by Anonymousreply 26804/12/2013

The TV-movie sequel with George Segal is finally on YouTube.

It's not very good...

by Anonymousreply 26909/07/2013
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